Dermatitis sentence example

dermatitis
  • allergic contact dermatitis " .
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  • buckthorn oils eased the symptoms of atopic dermatitis, which is a chronic rash.
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  • In patients who suffer from atopic dermatitis, the cold sores can, in rare cases, spread to larger parts of the body.
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  • In tests incontinence pad samples were held in contact with skin that had been treated with three topical agents used to manage incontinence dermatitis.
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  • Also, according to the NNDIC, between 15 to 20 percent of celiac sufferers experience no digestive symptoms at all, but instead display a pernicious and blistering rash across their body called Dermatitis Herpetiformis.
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  • Contact dermatitis from olive oil, which is often adulterated, was noted by Greenberg and Lester (1954 ).
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  • angelica root oil in a 62 year old woman with dermatitis around the eyes was reported by Larsen (1975 ).
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  • atopic dermatitis, the cold sores can, in rare cases, spread to larger parts of the body.
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  • canine atopic dermatitis is an allergic skin disease most commonly caused by an exaggerated immune response to house dust mites.
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  • commoner causes of contact dermatitis from woods in France (Zafiropoulo et al.
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  • conium maculatum L. Poison Hemlock, Carrot Fern Dermatitis from the plant was reported by several authors cited by Touton (1932 ).
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  • contact dermatitis over.. .
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  • P Patch test A skin test that can show which substances are causing contact dermatitis or eczema.
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  • In fact, some people who used Vitamin E oil developed a contact dermatitis over.. .
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  • A statement that the leaves can produce contact dermatitis (Massey 1941) requires confirmation.
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  • The flower of this species appeared to be the responsible agent in a farmer aged 35 years who had contact dermatitis of the hands.
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  • Hartmann & Schlegel (1980) reported contact dermatitis from the wood dust of this species in a Swiss woodworker.
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  • Many plants in this family appear to be capable of inducing contact dermatitis.
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  • Also, a negative patch test result can be useful to exclude an allergic contact dermatitis.
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  • The most frequent adverse effect is an irritant contact dermatitis.
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  • Because of this it is sometimes called ' occupational contact dermatitis ' .
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  • It is among the 14 most common causes of plant contact dermatitis in the Dominican Republic (Brache & Aquino 1978 ).
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  • contact dermatitis in workers in quinine plant.
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  • contact dermatitis in a gardener caused by daffodils.
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  • contact dermatitis in man.
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  • contact dermatitis of the hands.
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  • contact dermatitis from vegetation.
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  • contact dermatitis from weeds; patch testing with their oleoresins.
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  • contact dermatitis from this plant.
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  • contact dermatitis from citronella oil was observed by Lane (1922 ).
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  • contact dermatitis from woods in France (Zafiropoulo et al.
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  • contact dermatitis from methyl isothiocyanate in soil disinfectants.
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  • contagious pustular dermatitis of sheep (orf ).
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  • dermatitis caused by work.
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  • A few species appear to be capable of inducing dermatitis.
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  • The finished wood can also produce dermatitis at sites of contact.
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  • Cradle Cap Treatment Shampoo Cradle cap is a form of seborrhoeic dermatitis, which can cause a dry, flaky, itchy scalp.
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  • Skin: - rarely allergic skin reactions (e.g. exfoliative dermatitis ).
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  • An irritant dermatitis is most likely to occur on the hands.
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  • The most common type is known as contact eczematous dermatitis.
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  • dermatitis herpetiformis, or DH, is a related skin condition which is caused by gluten intolerance.
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  • dermatitis venenata.
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  • dermatitis eczema baking ONeill, wedded matters to you like floor.
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  • In India, an extensive outbreak of " weed dermatitis " involving perhaps 1000 patients with some deaths has been observed.
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  • Back problems, cement dermatitis, vibration white finger and deafness can ruin people's lives and force them out of their chosen profession.
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  • dermatitis in a gardener (Wilkinson 1975 ).
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  • dermatitis of the eyelids on a housewife.
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  • dermatitis from vegetation.
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  • dermatitis from weeds; patch testing with their oleoresins.
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  • She is recognized as a skin care expert in the field of atopic dermatitis and general dermatology.
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  • discolour with this plant in strong sunshine can cause severe blistering dermatitis which will often leave the skin discolored for several months.
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  • irritant contact eczema (or dermatitis) is far more common than allergic contact eczema.
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  • The dermatitis eczema baking ONeill, wedded matters to you like floor.
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  • Because of its content of proteolytic enzyme, the kiwi fruit is a potential cause of contact dermatitis.
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  • Siemens (1929) reported dermatitis from the foliage of silver fir; patch tests were not recorded.
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  • A florist developed contact dermatitis from the foliage of balsam fir; a patch test produced a positive reaction (Kappes 1948 ).
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  • The dermatitis spread to face, neck, scalp, elbow flexures, groins, popliteal skin and feet.
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  • irritant dermatitis is most likely to occur on the hands.
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  • mimosa trees in the southern United States can cause contact dermatitis (Grater 1975 ).
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  • ovine digital dermatitis) is a new disease that is a major problem in some flocks.
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  • perfumery workers who had dermatitis (Gutman and Somov 1968 ).
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  • poison ivy contact dermatitis has been reported by Schwartz & Downham (1981 ).
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  • It has very much reduced our use of topical steroid preparations in the treatment of such dermatitis.
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  • Primula dermatitis in a blind person: An eruption from primula dermatitis in a blind person: An eruption from Primula obconica affected the skin of the nose and around the eyes.
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  • primula sinensis Dermatitis from the plant was reported by Gillett (1896 ).
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  • pustular dermatitis of sheep (orf ).
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  • ragweed dermatitis, and parthenium dermatitis are all produced.
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  • Two outbreaks of dermatitis occurred in cabinet-makers working with East Indian satinwood in Glasgow ship-building yards; not all the men exposed were affected.
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  • Its use in India in the treatment of skin diseases has caused severe bullous dermatitis leading sometimes to hypertrophic scars (Behl et al.
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  • Contact dermatitis precluded the use of transdermal scopolamine in 3 (4.4 %) subjects.
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  • Dermatitis herpetiformis other conditions associated with gluten sensitivity, such as coeliac disease, are not contraindications.
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  • His disease would later be known as coeliac sprue and he would develop an associated condition, dermatitis herpetiformis.
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  • angular stomatitis, dermatitis in the corners of the mouth, usually in denture wearers, may be caused by candida.
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  • turpentine contact dermatitis has declined in countries where legislation has resulted in the substitution of other solvents.
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  • vesicular dermatitis appeared on the upper anterior trunk.
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  • In theory, this may help to reduce irritant contact dermatitis from repeated hand washing.
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  • weed dermatitis " (Shelmire 1939 ).
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  • Contact dermatitis from castor oil and vitamin B was attributed to pyridine derivatives (Kadlec & Hanslian 1965).
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  • This would appear to be the manner in which Australian bush dermatitis, ragweed dermatitis, and parthenium dermatitis are all produced.
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  • Angular stomatitis, dermatitis in the corners of the mouth, usually in denture wearers, may be caused by candida.
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  • The incidence of turpentine contact dermatitis has declined in countries where legislation has resulted in the substitution of other solvents.
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  • Two days later, vesicular dermatitis appeared on the upper anterior trunk.
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  • This species produced a positive patch test reaction in one of 50 patients investigated for " weed dermatitis " (Shelmire 1939).
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  • Other terms used for this type of rash include napkin dermatitis, ammonia dermatitis and diaper dermatitis.
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  • Similarly, sensitive skin or an allergy to fabrics, sometimes known as contact dermatitis, may also cause a rash.
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  • Contact dermatitis appears red and flat, and the skin may begin to peel or become flaky.
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  • Tea tree oil inhibits growth of the organism that causes dandruff and scalp dermatitis, Pityrosporum ovale, as well as most fungal and yeast cultures in laboratory studies.
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  • Readily absorbed by the skin, cocoa butter is sometimes recommended for treatment of skin conditions like eczema and dermatitis.
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  • This is important in the treatment of dermatitis and asthma.
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  • Long-term exposure to fleas can cause anemia, allergic dermatitis and intestinal parasites in your pet, so timely treatment is important.
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  • The burdock plant has been reported to cause contact dermatitis in some individuals.
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  • Skin problems: Some Lab puppies are prone to skin conditions like seborrhea, ringworm, mange or allergic dermatitis.
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  • Contact dermatitis is a rash that appears after the skin is exposed to an allergen, such as metal, rubber, some cosmetics or lotions, or some types of plants (e.g. poison ivy).
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  • See also Dermatitis; Malnutrition; Trichotillomania.
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  • Creams or ointments containing cortisone may help control the itch from insect bites, contact dermatitis, or eczema.
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  • Dermatitis herpetiformis-A chronic, very itchy skin disease with groups of red lesions that leave spots behind when they heal.
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  • Psoriasis on the scalp is distinguished from seborrheic dermatitis, or dandruff, because the scales of psoriasis are dry, not greasy.
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  • Dermatitis of the buttocks, genitals, lower abdomen, or thigh folds of an infant or toddler is called diaper rash.
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  • Diaper dermatitis results from prolonged contact with irritants such as moisture, chemical substances, and friction.
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  • Sometimes severe diaper dermatitis becomes super-infected with bacteria (streptococci or staphylococci).
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  • Some infants seem predisposed to diaper dermatitis.
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  • These infants have such sensitive skin that diaper dermatitis is a problem from the first few days of life.
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  • Ammonia dermatitis of this type is a problem in the second half of the first year of life when the infant is producing a larger quantity of urine.
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  • Sometimes chemicals in detergents contribute to contact dermatitis.
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  • Mild steroid creams, such as 0.5 to 1 percent hydrocortisone, may be used to treat seborrheic dermatitis and intertrigo.
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  • It is recommended for seborrheic dermatitis as well as for general inflammation of the skin.
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  • Diaper dermatitis (diaper rash)-An inflammatory reaction to irritants in the diaper area.
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  • Poison ivy, oak, and sumac are allergic skin rashes (or Rhus dermatitis) caused by the plants of the same name.
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  • A physician can distinguish poison ivy, oak, or sumac from other allergic contact dermatitis through a brief patient interview.
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  • "Poison Ivy, Oak, and Sumac Contact Dermatitis."
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  • See also Atopic dermatitis; Dysmenorrhea; Sports injuries.
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  • A distinctive, painful skin rash, called dermatitis herpetiformis, may be the first sign of celiac disease in adults but rarely occurs in children with celiac disease.
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  • Salicylic acid-An agent prescribed to treat a variety of skin disorders, such as acne, dandruff, psoriasis, seborrheic dermatitis, calluses, corns, and warts.
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  • Other common complications include contact dermatitis and scars.
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  • Immunoglobulin E (IgE) is found in respiratory secretions and is directed toward invasion of the body by parasites and in allergic reactions such as hay fever, atopic dermatitis, and allergic asthma.
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  • The most common example of this type of reaction is allergic contact dermatitis that causes inflammations of the skin.
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  • Contact dermatitis is the name for any skin inflammation that occurs when the skin's surface comes in contact with a substance originating outside the body.
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  • There are two major categories of contact dermatitis, irritant and allergic.
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  • Irritant dermatitis is essentially a direct injury to the skin, caused by such compounds as acids, alkalis, phenol, and detergents.
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  • The immune system is not involved in irritant dermatitis, and the person's skin is damaged without prior sensitization.
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  • In allergic dermatitis, however, the patient's skin reacts to a substance to which it has become sensitized.
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  • A third type of dermatitis, photo contact dermatitis, is triggered by exposure of the skin to light following the application of certain cosmetics or chemicals.
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  • Photo contact dermatitis may be either irritant or allergic.
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  • Contact dermatitis may be either an acute or chronic skin disorder.
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  • In general, allergic contact dermatitis is more severe and acute in its onset than irritant contact dermatitis.
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  • Irritant contact dermatitis most commonly affects the hands, while allergic contact dermatitis may be found on almost any part of the body, including the armpits and genitals.
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  • Allergic contact dermatitis is more likely to involve swelling of the skin and the development of small fluid-filled blisters than irritant contact dermatitis.
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  • Photo contact dermatitis is usually limited to the area of skin exposed to direct light.
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  • Contact dermatitis is a common complaint in people of all ages, in part because of the large number of potential irritants and allergens in the contemporary environment.
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  • One textbook on contact dermatitis runs to over 1,100 pages of descriptions of the various manufactured products and other substances that can cause these skin reactions.
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  • In the United States, contact dermatitis ranks among the top 10 reasons for visits to primary care doctors and accounts for 7 percent of all visits to dermatologists.
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  • About 20 percent of children in the general United States population develop allergic contact dermatitis at some point prior to adolescence.
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  • Children of parents with allergic contact dermatitis have a 60 percent greater chance of having a positive reaction on a patch test themselves.
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  • Contact dermatitis is more likely to affect Caucasians than African, Asian, or Native Americans.
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  • People with fair skin and red hair are particularly susceptible to contact dermatitis.
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  • Irritant contact dermatitis (ICD) is the more commonly reported of the two kinds of contact dermatitis, and is seen in about 80 percent of cases.
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  • A common form of irritant contact dermatitis in infants is diaper rash, which develops when the protective epidermal layer of the baby's skin is damaged by long periods of contact with fecal matter and urine.
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  • Allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) results when repeated exposure to an allergen (an allergy-causing substance) triggers an immune response that inflames the skin.
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  • In photo contact dermatitis, certain substances undergo chemical changes as a result of exposure to light that transform them into either irritants or allergens.
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  • Contact dermatitis is not a medical emergency.
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  • Diagnosis of contact dermatitis begins with a physical examination and asking the patient questions about his or her health and daily activities.
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  • If the dermatitis is mild, responds well to treatment, and does not recur, ordinarily the investigation is at an end.
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  • The best treatment for contact dermatitis is to identify the allergen or irritating substance and avoid further contact with it.
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  • In older children and adolescents, more severe cases of contact dermatitis are treated with corticosteroids applied to the skin or taken orally.
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  • Although antihistamines do not cure contact dermatitis, the doctor may prescribe them to relieve severe itching.
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  • Herbal remedies have been used for centuries to treat skin disorders including contact dermatitis.
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  • A homeopath treating a patient with contact dermatitis will do a thorough investigation of the individual's history and exposures before prescribing a remedy.
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  • One homeopathic remedy commonly prescribed to relieve the itching associated with contact dermatitis is Rhus toxicodendron, which is taken internally three to four times daily.
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  • Poison ivy, poison oak, and poison sumac are common culprits in cases of allergic contact dermatitis.
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  • For a few people, contact dermatitis becomes a chronic and disabling condition that can have a profound effect on quality of life.
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  • Parents should be concerned primarily with identifying the cause(s) of a child or adolescent's contact dermatitis, as treatment is often ineffective until the offending substance can be removed or avoided.
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  • Most cases of contact dermatitis are mild and can be treated without disrupting the child's school routine or severely affecting his or her quality of life.
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  • J. "A Review of the Pathophysiology, Prevention, and Treatment of Irritant Diaper Dermatitis."
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  • Duarte, I., et al. "Contact Dermatitis in Adolescents."
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  • American Journal of Contact Dermatitis 14 (December 2003): 200-02.
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  • Kutting, B., et al. "Allergic Contact Dermatitis in Children: Strategies of Prevention and Risk Management."
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  • W., et al. "Allergic Contact Dermatitis from Tacrolimus."
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  • Sood, A., et al. "Contact Dermatitis to a Limb Prosthesis."
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  • American Journal of Contact Dermatitis 14 (September 2003): 169-71.
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  • "Contact Dermatitis." eMedicine, September 1, 2004.
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  • J. "A review of the pathophysiology, prevention and treatment of irritant diaper dermatitis."
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  • Seborrheic dermatitis is a common inflammatory disease of the scalp and skin characterized by scaly lesions usually on the scalp, hairline, face and body.
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  • Seborrheic dermatitis appears as red, inflamed skin covered by greasy or dry scales that may be white, yellowish, or gray.
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  • Dandruff is a mild form of seborrheic dermatitis and appear as fine white scales without red skin or inflammation.
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  • Seborrheic dermatitis is a common, mild disease of newborns.
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  • When seborrheic dermatitis occurs in the diaper area, it is often accompanied by a yeast infection.
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  • Seborrheic dermatitis usually disappears by the end of the first year and does not reappear until puberty.
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  • Seborrheic dermatitis is not an infection and is not transmitted from individual to individual.
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  • Seborrheic dermatitis is a very common among newborns.
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  • Seborrheic dermatitis can reappear at puberty and into adulthood.
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  • As of 2004 the cause of seborrheic dermatitis was not clear.
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  • Seborrheic dermatitis may also be linked to genetic factors.
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  • If the seborrheic dermatitis is complicated by a yeast infection, an ointment containing anti-yeast medications such as nystatin is applied to the infected area three or four times daily.
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  • Seborrheic dermatitis normally resolves without difficulty, usually by the age of six months and almost always by the end of the first year.
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  • Seborrheic dermatitis cannot be prevented from developing, although it may be controlled through frequent hair washings with a mild baby shampoo.
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  • "Cradle Cap (infantile seborrhoeic dermatitis)."
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  • Skin changes, like atopic dermatitis or eczema, may demonstrate that the patient has allergic problems.
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  • Allergens that enter the circulation may cause hives, angioedema, anaphylaxis, or atopic dermatitis.
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  • Atopic dermatitis is one of the most common skin conditions and occurs commonly in infants and children.
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  • In contact with the skin, allergens can cause reddening, itching, and blistering, called contact dermatitis.
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  • This type of reaction is known as atopic dermatitis.
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  • Dermatitis may arise from an allergic response (such as from poison ivy) or exposure to an irritant causing nonimmune damage to skin cells (such as soap, cold, and chemical agents).
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  • Infant or childhood atopic dermatitis disappears in almost all people.
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  • Contact dermatitis is marked by red, itchy, weepy skin blisters, and an eczema that is slow to heal.
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  • Delayed allergic contact dermatitis diagnosis involves similar methods by application of a skin patch with allergen to induce an allergic skin reaction.
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  • An individual suffering from contact dermatitis should initially take steps to avoid possible sources of exposure to the offending agent.
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  • In the case of acute contact dermatitis, short-term oral corticosteroid therapy may be appropriate.
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  • Dermatitis is a general term used to describe inflammation of the skin.
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  • Most types of dermatitis are characterized by an itchy pink or red rash.
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  • Contact dermatitis is an allergic reaction to something that irritates the skin and is manifested by one or more lines of red, swollen, blistered skin that may itch or seep.
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  • Contact dermatitis can occur on any part of the body, but it usually affects the hands, feet, and groin.
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  • Contact dermatitis usually does not spread from one person to another, nor does it spread beyond the area exposed to the irritant unless affected skin comes into contact with another part of the body.
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  • However, in the case of some irritants, such as poison ivy, contact dermatitis can be passed to another person or to another part of the body.
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  • Atopic dermatitis is characterized by itching, scaling, swelling, and sometimes blistering.
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  • Seborrheic dermatitis may be dry or moist and is characterized by greasy scales and yellowish crusts on the scalp, eyelids, face, external surfaces of the ears, underarms, breasts, and groin.
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  • Allergic reactions are genetically determined, and different substances cause contact dermatitis to develop in different people.
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  • Burns and sunburn increase the risk of dermatitis developing.
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  • Contact dermatitis can develop when the first contact occurs or after years of use or exposure.
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  • Atopic dermatitis can be caused by allergies, asthma, or stress, and there seems to be a genetic predisposition for atopic conditions.
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  • Seborrheic dermatitis (for which there may also be a genetic predisposition) is usually caused by overproduction of the oil glands.
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  • The diagnosis of dermatitis is made on the basis of how the rash looks and its location.
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  • Treating contact dermatitis begins with eliminating or avoiding the source of irritation.
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  • Creams, lotions, or ointments not specifically formulated for dermatitis can intensify the irritation.
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  • Medications taken by mouth to relieve symptoms of dermatitis can make skin red and scaly and cause hair loss.
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  • People who have a history of dermatitis should remove their rings before washing their hands.
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  • Patting rather than rubbing the skin after bathing and thoroughly massaging lubricating lotion or nonprescription cortisone creams into still-damp skin can soothe red, irritated nummular dermatitis.
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  • Coal-tar salves can help relieve symptoms of nummular dermatitis that have not responded to other treatments, but these ointments have an unpleasant odor and stain clothing.
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  • Coal-tar shampoos may be used for seborrheic dermatitis that occurs on the scalp.
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  • Contact dermatitis can be treated botanically and homeopathically.
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  • Selenium-based shampoos, topical applications of flax oil and/or olive oil, and biotin supplementation are among the therapies recommended for seborrheic dermatitis.
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  • Dermatitis is often chronic, but symptoms can generally be controlled.
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  • Contact dermatitis can be prevented by avoiding the source of irritation.
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  • Yoga and other relaxation techniques may help prevent atopic dermatitis caused by stress.
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  • Avoidance of sweating may aid in preventing seborrheic dermatitis.
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  • People who are susceptible to dermatitis that is linked to particular foods obviously should avoid consuming them.
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  • M., et al. "Topical treatment for atopic dermatitis in the 21st century."
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  • "Contact dermatitis: diagnosis and management."
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  • "The effective management of atopic dermatitis in school-age children."
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  • Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic skin disorder associated with biochemical abnormalities in the patient's body tissues and immune system.
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  • Atopic dermatitis is also known as infantile eczema or atopic eczema.
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  • It includes bronchial asthma and food allergies as well as atopic dermatitis.
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  • Children with atopic dermatitis often have a lowered threshold of sensitivity to itching, which means that they feel itching sensations more intensely than children without the disorder.
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  • Atopic dermatitis is not contagious but may affect several members of the same family at the same time.
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  • Atopic dermatitis is a very common condition in the general population.
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  • About 20 percent of infants develop symptoms of atopic dermatitis.
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  • Atopic dermatitis begins early in life; about 65 percent of patients with AD develop symptoms during the first 12 months of life, with 90 percent showing symptoms before five years of age.
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  • There is some disagreement among researchers with regard to race or ethnicity as risk factors for atopic dermatitis.
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  • Atopic dermatitis is a major economic burden on families with children affected by the disorder.
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  • The National Institutes of Health (NIH) estimates that atopic dermatitis costs U.S. health insurance companies more than $1 billion every year.
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  • Nearly 40 percent of newly diagnosed children have at least one first-degree relative with atopic dermatitis.
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  • It is possible for a child or adolescent with chronic atopic dermatitis to have all three types of lesions at the same time.
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  • Psychosocial problems: Children with atopic dermatitis may withdraw socially if the lesions are extensive or otherwise noticeable.
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  • Atopic dermatitis is rarely a medical emergency and can often be treated by the child's pediatrician.
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  • Diagnosis of atopic dermatitis begins with a history-taking and physical examination by the child's doctor.
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  • There are no laboratory tests that can confirm the diagnosis of AD; in some cases, the doctor may need to examine the child more than once in order to distinguish between atopic and seborrheic dermatitis.
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  • To be considered atopic dermatitis, the child's symptoms must at total at least three major and three minor symptom criteria.
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  • There are about two dozen minor criteria for atopic dermatitis.
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  • These tests are usually given only to children with moderate or severe cases of atopic dermatitis.
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  • The AAAAI recommends a four-part approach to the treatment of atopic dermatitis.
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  • Other treatments that are sometimes used for atopic dermatitis are tar preparations and ultraviolet light therapy (phototherapy).
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  • Most alternative therapies for atopic dermatitis fall into one of the following groups.
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  • As of the early 2000s, there is no cure for atopic dermatitis.
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  • Many children diagnosed with atopic dermatitis have a history of xerosis even as newborns.
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  • Parental concerns about atopic dermatitis extend to the possible long-term consequences of the disorder as well as the child's present discomfort and sleeping problems.
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  • Because atopic dermatitis is so widespread in the general population, many support groups have been formed, particularly in the larger cities.
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  • A., et al. "The Use of Complementary Medicine in Children with Atopic Dermatitis in Secondary Care in Leicester."
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  • S. "Cost of Illness of Atopic Dermatitis in Children: A Societal Perspective."
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  • Y., et al. "New Insights into Atopic Dermatitis."
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  • M. "An Integrative Approach to Eczema (Atopic Dermatitis)."
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  • M., et al. "Topical Treatment of Atopic Dermatitis with St. John's Wort Cream: A Randomized, Placebo-Controlled, Double-Blind Half-Side Comparison."
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  • "Atopic Dermatitis." eMedicine, January 23, 2002.
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  • Diagnose, monitor, and treat abnormalities of the skin, hair, nails, including skin cancers, tumors, moles, acne, eczema, and contact dermatitis.
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  • Alternatively, you may experience a skin rash known as dermatitis herpetiformis.
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  • Dermatitis herpetiformis is the result of the autoimmune component of celiac disease, and presents as an intensely itchy rash with a distinctive pattern of blisters and lesions.
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  • Skin conditions such as dermatitis herpetiformis may occur.
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  • This form of dermatitis causes itching and blistering of the skin.
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  • Dermatitis herpetiformis is a skin condition characterized by intensely itchy bumps and blisters, usually occurring at the scalp, knees, elbows, back and buttocks of affected individuals.
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  • Also known as Duhring's disease, dermatitis herpetiformis was the first non-celiac form of gluten sensitivity commonly recognized by the medical community.
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  • A blistering, itchy skin disease, dermatitis herbetiformis, may also occur as a result of being intolerant to gluten.
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  • Dermatitis essentially means irritated skin.
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  • Contact dermatitis is a red, scaly rash that may itch, and the skin may appear cracked and raw.
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  • According to MedlinePlus, a service of the National Library of Medicine and the National Institute of Health, the most common type is irritant dermatitis.
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  • According to the American College of Osteophathic Dermatology, this form of dermatitis results from allergic reactions to substances that make direct skin contact.
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  • Eczema: This rash looks similar to contact dermatitis or allergic contact dermatitis, and it can itch severely.
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  • Atopic dermatitis is a common form of eczema, a sort of over-reaction to skin irritants that causes an itchy rash.
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  • People with atopic dermatitis have dry, itchy skin which may even crack and bleed.
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  • A frequent complaint amongst industry professionals, occupational dermatitis is often associated with workers who are exposed repeatedly to chemicals and irritants.
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  • Occupational dermatitis: A frequent complaint amongst industry professionals, occupational dermatitis is often associated with workers who are exposed repeatedly to chemicals and irritants.
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  • Eczema, a type of atopic dermatitis, is a condition that may cause rough, itchy, thickened skin.
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  • Eczema, also called dermatitis, is actually a group of skin conditions that effect every age group.
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  • The most general sort of rash is characterized as contact dermatitis.
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  • Dermatitis is an inflammation of the skin, and contact dermatitis is caused by direct contact with a skin irritant.
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  • Contact dermatitis can also arise from scratchy clothing.
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  • Allergic contact dermatitis is commonly brought on by contact with plants like poison ivy, or just a severe allergy to a specific tree or grass.
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  • Any common redness or disruption in the skin that isn't acne falls under the general name "dermatitis," simply meaning an inflammation of the skin.
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  • This minimizes the potential for allergic reactions and also protects individuals who suffer from other skin conditions commonly associated with dryness (such as psoriasis, dermatitis and eczema).
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  • Dandruff and Dermatitis: Dandruff and dermatitis are often an underlying cause of a rash.
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  • While eczema (also known as dermatitis) is a general term for skin conditions that feature irritated or inflamed skin, there are actually various types of the condition.
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  • Infants are more likely to suffer from some form of dermatitis.
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  • Atopic Dermatitis is a long-lasting condition, featuring extremely itchy skin.
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  • This type of eczema tends to run in families, particularly those who have a history of dermatitis or allergies.
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  • While the itchy patches of skin can occur anywhere, infants typically have them on the scalp and face, while teens usually experience this typs of dermatitis on the hands and feet.
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  • Middle-aged and elderly people are much more prone to this type of dermatitis, which can be characterized by swollen legs, painful sores, itching and discoloration on the legs.
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  • While there's no cure for dermatitis, there are various ways to make life more comfortable in living with this condition.
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  • Eczema, also known as dermatitis, is an irritable skin condition most often linked to specified occupations.
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  • Roughly one to two percent of the population suffers from contact dermatitis.
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  • Avoid scratching: While itchy skin is very common with dermatitis, scratching will worsen your condition and spread the rash further.
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  • While no case of dermatitis is comfortable by any means, hands that are affected by this condition can make daily life and tasks unbearable.
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  • Dermatitis and eczema are the most common forms of skin rashes.
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  • Normally caused by allergic reactions to skincare products or topical expsoure to irritants, dermatitis is usually a localized rash that produces small boil like blisters that may seep fluid.
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  • Dermatitis, like most all rashes, is extremely itchy and causes plenty of discomfort on the skin.
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  • While there are several over the counter itch ointments, a regular dermatitis or eczema patient may need professional medical treatment for the best care.
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  • If you're suffering from dermatitis, try to avoid itching the skin to prevent the spread of the rash.
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  • The risk of diaper rash complicated with candidiasis can be reduced by preventing irritating dermatitis through the use of absorbent diapers and prevention of excessive exposure to urine or feces through frequent changing of diapers.
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  • Antihistamine tablets and topical creams, gels, sprays, or ointments are used to treat skin hives related to food allergies and itching and hives associated with allergic contact dermatitis and insect bites and stings.
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  • In irritant contact dermatitis, the rash is usually limited to the area that was exposed to the substance, whereas in allergic contact dermatitis, the rash often spreads beyond the area directly exposed to the allergen.
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  • Barrier creams and such protective clothing as gloves, masks, and long-sleeved shirts are coping devices to reduce the chance of contact dermatitis when avoidance is impossible, though they are not always effective.
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  • People who immigrate to Europe or North America from under-developed countries have increased rates of atopic dermatitis, which suggests that environmental factors play a role in the development or triggering of the disorder.
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  • The doctor may also test tissue fluid or smears from the child's lesions to rule out skin parasites or infections that mimic atopic dermatitis, such as bacterial infections, scabies, or herpesvirus infections.
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  • Phototherapy with ultraviolet A or B light waves, or a combination of both, may be used to treat older children or adolescents with mild or moderate atopic dermatitis; it is not suitable for infants or younger children.
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  • According to Kenneth Pelletier, the former director of the alternative medicine program at Stanford University School of Medicine, both traditional Chinese remedies and Ayurvedic medicines benefit some people with atopic dermatitis.
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