How to use Desolate in a sentence

desolate
  • How very desolate must that one be.

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  • It was a desolate wasteland except for some grazing sheep.

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  • It presents a desolate appearance.

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  • The desolate wilderness is bounded only by the distant Red Sea.

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  • Babylon will be left desolate without a single inhabitant.

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  • He may make me feel desolate, make my spirits sink and hide the future from me.

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  • It was attacked in 1689, and in 1690 it was utterly destroyed by the French and Indians, and remained desolate until after the Treaty of Utrecht in 1713.

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  • The indifference of the Jews to the desolate conditions of their sanctuary opens up a problem of some difficulty.

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  • Egypt and Edom, on the other hand, shall be desolate, because they have shed the blood of Yahweh's innocents.

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  • The landscape around them was desolate.

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  • Northern Aetolia remains a desolate region, inhabited mainly by Vlach shepherds.

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  • But between the Lake of Zurich and the Walensee the huge desolate alluvial plain grew ever in size, while great damage was done by the river, which overflowed its bed and the dykes built to protect the region near it.

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  • At that conference the work had spread from Ring's Ash in Devon to Morrah, a lonely and desolate parish in west Cornwall.

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  • He then went into exile at Orvieto and Viterbo, and only on the 6th of October 1528 returned to his desolate residence.

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  • Under Antoninus and Marcus Aurelius it appears to have been a flourishing city, the district, now desolate, being then very fertile and covered with forests of olives.

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  • The effect of his preaching was immense, and large numbers of women, many of them left desolate by the loss of their husbands on crusade, came under the influence of a movement which was attended with all the manifestations of what is now called a "revival."

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  • This will make many people feel desolate and depressed at a time they need to see their loved ones daily.

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  • The forests which once covered the mountains have for the most part disappeared and the slopes are now desolate wastes.

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  • They inhabit the desolate plateau of Tibet, at elevations of between 13,000 and 18,000 ft., and, like all Tibetan animals, have a firm thick coat, formed in this instance of close woolly hair of a grey fawn-colour.

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  • Henceforward, for 290 m., the Rumanian shore is a desolate fen-country, varied only by a few hills, by cities, and by lagoons often 15 m.

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  • The surface of this tableland is also bare and desolate, being covered with gravel and fragments of rock.

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  • Borth is a very desolate place consisting of a long straggling street of the houses of fishermen.

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  • Fourth and Oak were just as desolate as Ninth and Locust, but as soon as Dean stopped the car, a disheveled figure jumped from the darkness and clawed at the passenger door until Dean reached over and opened it.

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  • On his third voyage, while seeking some land reported to have been found by Kerguelen, Cook in December 1776 reached the cluster of desolate islands now generally known by the name of the French explorer, and here, among many other kinds of birds, was a Sheathbill, which for a long while no one suspected to be otherwise than specifically identical with that of the western Antarctic Ocean; but, as will be seen, its distinctness has been subsequently admitted.

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  • West of the Nile there are a few oases-- those of Selima, Zaghawa and El Kab - but this district, part of the Libyan Desert, is even more desolate than the Nubian Desert.

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  • In the breeding season they resort to the most desolate lands in higher southern latitudes, and indeed have been met with as far to the southward as navigators have penetrated.

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  • The peninsula of Aden consists chiefly of a mass of barren and desolate volcanic rocks, extending five miles from east to west, and three from its northern shore to Ras Sanailah or Cape Aden, its most southerly point; it is connected with the mainland by a neck of flat sandy ground only a few feet high; and its greatest elevation is Jebel Shamshan, 1776 ft.

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  • Rodmar, for the sake of the treasure, was slain by his sons Fafnir and Regin; and Fafnir, seizing the whole, retired to a desolate heath and, in the form of a snake or dragon, brooded over the hoard.

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  • He was punished by him on some desolate hill (usually styled Caucasus) for fire-stealing, and was finally released by Heracles.

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  • The Brucheum and Jewish quarters were desolate in the 5th century, and the central monuments, the Soma and Museum, fallen to ruin.

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  • The foundation by Augustus of Nicopolis, into which the remaining inhabitants were drafted, left the site desolate.

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  • At the present day, with the exception of the Chahar-sick, where there is always a certain amount of traffic, and where the great diversity of race and costume imparts much liveliness to the scene, Herat presents a very melancholy and desolate appearance.

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  • Though the tender care which had mitigated his sufferings during months of sickness at Streatham was withdrawn, and though Boswell was absent, he was not left desolate.

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  • Its site is now entirely desolate.

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  • They are also characterized by the increasing aridity of the plateau from north to south, the Quito plain being fertile and well covered with vegetation, and the Ambato and Cuenca plains being barren and desolate except in some favoured localities.

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  • He was hurried away to the desolate town of Cucusus (Cocysus), among the ridges of Mount Taurus, with a secret hope, perhaps, that he might be a victim to the Isaurians on the march, or to the more implacable fury of the monks.

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  • Capernaum shall go to perdition; Jerusalem shall be a desolate ruin.

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  • It is a waste, elevated, desolate region that the route traverses, and the road itself is only open at certain seasons of the year.

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  • Timur marched back to Samarkand as he had come, by way of Kabul, and Mahmud Tughlak ventured to return to his desolate capital.

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  • Although in many districts there are low ranges of hills, the surface is more often a desolate and monotonous plain, flat or slightly undulating.

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  • The group, which forms part of the Finnish province of Abo-Bjdrneborg, consists of nearly three hundred islands, of which about eighty are inhabited, the remainder being desolate rocks.

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  • She is personified as a widowed princess, bereaved and desolate, sitting amid the ruins of her former joys, and brooding over her calamities.

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  • Nearly all the oficinas, or working plants, are owned and operated by British companies, and the railways of this desolate region are generally owned by the same companies and form a part of the working plant.

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  • The bleak and desolate heights of the Serra da Estrella and the ranges of the northern frontier are almost alpine in character, although they nowhere reach the limit of perpetual snow.

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  • The general appearance of the surface is arid and desolate, partly because of the volcanic remains, and partly because of the scanty rainfall, which is insufficient to support vegetation other than that of the desert except in the deeper mountain valleys.

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  • The western border was rendered desolate and deserted by guerrilla forays throughout the war.

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  • The country is of an even more desolate character than south of the Orange (see Bechuanaland).

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  • The salt tract runs the whole way down the coast, and forms a desolate strip a few miles broad.

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  • Kerguelen, a desolate and uninhabited island near the centre of the Indian Ocean at its southern border, is noteworthy as providing a base station for Antarctic exploration.

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  • The place is now a desolate heap of ruins, with remains of its walls and fragments of granite pillars.

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  • The group of lakes called Fiskiviitn (or Veidivotn), which lie in a desolate region to the west of Vatnajokull, consist for the most part of crater lakes.

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  • Beyond this belt there appear in the north-west Mesozoic limestones, such as occupy so extensive an area in the north-west of the Balkan Peninsula generally, and the valleys opening in that quarter to the Drina have the same desolate aspect as belongs to these rocks in the rest of that region.

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  • The south versant, on the other hand, is barren and desolate below the 10,000 ft.

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  • On many of these desolate rocks, which could have afforded only the barest sustenance, there are remains of the dwellings and churches of early religious settlers who sought solitude here.

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  • Apart from the surroundings of the lough, the neighbouring country is peculiarly desolate.

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  • The plateau of the Istrian Karst is prolonged in several of the bare and desolate mountain chains between the Save and the Adriatic, notably the Great and Little Kapella (or Kapela), which link together the Karst and the Dinaric Alps, culminating in Biela Lazica (5029 ft.); the Pljesevica or Plisevica Planina (5410 ft.), overlooking the valley of the river Una; and the Velebit Planina, which follows the westward curve of the coast, and rises above the sea in an abrupt wall, unbroken by any considerable bay or inlet.

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  • These highlands, formerly known as the Raigarh Bichhia tract, remained desolate and neglected until 1866, when the district of Balaghat was formed, and the country opened to the industrious and enterprising peasantry of the Wainganga valley.

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  • This area is very high and desolate, with only a few nomads.

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  • The chief source of boric acid for commercial purposes is the Maremma of Tuscany, an extensive and desolate tract of country over which jets of vapour and heated gases (soffioni) and springs of boiling water spurt out from chasms and fissures.

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  • They had reached the very wildest and most desolate portion of the pass when the girl gave a startled cry, and pointed upwards.

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  • Unfortunately, not much else of value is found on the planet and the wealthy-or anyone with the funds to do so-leave Pandora to the desolate and vagabonds who are forced to survive by looting and other nefarious means.

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  • Most involve a character that is trapped inside a empty house or a desolate town with little to no means of defending themselves.

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  • Along a desolate stretch of Mississippi highway where a haunted motel once stood, drivers report that on rainy nights they are frightened when they believe they've struck a person crossing the highway.

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  • Gary Jules' version accentuated the desolate side of Mad World beautifully.

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  • In choosing to help those who hold on to the vestiges of civilization, the desolate loner of the original movie rediscovers his lost soul.

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  • Nebuchadrezzar placed in the city a garrison which appears to have been quartered on the western hill, while the eastern hill on which were the Temple and the city of David was left more or less desolate.

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  • Eaton discovered on the desolate shores of Kerguelen's 'Island apterous and semi-apterous Diptera (Tipulidae and jEph_ydridae) of a degraded type adapted to the climatic peculiarities of the locality.

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  • The mound builders, Pueblo tribes, middle Americans and Peruvians, were potters of many schools; gorgeous colour fascinated the Amazonians, the Patagonians delighted in skins, and even the Fuegians saw beauty in the pretty snail shells of their desolate island shores.

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  • There is no railway within 20 m., and the surrounding country is barren and desolate.

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  • Most of these were as desolate then as now.

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  • The Archean rocks produce a picturesque coast-line, the north shore particularly being indented by deep bays surrounded by high cliffs, mostly burnt off and somewhat desolate; the islands also rise abruptly to considerable heights, the north shore furnish= ing the boldest scenery of the Great Lakes.

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  • Around 1716-17 it was decided to establish the seminary at Scalan a wild and desolate spot surrounded on three sides by hills.

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  • For many years, the World outside the Vale was desolate, laid waste by the armies of the Night.

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  • Then it became a desolate wasteland except for some grazing sheep.

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  • On the other side an equally desolate wilderness is bounded only by the distant Red Sea.

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  • The main object of these was to invest the senate, which he recruited with a number of his own party, with full control over the state, over every magistrate and every province; and the mainstay of his political system was to be the military colonies which he had established with grants of land throughout every part of Italy, to the ruin of the old Italian freeholders and farmers, who from this time dwindled away, leaving whole districts waste and desolate.

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  • Though restored by Augustus and renamed Sebaste, after the great earthquake of 15 B.C., and visited in state by Titus before his Jewish War in 79 B.C., it was ruinous and desolate by Jerome's time 3; but the prestige of its priest-kings partly lingers in the exceptional privileges of the patriarch of the Cypriote Church (see Cyprus, Church Of).

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  • Their last retreat was probably in the desolate wolds of Yorkshire.

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  • This desolate region was subsequently peopled by Vlachs, whom the religious persecutions of Louis the Great had driven thither from other parts of his domains, and, between 1350 and 1360, their voivode Bogdan threw off the Hungarian yoke altogether.

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  • Along the crest of the bank a public park is laid out, commanding a view of the desolate Dobrudja hills, across the river.

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  • The irruption of the Saxons left Thorney desolate.

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  • Rolling green hills and desolate moors, or gritty, industrial cities?

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  • Stavanger is the first port of call for northward-bound passenger steamers from Hull and Newcastle, and has regular services from all the Norwegian coast towns, from Hamburg, &c. A railway runs south along the wild and desolate coast of Jaederen, one of the few low and unprotected shores in Norway, the scene of many wrecks.

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  • Towards the river, though rich in parts, this tract of country is generally wild and desolate, but nearer the base of the hill range there is a large natural basin of fertile land which is highly cultivated.

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  • The natural aspect of the country is one desolate tract, without a single permanently running stream.

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  • Writing in the name of the desolate church at Jerusalem he sounded the first trumpet-call of the crusades, though almost a century was to pass away before his note was repeated by Peter the Hermit and Urban II.'

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  • During the Turkish occupation the district was nearly depopulated, and allowed to lie almost desolate in marsh and heath and forest.

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  • Whereas both the mountains and valleys of the Astintagh and of the Akato-tagh (the next large range to the Astin-tagh on the south) are arid and desolate in the extreme, smitten as it were with the desiccating breath of the desert, those of the Arka-tagh and beyond are supersaturated with moisture, so that, at any rate in summer, the surface is in many parts little better than a quaking quagmire.

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  • Often they are represented as living a primitive life in caves and desolate places, and their character is usually ferocious.

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  • According to this, a pilgrim returning from the Holy Land was cast by a storm on a desolate island where dwelt a hermit.

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  • The part which lies within the Arctic Circle is very desolate and sterile, consisting chiefly of sand and reindeer moss.

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  • The feeling is not desolate, but promises impending revelation.

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  • The little town of Eregli, some 190 kilometres distant from Konia, presented the only excusable locality for the terminus of the first section, and even that place is 90 kilometres distant from Karaman, the last town of any importance for some hundreds of miles on the way to the Euphrates valley, the country between the two towns being desolate and sparsely inhabited.

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  • Its shores are swampy and desolate and show considerable belts of saline incrustations with the fall in its level.

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  • Owing its real origin, as a distinct foundation of reformed Benedictines, in the year 1098, to Stephen Harding (a native of Dorsetshire, educated in the monastery of Sherborne), and deriving its name from Citeaux (Cistercium), a desolate and almost inaccessible forest solitude, on the borders of Champagne and Burgundy, the rapid growth and wide celebrity of the order are undoubtedly to be attributed to the enthusiastic piety of St Bernard, abbot of the first of the monastic colonies, subsequently sent forth in such quick succession by the first Cistercian houses, the far-famed abbey of Clairvaux (de Clara Valle), A.D.

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  • In April 1886 the frontier was drawn back to Wadi Haifa, a fortified camp at the northern end of the desolate defile, Batn-el-Hagar, through which the Nile tumbles amid black, rocky hills in a succession of rapids, and debouches on a wide plain.

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  • The scenery is fine, but wild and desolate in most parts, and of a kind that appeals rather to the northern genius than to the Italian, to whom, as a rule, Sardinia is not attractive.

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  • The letters of Acominatus, archbishop of Athens, towards the close of the 12th century, bewail the desolate condition of the city in language resembling that of Jeremiah in regard to Jerusalem.

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  • In May 1880 he married, and moved to the desolate mining-camp which he has described in The Silverado Squatters.

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  • Desolate bogs, incapable of cultivation, alternate with the mountains; and the inhabitants earn a scanty subsistence by fishing and tillage, or by seeking employment in England and Scotland during the harvesting.

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  • Many hill towns once thriving have long since become abandoned, desolate and comparatively inaccessible; though with the development of the summer resident's interests many will probably eventually regain prosperity.

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  • It lies on the western side of the canal on the low, narrow, treeless and desolate strip of land which separates the Mediterranean from Lake Menzala, the land at this point being raised and its area increased by the draining of part of the lake and by the excavation of the inner harbour.

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  • Although occasionally seen abroad during the day, especially in wild and desolate regions, where it is subject to little molestation, the night is, as in the case of so many other predaceous animals, the period of its greatest activity.

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  • At Leiden, Utrecht, Groningen, Franeker, Breda, Nimeguen, Harderwyk, Duisburg and Herborn, and at the Catholic university of Louvain, Cartesianism was warmly expounded and defended in seats of learning, of which many are now left desolate, and by adherents whose writings have for the most part long lost interest for any but the antiquary.

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  • At the seaward end of this promontory is the 13thcentury cathedral; behind which the belfries of four churches, at least as ancient, rise in a row along the crest of the ridge; while behind these, again, are the castle and a background of desolate hills.

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  • In an incredibly short time the circle of flourishing cities was destroyed or laid desolate.

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  • Farther south, in Patagonia, the prevailing wind is westerly, in which case the Andes again " blanket " an extensive region and deprive it of rain, turning it into an arid desolate steppe.

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  • The solitary and desolate frontier life became now more dreary than ever; he flung himself into politics the only outside resource open to him, and his long and eventful public career began.

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  • Though interesting from an antiquarian point of view, the district around, especially Dyffryn Ardudwy (the valley), is dreary and desolate, e.g.

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  • These same parts, properly dried, are also employed as fuel in the desolate steppes of the Icy Sea."

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  • Immense tracts were rendered desolate, and whole villages vanished from the map; in eight years the population sank from three to one and a half millions.

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  • He then took the old royal castle of Dunstaffnage and drove the chief, John of Lorne, into England; Menteith, the captor of Wallace, changed sides, and Edward, after a feeble invasion in 1310, retreated from a land laid desolate by the Scots.

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  • They returned to glens desolate of men, deserted, first, by the voluntary emigrations of the clans, and later by forced emigrations in the interests of sheep farms and deer forests.

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  • In seasons of drought they are hardly more than swamps and mud flats, which for a time may become a grassy plain, or desolate coast encrusted with salt.

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  • What can have made something so desolate so very fair?

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  • Quite close to the sea, all along the coast from Hammamet to Sfax, there are great fertility and much cultivation; but a little distance inland the country has a rather wild and desolate aspect, though it is nowhere a desert until the latitude of Sfax has been passed.

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  • But this was followed, during the next fourteen years, by the wholesale emigration of thousands upon thousands of Circassians, who sought an asylum in Turkish territory, leaving their native region almost uninhabited and desolate, a condition from which it has not recovered even at the present day.

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  • It soon becomes the boundary for a while between the departments of the HautesAlpes and of the Basses-Alpes, and receives successively the considerable Ubaye river, flowing from near the foot of Monte Viso past Barcelonnette (left), and then the small stream of the Luye (right), on which, a few miles above, is Gap. It enters the Basses-Alpes shortly before reaching Sisteron, where it is joined (right) by the wild torrent of the Busch, flowing from the desolate region of the Devoluy, and receives the Bleone (left) (on which Digne, the capital of the department, is situated) and the Asse (left), before quitting the department of the Basses-Alpes just as it is reinforced (left) by the Verdon, flowing from the lower summits of the Maritime Alps past Castellane.

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  • The advance of a Turkish detachment through the western districts, where other garrisons were besieged, was marked by pillage and devastation, and 5000 Christian peasants took refuge on the desolate promontory of Spada, where they suffered extreme privations.

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  • Among other trees and shrubs may be mentioned the sumach, the date-palm, the plantain, various bamboos, cycads and the dwarf-palm, the last of which grows in some parts of Sicily more profusely than anywhere else, and in the desolate region in the south-west yields almost the only vegetable product of importance.

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  • The position on 5/11 was an utterly desolate desert, many miles from any obvious water or habitation.

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  • Gathering together a reconnaissance team, MacReady investigates the now desolate Norwegian camp to ascertain the source of their madness.

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