Derived Sentence Examples

derived
  • The following is the general idea derived from these researches.

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  • In other respects his book is derived almost entirely from Christie.

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  • The hourly values are derived from smoothed curves, the object being to get the mean ordinate for a 60-minute period.

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  • A considerable part of the alimentary canal is said to be derived from the ectoderm in the buds of both Cephalodiscus and Rhabdopleura.

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  • Salama, from which the word is derived appears in salaam, " peace be with you," the greeting of the East, and in Moslem, and means to be "free" - or "secure."

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  • I do not doubt that she derived from them much pleasure and not a little profit.

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  • Erith, the name of which is commonly derived from A.S.

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  • During his three years of office as resident he was able to render not a few valuable services to the Company; but it is more important to observe that his name nowhere occurs in the official lists of those who derived pecuniary profit from the necessities and weakness of the native court.

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  • If this be overlooked, a wrong impression may be derived as to the absolute amplitudes of the changes.

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  • Viewing the subject as a whole, and apart from remote developments which have not in fact seriously influenced the great structure of the mathematics of the European races, it may be said to have had its origin with the Greeks, working on pre-existing fragmentary lines of thought derived from the Egyptians and Phoenicians.

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  • More than half the nomenclature of the map is derived from Orosius, an annotated Anglo-Saxon version of which had been produced by King Alfred (871-901).

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  • The outlines of several medieval maps resemble each other to such an extent that there can be no doubt that they are derived from the same original source.

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  • The poodle is probably derived from spaniels, but is of slighter, more graceful build, and is pre-eminent even among spaniels for intelligence.

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  • The breed is almost certainly derived from water-spaniels, with a strong admixture of Newfoundland blood.

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  • One account says that it was caused by a broken bridge which delayed the Conqueror's advance to the north, but this is known to have been at Ferrybridge, three miles away; a second says that the new name was derived from a Norman town called Pontfrete, which, however, never existed; and a third that it was caused by the breaking of a bridge in 1153 on the arrival of the archbishop of York, St William,.

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  • The name Visby is derived from the old Norse y e (sanctuary) and by (town).

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  • Responsible government after the British model is followed, and the revenue is chiefly derived from grants from the Dominion government.

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  • So complete was their control that they are estimated to have derived from it more than 200 millions sterling while it lasted.

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  • An excellent water supply is derived from the mountains.

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  • They believed that Cain derived his existence from the superior power, and Abel from the inferior power, and that in this respect he was the first of a line which included Esau, Korah, the Sodomites and Judas Iscariot.

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  • It was derived from the Greek Kara.

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  • There are mountains in Cuba from one end of the island to the other, but they are not derived from any central mass and are not continuous.

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  • At the base there is often an arkose, composed largely of fragments of serpentine and granite derived from the ancient floor.

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  • The corojo palm (Cocos crispa) rivals the royal palm in beauty and utility; oil, sugar, drink and wood are derived from it.

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  • Deep residual clay soils derived from underlying limestones, and coloured red or black according to the predominance of oxides of iron or vegetable detritus, characterize the plains.

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  • More than half of the revenue was derived from customs duties (two-thirds of the total being collected at Havana).

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  • Those derived from aldehydes are known as aldoximes, those from ketones as ketoximes.

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  • The city's water-supply is derived from the Chile river and is considered dangerous to new arrivals because of the quantity of saline and organic matter contained.

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  • Thus, to say that a pen is an entity and the class of pens is an entity is merely a play upon the word "entity"; the second sense of "entity" (if any) is indeed derived from the first, but has a more complex signification.

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  • The material is largely calcareous, and has probably been derived from the disintegration of the reefs, and from the shells of animals living in the shallows.

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  • In an unsuccessful war against the Croats (1322-26), from which Venice derived the sole advantage, the ban appears to have learned the value of sea-power; immediately afterwards he occupied the principality of Ilium and the Dalmatian littoral between Spalato and the river Narenta.

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  • Its general progress may be seen in the increase of the fishery revenue - derived from duties, permits, &c. - of the public debt administration.

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  • Hence the vast majority of the people whom we are accustomed to think of as Ottomans are so only by adoption, being really the descendants of Seljuks or Seljukian subjects, who had derived from Persia whatever they possessed of civilization or of literary taste.

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  • Interpreted in the most general sense, these decrees, which enacted that the council of Constance derived its power immediately from Jesus Christ, and that every one, even the pope, was bound to obey it and every legitimately assembled general council in all that concerned faith, reform, union, &c., were tantamount to the overturning of the constitution of the church by establishing the superiority of the council over the pope.

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  • From them he derived a sound knowledge of artillery and fortification, and particularly of mountain warfare, which latter was destined to prove of inestimable service to him in his first campaigns of 1794-95 and 1796.

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  • All the buildings, both public and private, are constructed of furnaceburnt bricks of a yellowish-red colour, principally derived from the ruins of other places, chiefly Madain (Ctesiphon), Wasit and Babylon, which have been plundered at various times to furnish materials for the construction of Bagdad.

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  • The staff of Armenian bishops is reminiscent of that of the West, from which it is apparently derived; that of the vartapeds is encircled at the upper end by one or two snakes.

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  • The little we know of him is mainly derived from his own works.

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  • Others have regarded it as a work similar to the first, and derived from Theodorus.

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  • The name of Bower was derived from a queen's residence attached to the ancient royal hunting-lodge in the vicinity.

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  • The last distinctive epithet was derived from the little hamlet in the vicinity which furnished shelter, not only to the workmen, but to the monks of St Jerome who were afterwards to be in possession of the monastery; and the hamlet itself is generally but perhaps erroneously supposed to be indebted for its name to the scoriae or dross of certain old iron mines.

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  • The name Atlas given to these mountains by Europeans - but never used by the native races - is derived from that of the mythical Greek god represented as carrying the globe on his shoulders, and applied to the high and distant mountains of the west, where Atlas was supposed to dwell.

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  • As to their present name, signifying in its present Russian spelling "self-eaters," many ingenious theories have been advanced, but that proposed by Schrenk, who derived the name "Samo-yedes" from "Syroyadtsy," or "raw-eaters," leaves much to be desired.

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  • The surname Miaoulis, which was added to his family name of Vokos, or Bokos, is said to be derived from the Turkish word miaoul, a felucca.

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  • The name Kambuja, whence the European form Cambodia, is derived from the Hindu Kambu, the name of the mythical founder of the Khmer race; it seems to have been officially adopted by the Khmers as the title of their country about this period.

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  • On the whole, greater weight is due to the evidence from botanical sources than to that derived from philology, particularly since the discovery both of the wild almond and of a form like a wild peach in Afghanistan.

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  • It may, however, well be that both peach and almond are derived from some pre-existing and now extinct form whose descendants have spread over the whole geographic area mentioned; but this is a mere speculation, though indirect evidence in its support might be obtained from the nectarine, of which no mention is made in ancient literature, and which, as we have seen, originates from the peach and reproduces itself by seed, thus offering the characteristics of a species in the act of developing itself.

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  • By applying these early in the season, great benefit may be derived from retarding the blossom till the frosty nights of spring have passed.

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  • Expenditures from the fund known as " The Internal Improvement Land Fund," derived from the sale of state lands, can be made only after the enactment for that purpose has been approved by the voters of the state; in 1881 the legislature, and in 1884 the popular vote, pledged the proceeds of this fund to the payment of Minnesota state railway adjustment bonds.

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  • In one family, the Ptychoderidae, the medullary tube of the collar is connected at intermediate points with the epidermis by means of a variable number of unpaired outgrowths from its dorsal wall, generally containing an axial lumen derived from and in continuity with the central canal.

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  • As to the origin of the name, it was long held to be derived from the river Yssel or Saal.

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  • In aqueous solutions, for instance, a few hydrogen (H) and hydroxyl (OH) ions derived from the water are always present, and will be liberated if the other ions require a higher decomposition voltage and the current be kept so small that hydrogen and hydroxyl ions can be formed fast enough to carry all the current across the junction between solution and electrode.

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  • The salt must therefore be derived from an acid, chloroplatinic acid, H 2 PtC1 6, and have the formula Na 2 PtC1 6, the ions being Na and PtCls", for if it were a double salt it would decompose as a mixture of sodium chloride and platinum chloride and both metals would go to the cathode.

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  • This has been ascribed by some to the presence in " wild " rubber of certain impurities derived either from the latex or introduced during the preparation of the rubber which are thought to enhance the physical properties of the caoutchouc. It is more probable, however,.

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  • The rubber is usually dark in colour and is often contaminated with proteid impurities derived from the latex.

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  • America which furnish rubber of secondary commercial importance are Hancornia speciosa, yielding the Mangabeira rubber of Brazil, and species of Sapium furnishing the Colombian rubber and much of the rubber of Guiana (derived from Sapium Jenmani), which is scarcely inferior to the rubber of Para.

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  • Among these are species of Willughbeia and Leuconotis, from which much of the rubber exported from Borneo is derived; Parameria glandulifera, common in Siam and Borneo, and Urceola esculenta and Cryptostegia grandiflora, both common in Burma.

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  • That derived from Brazil, however, is generally inferior, being mixed with wood and dirt.

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  • Hevea and Castilloa, the resin is present in large proportion in the latex derived from young trees, and diminishes in amount as the tree ages.

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  • True caoutchouc, the principal constituent of all rubbers, is probably essentially one and the same substance, from whatever botanical source it may have been derived.

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  • In this respect it differs from gutta-percha, which, like caoutchouc, is derived from the latices of certain plants.

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  • The word is commonly used in the Alexandrian Greek translation of the Old Testament (Septuagint) for the Hebrew word (ger) which is derived from a root (gur) denoting to sojourn.

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  • The ordinary use of "hustings" at the present day for the platform from which a candidate speaks at a parliamentary or other election, or more widely for a political candidate's election campaign, is derived from the application of the word, first to the platform in the Guildhall on which the London court was held, and next to that from which the public nomination of candidates for a parliamentary election was formerly made, and from which the candidate addressed the electors.

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  • The intermediate spaces are filled in according to information derived from various hunters.

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  • The name mica is probably derived from the Latin micare, to shine, to glitter; the German word glimmer has the same meaning.

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  • In any case, it is fairly certain that Tritogeneia means "water-born," although an old interpretation derived it from TpcTCO, a supposed Boeotian word meaning "head," which further points to the name having originated in Boeotia.

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  • Occlusor muscle - its double origin (i.) is derived from the is shown.

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  • The alake exercises little authority apart from his council, the form of government being largely democratic. Revenue is chiefly derived from tolls or import duties.

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  • For the case 8=1, 0' =2, the condition is a i r 1 72 = A032=0; and the simplest perpetuant, derived directly from the product A 1 B 21 is (I)a(2)b-(21)b; the remainder of those enumerated by z3 I z.

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  • To assist us in handling the symbolic products we have not only the identity (ab) cx + (bc) a x + (ca) bx =0, but also (ab) x x+ (b x) a + (ax) b x = 0, (ab)a+(bc)a s +(ca)a b = 0, and many others which may be derived from these in the manner which will be familiar to students of the works of Aronhold, Clebsch and Gordan.

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  • All native carbonate of lead seems to be derived from what was originally galena, which is always present in it as an admixture.

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  • Lead generally functions as a divalent element of distinctly metallic character, yielding a definite series of salts derived from the oxide PbO.

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  • From this accumulation of results most valuable evidence as to the history and more especially the internal administration of Africa under the Romans has been derived.

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  • By the American photographs the distances between the centres of Venus and the sun, and the angles between the line adjoining the centres and the meridian, could be separately measured and a separate result for the parallax derived from each.

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  • In 1895 Chandler, from a general discussion of all the observations, derived the value of 20.50".

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  • Brown the value of the solar parallax derived by this method is about 8.773".

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  • Values of I are derived from (B -H)/477and of from B/H.

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  • In all such magnetizable alloys the presence of manganese appears to be essential, and there can be little doubt that the magnetic quality of the mixtures is derived solely from this component.

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  • He considers that Hall's is the fundamental phenomenon, and that the Nernst effect is essentially identical with it, the primary electromotive force in the case of the latter being that of the Thomson effect in the unequally heated metal, while in the Hall experiment it is derived from an external source.

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  • The greatest of Gilbert's discoveries was that the globe of the earth was magnetic and a magnet; the evidence by which he supported this view was derived chiefly from ingenious experiments made with a spherical lodestone or lerrella, as he termed it, and from his original observation that an iron bar could be magnetized by the earth's force.

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  • Soon after it was held by Robert Beaumeis, from whom it passed by female descent to the family of la Zouch, whence it derived the adjunct to its name, having been hitherto known as Ashby or Essebi.

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  • Watase has shown, in a very convincing way, how by deepening the pit-like set of cells beneath a simple lens the more complex ommatidia of the compound eyes of Crustacea and Hexapoda may be derived from such a condition as that presented in the lateral eyes of Limulus and Scorpio.

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  • The similarity of the form of their appendages to those of the scorpions suggests that they are a degenerate group derived from the latter, but the large size of the prae-genital somite in them would indicate a connexion with forms preceding the scorpions.

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  • Christianity, moreover, moved by the same apocalyptic tendency as Judaism, gave birth to new Christian apocryphs, though, in the case of most of them, the subject matter was to a large extent traditional and derived from Jewish sources.

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  • While the characteristic features of apocalyptic literature were derived from Judaism, those of Gnosticism sprang partly from Greek philosophy, partly from oriental religions.

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  • Since this surplusage is in turn derived from the Septuagint, from which the old Latin version was translated, it thus follows that the difference between the Protestant and the Roman Catholic Old Testament is, roughly speaking, traceable to the difference between the Palestinian and the Alexandrian canons of the Old Testament.

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  • Some of his citations are derived from the Gospel to the Egyptians.

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  • Its scope may be briefly described as the reduction of the theory of mechanics to certain general formulae, from the simple development of which should be derived the equations necessary for the solution of each separate problem.

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  • Thus a universal science of matter and motion was derived, by an unbroken sequence of deduction, from one radical principle; and analytical mechanics assumed the clear and complete form of logical perfection which it now wears.

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  • Its name is said to be derived from the fact of troops having been stationed here since 1772.

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  • India-rubber is derived principally from the Hevea guayanensis, sometimes called the Siphonia elastica, which is found on the Amazon and its tributaries as far inland as the foothills of the Andes.

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  • Palm, or piassava fibre, derived from the piassava palm, is used in the manufacture of brooms, brushes, &c. It is found as far south as southern Bahia, and the export could be very largely increased.

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  • The national revenue is derived largely from the duties on imports, the duties on exports having been surrendered to the states when the republic was organized.

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  • Finding the spot chosen for the new town inconvenient, the colonists removed to the adjoining island of Sao Vicente, from which the captaincy derived its name.

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  • The southern Picts ultimately subdued the Britons, and the castle became their chief stronghold until they were overthrown in 617 (or 629) by the Saxons under Edwin, king of Northumbria, from whom the name of Edinburgh is derived.

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  • Revenue is derived chiefly from customs and excise, railways, land sales, posts and telegraphs and a capitation tax.

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  • First, however, we must examine the form 'which this question assumed to the first medieval thinkers, and the source from which they derived it.

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  • Bernard of Chartres, at the beginning of the 12th century, endeavoured, according to John of Salisbury, to reconcile Plato and Aristotle; but his doctrine is almost wholly derived from the former through St Augustine and the commentary of Chalcidius.

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  • From the last-mentioned river are derived the terms Cisleithania and Transleithania, applied to Austria and Hungary respectively.

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  • At the census of 1900 nearly 69% of the total population of the country derived their income from agriculture, forestry, horticulture and other agricultural pursuits.

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  • Delambre from the data there supplied marked the profit derived from the investigation by practical astronomy.

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  • From these are derived symbols of the type A i = ales+a2e2+...

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  • These values are assumed to be independent, so we have 2n(n - I) derived units of the second species or order.

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  • If, in the extensive calculus of the nth category, all the units (including i and the derived units E) are taken to be homologous instead of being distributed into species, we may regard it as a (2'-I)-tuple linear algebra, which, however, is not wholly associative.

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  • The full title is ilm al jebr wa'l-mugabala, which contains the ideas of restitution and comparison, or opposition and comparison, or resolution and equation, jebr being derived from the verb jabara, to reunite, and mugabala, from gabala, to make equal.

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  • Other writers have derived the word from the Arabic particle al (the definite article), and geber, meaning " man."

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  • His principal discovery is concerned with equations, which he showed to be derived from the continued multiplication of as many simple factors as the highest power of the unknown, and he was thus enabled to deduce relations between the coefficients and various functions of the roots.

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  • This is the Catholic view, common to all the ancient Churches whether of the West or East, and it is one that necessarily excludes from the union of Christendom all those Christian communities which possess no such apostolically derived ministry.

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  • Analogous structures in any two animals compared were by Owen defined as structures performing similar functions, but not necessarily derived from the modification of one and the same part in the " plan " or " archetype " according to which the two animals compared were supposed to be constructed.

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  • Weismann has also ingeniously argued from the structure of the egg-cell and sperm-cell, and from the way in which, and the period at which, they are derived in the course of the growth of the embryo from the egg - from the fertilized egg-cell - that it is impossible (it would be better to say highly improbable) that an alteration in parental structure could produce any exactly representative change in the substance of the germ or sperm-cells.

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  • The view that instinct is the hereditarily fixed result of habit derived from experience long dominated all inquiry into the subject, but we may now expect to see a renewed and careful study of animal instincts carried out with the view of testing the applicability to each instance of the pure Darwinian theory without the aid of Lamarckism.

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  • So far as the application to gratings is concerned, the same conclusion may be derived from (2).

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  • These architectural decorations are derived from a style of building found by the recent German expedition extant in an ancient church; courses of stone here alternate in the walls (both inside and out) with beams of wood held by circular clamps.

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  • The name (Sp. "tall tree") was derived from a solitary redwood-tree standing in the outskirts of the city.

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  • We need not suppose that the Chronicler quotes from the Psalter or vice versa, the matter which they have in common being probably derived from certain traditional songs current among the Levitical singers.

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  • The word, which was probably derived from some Greek bandmaster, was presumably an instruction for a musical interlude.

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  • The mathematical discussion of Airy showed that the primary rainbow is not situated directly on the line of minimum deviation, but at a slightly greater value; this means that the true angular radius of the bow is a little less than that derived from the geometrical theory.

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  • No forms of matter which are either not living, or have not been derived from living matter, exhibit these three properties, nor any approach to the remarkable phenomena defined under the second and third heads.

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  • In contradistinction to the Lao Pong Dam, who have derived their written language from the Burmese character, the eastern race has retained what appears to be the early form of the present Siamese writing, from which it differs little.

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  • Lode tin, as tinstone derived from primary deposits is often termed, is mined in the ordinary method, the very hard gangue in which it occurs necessitating a liberal use of explosives.

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  • Tin forms two well-marked series of salts, in one of which it is divalent, these salts being derived from stannous oxide, SnO, in the other it is tetravalent, this series being derived from stannic oxide, Sn02.

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  • The term "rulers" appears to be derived from Manichean speculation, or from the same cycle of myth which is reflected in Cor.

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  • The fashion of shoes worn by Roman senators was said to have been derived from Etruria.

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  • The marriage-veil (flammeum) derived its name from its bright orange colour.

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  • The soldier's boot (caliga, from which the emperor Gaius derived his nickname, Caligula) was in reality a heavy hobnailed sandal with a number of straps wound round the ankle and lower leg.

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  • It is also repeatedly mentioned (Kpkos) by Homer, Hippocrates and other Greek writers; and the word "crocodile" was long supposed to have been derived from Kancos and whence we have such stories as that "the crocodile's tears are never true save when he is forced where saffron groweth" (Fuller's Worthies).

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  • According to Hehn, the town derived its name from the crocus; Reymond, on the other hand, with more probability, holds that the name of the drug arose from that of the town.

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  • Their language is derived from Malay, and while some of the Chams are Mussulmans, the dominant religion is Brahmanism, and more especially the worship of Siva.

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  • Evidently derived from the Chinese, of which it appears to be a very ancient dialect, the Annamese language is composed of monosyllables, of slightly varied articulation, expressing different ideas according to the tone in which they are pronounced.

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  • Our knowledge of the life of the celebrated Latin playwright, Publius Terentius Afer, is derived chiefly from a fragment of the lost work of Suetonius, De viris illustribus, preserved in the commentary of Donatus, who adds a few words of his own.

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  • We have also a valuable commentary (newly edited by P. Wessner) on five of the plays, derived chiefly from Euanthius and Donatus (both of the 4th century), and another of less importance by one Eugraphius.

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  • The public revenues are derived from customs taxes and charges on imports and exports, transit taxes, cattle taxes, profits on coinage, receipts from state monopolies, receipts from various public services such as the post office, telegraph, Caracas waterworks, &c., and sundr y taxes, fines and other sources.

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  • From 60 to 70% of the revenue is derived from the custom-house, and the next largest source is the transit tax.

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  • Fortunately the Prussians here derived an unexpected advantage from the shape of the ground, and indeed from the weather.

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  • The word is derived from ribat, a fortified frontier station.

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  • This type of caudal fin must be regarded as secondary, the Gadidae being, no doubt, derived from fishes in which the homocercal fin of the typical Teleostean had been lost.

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  • Its name is said to be derived from Saxon tene, a beacon or fire (probably from the number of watch-fires existing on this easily ravaged coast), and numerous remains of Saxon occupation have been found, as at Osengal near Ramsgate.

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  • Haematogenous pigments are derived from the haemoglobin of the red blood corpuscles.

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  • All that is known of him from this date to his death about 1520 is derived from the poems or from entries in the royal registers of payments of pension and grants of livery.

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  • There is no sign in the Homeric poems of the subordination of medicine to religion which is seen in ancient Egypt and India, nor are priests charged, as they were in those countries, with medical functions - all circumstances which throw grave doubts on the commonly received opinion that medicine derived its origin in all countries from religious observances.

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  • They were extremely successful in practical matters, especially in surgery and in the use of drugs, and a large part of the routine knowledge of diseases and remedies which became traditional in the times of the Roman empire is believed to have been derived from them.

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  • Great importance was also attached to chemically prepared remedies as containing the essence or spiritual quality of the material from which they were derived.

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  • In this doubtless he derived much advantage from his knowledge of chemistry, though the science was as yet not disentangled from the secret traditions of alchemy, and was often mixed up with imposture.

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  • It was the concepts derived from the experimental methods of Harvey, Lavoisier, Liebig, Claude Bernard, Helmholtz, Darwin, Pasteur, Lister and others which, directly or indirectly, trained the eyes of clinicians to observe more closely and accurately; and not of clinicians only, but also of pathologists, such as Matthew Baillie, Cruveilhier, Rokitansky, Bright, Virchowto name but a few of those who, with (as must be admitted) new facilities for necropsies, began to pile upon us discoveries in morbid anatomy and histology.

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  • Many of the riparian potentates derived the bulk of their revenue from this source, and it is calculated that in the 18th century the Rhine yielded a total revenue of X200,000, in spite of the comparatively insignificant amount of the shipping.

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  • Sir Henry's own principal contribution to the discussion was rather unfortunate, for while insisting on the blessings derived by England from its free-trade policy, he coupled this with the rhetorical admission (at Bolton in 1903) that "12,000,000 British citizens were underfed and on the verge of hunger."

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  • His only important precursors in serious poetry were Ennius and Lucilius, and, though he derived from the first of these an impulse to shape the Latin tongue into a fitting vehicle for the expression of elevated emotion and imaginative conception, he could find in neither a guide to follow in the task he set before himself.

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  • Its original name was Duverger, derived from a fief near Bressuire in Poitou, and its pedigree is traceable to the 13th century.

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  • Balsam of Tolu, produced by Myroxylon toluiferum, a native of Venezuela and New Granada; balsam of Peru, derived from Myroxylon Pereirae, a native of San Salvador in Central America; Mexican and Brazilian elemi, produced by various species of Icica or "incense trees," and the liquid exudation of an American species of Liquidambar, are all used as incense in America.

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  • Cornhill, again, recalls the cornmarket " time out of mind there holden " (Stow), and Gracechurch Street was corrupted from the name of the church of St Benet Grasschurch (destroyed by the great fire, rebuilt, and removed in 1868), which was said to be derived from a herb-market held under its walls.

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  • As regards names derived from ancient buildings, instances are the streets called London Wall and Barbican, and those named after the numerous gates.

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  • A striking point in this municipal revolution is that the new privileges extended to the city of London were entirely copied from those of continental cities, and Mr Round shows that there is conclusive proof of the assertion that the Commune of London derived its origin from that of Rouen.

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    0
  • The word is derived from the M.E.

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  • At first it was known by the Dutch simply as the "fuyck" (hoop), from the curve in the river at this point, whence was soon derived the name Beverfuyck or Beverwyck.

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    0
  • The name Artois (still more corrupted in "Arras") is derived from the Atrebates, who possessed the district in the time of Caesar.

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    0
  • Glas, perhaps derived from an old Teutonic root gla-, a variant of glo-, having the general sense of shining, cf.

    0
    0
  • In Europe the gas burnt in these furnaces is derived from special gas-producers, while in some parts of America natural gas is utilized.

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    0
  • The mechanical operation is quite successful for thick sheets, but it is not as yet available for the thinner sheets required for the ordinary purposes of sheet-glass, since with these excessive breakage occurs, while the sheets generally show grooves or lines derived from small irregularities of the drawing orifice.

    0
    0
  • Many of the specimens discovered by Layard at Nineveh have all the appearance of being Roman, and were no doubt derived from the Roman colony, Niniva Claudiopolis, which occupied the same site.

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    0
  • Dillon has pointed out that the process of enamelling had probably been derived from Syria, with which country Venice had considerable commercial intercourse.

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    0
  • The English dialect in which the Anglo-Saxon laws have been handed down to us is in most cases a common speech derived from West Saxon - naturally enough as Wessex became the predominant English state, and the court of its kings the principal literary centre from which most of the compilers and scribes derived their dialect and spelling.

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    0
  • Looking somewhat deeper at the sources from which Old English law was derived, we shall have to modify our classification to some extent, as the external forms of publication, although important from the point of view of historical criticism, are not sufficient standards as to the juridical character of the various kinds of material.

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  • He held the doctrine that the chemical elements are compounds of equal and similar atoms, and might therefore possibly be all derived from one generic atom.

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  • The name Assyria itself was derived from that of the city of Assur or Asur, now Qal'at Sherqat (Kaleh Shergat), which stood on the right bank of the Tigris, midway between the Greater and the Lesser Zab.

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  • Had the native history of Berossus survived, this would not have been the case; all that is known of the Chaldaean historian's work, however, is derived from quotations in Josephus, Ptolemy, Eusebius and the Syncellus.

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  • This is chiefly derived from a chronological tablet containing the annals of Nabonidus, which is supplemented by an inscription of Nabonidus, in which he recounts his restoration of the temple of the Moon-god at Harran, as well as by a proclamation of Cyrus issued shortly after his formal recognition as king of Babylonia.

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    0
  • The forms of Assyrian pottery, however, are graceful; the porcelain, like the glass discovered in the palaces of Nineveh, was derived from Egyptian originals.

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    0
  • This double method of writing words arises from the circumstance that the cuneiform syllabary is of non-Semitic origin, the system being derived from the non-Semitic settlers of the Euphrates valley, commonly termed Sumerians (or Sumero-Akkadians), to whom, as the earlier settlers, the origin of the cuneiform script is due.

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    0
  • The name Hamalant is unquestionably derived from the Frankish tribe of the Chamavi, and the document is often called Lex Francorum Chamavorum.

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  • But the inconsistency has in part been explained by Gunkel, who has rightly emphasized that the writer did not freely invent his materials but derived them in the main from tradition, as he held that these mysterious traditions of his people were, if rightly expounded, forecasts of the time to come.

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  • The portion of this Hebrew work which is derived from the older work is reprinted in Charles's Ethiopic Version of the Hebrew Book of Jubilees, p. 179.

    0
    0
  • It is derived from one author, who has made free use of a variety of elements, some of which are Jewish and consort but ill with their new context.

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    0
  • Discord among the great families broke out again, and the attempt to put an end to it by a marriage between Buondelmonte de' Buondelmonti and a daughter of the Amidei, only led to further strife (1215), although the causes of these broils were deeper and wider, being derived from the general division between Guelphs and Ghibellines all over Italy.

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  • Florence was in the 14th century a city of about 100,000 inhabitants, of whom 25,000 could bear arms; there were Ito churches, 39 religious houses; the shops of the ante della lana numbered over 200, producing cloth worth 1,200,000 florins; Florentine bankers and merchants were found all over the world, often occupying responsible positions in the service of foreign governments; the revenues of the republic, derived chiefly from the city customs, amounted to some 300,000 florins, whereas its ordinary expenses, exclusive of military matters and public buildings, were barely 40,000.

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  • It is situated in a narrow valley between two hills called West Mountain and Skene's Mountain, and Wood Creek flows through the village and empties into the lake with a fall, from which valuable water-power is derived; there are various manufactures, and the village owns and operates the water works.

    0
    0
  • Characters derived from the size, colour or flavour of the berry are of less value for historical or genealogical purposes than those which are the outcome of purely natural conditions.

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    0
  • Contrary to the opinion of the Greeks, the Ethiopians appear to have derived their religion and civilization from the Egyptians.

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    0
  • Derived from the Old Eng.

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    0
  • According to the Chronicle, which probably derived its information from a lost list of Kentish kings, Hengest died in 488, while his son Aesc continued to reign until 512.

    0
    0
  • Also Kiliani found that the lactone derived from the cyanhydrin of natural arabinose (laevo) was identical with the previous lactone except that its rotation was equal and opposite.

    0
    0
  • Hence it follows that the " optical " formulae of the acids derived from two pentoses having the configuration given above will be C02H - 0 - C02H CO 2 H + 0 - C02H, and that consequently only one of the acids will be optically active.

    0
    0
  • The remaining aldohexoses discovered by Fischer are derived from d-galactose from milk-sugar.

    0
    0
  • This is derived from the sap of the rock or sugar maple (Ater saccharinum), a large tree growing in Canada and the United States.

    0
    0
  • The names of sugar in modern European languages are derived through the Arabic from the Persian shakar.

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    0
  • Lime of exceptionally good quality is burnt to a large extent in the neighbourhood, and forms an important article of trade; it is derived from the Lower Chalk formation.

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    0
  • The surrounding district, exceptionally fertile marshland, is known as Die Vierlande, being divided into four parishes, whence the name is derived.

    0
    0
  • It is often of very mixed origin, being derived from the detritus of many kinds of rocks, and usually forms soil of a fertile character.

    0
    0
  • With the exception of the carbon and a small proportion of the oxygen and nitrogen, which may be partially derived from the air, these elements are taken from the soil by crops.

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    0
  • The warp consists of fine muddy sediment which is suspended in the tidal river water and appears to be derived from material scoured from the bed of the Humber by the action of the tide and a certain amount of sediment brought down by the tributary streams which join the Humber some distance from its mouth.

    0
    0
  • The moisture in soil is derived from two sources--the rain and the ground-water.

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    0
  • The questions naturally suggest themselves - Are the reappearances due to a revival of the contagion derived from previous outbreaks in the same place, or to some favouring condition which the place offers for the development of infection derived from some other quarter; and have favouring conditions any dependence upon the character and state of the soil?

    0
    0
  • He wrote a poem on agriculture (De re rustica) in fourteen books, the material being derived from Columella and other earlier writers.

    0
    0
  • The deposits in the great limestone caves of Kentucky, Virginia and Indiana have been probably derived from the overlying soil and accumulated by percolating water; they are of no commercial value.

    0
    0
  • The great bulk of the tobacco supply is derived from FIG.

    0
    0
  • From this species the tobaccos of Cuba, the United States, the Philippine Islands and the Latakia of Turkey are derived, and it is also largely cultivated in India; the variety macrophylla is the source of the Maryland tobaccos.

    0
    0
  • Zinc forms only one oxide, ZnO, from which is derived a wellcharacterized series of salts.

    0
    0
  • True cavies, or couies (Cavia), are best known by the guineapig, a domesticated and parti-coloured race derived from one of the wild species, all of which are uniformly coloured.

    0
    0
  • The other institution, relating to land, was that known to the Roman law as the precarium, a name derived from one of its essential features through all its history, the prayer of the suppliant by which the relationship was begun.

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    0
  • These opinions must overrule the view of some Christian scholars that the writer often blunders in Jewish matters, the fact being that his knowledge is derived from the Judaism of Alexandria' rather than Palestine.

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    0
  • The people, according to their own traditions, are derived from two stocks, the pure Arabs, descended from Kahtan or Joktan, fourth in descent from Shem; and the Mustarab or naturalized Arabs, from Ishmael.

    0
    0
  • Its revenues were derived from the Bedouins of the surrounding lands as well as from its own subjects at home.

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    0
  • The name is derived from the Fanti word Nkran (an ant), by which designation the tribe inhabiting the surrounding district was formerly known.

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    0
  • He is also the reputed author of El Prodigio de los Monies, from which Calderon derived El Magico prodigioso.

    0
    0
  • The main argument for putting it earlier is derived from the admitted affinities between it and Romans, the Colossian and Ephesian epistles containing, it is held, a more advanced christology (so Lightfoot especially, and Hort, Judaistic Christianity, pp. 115-129).

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    0
  • A third variety of jalap known as woody jalap, male jalap, or Orizaba root, or by the Mexicans as Purgo macho, is derived from Ipomaea orizabensis, a plant of Orizaba.

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    0
  • The name, which was originally Wipendorp, is derived from an Augustine monastery, founded in 1130 by Vicelin, the apostle of Holstein, and is mentioned as "novum monasterium" in a document of 1136.

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    0
  • In dividing the Culicidae into genera reliance is placed chiefly upon characters derived from the scales on the three divisions of the body and on the wings.

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    0
  • The word has been derived from the Arabic Kedr, worth or value, or from Kedrat, strong, and has been supposed by some to have taken its origin from the brook Kedron, in Judaea.

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    0
  • Knowledge of ancient Iberian language and history is mainly derived from a variety of coins, found widely distributed in the peninsula,' and also in the neighbourhood of Narbonne.

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    0
  • From the same usage is derived the shorter political term "cave" for any body of men who secede from their party on some special subject.

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    0
  • In 1099 the Pisans joined in the second crusade, proved their valour at the capture of Jerusalem, and derived many commercial advantages from it; for within a short time they had banks, consuls, warehouses and privileges of all kinds in every Eastern port.

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    0
  • The coasts are very rich in fish, and the tunny fisheries of the north are one of the principal sources from which the world's supply of tunny is derived.

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    0
  • Cocaine is also derived from coca leaves, and a considerably quantity of the drug is exported.

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    0
  • From guano an immense revenue was derived during the third quarter of the 19th century and it is still one of the largest exports.

    0
    0
  • The last two are most important and, it is believed, were the sources from which the Incas derived the greater part of their store.

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    0
  • The public revenues are derived from customs, taxes, various inland and consumption taxes, state monopolies, the government wharves, posts and telegraphs, &c. The customs taxes include import and export duties, surcharges, harbour dues, warehouse charges, &c.; the inland taxes comprise consumption taxes on alcohol, tobacco, sugar and matches, stamps and stamped paper, capital and mining properties, licences, transfers of property, &c.; and the state monopolies cover opium and salt.

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  • The real velocities derived from good observations are rarely, if ever, under 7 or 8 m.

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    0
  • This assumption that Yahweh is derived from the verb "to be," as seems to be implied in Exod.

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    0
  • Thus Delitzsch formerly derived the name from an Akkadian god, I or Ia; or from the Semitic nominative ending, Yau; 7 but this deity has since disappeared from the pantheon of Assyriologists.

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  • Such, at least, is Echard's conclusion, derived from an examination of the earliest extant MSS.

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    0
  • The word is derived either from agonia, " a victim," or from agonium, " a festival."

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    0
  • It derived importance from its situation on the road to South Wales.

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    0
  • According to some writers (Leuckart) they are derived from undifferentiated blastomeres, other authorities (Thomas, Biehringer, Heckert) trace them to the parietal cells of the larva.

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    0
  • Another series of heroes, forming the central figures of stories variously derived but developed in Europe by the Latin-speaking peoples, may be conveniently grouped under the heading of " romance."

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    0
  • The adjective "beetle-browed," and similarly "beetling" (of a cliff), are derived from the name of the insect.

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    0
  • It derived its name from the abundance and luxuriance of the apple, pear and other fruit trees in the neighbourhood.

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    0
  • Lilerature.From the neighboring continent the Japanese derived the art of transmitting ideas to paper.

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  • But before accepting this conclusion as final, one must not lose sight of the fact that the so-called chiaroscuro engraving was at the height of its use in Italy at the same time that embassies from thc Christians in Japan visited Rome, and that it is thus possiblc that the suggestion at least may have been derived from Europe.

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  • Lacquer.Japan derived the art of lacquering from China (probably about the beginning of the 6th century), but she ultimately carried it far beyond Chinese conception.

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  • In the time of the counts the wealth of Gouda was mainly derived from brewing and cloth-weaving; but at a later date the making of clay tobacco pipes became the staple trade, and, although this industry has somewhat declined, the churchwarden pipes of Gouda are still well known and largely manufactured.

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    0
  • In nautical phraseology various usages of the term are derived from its association with a sailor's leave on shore, e.g.

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  • It is probably derived from the Turkish haidud, " marauder," but its origin is not absolutely certain.

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  • I enquired therefore how, in these series, the rest of the terms may be derived from the first two being given; and I found that by putting m for the second figure or term, the rest should be produced by the continued multiplication of the terms of this seriesI X m 2 I X m - 2 This rule I therefore applied to the series to be interpolated.

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  • Much of the information in this was derived from personal experience, for Defoe claims to have made many more tours and visits about England than those of which we have record; but the major part must necessarily have been dexterous compilation.

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  • The reprint (3 vols.) edited for the "Pulteney Library" by Hazlitt in 1840-1843 contains a good and full life mainly derived from Wilson, the whole of the novels (including the Serious Reflections now hardly ever published with Robinson Crusoe), Jure Divino, The Use and Abuse of Marriage, and many of the more important tracts and smaller works.

    0
    0
  • It is convenient to distinguish between aliphatic and aromatic acids; the first named being derived from open-chain hydrocarbons, the second from ringed hydrocarbon nuclei.

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    0
  • A pursuit of these two suggestions has established the probability that this "Eupatrid" clan traced its origin to Orestes, and derived its name from the hero, who was above all a benefactor of his father.

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    0
  • Of equestrian rank, his name Pontius suggests a Samnite origin, and his cognomen in the gospels, pileatus (if derived from the pileus or cap of liberty), descent from a freedman.

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    0
  • In the form of his poem he followed a Greek original; and the stuff out of which the texture of his philosophical argument is framed was derived from Greek science; but all that is of deep human and poetical meaning in the poem is his own.

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    0
  • Education is more widely diffused, but is less thorough, less leisurely in its method, derived less than before from the purer sources of culture.

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    0
  • The additional taxation of 5% on all incomes derived from land, imposed in 1869 and not repealed until the reign of Nicholas II., together with the suppression of the Polish language in all official matters, served the same ends.

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    0
  • It was called Fanum Sancti Hip polyti, from which, by corruption, the actual name is derived.

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    0
  • The word "alcohol" is of Arabic origin, being derived from the particle al and the word kohl, an impalpable powder used in the East for painting the eyebrows.

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    0
  • He therefore employed the corresponding expression for a cycle of infinitesimal range dt at the temperature t in which the work dW obtainable from a quantity of heat H would be represented by the equation dW =HF'(t)dt, where F'(t) is the derived function of F(t), or dF(t)/dt, and represents the work obtainable per unit of heat per degree fall of temperature at a temperature t.

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  • Not only do we know nothing from internal or external evidence of the existence of a prophet of this name, 1 but the occurrence of the word in the title is naturally explained as derived from iii.

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    0
  • Affiliated with the university is a school of music. The university's income is derived from the proceeds of invested funds and lands originally given by the United States, from permanent appropriations by the state and from the proceeds of a one-fifth mill tax to be used for buildings alone.

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    0
  • Most unfortunately our English version of the romances, Malory's Morte Arthur, being derived from these later forms (though his treatment of Gawain is by no means uniformly consistent), this unfavourable aspect is that under which the hero has become known to the modern reader.

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    0
  • The association and distribution of gold may be considered under two different heads, namely, as it occurs in mineral veins - " reef gold," and in alluvial or other superficial deposits which are derived from the waste of the former - " alluvial gold."

    0
    0
  • Of the total production in 1876, 5,016,488 oz., almost the whole was derived from the United States, Australasia and Russia.

    0
    0
  • The Alaska gold was derived almost wholly from the large low-grade quartz mines of Douglas Island prior to 1899, but in that year an important district was discovered at Cape Nome, on the north-western coast.

    0
    0
  • Of this increase, a considerable part was derived from gold-quartz mining, though much was also obtained as a by-product in the working of the ores of other metals.

    0
    0
  • The gold production of Russia has been remarkably constant, averaging £4,899,262 per annum; the gold is derived chiefly from placer workings in Siberia.

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    0
  • The intermediate rice plains, known as the Mogholbandi, from their having been regularly settled by the Mahommedans, have yielded to the successive dynasties and conquerors of Orissa almost the whole of the revenues derived from the province.

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    0
  • It is noticeable that this Targum has been considerably influenced by the Targum of Onkelos, and in this respect, as in others, is far less trustworthy than the Fragmentary Targum, as a witness to the linguistic and other peculiarities of the source from which they were both derived.

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    0
  • In regard to the source of the two Palestinian Targums to the Pentateuch, we must accept the conclusion of Bassfreund 4 that they both derived their variants from a complete Targum Jerushalmi.

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  • But though the existence of an older Targum Jerushalmi cannot be denied, it is clear that the form in which it was utilized by the two Palestinian Targums cannot be of an early date, for many of the latest elements in the Fragmentary and pseudo-Jonathan Targums were undoubtedly derived from their common source.

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    0
  • With the exception of the extreme southern and south-eastern ramifications, which belong to Rumania, the Carpathians lie entirely within Austrian and 2 The name is derived from the Slavonic word Chrb, which means mountain-range.

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    0
  • Several modern societies have been formed from time to time (some of which are still flourishing in Great Britain) for the study of Rosicrucianism and allied subjects, but in no sense are they directly derived from the "Brethren of the Rosy Cross" of the 17th century, though keen followers thereof.

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    0
  • From it many of the religious rites and ceremonies of Rome are said to have been derived, and even in imperial times a collegium of sixty haruspices continued to exist there.

    0
    0
  • Numerous sulphonic acids derived from 0-naphthylamine are known, the more important of which are the 2.8 or Badische, the 2.5 or Dahl, the 2.7 or S, and the 2.6 or Bronner acid.

    0
    0
  • The town, the name of which is usually derived from Dhara Nagari (the city of sword blades), is of great antiquity, and was made the capital of the Paramara chiefs of Malwa by Vairisinha II., who transferred his headquarters hither from Ujjain at the close of the 9th century.

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    0
  • Kattenbusch does not shrink from suggesting that he shows acquaintance with the Roman Creed, and that Justin Martyr also knew it, in which case all the so-called Eastern characteristics have been imprinted on the original Roman form, and are not derived from an Eastern archetype.

    0
    0
  • Eastern theologians expressed the mysterious relationship of the Holy Spirit to the Father and the Son in such phrases as " Who proceedeth from the Father and receiveth from the Son," rightly making the Godhead of the Father the foundation and primary source of the eternally derived Godhead of the Son and the Spirit.

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  • Nevertheless, there is as yet no monumental evidence in favour of the genuineness of the story, and at the most it can only be said that the author (of whatever date) has derived his names from a trustworthy source, and in representing an invasion of Palestine by Babylonian overlords has given expression to a possible situation.

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    0
  • The meaning of the root from which it is derived is very doubtful; cf.

    0
    0
  • The larger part of the water supply, however, is now derived by pumping from strata at about sea-level.

    0
    0
  • The principal resources of Malta are derived from its being an important military station and the headquarters of the Mediterranean fleet.

    0
    0
  • The knights lived apart from the Maltese, and derived their principal revenues from estates of the Order in the richest countries of Europe.

    0
    0
  • The New English Dictionary connects it with a Teutonic stem meaning "holy"; from which is derived the Lithuanian szwentas, and Lettish swats.

    0
    0
  • The municipality owns and operates the gas and electric-lighting plants and the water works (the watersupply being derived from natural ponds, some of which are outside the city limits), and owns and leases (to the New York, New Haven & Hartford railroad) a railway extending (10.3 m.) to Westfield, Mass.

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    0
  • Of Hellanicus, the Greek logographer, who appears to have lived through the greater part of the 5th century B.C., and who drew up a chronological list of the priestesses of Here at Argos; of Ephorus, who lived in the 4th century B.C., and is distinguished as the first Greek who attempted the composition of a universal history; and of Timaeus, who in the following century wrote an elaborate history of Sicily, in which he set the example of using the Olympiads as the basis of chronology, the works have perished and our meagre knowledge of their contents is derived only from fragmentary citations in later writers.

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    0
  • As the forgotten history of Oriental antiquity has been restored to us, it has come to be understood that, politically speaking, the Hebrews were a relatively insignificant people, whose chief importance from the standpoint of material history was derived from the geographical accident that made them a sort of buffer between the greater nations about them.

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    0
  • Their coins show a remarkable union of characteristics, derived from many nations.

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    0
  • He indulged freely in flourishes; and in devising technical terms derived from the Greek he seems to have aimed at making them as unintelligible as possible.

    0
    0
  • He had derived a considerable revenue from the enemy's country, and he had moreover quartered his troops without expense.

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    0
  • In the first three centuries of the Christian era Hippo was one of the richest cities in Roman Africa; but its chief title to fame is derived from its connexion with St Augustine, who lived here as priest and bishop for thirty-five years.

    0
    0
  • The name was first used by Linnaeus (1735), who derived it from the half-coriaceous and half-membranous condition of the forewing in many members of the order.

    0
    0
  • Besides the income from interest and dividends on investments, the state revenues are derived from taxes on licences, on commissions to public officers, on railway, telegraph and telephone, express, and banking companies, and to a slight extent from taxes on collateral inheritance.

    0
    0
  • From a series of measures of the angle between Jupiter's satellites and the planet, made in June and July 1794 and in August and September 1795, Schur finds the mass of Jupiter =I / Io 4 8.55 1.45, a result which accords well within the limits of its probable error with the received value of the mass derived from modern researches.

    0
    0
  • In determinations of stellar or solar parallax, comparison stars, symmetrically situated with respect to the object whose parallax is sought, should be employed, in which case the instantaneous scale-value may be regarded as an unknown quantity which can be derived in the process of the computation of the results.

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    0
  • It was from these two dukes that the rival houses of Lancaster and York derived their respective claims to the crown.

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    0
  • Another circumstance was unfavourable to the house of Mortimer - that it derived its title through a woman.

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    0
  • In other words, it has been taken over from pre-existing material - either Christian or Jewish - and the materials of which it is composed are ultimately derived from non-Jewish sources - either Babylonian, Greek or Egyptian - and bore therein very different meanings from those which belong to them in their present connexion.

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    0
  • The figure of the first beast presents many difficulties, owing to the fact that it is not freely invented but largely derived from traditional elements and is by the writer identified with the seventh wounded head.

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    0
  • When research in oceanography began, the conditions of the sea were of necessity observed only from the coast and from islands, the information derived from mariners as to the condition of parts of the sea far from land being for the most part mere anecdotes bearing on the marvellous or the frightful.

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    0
  • The most abundant of the terrigenous materials are the finest particles of clay and calcium carbonate as well as fragments derived from land vegetation, of which twigs, leaves, &c., may form a perceptible proportion as far as 200 m.

    0
    0
  • As well as the finest of terrigenous clay there is present in sea-water far from land a different clay derived from the decomposition of volcanic material.

    0
    0
  • Derived products in the form of crystals of phillipsite are not uncommon, but the most abundant of all are the incrustations of manganese oxide, as to the origin of which Murray and Renard are not fully clear.

    0
    0
  • The manganese nodules afford the most ample proof of the prodigious period of time which has elapsed since the formation of the red clay began; the sharks' teeth and whales' ear-bones which serve as nuclei belong in some cases to extinct species or even to forms derived from those familiar in the fossils from the seas of the Tertiary period.

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    0
  • This word is supposed to be derived from the Walloon hoie, corresponding to the medieval Latin hullae.

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    0
  • The proportion of carbon is comparatively low, usually not exceeding 70%, while the from this circumstance that the term lignite is derived.

    0
    0
  • For flat ropes the drum or bobbin consists of a solid disk, of the width of the rope fixed upon the shaft, with numerous parallel pairs of arms or horns, arranged radially on both sides, the space between being just sufficient to allow the rope to enter and coil regularly upon the preceding lap. This method has the advantage of equalizing the work of the engine throughout the journey, for when the load is greatest, with the full cage at the bottom and the whole length of rope out, the duty required in the first revolution of the engine is measured by the length of the smallest circumference; while the assistance derived from gravitating action of the descending cage in the same period is equal to the weight of the falling mass through a height corresponding to the length of the largest lap, and so on, the speed being increased as the weight diminishes, and vice versa.

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    0
  • Its name is derived from 'the Lat.

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  • The sources from which he derived his notices of King Arthur (§ 56) have not been determined.

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  • The name is derived from the ancient Abellinum, the ruins of which lie 21 m.

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  • The name is derived from the chief town.

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  • With these qualities Fichte himself combined a certain impetuosity and impatience probably derived from his mother, a woman of a somewhat querulous and jealous disposition.

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  • The eastern part of the Prairie Plains is a belt known as the Black Prairie, and it has a rich black soil derived from Upper Cretaceous limestone; immediately west of this is another belt with a thinner soil derived from Lower Cretaceous rocks; a southern part of the same plains has a soil derived from granite; in a large area in the north-west the plains have a reddish clay soil derived from Permian rocks and a variety of soils - good black soils and inferior sandy and clay soils - derived from Carboniferous rocks.

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  • A very thin soil covers the Edwards Plateau, but on the Llano Estacado are brownish and reddish loams derived from the sediments of a Neocene lake.

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  • The name, of which the Tene, Tayne and Thane are older forms. is derived from the Icelandic thing, " assembly" or "court."

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  • This newly-formed sympathy with the English reformer did not, in the first instance at least, involve Huss in any conscious opposition to the established doctrines of Catholicism, or in any direct conflict with the authorities of the church; and for 1 From which the name Huss, or more properly Hus, an abbreviation adopted by himself about 1396, is derived.

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  • The school tax was derived in1905-1906from interest on the state's permanent school fund - amounting to 2.3% of the total tax, and distributed in proportion to the population of school age; from a I to 3 mill county tax, amounting to 5.2% of the whole; and from local or district taxation, 92.5% of the entire tax.

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  • Even his frequent use of Greek words, phrases and quotations, reprehended by Horace, was probably taken from the actual practice of men, who found their own speech as yet inadequate to give free expression to the new ideas and impressions which they derived from their first contact with Greek philosophy, rhetoric and poetry.

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  • The chief wealth of the country is derived from agriculture and the produce of the forests.

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  • Revenue is chiefly derived from hut and poll taxes, R customs, wharfage dues, game licences and land tax.

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  • The expenditure is about £38,000 annually, and the revenue, mainly derived from customs duties, is rapidly increasing.

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  • The revenue of German New Guinea is derived from taxes, dues and licences, and amounted on the 31st of March 1892 to about £3000; on the same rate, 1901, to £3750.

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  • His claims on the attention of the Directors had been strengthened by his reading two papers before the French Institute, the first on the commercial relations between England and the United States (in the sense referred to above), and the second on the advantages to be derived from new colonies.

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  • Of the sixty-seven fables which it contains thirty are derived from lost fables of Phaedrus.

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  • These three prose versions contain in all one hundred distinct fables, of which fifty-six are derived from the existing and the remaining forty-four presumably from lost fables of Phaedrus.

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  • Amongst the collections partly derived from Romulus the most famous is probably that in French verse by Marie de France.

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  • He also showed that the roots of a cubic equation can be derived by means of the infinitesimal calculus.

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  • The prince is supported by the income derived from crown lands.

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  • If this be so, we are still in complete darkness as to the stock from which the South American edentates are derived.

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  • It appears to have been from France rather than from Geneva that the Presbyterian churches of Holland, Scotland and the United States derived their form of government.

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  • The Coptic name, Phelbes, seems to have been derived from Egyptian, but nothing is known of the place before medieval times.

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  • The Aztec name of the city was Tenochtitlan, derived either from Tenoch, one of their priests and leaders, or from tenuch, the Indian name for the " nopal," which is associated with its foundation.

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  • The modern name is derived from Mexitli, one of the names of the Aztec god of war Huitzilopochtli, which name was later on applied also to the Aztecs themselves.

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  • But the influence of Cluny, even on monasteries that did not enter into its organism, was enormous; many adopted Cluny customs and practices and moulded their life and spirit after the model it set; and many such monasteries became in turn centres of revival and reform in many lands, so that during the 10th and 11th centuries arose free unions of monasteries based on a common observance derived from a central abbey.

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  • The name America was derived from that of Amerigo Vespucci.

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  • About two-thirds of the public revenue was derived from duties on imports, in the adjustment of which the doctrine of protection to native industry had a large place.

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  • According to a local legend the name Gurramkonda, meaning "horse hill," was derived from the fact that a horse was supposed to be guardian of the fort and that the place was impregnable so long as the horse remained there.

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  • Of his life little is known, and that little is chiefly derived from the dedicatory letters prefixed to two of his treatises and addressed respectively to Bishop Theodald (not Theobald, as Burney writes the name) of Arezzo, and Michael, a monk of Pomposa and Guido's pupil and friend.

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  • Its name is derived from the "Teat" or conduit which conveyed water from Horningsham, about r m.

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  • But the indications derived from the later touches added to his work, which form the sole evidence on the subject, would rather lead to the conclusion that his life was not very prolonged.

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  • The name is probably derived from the Kurdish and Persian Yazdan, God; though some have connected it with the city of Yezd, or with Yezid, the second Omayyad caliph (720-24).

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  • Berber derived its importance from being the starting-point of the caravan route, 242 m.

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  • To get rid of Waldo, whose date was known, the name Waldenses or Vallenses was derived from Vallis, because they dwelt in the valleys, or from a supposed Provençal word Vaudes, which meant a sorcerer.

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  • Even in ancient times it was famous for its groves of bay-trees (laurus) from which its name was perhaps derived, and which in imperial times gave the villas of its territory a name for salubrity, so that both Vitellius and Commodus resorted there.

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