How to use Derives in a sentence

derives
  • The range is, however, continued through the province now called Calabria, to the southern extremity or toe of Italy, but presents in this part a very much altered character, the broken limestone range which is the true continuation of the chain as far as the neighbourhood of Nicastro and Catanzaro, and keeps close to the west coast, being flanked on the east by a great mass of granitic mountains, rising to about 6000 ft., and covered with vast forests, from which it derives the name of La Sila.

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  • This combination of natural and artificial highways of commerce derives an additional importance from the character of the regions thus.

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  • The structure derives some grace from its extreme simplicity.

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  • This idea was certainly entertained to some extent at the time, and derives some colour of justification from words of Defoe's, but there seems to be no serious foundation for it.

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  • He also excavated the holy tank from which the town derives its name of Amrita Turas, or Pool of Immortality.

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  • Through the truthfulness of that God as the author of all truth he derives a guarantee for our perceptions in so far as these are clear and distinct.

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  • Alkmaar derives its chief importance from being the centre of the flourishing butter and cheese trade of this region of Holland.

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  • While the rugged and mountainous district of Calabria, extending nearly due south for a distance of more than 150 m., thus derives its character and configuration almost wholly from the range of the Apennines, the long spur-like promontory which projects towards the east to Brindisi and Otranto is merely a continuation of the low tract of Apulia, with a dry calcareous soil of Tertiary origin.

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  • Parmesan is not confined to the province from which it derives its name; it is manufactured in all that part of Emilia in the neighborhood of the P0, and in the provinces of Brescia, Bergamo, Pavia, Novara and Alessandria.

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  • Later writers, Posidonius, Diodorus, Strabo and others, call them smallish islands off (Strabo says, some way off) the north-west coast of Spain, which contained tin mines, or, as Strabo says, tin and lead mines - though a passage in Diodorus derives the name rather from their nearness to the tin districts of north-west Spain.

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  • The independent plant which is generally attached to the soil by hair-like structures is the sexual generation, the sporophyte is a stalked or sessile capsule which remains always attached to the gametophyte from which it derives the whole or part of its nourishment.

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  • The phellogen derives its name from the fact that its external product is the characteristic tissue known as cork.

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  • The protoplasm derives its food from substances in solution in the water; the various waste products which are incident to its life are excreted into it, and so removed from the sphere of its activity.

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  • Florida derives a tropical element from the Antilles.

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  • The narration of Herodotus is only a popular tradition which derives the origin of kingship from its judicial functions, considered as its principal and most beneficent aspect.

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  • It is the centre of Bosnian education, containing the celebrated orphanage founded in 1869 by Miss Irby and Miss Mackenzie (afterwards Lady Sebright); the Scheriat-Schule, which derives its name from the Turkish code or scheri, and is maintained by the state for Moslem law-students; a gymnasium, a technical institute and a teachers' training-college.

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  • It derives its designation from the settlements on the Gabun river or Rio de Gabao.

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  • A later tradition, preserved by Arrian, derives Arsaces I.

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  • Carniola derives its modern name from the Slavonic word Krajina (frontier).

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  • The pheasant derives its name from the ancient name (Phasis) of the Rion.

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  • He derives his name Climax (or Climacus) from his work of the same name (KMµa 701i Ilapa5Eivov, ladder to Paradise), in thirty sections, corresponding to the thirty years of the life of Christ.

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  • Its most striking feature and the one from which it derives its name barytes, barite (from the Greek Oapis, heavy) or heavy spar, is its weight.

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  • Worterbuch, who derives the element bel from an old Celtic root meaning shining, &c.) (W.

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  • Almost the whole of Moravia belongs to the basin of the March or Morava, from which it derives its name and which rises within its territory in the Sudetes.

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  • The musky odour from which it derives its name is due to the secretion of a large gland situated in the inguinal region, and present in both sexes.

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  • Dumas went no further that thus epitomizing his observations; and the next development was made in 1836 by Auguste Laurent, who, having amplified and discussed the applicability of Dumas' views, promulgated his Nucleus Theory, which assumed the existence of " original nuclei or radicals " (radicaux or noyaux fondamentaux) composed of carbon and hydrogen, and " derived nuclei " (radicaux or noyaux derives) formed from the original nuclei by the substitution of hydrogen or the addition of other elements, and having properties closely related to the primary nuclei.

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  • Breda also derives some celebrity from the various political congresses of which it has been the scene.

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  • This usage derives from the last function of conscience mentioned above.

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  • It derives its name from Hazel-bosch (hazel wood).

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  • This cemetery derives its name from Priscilla, mother of Pudens, who is said to have given hospitality to St'Peter the Apostle.

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  • Valonia, a material largely used by tanners, is the pericarp of an acorn obtained in the neighbouring oakwoods, and derives its name from Valona.

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  • It is still, however, the centre of distribution for a very large, if scantily populated, country, and it also derives much profit from pilgrims, lying as it does on the route which Shiite pilgrims from Persia must take on their way to the sacred cities.

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  • Among the numerous conjectures which have been made as to the etymology of the term Africa ('Acppucii) may be quoted that which derives it from the Semitic radical.

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  • The outer coil derives current, through an adjustable resistance R, from a xvii.

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  • The town derives its name from a hermit who lived here in the 7th and 8th centuries.

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  • It belongs to the earl of Moray (Murray), who derives from it his title of Lord Doune, and was the home of James Stewart, the "bonnie earl" of Moray, murdered at Donibristle in Fife by the earl of Huntly (1592).

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  • The Lutheran Bugenhagen, who was in priest's orders, ordained seven superintendents, afterwards called bishops, for Denmark in 1527, and Norway, then under the same crown, derives its present episcopate from the same source.

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  • The English Church derives its orders through Matthew Parker, archbishop of Canterbury, who was consecrated in 1559 by William Barlow, bishop-elect of Chichester.

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  • A more widely accepted theory derives gilds wholly or in part from the early Germanic or Scandinavian sacrificial banquets.

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  • Shammar, who derives a considerable revenue from the pilgrimage.

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  • Moreover, the hierarchy derives a vast revenue from the fees for burials in the sacred limits.

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  • Another explanation, which appears first in Jewish authors of the middle ages and has found wide acceptance in recent times, derives the name from the causative of the verb; He (who) causes things to be, gives them being; or calls events into existence, brings them to pass; with many individual modifications of interpretation - creator, lifegiver, fulfiller of promises.

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  • The Arco di Riccardo, which derives its name from a popular delusion that it was connected with Richard Coeur-de-Lion, is believed by some to be a Roman triumphal arch, but is probably an arch of a Roman aqueduct.

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  • The inhabitants of Baden are of various origin - those to the north of the Murg being descended from the Alemanni and those to the south from the Franks, while the Swabian plateau derives its name and its population from another race.

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  • For one hundred years, thanks to the favours and 1 From this word Trapani derives its name.

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  • It derives its present name from Oswald, king of Northumbria, who is said to have been killed here in 642, although it was not definitely known as Oswestry until the 13th century.

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  • It has been suggested that they were descendants of the Visigoths, and Michael derives the name from caws (dog) and Goth.

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  • The tract derives its name from the extensive afforestation carried through in this region by William the Conqueror in 1079; and the deaths of two of his sons within its confines - Richard killed by a stag, and William Rufus by an arrow - were regarded in their generation as a judgment of Heaven for the cruelty and injustice perpetrated by their father when appropriating the forest.

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  • It derives its name from an iron pillar, supposed to have been originally set up at the beginning of the 13th century in commemoration of a victory, and bearing a later inscription recording the seven days' visit to the town of the emperor Akbar in 1598.

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  • The Mlagarazi (or 1Vlalagarasi), perhaps the largest feeder, derives most of its water from the rainy districts east of the strip of high ground which shuts in the lake on the north-east.

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  • Belize probably derives its name from the French balise, " a beacon," as no doubt some signal or light was raised here for the guidance of the buccaneers who once infested this region.

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  • Bona is identified with the ancient Aphrodisium, the seaport of Hippo Regius or Ubbo, but it derives its name from the latter city, the ruins of which, consisting of large cisterns, now restored, and fragments of walls, are about a mile to the south of the town.

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  • Jupiter was measured on eleven nights in the months of June and July 1794; from these measures Schur derives the values 35"39 and 37".94 for the polar and equatorial diameter respectively, at mean distance, corresponding with a compression 1/14.44.

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  • Cherbourg derives its chief importance from its naval and commercial harbours, which are distant from each other about half a mile.

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  • The church of St James - also called Schottenkirche - a plain Romanesque basilica of the 12th century, derives its name from the monastery of Irish Benedictines ("Scoti") to which it was attached; the principal doorway is covered with very singular grotesque carvings.

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  • Icaria (pop. about 8000) derives its name from the legend of Icarus.

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  • Figueras is built at the foot of the Pyrenees, and on the northern edge of El Ampurdan, a fertile and well-irrigated plain,which produces wine, olives and rice,and derives its name from the seaport of Ampurias,.

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  • Wallsend derives its modern name from its position at the eastern extremity of the Roman Hadrian's Wall; and there was a Roman fort here.

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  • Boston (Icanhoe, St Botolph or Botolph's Town) derives its name from St Botolph, who in 654 founded a monastery here, which was destroyed by the Danes, 870.

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  • The town derives its chief importance from its value as a military position.

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  • The Society is not assisted by the state or the municipality, but derives its revenue from the subscriptions of Fellows, gate-money, Garden receipts and so forth.

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  • They are slowly absorbed into the blood, and are a natural constituent of the blood plasma, which derives them from the food.

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  • There is also an American beetle, the Ambrosia beetle, belonging to the family of Swlytidae, which derives its name from its curious cultivation of a succulent fungus, called ambrosia.

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  • The Gulf of Nicoya, a shallow landlocked inlet, containing a whole archipelago of richly-wooded islets, derives its name from Nicoya, an Indian chief who, with his tribe, was here converted to Christianity in the 16th century.

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  • Recent grail researches have made it most probable that that mysterious talisman was originally the vessel of the ritual feast held in honour of a deity of vegetation, - Adonis, or another; if the Round Table also, as Dr Mott suggests, derives from a similar source, we have a link between these two notable features of Arthurian tradition, and an additional piece of evidence in support of the view that behind the Arthur of romance there lie not only memories of an historic British chieftain, but distinct traces of a mythological and beneficent hero.

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  • The principal places of interest on the banks of the Earn are Dunira, the favourite seat of Henry Dundas, ist Viscount Melville, who took the title of his barony from the estate and to whose memory .an obelisk was raised on the adjoining hill of Dunmore; the village of Comrie; the town of Crieff; the ruined castle of Innerpeffray, founded in 1610 by the ist Lord Maderty, close to which is the library founded in 1691 by the 3rd Lord Maderty, containing some rare black-letter books and the Bible that belonged to the marquess of Montrose; Gascon Hall, now in ruins, but with traditions reaching back to the days of Wallace; Dupplin Castle, a fine Tudor mansion, seat of the earl of Kinnoull, who derives from it the title of his viscounty; Aberdalgie, Forgandenny and Bridge of Earn, a health resort situated amidst picturesque surroundings.

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  • Another theory (3) derives the uten from 1/1000 of the cubic cubit of 24 digits, or better of 6/7 of 20.63; that, however, will only fit the very lowest variety of the uten, while there is no evidence of the existence of such a cubit.

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  • Smith sets out from the thought that the annual labour of a nation is the source from which it derives its supply of the necessaries and conveniences of life.

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  • The state also derives an income from fees charged for chartering banks, railways, insurance companies and other corporations.

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  • The town, founded by the French, derives its name from the kubba (tomb) of a marabout named Sidi-bel-Abbes, near which a redoubt was constructed by General Bedeau in 1843.

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  • The town of Bitsch, which was formed out of the villages of Rohr and Kaltenhausen in the 17th century, derives its name from the old stronghold (mentioned in 1172 as Bytis Castrum) standing on a rock some 250 ft.

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  • It derives its name - Church (ecclesia) Island - from the little church of St Magnus, now in ruins, consisting of a chancel 15 ft.

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  • The town derives its name from the river Avon (corrupted from Avan), which also gave its name to a medieval lordship. On the Norman conquest at Glamorgan, Caradoc, the eldest son of the defeated prince, Lestyn ab Gwrgan, continued to hold this lordship, and for the defence of the passage of the river built here a castle whose foundations are still traceable in a field near the churchyard.

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  • Georgia derives its name from King George II.

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  • Along the middle of the hinder half of the back is a line of long erectile white hairs, forming the "fan," continued down over the rump; in repose this is concealed by the surrounding hair, but is conspicuously displayed when the animal takes the great leaps from which it derives its popular name.

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  • On the isthmus are distinct traces of the canal cut by Xerxes before his invasion of Greece in 480 B.C. The peninsula is remarkable for the beauty of its scenery, and derives a peculiar interest from its unique group of monastic communities with their medieval customs and institutions, their treasures of Byzantine art and rich collections of documents.

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  • Many buildings were completed or founded by King Anthony, from whom Antonstadt derives its name.

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  • The town derives its name from a British fortress, Criig Hywel, commonly called Table Mountain, about 2 m.

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  • It derives its scientific name from a curious beak-like appendage at the end of the stigma, in the centre of the flower; this appendage though solid was supposed to be hollow (hence the name from 46a, a bladder, and stigma).

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  • It derives its name from the Seljuk emir who took Tralles, and is the richest and most productive province of Asiatic Turkey.

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  • It is a popular disquisition on the heroes of the Trojan War in the form of a conversation between a Thracian vine-dresser on the shore of the Hellespont and a Phoenician merchant who derives his knowledge from the hero Protesilaus, Palamedes is exalted at the expense of Odysseus, and Homer's unfairness to him is attacked.

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  • During the breeding season it utters a booming noise, from which it probably derives its generic name, Botaurus, and which has made it in many places an object of superstitious dread.

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  • It derives its name from the springs of the Pader, a small affluent of the Lippe, which rise in the town under the cathedral to the number of nearly 200, and with such force as to drive several mills within a few yards of their source.

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  • Fuerst (Kanon des Alten Testaments) that it is derived from the Persian bahar, " spring," and of Hitzig (Geschichte Israels), who derives it from the modern Arabic Phur, " the New Year."

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  • Another but less probable explanation derives the name from a combination of the old high German word uudra, meaning league, and bai, a Gothic word for both.

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  • Axminster (Axemystre) derives its name from the river Axe and from the old abbey church or minster said to have been built by King lEthelstan.

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  • Less likely is the theory of Palgrave that the Bretwaldas were the successors of the pseudo-emperors, Maximus and Carausius, and claimed to share the imperial dignity of Rome; or that of Kemble, who derives Bretwalda from the British word breotan, to distribute, and translates it "widely ruling."

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  • The city is historically interesting as the capital of the Chola race, one of the oldest Hindu dynasties of which any traces remain, and from which the whole coast of Coromandel, or more properly Cholamandal, derives its name.

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  • Augsburg (the Augusta Vindelicorum of the Romans) derives its name from the Roman emperor Augustus, who, on the conquest of Rhaetia by Drusus, established here a Roman colony about 14 B.C. In the 5th century it was sacked by the Huns, and afterwards came under the power of the Frankish kings.

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  • The mother-church of St Elliw, or Elli (whence the town derives its name) has been practically rebuilt (1906), but it retains its 13th-century tower and other ancient features of the original fabric. Its situation on a broad estuary and its central position with regard to a neighbourhood rich in coal, iron and limestone, have combined to make Llanelly one of the many important industrial towns of South Wales.

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  • Of the Gaulish tribes west of the Rhine, the most important was the Treveri, inhabiting the basin of the Moselle, from whom the cityof Trier(Trves)derives its name.

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  • It derives its name from a small lake among the hills, 2389 ft.

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  • Rubenson (14), from whom Tromholt derives his data for Sweden, seems to accept this view, assigning the apparent increase in auroral frequency since 1860 to the institution by the state of meteorological stations in 1859, and to the increased interest taken in the subject since 1865 by the university of Upsala.

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  • It derives its name from the Bhattis, a wild Rajput clan, who held the country lying between Hariana, Bikanir and Bahawalpur.

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  • The developing embryo at the end of the suspensor grows out to a varying extent into the forming endosperm, from which by surface absorption it derives good material for growth; at the same time the suspensor plays a direct part as a carrier of nutrition, and may even develop, where perhaps no endosperm is formed, special absorptive "suspensor roots" which invest the developing embryo, or pass out into the body and coats of the ovule, or even into the placenta.

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  • It was known to the ancient Arab and Persian geographers as the Sea of Khwarizm or Kharezm, from the neighbouring district of the Chorasmians, and derives its present name from the Kirghiz designation of Aral-denghiz, or Sea of Islands.

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  • The Conosgimiento (as noticed above) explicitly derives the island-name from the Genoese commander who perished here.

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  • The Danubian plain, lying, for the most part, outside the Peninsula, is enclosed, on the north, by the Carpathians; and on the south by the Balkans, from which the Peninsula derives its name.

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  • Few vestiges of antiquity survived, except the baths from which Alhama (in Arabic " the Bath ") derives its name.

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  • The Sala de los Abencerrajes (Hall of the Abencerrages) derives its name from a legend according to which Boabdil, the last king of Granada, having invited the chiefs of that illustrious line to a banquet, massacred them here.

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  • As to its substance, it is beyond dispute that much of the text derives from the French romances of the Round Table; but the evidence does not enable us to say (1) whether it was pieced together from various French romances; (2) whether it was more or less literally translated from a lost French original; or (3) whether the first Peninsular adapter or translator was a Castilian or a Portuguese.

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  • Neither Lake Victoria nor Lake Chakmaktin derives any very large contributions from glacial sources other than those of the Nicolas range.

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  • Although the superficial area of glacial ice from which the Ab-iWakhjir derives the greater part of its volume is not equal to that found on the Nicolas range, it is quite impossible to frame any estimate of comparative depth or bulk, or to separate the volume of its contributions at any time from those which, combined, derive their origin from the Nicolas range.

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  • Khwaja Salar derives some historical significance from the fact that it presented a substantial difficulty to the settlement of the RussoAfghan boundary, in which it was assigned by agreement as the point of junction between that boundary and the Khwaja Oxus.

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  • Amiens occupies the site of the ancient Samarobriva, capital of the Ambiani, from whom it probably derives its name.

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  • This battle derives its name from a ruin on the northern bank of the river Tchernaya near its mouth, but it was fought some distance away, on a nameless ridge (styled Mount Inkerman after the event) between the Tchernaya and the Careenage Ravine, which latter marked the right of the siegeworks directed against Sevastopol itself.

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  • Wetzstein derives it from mahir, a corruption of Amasir with its plurals Imazir and Masir, archaic forms of the Berber native name Amazigh, the free.

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  • For them Israel is the centre of the world, the point around which all other things revolve - every other people derives its claim to consideration from its relation to Israel - the only subject deserving attention is the extent of the Jewish nation's obedience or disobedience to its divinely given law, on which depends its prosperity or its adversity.

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  • It derives its importance from the river, which is navigable and joins the Oginsky canal, connecting the Niemen with the Dnieper.

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  • It is believed that from the nature of the cell in which she is ovipositing, the queen derives a reflex impulse to lay the appropriate egg - fertilized in the queen or worker cell, unfertilized in the drone cell, as previously mentioned.

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  • But his second term derives most of its historical interest from the unsuccessful efforts to convict Aaron Burr of treasonable acts in the south-west, and from the efforts made to maintain, without war, the rights of neutrals on the high seas.

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  • Its wide streets, of which the most important is the rue St Jean, shady boulevards, and public gardens enhance the attraction which the town derives from an abundance of fine churches and old houses.

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  • It requires an idea, because every object is conceived as well as recognized or denied; but it is itself an assertion of actual fact, every perception counts for a judgment, and every categorical is changeable into an existential judgment without change of sense (Brentano, who derives his theory from Mill except that he denies the necessity of a combination of ideas, and reduces a categorical to an existential judgment).

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  • The Sophistes is apparently matter for animadversion by Aristotle in the Metaphysics and elsewhere, but derives stronger support from the testimonies to the Politicus which presumes it.

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  • Yet it is not a single and unambiguous logical movement that derives from Kant.

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  • The old abbey, San Giacomo della Priluca, from which the place derives its name, has been converted into a villa.

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  • The Bluefields, Blewfields, Escondida, or Rio del Desastre, which derives its bestknown name from that of Blieveldt, a Dutch corsair, is navigable for 65 m.

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  • About Liszt's pianoforte technique in general it may be said that it derives its efficiency from the teaching of Czerny, who brought up his pupil on Mozart, a little Bach and Beethoven, a good deal of Clementi and Hummel, and a good deal of his (Czerny's) own work.

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  • For the southern quarter there is the Shemiram Canal, also of very ancient construction, which derives its supply from a large spring 19 m.

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  • It derives its name from the dangers attending its navigation, or, according to an Arabic legend, from the numbers who were drowned by the earthquake which separated Asia and Africa.

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  • It derives its importance from its situation on the Volga, opposite the mouth of the Sheksna, which connects the Volga with the regions around Lake Ladoga.

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  • From burgh and other local funds the church derives a revenue of £23,501.

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  • This place derives its name from the castle of Kishmul standing on a rock in the bay, which was once the stronghold of the M`Neills of Barra, one of the oldest of Highland clans.

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  • Its mineral baths are frequented in summer; and the volcanic pozzolana earth (also found near Rome), used now as in Roman times for making cement and concrete, derives its name from the place.

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  • Bloomington derives its name from Blooming Grove, a small forest which was crossed by the trails leading from the Galena lead mines to Southern Illinois, from Lake Michigan to St Louis, and from the Eastern to the far Western states.

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  • In the vicinity there are the most important deposits of zinc and lead in the state, and the city derives its name from the deposits of sulphide of lead (galena), which were the first worked about here; below the galena is a zone of zinc carbonate (or smithsonite) ores, which was the main zone worked between 1860 and 1890; still lower is a zone of blende, or zinc sulphide, now the principal source of the mineral wealth of the region.

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  • The black pine, P. austriaca, generally now regarded as a variety of P. Laricio, derives its name from the extreme depth of its foliage tints - the sharp, rigid, rather long leaves of a dark green hue giving a sombre aspect to the tree.

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  • Fisheries.Fish is a staple food along the shores of the Persian Gulf, but the Crown derives no revenue from fisheries there.

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  • Thus the divine kingship of Alexander derives in,direct line, not from the Oriental polities which (Egypt apart) know nothing of royal apotheosisbut from these Hellenic theories of the state.

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  • Its name, which signifies "east of Kwang," is derived, according to Chinese writers, from the fact of its being to the east of the old province of Hu-kwang, in the same way that Kwang-si derives its name from its position to the west of Hu-kwang.

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  • In addition to its direct foreign commerce Portugal derives much benefit from its share in the trade between South America and Europe.

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  • His Amphitryons is a free imitation of the Latin, yet thoroughly national in spirit and cast in the popular redondilha; the dialogue is spirited, the situations comic. King Seleucus derives from Plutarch and has a prose prologue of real interest for the history of the stage, while Filodemo is a clever tragi-comedy in verse with prose dialogues interspersed.

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  • She knows that if the wings are driven with sufficient rapidity they practically convert the spaces through which they move into solid bases of support; she also knows that the body in rapid flight derives support from all the air over which it passes.

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  • Reading flourishes from its position on the edge of the London Tertiary Basin, Croydon is a suburb of London, and Hull, though on the Chalk, derives its importance from the Humber estuary, which cuts through the Chalk and the Jurassic belts, to drain the Triassic plain and the Pennine region.

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  • From this feature the species, which is the only representative of its genus, derives its name of Nasalis larvatus.

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  • Duren derives its name, not, as was at one time believed, from the Marcodurum of the Ubii, mentioned in Tacitus, but from the Dura or Duria, assemblies held by the Carolingians in the 8th century.

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  • Sporobolus, a large genus in the warmer parts of both hemispheres, but chiefly America, derives its name from the fact that the seed is ultimately expelled from the fruit.

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  • A constitutional infirmity has been suggested as the reason, and the conjecture derives support from several peculiarities in his writings.

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  • The general aspect of the district is that of a flat even country, dotted with clusters of bamboos and betelnut trees, and intersected by a perfect network of dark-coloured and sluggish streams. There is not a hill or hillock in the whole district, but it derives a certain picturesque beauty from its wide expanses of cultivation, and the greenness and freshness of the vegetation.

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  • Damasonium derives its popular name, star-fruit, from the fruits spreading when ripe in the form of a star.

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  • These fortifications, starting from the river, followed the line of the present Elisabeth Street, the Pfikopy or Graben - which therefrom derives its name, signifying ditch or trench - and then that of the Ovocna and Ferdinandova.

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  • Roscher, in the article "Apollo" in his Lexikon der Mythologie, derives all the aspects and functions of Apollo from the conception of an original lightand sun-god.

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  • The jungle tribes collect gum from several varieties of trees, and in Sind the Forest Department derives a small revenue from lac. The palms of the presidency consist of cocoa-nut, date, palmyra and areca catechu.

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  • The line derives its name from Charles Mason (1730-1787) and Jeremiah Dixon, two English astronomers, whose survey of to a point about 244 m.

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  • Alcazar is sometimes identified with the Roman Alce, captured by Tiberius Sempronius Gracchus in 180 B.C. It derives its existing name from its medieval Moorish castle (al-kasr), which was afterwards garrisoned by the knights of St John.

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  • The conception of the Dipleurula derives its chief weight from the fact that it is comparable to the early larval forms of other primitive coelomate animals, such as Balanoglossus, Phoronis, Chaetognatha, Brachiopoda and Bryozoa.

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  • That derives its immense power from other sources; from passion, intensity, imagination, size, truth, cogency of logical reason.

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  • With the exception of the lowest group, such glands always communicate with the exterior by means of the teats, nipples or mammae, from which the class derives its name.

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  • The whole mass evidently belongs to the ancient Hercynian chain of North Europe (which, indeed, derives its name from the Harz), and is the north-easterly continuation of the rocks of the Ardennes and the Eifel.

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  • Haibak derives its importance from its position on the main line of communication between Kabul and Afghan Turkestan.

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  • Zimmer, who derives the Arthurian names largely from Breton roots.

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  • The town is intersected from north to south by Pittencrieff Glen, a deep, picturesque and tortuous ravine, from which the town derives its name and at the bottom of which flows Lyne Burn.

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  • The better judgment in all affairs derives from this quality, which has some very covetable advantages for its possessor.

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  • He wolde sowen som difficultee Or springen cokkel in our clene corn"; but the most generally received explanation derives the words from lollen or lullen, to sing softly.

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  • At the lower end of the albumen, and placed obliquely, is the minute embryo-plant, which derives its nourishment in the first instance from the albumen; this is destined to form the future plant.

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  • The town derives its importance from being the port of Constantine.

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  • It was not difficult to show that motives have meaning only with reference to a self, and that it is the self which alone has power to erect a desire into a motive, or that the attraction of an object of appetite derives much of its power from the character of the self to which it makes its appeal.

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  • It derives its name from its ancient place of judicature, which was in the church of Beata Maria de Arcubus - St Mary-le-Bow or St Mary of the Arches, "by reason of the steeple thereof raised at the top with stone pillars in fashion like a bow bent archwise."

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  • He explains that though absolute good is discerned by the intellect, the " sweetness and flavour " of it is apprehended, not by the intellect proper, but by what he calls a " boniform faculty "; and it is in this sweetness and flavour that the motive to virtuous conduct lies; ethics is the " art of living well and happily," and true happiness lies in " the pleasure which the soul derives from the sense of virtue."

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  • Celestial Mechanics is, strictly speaking, that branch of applied mathematics which, by deductive processes, derives the laws of motion of the heavenly bodies from their gravitation towards each other, or from the mutual action of the parts which form them.

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  • The meaning of the name is uncertain; Wellhausen derives it from nan "Eve," or "serpent," in which case the Hivites were originally the snake clan; others explain it from the Arabic hayy, " family," as meaning "dwellers in (Bedouin) encampments."

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  • He incorporates some official documents, and in many places obviously derives his information from others which he does not quote.

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  • The city derives some importance from its position on the ancient frontier road from Saragossa to Pau.

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  • The colony, as its name implies, derives its character and value from the river Gambia (q.v.), which is navigable throughout and beyond the limits of the colony, while large ocean-going ships can always cross the bar at its mouth and enter the port of Bathurst.

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  • Originally called Diego Alvarez, it derives its other name from a Captain Gough, the commander of a British ship which visited it in 1731.

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  • It derives its celebrity ffom the demonstration by Laplace that to whatever mutual actions all the bodies of a system may be subjected, the position of this plane remains invariable.

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  • It derives some importance from its fine landlocked harbour, which, affording accommodation to large vessels, is used as a naval station, and is the centre of an important fishery.

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  • Quito derives its name from the Quitus, who inhabited the locality a long time before the Spanish conquest.

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  • The name derives from the Wenlock brewery which once brewed ales here - the pub dates back to 1835.

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  • The term derives from the notion of cultural brokering developed by anthropologists to describe the activities of individuals who connect local with national worlds.

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  • Beaux Artsrd building derives from American Beaux-arts buildings such as those of McKim Mead and White in New York.

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  • It burns with a brilliant blue flame - the name cesium derives from the sky-blue lines in its spectrum.

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  • The minister derives his stipend, £ 80, from the seat-rents and collections, under the patronage of the male communicants.

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  • I am sure that he knows that the original concept derives from Catholic teaching, and a 19th century papal encyclical.

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  • The Greek word gnosis means revealed knowledge, and from it derives the word Gnosticism, a religion of the second and third centuries.

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  • The word homeopathy derives from the Greek ' homoios ', meaning similar, and ' pathos ', meaning suffering.

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  • For this reason I kneel before the Father, from whom his whole family in heaven and on earth derives its name.

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  • Just like a leech derives nourishment from its host's blood, the embryo derives nourishment from the decidua or the pregnant endometrium.

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  • She still derives much pleasure from the visits of Old Boys.

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  • The anatomical term sacrum derives its names fro the Latin os sacrum which means sacred bone.

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  • We also implement a proof checker for SPL which derives theorems in the HOL system from SPL proof scripts.

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  • The name ' togs for Dogs ' derives in part from design activities included in our information packs available for children taking part.

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  • The second line we can draw derives from quantum uncertainty.

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  • In this episode a tornado attacks a power station which derives energy from a giant whirlpool.

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  • The well-known circumstance of the great variety of new plants here obtained, from which Botany Bay derives its name, should not be passed over.

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  • It is situated on the right bank of the Ostrawitza, near its confluence with the Oder, and it derives its importance from the neighbouring coal mines, and the blast furnaces and iron-works which they have called into existence.

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  • Probably a mere variety of the black poplar, its native land appears to have been Persia or some neighbouring country; it was unknown in Italy in the days of Pliny, while from remote times it has been an inhabitant of Kashmir, the Punjab, and Persia, where it is often planted along roadsides for the purpose of shade; it was probably brought from these countries to southern Europe, and derives its popular name from its abundance along the banks of the Po and other rivers of Lombardy, where it is said now to spring up naturally from seed, like the indigenous black poplar.

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  • Instances of what we may term tolerated parasitism, where the host plant seems to accommodate itself very well to the presence of the Fungus, paying the tax it extorts and nevertheless not succumbing but managing to provide itself with sufficient material to go on with, are not rare; and these seem to lead to those cases where the mutual accommodation between host and guest has been carried so far that each derives some benefit from the associationsymbiosis (see FUNGI).

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  • On the whole, the state derives profit from its railways, although several of the later lines, while imperative for state purposes, must necessarily yield but a very small revenue, or be worked at a loss.

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  • It was in the "yamen" of one of these boards - the Li Pu or board of rites - that Lord Elgin signed the treaty at the conclusion of the war in 1860 - an event which derives especial interest from the fact of its having been the first occasion on which a European plenipotentiary ever entered Peking accompanied by all the pomp and circumstance of his rank.

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  • The Christian Endeavour movement in Great Britain derives, perhaps, its greatest force from its Primitive Methodist members; and the appointment of central missions, connexional evangelists and mission-vans, which tour the more sparsely populated rural districts, witness to a continuance of the original spirit of the denomination, while the more cultured side is fostered by the Hartley lecture.

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  • Possibly Thucydides, who in the passage referred to is dealing with the question of defence, included a portion of the contiguous long walls in his measurement; this explanation derives probability from his underestimate of the length of the long walls.

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  • Huntly Banks, where "true Thomas" lay and watched the queen's approach, is half a mile west of the Eildon Tree Stone, and on the west side of the hills is Bogle Burn, a streamlet that feeds the Tweed and probably derives its name from his ghostly visitor.

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  • Delaware College (non-sectarian) at Newark, founded in 1833 as Newark College and rechartered, after suspension from 1859 to 1870, under the present name, as a state institution, derives most of its financial support from the United States Land Grant of 1862 and the supplementary appropriation of 1890, and is the seat of an agricultural experiment station, established in 1888 under the so-called " Hatch Bill " of 1887.

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  • Church, in the paper cited below, derives it from Costa de Oreja," Earring Coast," in allusion to the earrings worn by the Indians and remarked by their conquerors.

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  • This statement derives confirmation from the Digest, where references are made to two works, De Castrensi Peculio and Quaestionum Libri VIII., of a Roman jurist named Tertullian, who must have flourished about 180 A.D.

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  • But about the Topics we may venture to make the suggestion that, as in describing consciousness Aristotle says we perceive that we perceive, and understand that we understand, and as he calls Analytics a science of sciences, so he might have called the Topics a dialectical investigation of dialectic. Now, this suggestion derives support from his own description of the allied art of Rhetoric. " Rhetoric is counterpart to dialectic " is the first sentence of the Rhetoric; and the reason is that both are concerned with common objects of no definite science.

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  • This first position is psychological idealism in a new form and supported by new reasons; for, if experience derives its matter from mental sensations and its form from mental synthesis of sensations, it can apprehend nothing but mental objects of sense, which, according to Kant, are sensible ideas having no existence outside our thought, not things in themselves; or phenomena, not noumena.

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  • From this epistemology he derives the metaphysical conclusion that the things we know are indeed independent of my consciousness and of yours, taken individually, or, to use a new phrase, are " transsubjective "; but, so far from being independent of the common consciousness, one and the same in all of us, they are simply its contents in the inseparable relation of subject and object.

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  • The town derives celebrity from the great July fair, which has been held here annually since the 12th century, but has now lost its former importance (see Fair).

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  • Helen certainly derives great pleasure from the exercise of these senses.

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  • This movement was led by a rascally pirate Haver, from which Haverhill derives it 's name.

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  • We pay part of the schoolmaster 's salary; the rest he derives from the school fees.

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  • This book is at least in part a modern view of the sigil magick that derives from AOS.

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  • Which slang term derives from olden day smugglers who hit brandy in their thigh boots?

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  • The name ' Togs for Dogs ' derives in part from design activities included in our information packs available for children taking part.

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  • It derives its energy from the human pedaling, as well as the gasoline engine.

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  • The word "camisole" derives from Latin, French and Italian and originally referred to a negligee jacket or a garment worn under a transparent top to conceal what back then would have been a corset.

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  • Soy protein powder supplements makes a great protein source for vegans who choose not to consume whey protein shakes because whey derives from cow's milk.

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  • One reason for this is that the person derives pleasure from just viewing information or pictures of food instead of eating it.

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  • It derives from the words picture-pillow duvet.

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  • Iris Sari - Derives its name from the river Sar, in Cilicia, in the neighborhood of which it was found.

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  • If the sleep problem derives from structural abnormalities, you may be referred to an ENT for evaluation.

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  • Overall, the "most anticipated soundtrack of the holiday season" derives much of its inspiration from the epic themes in the third game in the storied Halo franchise.

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  • The name Paringa derives from the single vineyard where this 2003 Shiraz came from.

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  • That is where it derives its name and this added speed vastly changes the user experience.

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  • Navigation is done with the pearl-like trackball, which is where the series derives its name.

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  • Its name derives from the fibrous scar tissue that develops in the pancreas, one of the principal organs affected by the disease.

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  • The deficiency begins when the body loses more iron than it derives from food and other sources.

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  • Authentic assessment derives its name from the idea that it tests students in skills and knowledge needed to succeed in the real world.

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  • The banjo, another important instrumental aspect of country western dancing in these early days, derives from Africa.

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  • This is where the "jumbo" portion of their name derives from.

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  • This dress derives its name from the short scalloped sleeves which are crocheted.

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  • The name derives from its ability to keep the skin from chafing after prolonged contact with the surfboard or boogie board.

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  • The success of this technique derives from the power of networking.

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  • He derives great satisfaction from seeing his team mates excel.

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  • He derives great pleasure in her independent lifestyle and attitude - to a point.

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  • The math is only half of the battle, knowing where the math derives from is the other half.

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  • You don't need to pay a professional massage therapist to conduct these massages; simply massage the injured area lightly enough to where it doesn't hurt but deep enough to where the injured spot derives benefit from the massage.

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  • The term derives from the character '/' - if you put this character between two names or initials, you have 'slashed' the pair together.

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  • It derives its name from the nearby bridge, the site of three suicides over the years.

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  • Tradition derives the name from Aegina, the mother of Aeacus, who was born in and ruled the island.

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  • It derives its prosperity from the fact that it is the most important custom-house in Spain for the overland trade with the rest of Europe.

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