Describes sentence example

describes
  • In it, he describes what you're going through.
    28
    3
  • He describes the safe and happy establishment of the people in their own land.
    5
    4
  • He then allotted the reconstruction of wall and gates to different parties of workmen, and his narrative describes the portion of wall upon which each of these was employed.'
    3
    2
  • Pinto (q.v.), which minutely describes certain incidents of his life in the Far East (especially in Japan and Malacca).
    1
    0
  • I've seen what Taran describes.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • He sometimes held the carbon powder against the diaphragm in a small tr ans' shallow cell (from a quarter to half an inch in diameter and about an eighth of an inch deep), and sometimes he used what he describes as a fluff, that is, a little brush of silk fibre with plumbago rubbed into it.
    0
    0
  • Leo, the saint's favourite disciple and companion on Mount Alverno at the time, which describes the circumstances of the stigmatization; Elias of Cortona, the acting superior, wrote on the day after his death a circular letter wherein he uses language clearly implying that he had himself seen the Stigmata, and there is a considerable amount of contemporary authentic second hand evidence.
    0
    0
  • As he himself took part in the events he describes, his work was a kind of memoirs.
    0
    0
  • Evelyn, who knew him intimately from his youth, describes him as "a man of excellent natural parts but nothing of generous or grateful."
    0
    0
  • (2) Raymond of Sabunde's Liber naturae sive creaturarum (1434-36) bears also the title Theologia Naturalis - but not from the author's own hand,3 though his introduction to the book in question, the Prologue, put upon the Index at Rome for its daring, describes the " book of nature " as " connatural to us," in contrast with the " supernatural" book, the Bible, which belongs to the clerics.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Herodotus describes the festival of Bubastis, which was attended by thousands from all parts of Egypt and was a very riotous affair; it has its modern equivalent in the Moslem festival of the sheikh Said el Badawi at Tanta.
    0
    0
  • The shrine of Imam Reza is the most venerated spot in Persia, and yearly visited by more than 100,000 pilgrims. Eastwick thus describes it (Journal of a Diplomat's Three Years' Residence in Persia, London, 1864) "The quadrangle of the shrine seemed to be about 150 paces square.
    0
    0
  • In later usage it describes those of the New Testament books which have obtained a doubtful place in the Canon.
    0
    0
  • Gibbon justly describes it as " a golden volume, not unworthy of the leisure of Plato or Tully, but which claims incomparable merit from the barbarism of the times and the situation of the author."
    0
    0
  • The first book opens with a few verses, in which Boetius describes how his sorrows had brought him to a premature old age.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Herodotus describes Hegesistratus as a bastard, and Thucydides says that Thessalus was legitimate.
    0
    0
  • 1 It should be noted as against this, the general account, that Thucydides, speaking apparently with accuracy, describes the tax as (5%); the Constitution of Athens speaks of (the familiar) SEKar7 (10%).
    0
    0
  • Stevenson vividly describes the heroism of the captain and crew.
    0
    0
  • But Ezekiel was, as Wellhausen well describes him, " a priest in prophet's mantle."
    0
    0
  • He describes for instance the Sunday games in the village, football, and the struggle for food at great feasts; 1 Script.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • His remains were laid in the burial place of the Sheffield family, Fletching, Sussex, where an epitaph by Dr Parr describes his character and work in the language at once of elegance, of moderation and of truth.
    0
    0
  • A third describes the repairs executed in 1681 by Prince Sherban Cantacuzino; a fourth, the restoration, in 1804, by Joseph, the first bishop. Between 1875 and 1885 the cathedral was reconstructed; and in 1886 it was reconsecrated.
    0
    0
  • One tradition describes how Neagoe Bassarab, while a hostage in Constantinople, designed a splendid mosque for the sultan, returning to build the cathedral out of the surplus materials.
    0
    0
  • Camden describes the wonder with which O'Neill's wild gallowglasses were seen in the English capital, with their heads bare, their long hair falling over their shoulders and clipped short in front above the eyes, and clothed in rough yellow shirts.
    0
    0
  • - The book of Joshua continues the fortunes of the " children of Israel " and describes a successful occupation of Palestine by the united tribes.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • The account of Josiah's work, like that of Hezekiah, is written by one of the Deuteronomic school: that is to say, the writer describes the promulgation of the teaching under which he lives.
    0
    0
  • 28 describes theinvader as leaving his heavy baggage at Michmash before pushing on through the pass.
    0
    0
  • C. McCook describes an almost straight tunnel, nearly 450 ft.
    0
    0
  • The same naturalist describes the association with Lasius of small mites (Antennophorus) which are carried about by the worker ants, one of which may have a mite beneath her mouth, and another on either side of her abdomen.
    0
    0
  • Barras's account of the visit describes the child as suffering from extreme neglect, but conveys no idea of the alleged walling in.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Sophocles describes in his Oedipus Tyrannus how Oedipus was resolved to pursue to the end the mystery of the death of Laius, and thus unravelled the dark tale, and in horror put out his own eyes.
    0
    0
  • 107-161) describes his instrument in the Syntaxis (book v.
    0
    0
  • Thomas Carlyle thus describes him as he appeared in London in 1839.
    0
    0
  • The story in Acts differs slightly from that in Josephus, who describes how in the midst of his elation he saw an owl perched over his head.
    0
    0
  • It was not their first encounter, for a letter of 1299 to Edward from Scotland describes Comyn as having seized Bruce by the throat at a meeting at Peebles, where they were with difficulty reconciled by the regents.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • The chief authority for the bishop's life is William de Chambre (printed in Wharton's Anglia Sacra, 1691, and in Historiae Dunelmensis scriptores tres, Surtees Soc. 1839), who describes him as an amiable and excellent man, charitable in his diocese, and the liberal patron of many learned men, among these being Thomas Bradwardine, afterwards archbishop of Canterbury, Richard Fitzralph, afterwards archbishop of Armagh, the enemy of the mendicant orders, Walter Burley, who translated Aristotle, John Mauduit the astronomer, Robert Holkot and Richard de Kilvington.
    0
    0
  • Most of the birds he describes are characterized with accuracy sufficient to enable them to be identified, and his observations upon them have still some interest; but he was innocent of any methodical system, and was not exempt from most of the professional fallacies of his time.'
    0
    0
  • As it is, so much of them as we have are of considerable importance; for, in this unfortunately unfinished memoir, he describes in some detail the several differences which the sternum in a great many different groups of his Tropidosternii presents, and to some extent makes a methodical disposition of them accordingly.
    0
    0
  • The Greek monk Cosmas Indicopleustes, who visited India about 530, describes the ruler of the country, whom he calls Gollas, as a White Hun king, who exacted an oppressive tribute with the help of a large army of cavalry and war elephants.
    0
    0
  • Angilbert was the Homer of the emperor's literary circle, and was the probable author of an epic, of which the fragment which has been preserved describes the life at the palace and the meeting between Charlemagne and Leo III.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Polo, a late central Gothic building (1380-1400) which Ruskin describes as "of the finest kind and superb in its effect of colour when seen from the side.
    0
    0
  • He certainly describes a method of constructing a telescope, but not so as to lead one to conclude that he was in possession of that instrument.
    0
    0
  • The conception of the Unconscious, by which von Hartmann describes his ultimate metaphysical principle, is not at bottom as paradoxical as it sounds, being merely a new and mysterious designation for the Absolute of German metaphysicians.
    0
    0
  • Of the two Italian botanists who in comparatively recent years have monographed the group, Parlatore (Le Specie dei cotoni, 1866) recognizes seven species, whilst Todaro (Relazione sulla culta dei cotoni, 18 7718 78) describes over fifty species: many of these, however, are of but little economic importance, and, in spite of the difficulties mentioned above, it i s possible for practical purposes to divide the commercially important plants into five species, placing these in two groups according to the character of the hairs borne on the seeds.
    0
    0
  • Against the common view that miracles can attest the truth of a divine revelation Gerhard maintained that " per miracula non possunt probari oracula "; and Hopfner returns to the qualified position of Augustine when he describes them as praeter et supra naturae ordinem."
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Herodotus describes the oil pits near Ardericca (near Babylon), and the pitch spring of Zacynthus (Zante), whilst Strabo, Dioscorides and Pliny mention the use of the oil of Agrigentum, in Sicily, for illumination, and Plutarch refers to the petroleum found near Ecbatana (Kerkuk).
    0
    0
  • At the same time, if our text is thus late, it must be remembered that its content gives us the earliest and purest exposition of French feudalism, and describes for us the organization of a kingdom, where all rights and duties were connected with the fief, and the monarch was only a suzerain of feudatories.
    0
    0
  • In one of his epistles he describes how he recovered Quintilian, part of Valerius Flaccus, and the commentaries of Asconius Pedianus at St Gall.
    0
    0
  • In contrast with the drunken revels of the Greeks, Philo describes the sober enjoyment by the Therapeutae of the feast of Pentecost, or rather of the eve of that festival.
    0
    0
  • Scoresby describes them as "extremely playful, frequently elevating their horns and crossing them with each other as in fencing."
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • The meridian of Greenwich has been universally accepted as the initial meridian, but in the case of most topographical maps of foreign countries local meridians are still adhered to - the more important among which are: The outline includes coast-line, rivers, roads, towns, and in fact all objects capable of being shown on a map, with the exception of the hills and of woods, swamps, deserts and the like, which the draughtsman generally describes as " ornament."
    0
    0
  • Beatus, too, describes the southern land as inhabitabilis.
    0
    0
  • Robert Burns, the poet, in a letter dated August 1784, describes the sect as idle and immoral.
    0
    0
  • A friend describes Wesley at this time as "a young fellow of the finest classical taste, and the most liberal and manly sentiments."
    0
    0
  • The new material in the Journal describes the simple matter of his life.
    0
    0
  • Wesley describes this as the third beginning of Methodism.
    0
    0
  • Denon also describes catacombs at Malta near the ancient capital of the island.
    0
    0
  • Zuyev describes them as like the Tunguses, with flattened nose, thick lips, little beard and black, hard hair.
    0
    0
  • Horace mentions it as the usual halt at the end of the first day's journey from Rome, and describes it as full of boatmen and cheating innkeepers.
    0
    0
  • Prudentius describes it in Peristephanon (x., 1066 ff.): the priest of the Mother, clad in a toga worn cinctu Gabino, with golden crown and fillets on his head, takes his place in a trench covered by a.
    0
    0
  • Siberia is situated for the most part in what Grisebach describes as the " forest region of the Eastern continent."
    0
    0
  • The Annual describes 21 vessels of various types, and mentions 23 small gunboats used for river and harbour service.
    0
    0
  • The stirring incidents in the political emancipation of Portugal inspired his muse, and he describes the bitterness of exile, the adventurous expedition to Terceira, the heroic defence of Oporto, and the final combats of liberty.
    0
    0
  • Plan of ' Main Entrance II Impluvium Bath IV Principal Hall 'V birth to the Christian kingdoms of the Peninsula, while the Monge de Cister, published in 1848, describes the time of King John I., when the middle class and the municipalities first asserted their power and elected a king in opposition to the nobility.
    0
    0
  • Prentice, the historian of the Anti-Corn-Law League, who was then editor of the Manchester Times, describes how, in the year 1835, he received for publication in his paper a series of admirably written letters, under the signature of "Libra," discussing commercial and economical questions with rare ability.
    0
    0
  • His services to his country are aptly epitomized in the epitaph on his ancient monument at Ringsted church which describes him as "Sclavorum dominator, patriae liberator et pacis conservator."
    0
    0
  • The birds, as Mr Necker very truly describes, appear like flying brilliant sparks."
    0
    0
  • Reinegg describes a similar state of things in the Nogai in the 18th century.
    0
    0
  • They were probably of Iranian race: among the Persians Herodotus describes a similar mixture of nomadic and settled tribes.
    0
    0
  • Chap. vi., which describes a vision of Isaiah "in the death-year of King Uzziah" (740 or 734 B.C.?) may possibly have arisen out of notes put down in the reign of Jotham; but for several reasons it is not an acceptable view that, in its present form, this striking chapter is earlier than the reign of Ahaz.
    0
    0
  • The great orators of all times were a special object of study with him, and he describes his boyish pedantry pleasantly enough, but by no means without a touch of self-satisfaction in the memory.
    0
    0
  • Early in the 9th century Sergius, greatest of the leaders, profiting by the tolerance of the emperor Nicephorus, began that ministry which, in one of the epistles canonized by the sect, but lost, he describes thus: "I have run from east to west, and from north to south, till my knees were weary, preaching the gospel of Christ."
    0
    0
  • Busch (Ber., 1905, 38, pp. 856, 4049) has isolated a series of bridged ring compounds which he describes as endo-iminodihydrotriazoles, the triphenyl derivative (annexed formula) being prepared by condensing triphenylaminoguanidine with formic acid.
    0
    0
  • Before the middle of the 15th century it had ceased to be a fortified residence and was used as a prison, which was also the case in the time of Leland (1535), who describes it as in a ruinous state.
    0
    0
  • In a series of letters, De sedibus et causis morborum per anatomen indagatis, published when he was in his eightieth year, he describes the appearances met with at the post mortem examination as well as the symptoms during life in a number of cases of various diseases.
    0
    0
  • Other passages, where he describes himself as ever engaged, even in his dreams, on his task of inquiry and composition, produce the impression of an unrelieved strain of mind and feeling, which may have ended in some extreme reaction of spirit, or in some failure of intellectual power, that may have led him to commit suicide.
    0
    0
  • 75) describes a similar artifice as practised by the women of Scythia (compare also Judith x.
    0
    0
  • Strabo describes a river which he terms Catarractes as a large stream falling with a great noise over a lofty cliff.
    0
    0
  • It is named the tractory, since a weight placed on the ground and drawn along by means of a flexible string by a person travelling in a straight line, the weight not being in this line, describes the curve in question.
    0
    0
  • In chapter 25 of the same book Pliny describes five varieties of " magnes lapis."
    0
    0
  • In the steady motion under no force of such a body in medium, the centre of gravity describes a helix, while the axis escribes a cone round the direction of motion of the centre of ravity, and the couple causing precession is due to the dislacement of the medium.
    0
    0
  • His chief work is a philosophical romance, in which he describes the awakening and growth of intellect in a child removed from the influences of ordinary life.
    0
    0
  • The god Nebo appears as PA - the sign of the stylus, which is associated with this deity as the originator and patron of writing and of knowledge in general, - or it is written with a sign AK, which describes the god as a " creator."
    0
    0
  • Even the Greek cannot claim to be the original work, but only to be a recension of it; for, whereas Origen states that this apocalypse contained an account of the seven heavens, the existing Greek work describes only five, and the Slavonic only two.
    0
    0
  • Tacitus mentions it, and Florus describes it as one of the municipia splendidissima.
    0
    0
  • Rejecting the retributive view of punishment, he describes the sufferings of Christ as those of the perfect "Penitent," and finds their expiatory value to lie in the Person of the Sufferer, the God-Man.
    0
    0
  • In the Magamas of Hamadhani a narrator describes how in various places he met a wandering scholar who in these assemblies puts all his rivals to shame by his eloquence.
    0
    0
  • William Gilpin, in his Forest Scenery, describes a cedar which, at an age of about 118 years, had attained to a height of 53 ft.
    0
    0
  • He describes an experiment made by a Benedictine monk and architect, Dom Papnutio or Panuce, of the same kind as Leonardo's but without the demonstration.
    0
    0
  • He describes some entertaining peep-show arrangements, possibly similar to Alberti's, and indicates how the dark chamber with a concave speculum can be used for observing eclipses.
    0
    0
  • In 1611 Johann Fabricius published his observations of sun-spots and describes how he and his father fell back upon the old method of projecting the sun's image in a darkened room, finding that they could observe the spots just as well as with the telescope.
    0
    0
  • The third book, De Falsa Sapientia, describes and criticizes the various systems of prevalent philosophy.
    0
    0
  • Then it was included in the province Pisidia (as Ammianus Marcellinus describes it) till 372, after which it formed part of the new province Lycaonia so long as the provincial division lasted.
    0
    0
  • It appears, therefore, that Spencer ultimately describes the Knowable in terms of the mechanical conceptions of matter and motion, and that this must give a materialistic colouring to his philosophy.
    0
    0
  • Dieterich, which has appeared annually since 1896, describes about 1300 periodicals (mostly scientific) by subjects and titles; from 1900 it has been supplemented by Bibliographic der deutschen Recensionen, which indexes notices and reviews in over moo serials each year, chiefly scientific and technical.
    0
    0
  • Thucydides expressly describes the predominance of Athens as riyEgovia (leadership, headship), not as apyi 7 (empire), and the attempts made by Athenian orators during the second period of the Peloponnesian War to prove that the attitude of Athens had not altered since the time of Aristides are manifestly unsuccessful.
    0
    0
  • The conquest of Laconia at least is represented in 5th-century tradition as immediate and complete, though one legend admits the previous death of the Heracleid leader Aristodemus, and another describes a protracted struggle in the case of Corinth.
    0
    0
  • Herodotus, also in the 5th century, describes them as the typical (perhaps in contrast to Athenians as the only genuine) Hellenes, and traces their numerous wanderings from (I) an original home " in Deucalion's time " in Phthiotis (the Homeric " Hellas ") in south Thessaly, to (2) Histiaeotis " below Ossa and Olympus " in north-east Thessaly (note that the historic Histiaeotis is " below Pindus " in north-west Thessaly): this was " in the days of Dorus," i.e.
    0
    0
  • It describes his entering Rome on foot, amid the rejoicings of the citizens; his liberality towards his soldiers and to the citizens of Rome, a liberality that was extended even to persons under eleven years of age; his charities for the maintenance of the children of the poor; his remission of succession-duties in cases where the property was small or the heirs members of the testator's family; his establishment of free trade in corn between the various parts of the empire; his abandonment of vexatious and petty prosecutions for "high treason"; his punishment of informers; his abolition of pantomimes; his repairs of public buildings and his extension and embellishment of the Circus Maximus.
    0
    0
  • Some: light is thrown upon the lost plays by Dio Chrysostom, who in one of his discourses (52) describes his reading of the three tragedies, and in another (59) gives a prose version of the opening of the Philoctetes of Euripides.
    0
    0
  • Caesar describes it as one of the oldest and most important towns in Gaul.
    0
    0
  • Finlay speaks of him as a capable partisan leader who had great influence over his men, and describes him as of "middle size, thin, dark-complexioned, with a bright expressive animal eye which indicated gipsy blood."
    0
    0
  • That phrase accurately describes the prevalent bias of its author's mind.
    0
    0
  • Our only authority, a passage in the Liber Pontificalis, describes the gift as including the whole of Italy and Corsica, except the lands north of the Po, Calabria and the city of Naples.
    0
    0
  • Aspremont (12th century) describes a fictitious campaign against the Saracen King Agolant in Calabria, and is chiefly devoted to the enfances of Roland.
    0
    0
  • The traditions of Charlemagne's fights with the Norsemen (Norois, Noreins) are preserved in Aiquin (12th century), which describes the emperor's reconquest of Armorica from the " Saracen " king Aiquin, and a disaster at Cezembre as terrible in its way as those of Roncesvalles and Aliscans.
    0
    0
  • Having so introduced his work the author describes a vision of the ascended Christ, i.
    0
    0
  • Spitta takes verse 6 to be an addition of the redactor, which describes proleptically what follows, while Gunkel sees in 6 and 7-16 parallel accounts.
    0
    0
  • - This section describes in prophetic language borrowed almost wholly from Isaiah and Jeremiah the coming judgment of Rome, and gives the ten lamentations of the kings and the merchants and the seamen over her, and the thanksgivings in heaven for her overthrow.
    0
    0
  • Berossus describes Oannes as having the body of a fish but underneath the figure of a man.
    0
    0
  • Menno was not satisfied with the inconsistent answers which he got from Luther, Bucer and Bullinger; he resolved to rely on Scripture alone, and from this time describes his preaching as evangelical, not sacramental.
    0
    0
  • 3, 4, (b) in the letter to Victor, where Irenaeus gives an account of Polycarp's visit to Rome, (c) in the letter to Florinus - a most important document which describes the intercourse between Irenaeus and Polycarp and Polycarp's relation with St John.
    0
    0
  • (a) When Irenaeus describes himself as a boy (7rais), he need not have meant a very young lad, under thirteen, as Harnack makes out.
    0
    0
  • His chapter on the flea, in which he not only describes its structure, but traces out the whole history of its metamorphoses from its first emergence from the egg, is full of interest - not so much for the exactness of his observations, as for its incidental revelation of the extraordinary ignorance then prevalent in regard to the origin and propagation of "this minute and despised creature," which some asserted to be produced from sand, others from dust, others from the dung of pigeons, and others from urine, but which he showed to be "endowed with as great perfection in its kind as any large animal," and proved to breed in the regular way of winged insects.
    0
    0
  • Strabo describes them as tall, well made, and in character simple and honest; he says that payment was in kind and that the people could not count beyond a hundred.
    0
    0
  • Thus he describes the Loves of the Plants according to the Linnaean system by means of a most ingenious but misplaced and amusing personification of each plant, and often even of the parts of the plant.
    0
    0
  • In the work About the Crown, chap. iii., he describes how the faithful " take the sacrament of the Eucharist also in their meetings held before dawn."
    0
    0
  • St Gregory describes St Benedict's sister Scholastica as a nun (sanctimonialis), and she is looked upon as the foundress of Benedictine nuns.
    0
    0
  • (3) De cerimoniis aulae Byzantinae, which describes the customs of the Eastern Church and court.
    0
    0
  • Philo describes him in the Life of Moses as a great magician; elsewhere 8 he speaks of "the sophist Balaam, being," i.e.
    0
    0
  • The travels of Herodotus seem to have been chiefly accomplished between his twentieth and his thirty-seventh year (464-447 B.C.).1 It was probably in his early manhood that as a Persian subject he visited Susa and Babylon, taking advantage of the Persian system of posts which he describes in his fifth book.
    0
    0
  • On the other hand, he has no claim to rank as a critical historian; he has no conception of the philosophy of history, no insight into the real causes that underlie political changes, no power of penetrating below the surface, or even of grasping the real interconnexion of the events which he describes.
    0
    0
  • Hence Plato in the Sophist describes the Megarians as "the friends of ideas."
    0
    0
  • Herberstein describes the colour of the aurochs as black, and this is confirmed by another old picture of the animal.
    0
    0
  • In a work of 1610, the sequel to his Divine Beginning and Institution of Christ's true Visible and Ministerial Church, Jacob describes " an entire and independent 3 body-politic," " endued with power immediately under and from Christ, as every proper church is and ought to be."
    0
    0
  • C. Morey, The Government of New York: Its History and Administration (New York, 1902) after tracing briefly the development of the governmental system describes its structure and operation.
    0
    0
  • He had been an eyewitness of and an actor in the events which he describes, but his testimony must be accepted with caution.
    0
    0
  • La Cote d'Ivoire by Michellet and Clement describes the administrative and land systems, &c. Another volume also called La Cote d'Ivoire (Paris, 1908) is an official monograph on the colony.
    0
    0
  • But it revived, and most of its fine Moslem mosque and fortress architecture, still extant, belongs to the reign of Sultan Kalaun (1282) and the succeeding century, during which Abulfeda describes it as a very strong place.
    0
    0
  • In the first, John describes how the Baptist, on Jesus' approach, cries " Behold the Lamb of God, which taketh away the sins of, the world "; and how he says " I saw the spirit descending upon Him, and I bore witness that this is the Son of God."
    0
    0
  • If both vibrate, the point describes a curve which appears continuous through the persistence of the retinal impression.
    0
    0
  • Koenig, Quelques experiences d'acoustique (1882) describes apparatus and experiments, intended to show, in opposition to Helmholtz, that beats coalesce into tones, and also that the quality of a note is affected by alteration of phase of one of its component overtones relative to the phase of the fundamental.
    0
    0
  • Nevertheless, that title fitly describes the work.
    0
    0
  • Dumont d'Urville describes four such villages in the Bay of Dorei, containing from eight to fifteen blocks or clusters of houses, each block separately built on piles, and consisting of a row of distinct dwellings.
    0
    0
  • Cameron describes three villages thus built on piles in Lake Mohrya, or Moria, in Central Africa, the motive here being to prevent surprise by bands of slave-catchers.
    0
    0
  • Herodotus, writing also in the 5th century B.C., describes the people of Lake Prasias as living in houses constructed on platforms supported on piles in the middle of the lake, which are approached from the land by a single narrow bridge.
    0
    0
  • There exists a central force from which are derived all the powers which make or give effect to laws; a power which he describes sometimes as "majestas summa potestas summum imperium."
    0
    0
  • Maitland describes it (Political Theories of the Middle Ages, p. x.), have an essentially "statelike character."
    0
    0
  • He also describes them as "inseparable rights."
    0
    0
  • Stow (Survey of the Cities of London and Westminster) describes was destroyed for military reasons by Carmagnola in 1416.
    0
    0
  • This comprehensive book describes the collective life of the " Bohemian " people, as the Czechs called themselves in contrast to their present.
    0
    0
  • It describes its material development, " its physical constitution and warlike prowess," of which they make a special boast, and after that its intellectual progress.
    0
    0
  • The city never revived; Strabo asserts that no trace of it remained in his time, but Pausanias describes the ruins.
    0
    0
  • Beatus Rhenanus; "summus Erasmi observator," as he is called by de Thou, describes his person thus: "In stature not tall, but not noticeably short; in figure well built and graceful; of an extremely delicate constitution, sensitive to the slightest changes of climate, food or drink.
    0
    0
  • He does not tell us how it was prepared, but he describes the method of subliming it, which can leave no doubt that it was real sal ammoniac. In the Opera mineralia of Isaac Hollandus the elder, there is likewise a description of the mode of subliming sal ammoniac. Basil Valentine, in his Currus triumphalis antimonii, describes some of the peculiar properties of sal ammoniac in, if possible, a still less equivocal manner.
    0
    0
  • Bacon describes oak-apples as " an exudation of plants joined with putrefaction."
    0
    0
  • His work Eratosthenes Batavus, published in 1617, describes the method and gives as the result of his operations between Alkmaar and Bergen-opZoom a degree of the meridian equal to 55,100 toises =117,449 yds.
    0
    0
  • Cobenzl, the Austrian minister at St Petersburg, writing to his court immediately after the reception of the tidings at the Russian capital, describes the empress as full of consternation at the idea that Poland under an hereditary dynasty might once more become a considerable power.
    0
    0
  • He has left The Game of Chess, an imitation of Vida, and Proporzec albo hold pruski (The Standard or Investiture of Prussia), where he describes the fealty done by Albert of Brandenburg to Sigismund Augustus.
    0
    0
  • Although they are imitated from classical writers, he has introduced many scenes of national life, which he describes with much vigour.
    0
    0
  • In another piece, Rhoxolania, in Latin, he describes the beauties of Galicia.
    0
    0
  • His mock heroics are, to say the least, amusing, and among these may be mentioned Myszeis, where he describes how King Popiel, according to the legend, was eaten up by rats.
    0
    0
  • Vincent Zakrzewski, professor of history at Cracow, has written some works which have attracted considerable attention, such as On the Origin and Growth of the Reformation in Poland, and After the Flight of King Henry, in which he describes the condition of the country during the period between that king's departure from Poland and the election of Stephen Batory.
    0
    0
  • Plato describes how certain Egyptian priests, in a conversation with Solon, represented the island as a country larger than Asia Minor and Libya united, and situated just beyond the Pillars of Hercules (Straits of Gibraltar).
    0
    0
  • Buchan describes the island-studded portion of the western Pacific as the most extensive region of the globe characterized by an unusually heavy rainfall.
    0
    0
  • However this name may have originally been pronounced, so much is certain, - that through Aramaic influences in Babylonia and Assyria he was identified with the storm-god of the western Semites, and a trace of this influence is to be seen in the designation Amurru, also given to this god in the religious literature of Babylonia, which as an early name for Palestine and Syria describes the god as belonging to the Amorite district.
    0
    0
  • He describes himself to Hume during this period as being extremely happy.
    0
    0
  • Whilst he correctly describes the European movement of industry, and explains it as arising out of adequate social causes, he yet, in accordance with the absolute principles which tainted his philosophy, protests against it as in- volving an entire inversion of the "natural order of things."
    0
    0
  • 2 He brought with him some 1 Dr Thomas Smith thus describes the ardour with which Briggs studied the Descriptio: " Hunc in deliciis habuit, in sinu, in manibus, in pectore gestavit, oculisque avidissimis, et mente attentissima, iterum iterumque perlegit, ...
    0
    0
  • Bonar describes as " mere pretences at catechisms."
    0
    0
  • Not long afterwards we find the citizens receiving the present of a gymnasium from Ptolemy, and building in his honour a stoa or portico; but the city never recovered altogether from the disasters of the siege, and Cicero describes it as almost deserted.
    0
    0
  • Professor Sargent describes it as the most valuable timber tree of the forests of Pacific North America.
    0
    0
  • 65, describes the first communion of the newly baptized: " After we have thus washed the person who has believed and conformed we lead him to the brethren so called, where they are gathered together, to offer public prayer both for ourselves and for the person illuminated, and for all others everywhere, earnestly, to the end that having learned the truth we may be made worthy to be found not only in our actions good citizens, but guardians of the things enjoined.
    0
    0
  • A Latin memoir of Tamerlane by Perondinus, printed in 1600, entitled Magni Tamerlanis scytharum imperatoris vita, describes Timur as tall and bearded, broad-chested and broadshouldered, well-built but lame, of a fierce countenance and with receding eyes, which express cruelty and strike terror into the lookers-on.
    0
    0
  • Although he had seen a comparatively small portion of the regions which he describes, he had travelled much.
    0
    0
  • Of Greece proper he saw but little; it is by no means certain that he even visited Athens, and though he describes Corinth as an eyewitness, it is clear that he was never at Delphi, and was not aware that the ruins of Mycenae still existed.
    0
    0
  • His earliest writing was an historical work now lost, which he himself describes as his Historical Memoirs.
    0
    0
  • In A Copper Cylinder (1888), Describes A Singular Race Whose Cardinal Doctrine Is That Poverty Is Honourable And Wealth The Reverse.
    0
    0
  • He describes himself when he says, "The student of Christian doctrine, because he strives after exactness of phrase, because he is conscious of the inadequacy of any one human formula to exhaust the truth, will be filled with sympathy for every genuine endeavour towards the embodiment of right opinion.
    0
    0
  • Aubrey describes him as "of a very fair, clear sanguine complexion, with a long beard as white as milk - a very handsome man - tall and slender.
    0
    0
  • The city is the see of Protestant Episcopal and 1 The cathedral is the centre of the city according to the charter, which describes the city as including "six miles square, of which the sides shall be equi-distant from what is known as the cupola of the cathedral of San Fernando and three miles therefrom."
    0
    0
  • Every star, therefore, describes an apparent orbit, which, if the line joining the sun and the star be perpendicular to the plane Abcd, will be exactly similar to that of the earth, i.e.
    0
    0
  • Proposition 30 describes the construction of a curve of double curvature called by Pappus the helix on a sphere; it is described by a point moving uniformly along the arc of a great circle, which itself turns about its diameter uniformly, the point describing a quadrant and the great circle a complete revolution in the same time.
    0
    0
  • Incidentally Pappus describes the thirteen other polyhedra bounded by equilateral and equiangular but not similar polygons, discovered by Archimedes, and finds, by a method recalling that of Archimedes, the surface and volume of a sphere.
    0
    0
  • In 1540 Leland, without sufficient reason, credits Athelstan with the bestowal of such privileges as it then enjoyed, and describes it as a parish full of fishermen and Irishmen.
    0
    0
  • Forty years later Norden describes it as an incorporation and market town.
    0
    0
  • The Rigveda (3, 8) describes it as a tree well lopped with axe, anointed and adorned by the priest.
    0
    0
  • Thus briefly he describes what appears to have been the greatest moral crisis in his life.
    0
    0
  • Hence Fechner describes himself as a twig fallen from Schelling's stem.
    0
    0
  • He describes it as idealism in the form of ideal realism, because it recognizes an ideating will requiring substance as substratum or matter for outer relations of phenomena.
    0
    0
  • He describes his belief in an unknowable absolute as " carrying a step farther the doctrine put into shape by Hamilton and Mansel."
    0
    0
  • Gellius describes his arguments as scita et teretia.
    0
    0
  • Their father, Niiir6r, the god of wealth, who is a somewhat less important figure, corresponds in name to the goddess Nerthus (Hertha), who in ancient times was worshipped by a number of tribes, including the Angli, round the coasts of the southern Baltic. Tacitus describes her as " Mother Earth," and the account which he gives of her cult bears a somewhat remarkable resemblance to the ceremonies associated in later times with Frey.
    0
    0
  • In the second part Peregrinus describes first an improved floating compass with fiducial line, a circle graduated with 90 degrees to each quadrant, and provided with movable sights for taking bearings.
    0
    0
  • He then describes a new compass with a needle thrust through a pivoted axis, placed in a box with transparent cover, cross index of brass or silver, divided circle, and an external "rule" or alhidade provided with a pair of sights.
    0
    0
  • It includes three divisions - the Djiung ling, which describes the invasion of part of Tibet by the Djiung or Moso; the Hor ling, which recounts the conquest of the Hor (Turk tribes) by the Tibetans, and conveys much historical information in a tale of magic and marvel; and the Djia ling (Chinese division), which narrates a contest of unknown date between the Tibetans and the Chinese.
    0
    0
  • Cicero (De fato, 5) describes him as a man of the highest character.
    0
    0
  • Guicciardini, the Venetian envoy, describes the activity of the port, into which 500 ships sometimes passed in a day, and as evidence of the extent of its land trade he mentioned that 2000 carts entered the city each week.
    0
    0
  • 6, io), and Herodotus describes her temple at Ashkelon as that of the heavenly Aphrodite (i.
    0
    0
  • In the Roman period it was favoured by Caesar, and took the name of Julia; and, though it suffered severely when the fugitive Dolabella stood his last siege within its walls (43 B.C.), Strabo describes it as a flourishing port, which supplied, from the vineyards on the mountains, the greater part of the wine imported to Alexandria.
    0
    0
  • He describes the Naturalis historia, as a Naturae historia, and characterizes it as a "work that is learned and full of matter, and as varied as nature herself."
    0
    0
  • The testimony of Domesday also establishes the existence in the reign of Edward the Confessor of what Stubbs describes as a " large class " of landholders who had commended themselves to some lord, and he regards it as doubtful whether their tenure had not already assumed a really feudal character.
    0
    0
  • When William of Malmesbury describes the knighting of Athelstan by his grandfather Alfred the Great, that is, his investiture " with a purple garment set with gems and a Saxon sword with a golden sheath," there is no hint of any religious observance.
    0
    0
  • Bornet describes free conidia in Arnoldia minitula, and Placodium decipiens and Conidia-formation has been described by Neubner in the Caliciae.
    0
    0
  • John Gerard (Herball, p. 1228) describes it as sweet willow or gaule, and refers to its use in beer or ale.
    0
    0
  • They were perhaps influenced by the example of Goethe, who in his Autobiography describes, at considerable length, the plan of a poem he had designed on the Wandering Jew.
    0
    0
  • In a playful letter to Dr Clephane, he describes his satisfaction at his appointment, and attributes it in some measure to the support of " the ladies."
    0
    0
  • 2 Macaulay describes Hume's characteristic fault as an historian: " Hume is an accomplished advocate.
    0
    0
  • In one of his most charming letters he describes his life in Edinburgh.
    0
    0
  • These external relations are, in fact, what Hume describes as the natural bonds of connexion among ideas, and, regarded subjectively as principles of association among the facts of mental experience, they form the substitute he offers for the synthesis implied in knowledge.
    0
    0
  • Thus, though he gave no special name to it, he yet describes the subject-matter, and indicates the true method, of economic science.
    0
    0
  • The inscription on the work describes it as the "Embassy of Athenagoras, the Athenian, a philosopher and a Christian concerning the Christians, to the Emperors Marcus Aurelius Antoninus and Lucius Aurelius Commodus, &c."
    0
    0
  • All of which suggests a personality mentally and physically phlegmatic, a suggestion strengthened by the fact that Bartholomaeus de Neocastro (quoted by Wenck) describes him as corpulent in 1290.
    0
    0
  • The Bug, another right-hand tributary of the Vistula, describes a wide curve concentric with those of the middle Vistula and the Narew, and separates the Polish governments of Lublin and Siedlce from the Russian governments of Volhynia and Grodno.
    0
    0
  • Rohricht describes the reign of Baldwin IV., Geschichte des KOnigreichs Jerusalem (Innsbruck, 1898), C. xix.-xxi.
    0
    0
  • He retired for a time to Weimar, where he occupied his leisure in the preparation of his edition of Luther, and in writing the romance Theodor oder die Weihe des Zweiflers (Berlin, 1822), in which he describes the education of an evangelical pastor.
    0
    0
  • Rasselas and Imlac, Nekayah and Pekuah, are evidently meant to be Abyssinians of the 18th century; for the Europe which Imlac describes is the Europe of the 18th century, and the inmates of the Happy Valley talk familiarly of that law of gravitation which Newton discovered and which was not fully received even at Cambridge till the 18th century.
    0
    0
  • This last account is the only one which describes any circumstances (for a further discussion see § 3 (2) below).
    0
    0
  • 44 describes him and his brother Andrew as of Bethsaida.
    0
    0
  • Tacitus describes him as brave in action, ready of speech, clever at bringing others into odium, powerful in times of civil war and rebellion, greedy, extravagant, in peace a bad citizen, in war an ally not to be despised.
    0
    0
  • Horace (Epistles, ii.) criticizes his old schoolmaster and describes him as plagosus (a flogger), and Orbilius has become proverbial as a disciplinarian pedagogue.
    0
    0
  • Besides a valuable account of the principal sacred sites of Judaea, Samaria and Galilee as they existed in the 7th century, he also gives important information as to Alexandria and Constantinople, briefly describes Damascus and Tyre, the Nile and the Lipari volcanoes, and refers to the caliph Moawiya I .
    0
    0
  • William Godwin was educated for his father's profession at Hoxton Academy, where he was under Andrew Kippis the biographer and Dr Abraham Rees of the Cyclopaedia, and was at first more Calvinistic than his teachers, becoming a Sande manian, or follower of John Glas, whom he describes as "a celebrated north-country apostle who, after Calvin had damned ninety-nine in a hundred of mankind, has contrived a scheme for damning ninety-nine in a hundred of the followers of Calvin."
    0
    0
  • This vast book enumerates and describes all the plants known to the author or described by his predecessors, to the number, according to Adanson, of 18,625 species.
    0
    0
  • The section 1023 - I 06 7 certainly, and possibly also the section 1068-11 21, was composed at St Augustine's, Canterbury; and the former is of extreme interest and value, the writer being in close contact with the events which he describes.
    0
    0
  • Egypt before the Deltaic dynasties, but Diodorus in the first century B.C. describes how its eggs were hatched artificially, as they are at the present day.
    0
    0
  • Herodotus, however, describes his reign as exceedingly prosperous.
    0
    0
  • The first or semi-historical part shows us Alexander the Great as the conqueror of the world, while the second, of a more ethical tendency, describes him in the character of a prophet and philosopher, and narrates his second tour through the world and his adventures in the west, south, east and north.
    0
    0
  • Justinian made an effort to revive it, and Procopius describes his repairing of the walls; but its glory was past.
    0
    0
  • His principal works are El Heroe (1630), which describes in apophthegmatic phrases the qualities of the ideal man; the Arte de ingenio, tratado de la Agudeza (1642), republished six years afterwards under the title of Agudeza, y arte de ingenio (1648), a system of rhetoric in which the principles of conceptismo as opposed to culteranismo are inculcated; El Discreto (1645), a delineation of the typical courtier; El Oraculo manual y arte de prudencia (1647), a system of rules for the conduct of life; and El Criticon (1651-1653-1657), an ingenious philosophical allegory of human existence.
    0
    0
  • Atwood's published works, exclusive of papers contributed to the Philosophical Transactions, for one of which he obtained the Copley medal, are as follows: - Analysis of a Course of Lectures on the Principles of Natural Philosophy (Cambridge, 1784); Treatise on the Rectilinear Motion and Rotation of Bodies (Cambridge, 1784), which gives some interesting experiments, by means of which mechanical truths can be ocularly exhibited and demonstrated, and describes the machine, since called by Atwood's name, for verifying experimentally the laws of simple acceleration of motion; Review of the Statutes and Ordinances of Assize which have been established in England from the 4th year of King John, 1202, to the 37th of his present Majesty (London, 1801), a work of some historical research; Dissertation on the Construction and Properties of Arches (London, 1801), with supplement, pt.
    0
    0
  • Zeiler also in his German Itinerary (1618) describes their way of life.
    0
    0
  • In the first place, a hare, when found, generally describes a circle in her course which naturally brings her upon her foil, which is the greatest trial for hounds.
    0
    0
  • The poet Prudentius describes how, on the day of the martyr's death, an innumerable multitude of pilgrims flocked round the site.
    0
    0
  • In 1904 appeared the third volume, La Renaissance de Petal, in which the author describes the efforts of the Capetian kings to reconstruct the power of the Frankish kings over the whole of Gaul; and goes on to show how the clergy, the heirs of the imperial tradition, encouraged this ambition; how the great lords of the kingdom (the "princes," as Flach calls them), whether as allies or foes, pursued the same end; and how, before the close of the 12th century, the Capetian kings were in possession of the organs and the means of action which were to render them so powerful and bring about the early downfall of feudalism.
    0
    0
  • Edmund, the "deed-doer" as the chronicle calls him, "Edmundus magnificus" as Florence of Worcester describes him, perhaps translating the Saxon epithet, was buried at Glastonbury, an abbey which he had entrusted in 943 to the famous Dunstan.
    0
    0
  • When it first appears in history Pest was essentially a German settlement, and a chronicler of the 13th century describes it as "Villa Teutonica ditissima."
    0
    0
  • Hassaurek describes as " the most beautiful of all the snow peaks in the country."
    0
    0
  • Ella is the first king of the invading race whom Bede describes as exercising supremacy over his fellows, and we may probably regard him as an historical person, though little weight can be attached to the dates given by the Chronicle.
    0
    0
  • Pellican's autobiography describes the gradual multiplication of accessible books on the subjects, and he not only studied but translated a vast mass of rabbinical and Talmudic texts, his interest in Jewish literature being mainly philological.
    0
    0
  • Gass describes him as the most notable of the Swiss theologians of the time.
    0
    0
  • Latham (The Action of Examinations, 1877, p. 490) describes other numerical adjustments used to meet this difficulty, especially that used in English civil service examinations.
    0
    0
  • This construction assumes that the sun describes daily a small circle about the pole of the celestial sphere, and ignores any diurnal variation in the declination.
    0
    0
  • As early as the 10th century Sokotra was a haunt of pirates; in the r3th century Abulfeda describes the inhabitants as "Nestorian Christians and pirates" but the island was rather a station of the Indian corsairs who harassed the Arab trade with the Far East.
    0
    0
  • For the Malayan area, which Sir Joseph Hooker describes as forming " the bulk of the flora of the perennially humid regions of India, as of the whole Malayan peninsula, Upper Assam valley, the Khasi mountains, the forests of the base of the Himalaya from the Brahmaputra to Nepal, of the Malabar coast, and of Ceylon," see AssAM, Ceylon and Malay Peninsula.
    0
    0
  • He describes the classification of the people, dividing them, however, into seven castes instead of four, namely, philosophers, husbandmen, shepherds, artisans, soldiers, inspectors and the counsellors of the king.
    0
    0
  • He describes himself as a worshipper of Bhagavata (= Vishnu), and states that he had come from Taxila in the name of the great king Antialcidas, who is known from his coins to have lived c. 170 B.C.
    0
    0
  • He then describes the effects of magnification from a combination of lenses or mirrors, adding: - "But of these conclusions I minde not here to intreate, having at large in a volume 2 by itselfe opened the miraculous effects of perspective glasses."
    0
    0
  • The article Transit Circle describes one form of mounting in which the telescope is simply a refined substitute for the sights or pinules of the old astronomers.
    0
    0
  • But he frequently describes an ideal character of a missionary sage, the perfect Stoic - or, as he calls him, the Cynic. This missionary has neither country nor home nor land nor slave; his bed is the ground; he is without wife or child; his only mansion is the earth and sky and a shabby cloak.
    0
    0
  • In her Dit de la rose (1402) she describes an order of the rose, the members of which bind themselves by vow to defend the honour of women.
    0
    0
  • Pfleiderer describes this work, especially the first volume, as "a classic for all time."
    0
    0
  • When Bosanquet says that in " Heat is a mode of motion " there is no reference to individual objects, but " a pure hypothetical form which absolutely neglects the existence of objects," he falls far short of expressing the nature of this scientific judgment, for in his Theory of Heat Clerk Maxwell describes it as " believing heat as it exists in a hot body to be in the form of kinetic energy."
    0
    0
  • What, however, Hume describes as " all the logic I think proper to employ in my reasoning," viz.
    0
    0
  • Schleiermacher's formula obviously ascribes a function in knowledge to thought as such, and describes in a suggestive manner a duality of the intellectual and organic functions, resting on a parallelism of thought and being whose collapse into identity it is beyond human capacity to grasp. It is rather, however, a statement of a way in which the relations of the terms of the problem may be conceived than a system of necessity.
    0
    0
  • She showed great forbearance and generosity towards the duchess of Marlborough in the face of unexampled provocation, and her character was unduly disparaged by the latter, who with her violent and coarse nature could not understand the queen's self-restraint in sorrow, and describes her as "very hard" and as "not apt to cry."
    0
    0
  • Gabriel de Mussis describes it even in the East, before its arrival in Europe, as a bubonic disease.
    0
    0
  • Ibn Batesta notices two destructive pestilences in the 14th century, and Ferishta one in 1443, which he calls ta'un, and describes as very unusual in India.
    0
    0
  • He next sailed down the Red Sea to Aden (then a place of great trade), the singular position of which he describes, noticing its dependence for water-supply upon the great cisterns restored in modern times.
    0
    0
  • An Idyl of Work (1875) describes the life of the mills and A New England Girlhood (1889) is autobiographical; she wrote many stories and poems, of which Hannah Binding Shoes is best known.
    0
    0
  • Again, any plane w is the locus of a system of null-lines meeting in a point, called the null-point of c. If a plane revolve about a fixed straight line p in it, its ntill-point describes another straight line p, which is called the conjugate line of p. We have seen that the wrench may be replaced by two forces, one of which may act in any arbitrary line p. It is now evident that the second force must act in the conjugate line p, since every line meeting p, p is a null-line.
    0
    0
  • Thus the centre of a sphere rolling under gravity on a plane of inclination a describes a parabola with an acceleration g sin a/(I+C/Ma)
    0
    0
  • The invariable line OH describes another cone in the body, called the invariable cone.
    0
    0
  • The result is that the axis of the top describes a circular cone about a fixed line making a small angle with the vertical.
    0
    0
  • If the particle describes a horizontal circle of angular radius a with constant angular velocity f~, we have 0=0, h=c~ sin a, and therefore f~f-cosa, (25)
    0
    0
  • As regards the most general motion of a spherical pendulum, it is obvious that a particle moving under gravity on a smooth sphere cannot pass through the highest or lowest point unless it describes a vertical circle.
    0
    0
  • Such a complex motion is called screw-like or helical motion; for each point in the body describes a helix or screw round the axis of rotation, fixed or instantaneous as the case may ~ be.
    0
    0
  • It may be granted that the author of the Odyssey can hardly have been just such a singer as he himself describes.
    0
    0
  • Alcock (1901) describes from his own observation the newly hatched Phyllosoma larva of Thenus orientalis, Fabricius.
    0
    0
  • Tiverton was an important centre of the woollen trade in the 16th century, and Risdon, writing in 1608, describes it as thronged with rich clothiers, and the Monday market famous for its kersies, known as "Tiverton kersies," while as late as the reign of George II.
    0
    0
  • His last chemical paper, published in 1788, on the "Conversion of a mixture of dephlogisticated and phlogisticated air into nitrous acid by the electric spark," describes measures he took to authenticate the truth of the experiment described in the 1785 paper, which had "since been tried by persons of distinguished ability in such pursuits without success."
    0
    0
  • " In this capacity William Fitz-Osbern, the steward of Normandy, and Odo of Bayeux, acted during the Conqueror's visit to the continent in 1067; they were left, according to William of Poitiers, the former to govern the north of England, the latter to hold rule in Kent, vice sua; Florence of Worcester describes them as "custodes Angliae," and Ordericus Vitalis gives to their office the name of " praefectura."
    0
    0
  • In it Oersted describes the action he considers is taking place around 2 Faraday discussed the chemical theory of the pile and arguments in support of it in the 8th and 16th series of his Experimental Researches on Electricity.
    0
    0
  • He describes the ruins as consisting of a low, circular platform, about 42 m.
    0
    0
  • He describes in his preface the method of its production.
    0
    0
  • In the 4th century, however, Philippus of Theangela in south Caria describes Leleges still surviving as serfs of the true Carians, and Strabo, in the 1st century B.C., attributes to the Leleges a well-marked group of deserted forts, tombs and dwellings which ranged (and can still be traced) from the neighbourhood of Theangela and Halicarnassus as far north as Miletus, the southern limit of the "true Carians" of Pherecydes.
    0
    0
  • She is the daughter of Ouranos and Gaia; and after Metis she becomes the bride of Zeus.6 Pindar describes her as born in a golden car from the primeval Oceanus, source of all things, to the sacred height of Olympus to be the consort of Zeus the saviour; and she bears the same august epithet, as the symbol of social justice and the refuge for the oppressed.'
    0
    0
  • His last work, Vision d'Hebal, intended as part of the Ville des expiations, describes the chief of a Scottish clan, who, gifted with second sight, gives semi-prophetic utterances as to the course of world-history.
    0
    0
  • He wrote Brief Notes on his experiences in France in 1793, in which he describes state persecution of Catholic priests.
    0
    0
  • Bernard de Mandeville's Fable of the Bees is unique in that it describes the downfall of an ideal commonwealth.
    0
    0
  • He describes the temple as one of great splendour and covered with gilding.
    0
    0
  • As a wife she was wholly admirable; she had to entertain a man who would not be amused, and had to submit to that terribly strict court etiquette of absolute obedience to the king's inclination, which Saint-Simon so vividly describes, and yet be always cheerful and never complain of weariness or ill-health.
    0
    0
  • Liebrecht, by whom it was translated into German (1851) with valuable notes, describes it as the only work of its kind.
    0
    0
  • He was the contemporary and intimate friend of Ausonius, who dedicated two of his minor works to Pacatus, and describes him as the greatest Latin poet after Virgil.
    0
    0
  • The beginnings of the Median monarchy can scarcely go farther back than 640 B.C. To all appearance, the insurrection against Assyria must have prcceeded from the desert tribe of the Manda, mentioned by Sargon: for Nabonidus invariably describes the Median kings as kings of the Manda.
    0
    0
  • He calls Aga Mahommed chief of Mazandaran, as also of Astarabad and some districts situate in Khurasan, and describes his tribe the Kajar, to be, like the Indian Rajput, usually devoted to the profession of arms. Whatever hold his father may have had on Gilan, it is certain that this province was not then in the sons possession, for his brother, Jiafir Kuli, governor of Baifrush (Balfroosh), had made a recent incursion into it and driven Hidaiyat Khan, its ruler, from Resht to Enzeli, and Aga Mahommed was himself meditating another attack on the same quarter.
    0
    0
  • To European taste only the shortei epigrams and the double-rhymed poem Tuizfatulira1~ain, in which Khal~ani describes his journey to Mecca and back, give full satisfaction.
    0
    0
  • The life then describes the training of the boy by Servanus, but the date of the latter renders this impossible.
    0
    0
  • Strabo describes the ancient Nicaea as built regularly, in the form of a square, with a gate in the middle of each side.
    0
    0
  • Heriot (De Bry's Collection of Voyages), in his report on Virginia, describes a plant under the same name "with roots as large as a walnut and others much larger; they grow in damp soil, many hanging together as if fixed on ropes; they are good food either boiled or roasted."
    0
    0
  • The tract describes in detail the measures to be adopted for the introduction and working of the system.
    0
    0
  • Basil Valentine alludes to it in his Triumphal Car of Antimony (circa 'boo), and at a later date describes the preparation of the metal.
    0
    0
  • 1 He gives a very accurate account of this forlorn tract, its general aridity and the necessity of obtaining water by digging in the beds of torrents; describes the food of the inhabitants as dates and fish; and adverts to the occasional occurrence of fertile spots, the abundance of aromatic and thorny shrubs and fragrant plants, and the violence of the monsoon in the western part of Makran.
    0
    0
  • Thus he describes the body (which, after Epicurus, he calls the flesh) as a mere husk or fetter or prison of the soul; with its departure begins the soul's true life.
    0
    0
  • The Ulyssea of Gabriel Pereira de Castro describes the foundation of Lisbon by Ulysses, but, notwithstanding its plagiarism of The Lusiads and faults of taste, these ten cantos contain some masterly descriptive passages, and the ottava rima shows a harmony and flexibility to which even Camoens rarely attained; but this praise cannot be extended to the tiresome Ulyssipo of Sousa de Macedo.
    0
    0
  • The first, a wonderful impressionist though not perhaps a great novelist, describes to perfection the domestic and social life of Portugal in the early part of the 10th century.
    0
    0
  • The Semnones claimed to be the chief of the Suebic peoples, and Tacitus describes a great religious festival held in their tribal sanctuary, at which legations were present from all the other tribes.
    0
    0
  • Of the various traditions that were current among the ancient Greeks regarding the origin of Delos, the most popular describes it as drifting through the Aegean till moored by Zeus as a refuge for the wandering Leto.
    0
    0
  • In his Bee Thankfull London and her Sisters (1626), he describes himself as formerly "assistant to a reverend divine.
    0
    0
  • Shadwell (Industrial Efficiency, London, 1906) describes it as representing " the most complete application of science, order and method of public life," adding it is a marvel of civic administration, the most modern and most perfectly organized city that there is."
    0
    0
  • He describes the troubles that befell Prague and Bohemia generally during the reign of the weak and absentee sovereign King Louis.
    0
    0
  • The book describes the unsuccessful rising of the Bohemians against Ferdinand I.
    0
    0
  • If the moving circle rolls internally on the fixed circle, a point on the circumference describes a "hypocycloid" (from inr6, under).
    0
    0
  • The De schismate libri III., completed on the 25th of May 1410, describes the history of events since 1376 as Niem himself had seen them.
    0
    0
  • Thus Mommsen (History of Rome) indiscriminately describes the supremacy of Rome over Armenia as " suzerainty " or " protectorate."
    0
    0
  • Gairal describes it as a vassal state.
    0
    0
  • Tavernier, the French jeweller, who saw Delhi in 1665, describes the throne as of the shape of a bed, 6 ft.
    0
    0
  • The first book, Gargantua, describes the birth of that hero (a giant and the son of gigantic parents), whose nativity is ushered in by the account of a tremendous feast.
    0
    0
  • Cinnamus was probably an eye-witness of the events of the last ten years which he describes.
    0
    0
  • 77, draws a distinction between pn?aiwEcov, which he describes as an extract of the entire herb, and the more active Inros, derived from the capsules alone.
    0
    0
  • In the 17th century Kaempfer describes the various kinds of opium prepared in Persia, and states that the best sorts were flavoured with spices and called " theriaka."
    0
    0
  • He now describes a number in succession, introducing all but the first of those told between Mark i.
    0
    0
  • His idealistic scheme of history, which makes religion the keynote of progress, and describes the function of each - Judaism to typify duty, Confucianism order, Mahommedanism justice, Buddhism patience, and Christianity love - does not account for the facts of the history enacted by the devotees.
    0
    0
  • In this case the wing, in virtue of its being carried forward by the body in motion, describes an undulating or spiral course, as shown in fig.
    0
    0
  • These figures illustrate the various angles made by the wing with the horizon as it hastens to and fro, and show how the wing reverses and reciprocates, and how it twists upon itself in opposite directions, and describes a figure-of-8 track in space.
    0
    0
  • This author, distinguished alike as a physiologist, mathematician and mechanician, describes and figures a bird with artificial wings, each of which consists of a rigid rod in front and flexible feathers behind.
    0
    0
  • In his theology of nature he describes a schematic wing as consisting of a rigid ribbing in front, and a flexible sail behind.
    0
    0
  • He describes two artificial wings, the one composed of a rigid rod and sail - the rod representing the stiff anterior margin of the wing; the sail, which is made of paper bordered with cardboard, the flexible posterior margin.
    0
    0
  • It, moreover, twists and untwists during its action and describes figure-of-8 and waved tracks in space, precisely as the natural wing does.
    0
    0
  • This author, in his treatise on the Theorie de la vis d'Archimede, describes a machine provided with two screws which he calls a " pterophores."
    0
    0
  • He was an eye-witness of some of the events he describes.
    0
    0
  • Again Matthew says that Joseph was a disciple, while Mark implies that he was not yet among the definite adherents of Christ, and John describes him as an adherent "secretly for fear of the Jews."
    0
    0
  • In Blanquerna (1283), a novel which describes a new Utopia, Lull renews the Platonic tradition and anticipates the methods of Sir Thomas More, Campanella and Harrington, and in the Libre de Maravelles (1286) he adopts the Oriental apologue from Kalilah and Dimnah.
    0
    0
  • Paul Bourget describes him as a dreamer with an exquisite sense of vision, who sought and found in his work a refuge from the.
    0
    0
  • In these drafts Leonardo describes in the first person, with sketches, a traveller's strange experiences in Egypt, Cyprus, Constantinople, the Cilician coasts about Mount Taurus and Armenia.
    0
    0
  • No contemporary gives the least hint of Leonardo's having travelled in the East; to the places he mentions he gives their classical and not their current Oriental names; the catastrophes he describes are unattested from any other source; he confuses the Taurus and the Caucasus; some of the phenomena he mentions are repeated from Aristotle and Ptolemy; and there seems little reason to doubt that these passages in his MSS.
    0
    0
  • He then (according to his highly fabulous narrative) visited the territory of Issachar, in the mountains of Media and Persia; he also describes the abodes of Zabulon, on the "other side" of the Paran Mountains, extending to Armenia and the Euphrates; of Reuben, on another side of the same mountains; of Ephraim and Half Manasseh, in Arabia, not far from Mecca; and of Simeon and the other Half of Manasseh, in Chorazin, six months' journey from Jerusalem.
    0
    0
  • Xenocrates indeed, identifying ideal and mathematical numbers, sought to ' That Plato did not neglect, but rather encouraged, classificatory science is shown, not only by a well-known fragment of the comic poet Epicrates, which describes a party of Academics engaged in investigating, under the eye of Plato, the affinities of the common pumpkin, but also by the Timaeus, which, while it carefully discriminates science from ontology, plainly recognizes the importance of the study of natural kinds.
    0
    0
  • The poem describes the wanderings of the bride in search of her lover, and her final discovery of him as an old man on his death-bed, in a public hospital which she had entered as a nurse.
    0
    0
  • Ibn-Haukal, an Arabian traveller of the 10th century, describes Balkh as built of clay, with ramparts and six gates, and extending half a parasang.
    0
    0
  • In Libocedrus decurrens (Cupressineae) Lawson describes the archegonia as varying in number from 6 to 24 (Annals of Botany xxi.,1907).
    0
    0
  • The prosperity and local importance of Haverfordwest continued unimpaired throughout the 17th and 18th centuries, and Richard Fenton, the historian of Pembrokeshire, describes it in 1810, as "the largest town in the county, if not in all Wales."
    0
    0
  • To the north-west on the Capo di Sorrento is another villa, the so-called Bagni della Regina Giovanna, with baths, and in the bay to the south-west was the villa of Pollius Felix, the friend of Statius, which he describes in Silvae ii.
    0
    0
  • He describes the stoneless Walachian plain, with its rich pastures, its crops of maize and millet, and woods so symmetrically planted and carefully kept by Brancovan's orders that hiding in them was out of the question.
    0
    0
  • The election of the voivodes, though in the hands of the boiars, was strictly regulated by hereditary principles, and Cantemir describes the extinction of the house of Dragosh in the 16th century as one of the unsettling causes that most contributed to the ruin of the country.
    0
    0
  • Alexander Beldiman describes in a rhymed epic, Eteria (1821), the first battles, between the Greeks and the Turks in Moldavia.
    0
    0
  • Iwo, calls the place Takarart, and describes it as an ordinary citadel, from which the town gradually developed, taking its name from the Miknasa Berbers.
    0
    0
  • Little change, however, seems to have been made since the time of Ibn Jubair, who describes the floor and walls as overlaid with richly variegated marbles, and the upper half of the walls as plated with silver thickly gilt, while the roof was veiled with coloured silk.
    0
    0
  • In the middle ages it was sometimes shown, and Ibn Jubair describes the pious enthusiasm with which he drank Zamzam water poured on the footprints.
    0
    0
  • Silistria flourished under Ottoman rule; Hajji Khalifa describes it as the most important of all the Danubian towns; a Greek metropolitan was installed here with five bishops under his control and a settlement of Ragusan merchants kept alive its commercial interests.
    0
    0
  • A spur pinion D, gearing with both wheels, is carried loosely upon an eccentric E forming part of the central pin, so that when this latter is turned by the hand-wheel F and chain G the axis of the pinion describes a circle the diameter of which equals the throw of the eccentric, and a small relative motion of the two sheaves takes place, depending on the number of the teeth of the annular wheels.
    0
    0
  • Johann Kepler had proved by an elaborate series of measurements that each planet revolves in an elliptical orbit round the sun, whose centre occupies one of the foci of the orbit, that the radius vector of each planet drawn from the sun describes equal areas in equal times, and that the squares of the periodic times of the planets are in the same proportion as the cubes of their mean distances from the sun.
    0
    0
  • Justin thus describes the rite in ch.
    0
    0
  • Late in the 2nd century Tertullian describes the rite of baptism in his treatise On the Resurrection of the Flesh, thus: 1.
    0
    0
  • In the " Proem " the poet describes his journey from darkness to light.
    0
    0
  • It is traceable as far back as the schoolmen of whom Duns Scotus describes as "transcendental" those conceptions which have a higher degree of universality than the Aristotelian categories.
    0
    0
  • His abilities as a counsellor, statesman and diplomatist gained him the admiration of his contemporaries, and Henry of Huntingdon describes him as "the wisest man between this and Jerusalem."
    0
    0
  • Jules Crevaux, who descended it, describes it as full of obstacles to navigation, the current very strong and the stream frequently interrupted by rapids and cataracts.
    0
    0
  • In a machine of any kind, each point describes a curve; a simple but important instance is the " three-bar curve," or locus of a point in or rigidly connected with a bar pivoted on to two other bars which rotate about fixed centres respectively.
    0
    0
  • Stating the theorem in regard to a conic, we have a real point P (called the pole) and a real line XY (called the polar), the line joining the two (real or imaginary) points of contact of the (real or imaginary) tangents drawn from the point to the conic; and the theorem is that when the point describes a line the line passes through a point, this line and point being polar and pole to each other.
    0
    0
  • There are two non-singular kinds, the one with, the other without, an oval, but each of them has an infinite (as Newton describes it) campaniform branch; this cuts the axis at right angles, being at first concave, but ultimately convex, towards the axis, the two legs continually tending to become at right angles to the axis.
    0
    0
  • Darius describes himself in an inscription as of Aryan stock, Daraya h va h us ariyahci'aah.
    0
    0
  • The nature of the dream, in which the elder Scipio appears to his (adopted) grandson, and describes the life of the good after death and the constitution of the universe from the Stoic point of view, gives occasion for Macrobius to discourse upon many points of physics in a series of essays interesting as showing the astronomical notions then current.
    0
    0
  • 428-429, describes their camping ground between the town of Troy and the sea; but this obviously proves nothing about their habitat in time of peace.
    0
    0
  • He describes actual Pelasgians surviving and mutually intelligible (a) at Placie and Scylace on the Asiatic shore of the Hellespont, and (b) near Creston on the Strymon; in the latter area they have "Tyrrhenian" neighbours.
    0
    0
  • In Lemnos and Imbros he describes a Pelasgian population who were only conquered by Athens shortly before soo B.C., and in this connexion he tells a story of earlier raids of these Pelasgians on Attica, and of a temporary settlement there of Hellespontine Pelasgians, all dating from a time "when the Athenians were first beginning to count as Greeks."
    0
    0
  • Since this book describes the way in which an elaborate census of Israel was taken on two separate occasions, the first at Sinai at the beginning of the desert wanderings and the second just before their close on the plains of Moab, the title is quite appropriate.
    0
    0
  • Benham describes backward shifting of the oral aperture in certain Chaetopods, Proc. Zoolog.
    0
    0
  • Unpublished correspondence with his Somerset friend, Edward Clarke of Chipley, describes Locke's life in those troubled years.
    0
    0
  • For several centuries during the middle ages Rumanian immigrants formed so large a part of the population of Thessaly that that district was called by the Byzantine writers Great Wallachia (Meye:An BAaXia): the Jewish traveller, Benjamin of Tudela, who passed though the country in the latter half of the 12th century, describes them as then occupying it.
    0
    0
  • The lines in which James Thomson describes their simple life The reindeer form their riches: these their tents, Their robes, their beds, and all their homely wealth Supply; their wholesome fare and cheerful cups are still applicable in the main to the mountain Lapps; but even they have learned to use coffee as an ordinary beverage and to wear stout Norwegian cloth (vadmal).
    0
    0
  • He lived in quiet days a quiet life; but he shows himself in his works, as Snorri describes him, " a man wise, of good memory and a speaker of the truth."
    0
    0
  • He describes various kinds of game, methods of hunting, the best breeds of horses and dogs.
    0
    0
  • Sarayliya's most important work is Serbiyanka (Leipzig, 1826), in which he describes the rising of the Servians against the Turks in 1804 and 1815.
    0
    0
  • In the Lucha he describes how the spirit of man wished to solve the problem of human destiny.
    0
    0
  • In Gorski Viyenats, " The Mountain Wreath " (Vienna, 1847), Nyegosh describes the liberation of Montenegro from the Turks towards the end of the 17th century in the form of a drama.
    0
    0
  • These ever varying elements represent an ever varying elliptic orbit, - not an orbit which the planet actually describes through its whole course, but an ideal one in which it is moving at each instant, and which continually adjusts itself to the actual motion of the planet at the instant.
    0
    0
  • The males are polygamous, and during autumn and winter associate together, feeding in flocks apart from the females; but with the approach of spring they separate, each selecting a locality for itself, from which it drives off all intruders, and where morning and evening it seeks to attract the other sex by a display of its beautiful plumage, which at this season attains its greatest perfection, and by a peculiar cry, which Selby describes as "a crowing note, and another similar to the noise made by the whetting of a scythe."
    0
    0
  • The Four Masters thus describes the Reformation: "A heresy and new error arising in England, through pride, vain glory, avarice, and lust, and through many strange sciences, so that the men of England went into opposition to the pope and to Rome."
    0
    0
  • One of the Jesuit missionaries in North America thus describes the Red Man's philosophy: 2 " Les sauvages se persuadent que non seulement les hommes et les autres animaux, mais aussi que toutes les autres choses sont animees."
    0
    0
  • Mrs Langloh Parker describes her methods of checking and controlling native statements made in English.
    0
    0
  • The king describes himself as the child of Sky and Earth.
    0
    0
  • 5 seq.), and describes the latter's withdrawal to Seir (cf.
    0
    0
  • Rashi and his family worked in the vines of Troyes (in the Champagne); in his letters he describes the structure of the winepresses.
    0
    0
  • It describes the process by which an isolated truth-seeker detaches himself from his lower passions, and raises himself above the material earth and the orbs of heaven to the forms which are the source of their movement, until he arrives at a union with the supreme intellect.
    0
    0
  • If now the strip be moved so that the point a is always on the minor axis, and the point b on the major axis, the point P describes the ellipse.
    0
    0
  • First of all 2 the writer describes the futile attempt of Heliodorus to rob the Temple, and the malicious intrigues of the Benjamite Simon against the worthy high priest Onias III.
    0
    0
  • Bellew describes the aspect of that portion of Seistan limited to the actual basin of the Helmund as indicating the former existence of a lake which covered with its waters a considerable area.
    0
    0
  • The main water-parting of the Peninsula is everywhere near the edge of the table-land on the north, east and south, and hence describes a semicircle with the convexity to the east.
    0
    0
  • Coming to later times, Della Rocca minutely describes a disease to which bees were subject in the island of Syra, between the years 1 777 and 1780, and through which nearly every colony in the island perished.
    0
    0
  • There are few good harbours, Port 1 It was supposed to be indicated by the line which, according to the Turkish firman of 1841, describes a semicircle from the Siwa Oasis to Wadai, approaching the Nile between the Second and Third Cataracts.
    0
    0
  • The natural geographical and ethnical southern frontier of Egypt is the First Cataract; Egyptian scribes of the Old Empire recognized this truth no less clearly than Diocletian, and Juvenal anticipates the verdict of every modern observer when he describes the " porta Syenes " as the gate of Africa.
    0
    0
  • Its first appearance, and the only manifestation of it which Anaxagoras describes, is Motion.
    0
    0
  • As the planet revolves around the centre, each radius vector describes a surface of which the area swept over in a unit of time measures the areal velocity of the planet.
    0
    0
  • From youth to age he describes himself as gifted with a buoyant temper.
    0
    0
  • Hutton describes his specimens as sucking the juices of flies, which they had stuck down with their slime, and they have been observed in captivity to devour the entrails which have been removed from their fellows, and to eat raw sheep's liver.
    0
    0
  • Domesday describes Woodstock (Wodestock, Wodestok', Wodestok) as a royal forest; it was a royal seat from early times and 'Ethelred is said to have held a council there, and Henry I.
    0
    0
  • Another anomaly is that he never saw the Gegenschein, but describes the band as equally bright in all its parts, except near the horizon.
    0
    0
  • He also describes the moon as adding to the zodiacal light during her first and last quarters, a result so difficult to explain that it needs confirmation.
    0
    0
  • It describes a wide curve eastwards past Soria, then flows westward across the Castilian table-land, passing south of Valladolid, with Toro and Zamora on its right bank; then from a point 3 m.
    0
    0