This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience. Learn more

derived

derived Sentence Examples

  • The following is the general idea derived from these researches.

    111
    40
  • In other respects his book is derived almost entirely from Christie.

    40
    14
  • The hourly values are derived from smoothed curves, the object being to get the mean ordinate for a 60-minute period.

    28
    14
  • Nearly all the rest, more especially the transition from poetical to occult wisdom, was derived from Rome.

    22
    39
  • Nearly all the rest, more especially the transition from poetical to occult wisdom, was derived from Rome.

    21
    39
  • If this be overlooked, a wrong impression may be derived as to the absolute amplitudes of the changes.

    19
    17
  • Davout glanced at him silently and plainly derived pleasure from the signs of agitation and confusion which appeared on Balashev's face.

    19
    20
  • A considerable part of the alimentary canal is said to be derived from the ectoderm in the buds of both Cephalodiscus and Rhabdopleura.

    18
    7
  • In truth, not so large a proportion of the endowment of All Souls was derived from this source as was that of New College.

    17
    21
  • Salama, from which the word is derived appears in salaam, " peace be with you," the greeting of the East, and in Moslem, and means to be "free" - or "secure."

    12
    3
  • During his three years of office as resident he was able to render not a few valuable services to the Company; but it is more important to observe that his name nowhere occurs in the official lists of those who derived pecuniary profit from the necessities and weakness of the native court.

    10
    1
  • The dedication to Mary Magdalen was no doubt derived from the hospital at Winchester of which the founder had been master.

    9
    6
  • Erith, the name of which is commonly derived from A.S.

    9
    7
  • His account of the notion of external existence, as derived, not from pure sensation, but from the experience of action on the one hand and resistance on the other, may be compared with the account of Bain and later psychologists.

    8
    6
  • He was no follower of their ideas, indeed often opposed to them; but he derived from Bacon an increasing stimulus towards the investigation of certain great problems of history and philosophy, while Grotius proved valuable in his study of philosophic jurisprudence.

    8
    7
  • Natural gas, piped from the Kansas fields, is used for light and power, and electricity for commercial lighting and power is derived from plants on Spring River, near Vark, Kansas, and on Shoal creek.

    6
    2
  • I do not doubt that she derived from them much pleasure and not a little profit.

    6
    5
  • Some part, however, seems to be derived from Thorium, And H.

    5
    6
  • For a wire exposed under the conditions observed by Elster and Geitel the emanation seems to be almost entirely derived from radium.

    5
    7
  • From broken remarks about Natasha and his father, from the emotion with which Pierre spoke of that dead father, and from the careful, reverent tenderness with which Natasha spoke of him, the boy, who was only just beginning to guess what love is, derived the notion that his father had loved Natasha and when dying had left her to his friend.

    5
    10
  • The pair 6232 and 6368 are amicable, but they cannot be derived from this formula.

    4
    3
  • The romance of Alexander is found written in the languages of nearly all peoples from the Indian Ocean to the Atlantic, but all these versions are derived, mediately or immediately, from the Greek original which circulated under the false name of Callisthenes.

    4
    3
  • It is commonly represented that the endowment was wholly derived from alien priories bought by Chicheley from the crown.

    4
    4
  • The results for the Sonnblick are derived from a comparatively small number of days in August and September.

    4
    4
  • Ogling a spouse couldn't be a sin – especially when he derived such obvious pleasure from it.

    4
    11
  • The "stinking fermentations" occasionally experienced in breweries probably arise from this, the free sulphur being derived from the hops.

    3
    2
  • From the same stock may be derived the Abyssinian breed, in which the ears are relatively large and occasionally tipped with long hairs (thus recalling the tufted ears of the jungle-cat).

    3
    2
  • Who has not sometimes derived an inexpressible satisfaction from his food in which appetite had no share?

    3
    5
  • The state revenue is derived mainly from a general property tax, licence taxes levied on various businesses and occupations, a collateral inheritance tax and a capitation tax.

    3
    7
  • If then the screw-value in kilometres per second is known for the neighbourhood of each of the comparison lines employed, the radial velocity of the star can be independently derived directly from coincidences made in above manner in the neighbourhood of each comparison line.

    2
    1
  • Eventually he was able to prove that the biological doctrine of omnis cellula ecellula applies to pathological processes as well as to those of normal growth, and in his famous book on Cellular-pathologic, published at Berlin in 1858, he established what Lord Lister described as the "true and fertile doctrine that every morbid structure consists of cells which have been derived from pre-existing cells as a progeny."

    2
    1
  • The name of the genus is derived from Arauco, the name of the district in southern Chile where the trees were first discovered.

    2
    1
  • Plato, while admiring Pericles' intellect, accuses him of pandering to the mob; Aristotle in his Politics and especially in the Constitution of Athens, which is valuable in that it gives the dates of Pericles' enactments as derived from an official document, accepts the same view.

    2
    1
  • Strutt has suggested that helium in hot springs may be derived from the disintegration of common rocks at great depths.

    2
    1
  • Vico may have derived from Grotius the idea of natural law; but his discovery of the historic evolution of law was first suggested to him by his study of Roman law.

    2
    2
  • Both the alb and its name are derived ultimately from the tunica alba, the white tunic, which formed part of the ordinary dress of Roman citizens under the Empire.

    2
    2
  • the absolute freedom of the derived co-ordinates from the effects of wear of the screws in the mean of measures made in reversed positions of the plate.

    2
    2
  • 1670 C.Meerens,proposed standard derived from c 2 512, and favoured by Boito and other Italian musicians.

    2
    2
  • The name of the genus is derived from Arauco, the name of the district in southern Chile where the trees were first discovered.

    2
    2
  • Ellis used this indication to have an organ pipe made which with one-sixteenth diameter and a wind-pressure of 34 in., at one-fourth Schlick's length, gave f' 301.6, from which he derived a just major third of a' 377, which would compare very well with an old Greek a'.

    2
    4
  • Countess Mary was jealous of this passion of her husband's and regretted that she could not share it; but she could not understand the joys and vexations he derived from that world, to her so remote and alien.

    2
    4
  • Since the wood-cutters, and the railroad, and I myself have profaned Walden, perhaps the most attractive, if not the most beautiful, of all our lakes, the gem of the woods, is White Pond;--a poor name from its commonness, whether derived from the remarkable purity of its waters or the color of its sands.

    2
    6
  • He emphasized the opinion that yeast derived from one cell was of no good for top fermentation, and advocated Pasteur's method of purification.

    1
    3
  • The present name, derived from Clarus Mons and originally applied only to the citadel, was used of the town as early as the 9th century.

    1
    3
  • An, matter, 'coii, life), in philosophy, a term applied to any system which explains all life, whether physical or mental, as ultimately derived from matter ("cosmic matter," Weldstoff).

    1
    3
  • The mistletoe so extensively used in England at Christmas is largely derived from the apple orchards of Normandy; a quantity is also sent from the apple orchards of Herefordshire.

    1
    3
  • ZIMBABWE, a Bantu name, probably derived from the two words zimba (" houses") and mabgi (" stones"), given to certain ruins in South-East Africa.

    1
    3
  • Plutarch (Pericles) gives many interesting details as to Pericles' personal bearing, home life, and patronage of art, literature and philosophy, derived in part from the old comic poets, Aristophanes, Cratinus, Eupolis, Hermippus, Plato and Teleclides; in part from the contemporary memoirs of Stesimbrotus and Ion of Chios.

    1
    3
  • Ellis used this indication to have an organ pipe made which with one-sixteenth diameter and a wind-pressure of 34 in., at one-fourth Schlick's length, gave f' 301.6, from which he derived a just major third of a' 377, which would compare very well with an old Greek a'.

    1
    3
  • Other countries have gradually followed, and, with few exceptions, the low pitch derived from the Diapason Normal may be said to prevail throughout the musical world.

    1
    3
  • CROZIER, or pastoral staff, one of the insignia of a bishop, and probably derived from the lituus of the Roman augurs.

    1
    3
  • The mistletoe so extensively used in England at Christmas is largely derived from the apple orchards of Normandy; a quantity is also sent from the apple orchards of Herefordshire.

    1
    4
  • to c 1, vary much, then a diurnal inequality derived from a whole year, or from a season composed of several months, represents a mean curve arising from the superposition of a number of curves, which differ in shape and in the positions of their maxima and minima.

    0
    0
  • mushroom has numerous varieties, and it differs in different places and under different modes of culture in much the same way as our kitchen-garden plants differ from the type they have been derived from, and from each other.

    0
    0
  • The revenue of the republic is derived mainly from customs and excise, and the largest item of expenditure is the service of the public debt.

    0
    0
  • The title of princess of Battenberg, derived from an old residence of the grand-dukes of Hesse, was conferred, with the prefix Durchlaucht or "Serene Highness," on the countess and her descendants in 1858.

    0
    0
  • The name is derived from galapago, a tortoise, on account of the giant species, the characteristic feature of the fauna.

    0
    0
  • The principal water supply is derived from the Macarao river, 15 m.

    0
    0
  • ACID-AMIDES, chemical compounds which may be considered as derived from ammonia by replacement of its hydrogen with acidyl residues, the substances produced being known as, primary, secondary or tertiary amides, according to the number of hydrogen atoms replaced.

    0
    0
  • the silver salt as being derived from the tautomeric imidobenzoic acid, C 6 1-1 5 C: (NH) -OH (J.

    0
    0
  • They did not dedicate each day in turn to its astrological planet; and it is therefore precarious to assume that the Sabbath was in its origin what it is in the astrological week, the day sacred to Saturn, and that its observance is to be derived from an ancient Hebrew worship of that planet.4 The week, however, is found in various parts of the world in a form that has nothing to do with astrology or the seven planets, and with such a distribution as to make it pretty certain that it had no artificial origin, but suggested itself independently, and for natural reasons, to different races.

    0
    0
  • AMADOU, a soft tough substance used as tinder, derived from Polyporus fomentarius, a fungus belonging to the group Basidiomycetes and somewhat resembling a mushroom in manner of growth.

    0
    0
  • A theory was therefore propounded that these known types were all derived from a continent which has been named Antarctica.

    0
    0
  • The monitor lizard is popularly known as the goanna, a name derived from the iguana, an entirely different animal.

    0
    0
  • This flora, isolated by arid country from the rest of the continent, has evidently derived its plant life from an outside source, probably from lands no longer existing.

    0
    0
  • Including the total receipts derived from the customs, the Commonwealth revenue, during the year 1906, was made up as follows: Customs and excise £8,999,485 Posts, telegraphs, &c..

    0
    0
  • £4,494,841 The states have the same powers of taxation as the Commonwealth except in regard to customs and excise, over which the Commonwealth has exclusive power, but the states are the owners of the crown lands, and the revenues derived from this source form an important part of their income.

    0
    0
  • As stream tin it occurs abundantly in some of the alluvial deposits derived from the crystalline area, especially on the west coast.

    0
    0
  • The revenues for educational purposes are derived mainly from a state tax of 8 on the general list, from local taxes, and from the interest on the permanent school fund, which (including the money paid to Vermont by the United States government when a portion of the treasury surplus was distributed among the states in 1837) amounted in 1908 to $1,120,218.

    0
    0
  • The first private state bank was opened in 1817; an act of 1831 provided for a safety fund guaranteeing bank circulations and derived from a 41% tax on capital stock and a 1 o% tax on profits; but this law was modified in 1842, the tax being removed from banks giving specie guarantees; and a free banking act was passed in 1851.

    0
    0
  • The name (originally Ai i rr t) is generally derived from the nurse of Aeneas.

    0
    0
  • was almost wholly derived from the soundings of the expedition of Sir J.

    0
    0
  • CUSH, the eldest son of Ham, in the Bible, from whom seems to have been derived the name of the "Land of Cush," commonly rendered "Ethiopia" by the Septuagint and by the Vulgate.

    0
    0
  • Revenue is derived principally from customs duties, direct taxation being light.

    0
    0
  • The name Samaria is derived through the Gr.

    0
    0
  • The conception of work and of energy was originally derived from observation of purely mechanical phenomena, that is to say, phenomena in which the relative positions and motions of visible portions of matter were all that were taken into consideration.

    0
    0
  • Finally, Rumford reviewed all the sources from which the heat might have been supposed to be derived, and concluded that it was simply produced by the friction, and that the supply was inexhaustible.

    0
    0
  • Richard Strauss, in his edition of Berlioz's works on Instrumentation, paradoxically characterizes the classical orchestral style as that which was derived from chamber-music. Now it, is true that in Haydn's early days orchestras were small and generally private; and that the styles of orchestral and chamber music were not distinct; but surely nothing is clearer than that the whole history of the rise of classical chamber-music lies in its rapid differentiation from the coarse-grained orchestral style with which it began.

    0
    0
  • " The law in Assyria was derived from Babylonia but conserved early features long after they had disappeared elsewhere.

    0
    0
  • The profits when earned were derived mainly from foreign messages and transit messages between foreign countries, while the receipts from inland messages did not always cover expenses.

    0
    0
  • The evidence of date derived from changes in the language is more difficult to formulate, and the inquiry calls for the most diligent use of scientific method and critical judgment.

    0
    0
  • The requisite energy is derived from the battery.

    0
    0
  • The gross revenue derived from the trunk services was £480,658, being an average of 5.82d.

    0
    0
  • All our knowledge of him is derived from a passionately hostile polemic of Jerome (Adv.

    0
    0
  • Tortoiseshell, an important article of commerce, is derived from the Thalassochelys caretta, a sea turtle.

    0
    0
  • The imports op incomes from personal estate (ricchezza mobile) were introduced in 1866; it applies to incomes derived from investments, industry or personal enterprise, but not to landed revenues.

    0
    0
  • Since 1880, while income from the salt and lotto monopolies hai remained almost stationary, and that from land tax and octroi har - diminished, revenue derived from all other sources has notabl)

    0
    0
  • These materials, imperfect as they are, when combined with the notices derived from ancient writers and the evidence of archaeological excavations, may be considered as having furnished some results of reasonable certainty.

    0
    0
  • His title was derived from that of Frederick Barharossas judges; but he had no dependence on the empire.

    0
    0
  • The name condottiero, derived from condolta, a paid contract to supply so many fighting men in serviceable order, sufficiently indicates the nature of the business.

    0
    0
  • The brutalities of Austrias white coats in the north, the unintelligent repression then characteristic of the house of Savoy, the petty spite of the duke of Modena, the medieval obscurantism of pope and cardinals in the middle of the peninsula and the clownish excesses of Ferdinand in the south, could not blot out from the minds of the Italians the recollection of the benefits derived from the just laws, vigorous administration and enlightened aims of the great emperor.

    0
    0
  • The chief advantage derived by Italy from Crispis foreign policy was the increase of confidence in her government on the part of her allies and of Great Britain.

    0
    0
  • Most of the birds also are derived from the distant Indian region, while the IndoBurmese and Indo-Malayan regions are represented to a far less degree.

    0
    0
  • The name is probably derived from the Malay Handuman, coming from the ancient Hanuman (monkey).

    0
    0
  • Schulze.) elements, more especially by nervous (ganglion) cells and musclecells derived from the epithelial layer.

    0
    0
  • One, the " upper " or ex-umbral nervering, is derived from the ectoderm on the ex-umbral side of the velum; it is the larger of the two rings, containing more numerous but smaller ganglioncells, and innervates the tentacles.

    0
    0
  • Further, two distinct types of otocyst can be recognized in the Hydro medusae; that of the Leptolinae, in which the entire organ is ectodermal, concrement-cells and all, and the organ is not a tentaculocyst; and that of the Trachylinae, in which the organ is a tentaculocyst, and the concrement-cells are endodermal, derived from the endoderm of the modified tentacle, while the rest of the organ is ectodermal.

    0
    0
  • Brooks, on the other hand, as stated above, regards the medusa as the older type and looks upon both polyp and medusa, in the Hydromedusae, as derived from a free-swimming or floating actinula, the polyp being thus merely a fixed nutritive stage, possessing secondarily acquired powers of multiplication by budding.

    0
    0
  • This must not be taken to mean, however, that the medusa is derived from a sessile polyp; it must be regarded as a direct modification of the more ancient free actinula form, without primitively any intervening polyp-stage, such as has been introduced secondarily into the development of the Leptolinae and represents 'a revival, so to speak, of an ancestral form or larval stage, which has taken on a special role in the economy of the species.

    0
    0
  • Medusae with sense-organs represented by otocysts derived from modified tentacles (tentaculocysts), containing otoliths of endodermal origin, and innervated from the ex-umbral nerve-ring.

    0
    0
  • It may be regarded as derived from floating polyps similar to Nemopsis or Pelagohydra, which by budding produce a colony of polyps and also form medusa-buds.

    0
    0
  • The Treveri or Treviri, from whom the city derived its name, were one of the most powerful tribes among the Belgae, and according to Julius Caesar, who conquered them in 56 B.C., possessed the best cavalry.

    0
    0
  • When a series of the modifications of an anatomical structure has been sufficiently examined, it is frequently possible to decide that one particular condition is primitive, ancestral or central, and that the other conditions have been derived from it.

    0
    0
  • Sometimes it was given to deans alone or to prebendaries in the parishes whence they derived their prebends.

    0
    0
  • Its original name is said to have been Eskmouth, its present one being derived from a bed of mussels at the mouth of the river.

    0
    0
  • Its name, derived from the small river Cor, a tributary of the Tyne, is said to be associated with the Brigantian tribe of Corionototai.

    0
    0
  • James Prinsep was then devoting his rare genius to the decipherment of the early inscriptions of northern India, especially those of Asoka in the 3rd century B.C. He derived the greatest assistance from Tumour's work not only in historical information, but also as regards the forms of words and grammatical inflexions.

    0
    0
  • He shows that in the 3rd century B.C. the language used throughout northern India was practically one, and that it was derived directly from the speech of the Vedic Aryans, retaining many Vedic forms lost in the later classical Sanskrit.

    0
    0
  • equivalent reQaapa?coo-n) (now superseded by the term p roTEta " the fast"), are derived from the Sunday which was the fortieth day before Easter, as Quinquagesima and Sexagesima are the fiftieth and sixtieth, Quadragesima being until the 7th century the capul jejunii or first day of the fast.

    0
    0
  • The word is derived through M.

    0
    0
  • It appears, however, to have been partly derived from yet earlier Tertiary deposits (Eocene); and it occurs also as a derivative mineral in later formations, such as the drift.

    0
    0
  • In these northern habitats it attains a large size; the wood is very soft; the buds yield a gum-like balsam, from which the common name is derived; considered valuable as an.

    0
    0
  • The first was subsequently known as Mithradatum Damocrates, and the second as Theriaca Andromachi, the name Theriaca or Tiriaca being derived from the snake called Tyrus, the flesh of which was added to it by Andromachus.

    0
    0
  • The medicinal preparations which required the aid of a furnace, such as mineral earths, were undertaken by the chymists, who probably derived their name from the Alchymists, who flourished from the 14th to the 16th centuries.

    0
    0
  • The name is derived from Gr.

    0
    0
  • The algal fungi, Phycomycetes, are obviously derived from the Green Algae, while the remaining Fungi, the Eumycetes, appear to have sprung from the same stock as the Rhodophyceae.

    0
    0
  • The word is derived from the general resemblance of the texture of plant substance to that of a textile fabric, and dates from a period when the fundamental constitution of plant substance from individual cells was not yet discovered.

    0
    0
  • Above each cavity is situated a so-called water-sloma, no doubt derived phylogenetically from an ordinary stoma, and enclosed by guard-cells which have nearly or entirely lost the power of movement.

    0
    0
  • It is possible to suppose that this condition is derived from the astelic condition already referred to, but the evidence on the whole leads to the conclusion that it has ansen byan increase in the number of the bundles within the stele, the individuality of the bundle asserting itself after its escape from the original bundle-ring of the primitive cylinder.

    0
    0
  • Certain cells of the exterior are set apart for absorption of water from the soil, this being the source from which supplies are derived.

    0
    0
  • Expenditure of Energy by Plants.The energy of the plant is, af we have seen, derived originally from the kinetic radiant energy 01 the sun.

    0
    0
  • The spindle arises partly from the cytoplasm, partly from the nucleus, or it may be derived entirely from the nucleusintranuclear spindleas occurs in many of the lower plants (Fungi, &c.).

    0
    0
  • Flora), the primitive leaf was a reproductive leaf, a sporophyll, from which the foliage-leaf was derived by progressive sterilization.

    0
    0
  • It was formerly assumed, and the view is still held, that the foliage-leaf was the primitive form from which all others were derived, mainly on the ground that, in ontogeny, the foliage-leaf generally precedes the sporophyll.

    0
    0
  • Thus all existing hygrophytes (excepting the Algae) are considered to have been derived from land-plants which have adapted themselves to a watery habitat.

    0
    0
  • An Indian element derived from the northeast is most marked on the eastern side: the Himalayan Gloriosa will suffice as an example, and of more tropical types Phoenix and Calamus amongst palms.

    0
    0
  • And it cannot be doubted that the profusion of Melastomaceae in South America was not derived from elsewhere, but the result of local evolution.

    0
    0
  • In the Beaux-Arts, Batteux developed a theory which is derived from Locke through Voltaire's sceptical sensualism.

    0
    0
  • It is from these works that our knowledge of the gallant deeds of the English and other explorers of the Elizabethan age is mainly derived.

    0
    0
  • These may be looked The six upon as being all derived by various modifications or elementa ry arrangements of the single form-unit, the slope or inclined land forms. plane surface.

    0
    0
  • So it seems that the dynasty, which more than half a century later succeeded in throwing off the Assyrian yoke and founded the Median empire, was derived from this Dayukku, and that his name was thus introduced into the Median traditions, which contrary to history considered him as founder of the kingdom.

    0
    0
  • thick, containing rolled fossil bones, cetacean and fish teeth, and shells of the Crag period, with nodules or pebbles of phosphatic matter derived from the London Clay, and often investing fossils from that formation.

    0
    0
  • The phosphatic nodules occurring throughout the Red Crag of Suffolk are regarded as derived from the Coralline Crag.

    0
    0
  • The Cambridgeshire coprolites are believed to be derived from deposits of Gault age; they are obtained by washing from a stratum about a foot thick, resting on the Gault, at the base of the Chalk Marl, and probably homotaxeous with the Chloritic Marl.

    0
    0
  • [the city] Bast" (B;s-t), a city better known by its later name, P-ubasti, "place of Ubasti"; thus the goddess derived her name Ubasti from her city (Bast), and in turn the city derived its name P-ubasti from that of the goddess; the Greeks, confusing the name of the city with that of the goddess, called the latter Bubastis, and the former also Bubastis (later Bubastos).

    0
    0
  • Further, the combinations B X Y and A X Y cannot be derived from each other, but both directly from A B X Y in two different directions.

    0
    0
  • For instance, the Tyranninae are anacromyod, while the closely allied Pipras and Cotingas are katacromyod; both these modifications can be shown to have been derived but recently from the weak mesoand oligomyodian condition which prevails in the majority of the so-called Oligomyodi.

    0
    0
  • There are few or no local taxes, the municipal chest being filled by the revenues derived from the fertile delta-land, the Kampeneiland, which is always being built up at the mouth of the Ysel.

    0
    0
  • Like Anaximenes, he believed air to be the one source of all being, and all other substances to be derived from it by condensation and rarefaction.

    0
    0
  • The name Masorah (Massorah) is usually derived from masar, to hand on, and explained as "tradition."

    0
    0
  • In North Africa, probably in the 9th century, appeared the book known under the name of Eldad ha-Dani, giving an account of the ten tribes, from which much medieval legend was derived; 2 and in Kairawan the medical and philosophical treatises of Isaac Israeli, who died in 932.

    0
    0
  • Begriff), in philosophy, a term applied to a general idea derived from and considered apart from the particulars observed by the senses.

    0
    0
  • The name is generally said to be derived from the Gr.

    0
    0
  • Purple corundum, or sapphire of amethystine tint, is called Oriental amethyst, but this expression is often applied by jewellers to fine examples of the ordinary amethystine quartz, even when not derived from Eastern sources.

    0
    0
  • In the 1st century B.C. Buthrotum became a Roman colony, and derived some importance from its position near Corcyra, and on the main highway between Dyrrachium and Ambracia.

    0
    0
  • - Of the national revenue nearly half is derived from customs duties, taxes being levied also on real estate, licences, tobacco, stamped paper and in other ways.

    0
    0
  • The solid derived from SA is crystalline and soluble in carbon bisulphide, that from S, is amorphous and insoluble.

    0
    0
  • Although this acid appears to be derived from an oxide S203, it is not certain that the known sesquioxide is its anhydride.

    0
    0
  • These works formed to a large extent the source from which the middle ages derived their knowledge of Aristotle.

    0
    0
  • The book contains expressions such as daemones, angelica virtus, and purgatoria dementia, which have been thought to be derived from the Christian faith; but they are used in a heathen sense, and are explained sufficiently by the circumstance that Boetius was on intimate terms with Christians.

    0
    0
  • Large edible nuts are derived from Coula edulis of the order Olacineae.

    0
    0
  • Many trees offer magnificent displays of flowers at certain seasons of the year; perhaps the loveliest effect is derived from the bushes and trailing creepers of the Combretum genus, which, during the "winter" months from December to March, cover the scrub and the forest with mantles of rose colour.

    0
    0
  • 24 §§ 3-7) gives a sketch of Basilides' school of thought, perhaps derived from Justin's Syntagma.

    0
    0
  • Hawaii, Apai in the Tonga Islands, Evava in the Marquesas, all of which are held to be derived from Savii or Savaiki.

    0
    0
  • Bede states that Radwald was the son of Tytili, the son of Wuffa, from whom the East Anglian royal family derived their name Wuffingas.

    0
    0
  • Many of the Hydrophilidae construct, for the protection of their eggs, a cocoon formed of a silky material derived from glands opening at the tip of the abdomen.

    0
    0
  • From the mines of Thrace, and perhaps from the harbour dues and from the mines of Laurium, he derived a large revenue; under his encouragement, Miltiades had planted an Athenian colony on the shores of the Thracian Chersonese; he had even made friends with Thessaly and Macedonia, as is evidenced by the hospitality extended by them to Hippias on his final expulsion.

    0
    0
  • It is certainly derived, through Rossiya, from Slavonic Rus or Ros (Byzantine `Pws or `Pc o-oc), a name first given to the Scandinavians who founded a principality on the Dnieper in the 9th century; and afterwards extended to the collection of Russian states of which this principality formed the nucleus.

    0
    0
  • The word Rus, in former times wrongly connected with the tribal name Rhoxolani, is more probably derived from Ruotsi, a Finnish name for the Swedes, which seems to be a corruption of the Swedish rothsmenn, " rowers " or " seafarers."

    0
    0
  • The only sources of extraordinary revenue still remaining under that head are the money derived from loans and the perpetual deposits in the Imperial Bank.

    0
    0
  • Closely akin to these, though not derived from the Old Believers, are certain mystic sects which deny the efficacy of the sacraments altogether.

    0
    0
  • There can be little doubt but that the United States would long ago have disintegrated into separate, warring republics, had they not been bound together by railways, and standards of safety were 1 These figures are derived from a total.

    0
    0
  • Of these there are two main systems: (1) a continuous cable is carried over two main drums at each end of the line, and the motion is derived either (a) from the weight of the descending load or (b) from a motor acting on one of the main drums; (2) each end of the cable is attached to wagons, one set of which accordingly ascends as the other descends.

    0
    0
  • The colony is self-supporting, the revenue being largely derived from the drink duties, and there is no public debt.

    0
    0
  • HEBREW RELIGION (I) Introductory.-To trace the history of the religion of the Hebrews is a complex task, because the literary sources from which our knowledge of that history is derived are themselves complex and replete with problems as to age and authorship, some of which have been solved according to the consensus of nearly all the best scholars, but some of which still await solution or are matters of dispute.

    0
    0
  • It is highly significant that Elijah, when driven from the northern kingdom by the threats of the Tyrian Jezebel, retreats to the old sanctuary at Horeb, whence Moses derived his inspiration and his TOrah.

    0
    0
  • The biblical name Kittim, derived from Citium, is in fact used quite generally for Cyprus as a whole; 3 later also for Greeks and Romans in general.

    0
    0
  • From the emoluments of a profession he " might have derived an ample fortune, or a competent income instead of being stinted to the same narrow allowance, to be increased only by an event which he sincerely deprecated."

    0
    0
  • But while it may be doubted whether his presence in parliament was of any direct utility to the legislative business of the country, there can be no question of the present advantage which he derived from it in the prosecution of the great work of his life - an advantage of which he was fully conscious when he wrote: " The eight sessions that I sat in parliament were a school of civil prudence, the first and most essential virtue of an historian."

    0
    0
  • For some months he found amusement in the preparation of the delightful Memoirs (1789) from which most of our knowledge of his personal history is derived; but his letters to friends in England, written between 1788 and 1793 occasionally betray a slight but unmistakable tone of ennui.

    0
    0
  • Practically all the revenue is derived from the taxation of real and personal property.

    0
    0
  • Rivoira, in the book cited below, shows that many of the characteristic architectural details can be traced back to a classical and in particular a Roman origin, and were not derived from the East, e.g.

    0
    0
  • The plan is no doubt derived from that of a Roman tomb.

    0
    0
  • The capitals are, in the lower order, the characteristic funnel-shaped rectangular Byzantine capitals, some of them with open work, bearing cushions; this is a type probably derived from the cushion itself, and developed in the East about the second half of the 5th century.

    0
    0
  • 495), while the plan is derived from a Christian baptistery, or from such a building as the so-called temple of Minerva Medica at Rome.

    0
    0
  • An old popular belief current in different countries, and derived from common observation, connected mosquitoes with malaria, and from time to time this theory found support in more scientific quarters on general grounds, but it lacked demonstration and attracted little attention.

    0
    0
  • The conclusions derived from the microscopical laboratory were confirmed by actual experiment.

    0
    0
  • The fundamental position of the work is that all legislative as well as all paternal power is derived from God, and that the authority of every law resolves itself into His.

    0
    0
  • Niall of the black knee), one of the most famous of the early Irish kings, from whom the family surname of the O'Neills was derived.

    0
    0
  • 1 3Xaa477uLa, profane language, slander, probably derived from root of Ovi rrEt y, to injure, and 017µr7, speech), literally, defamation or evil speaking, but more peculiarly restricted to an indignity offered to the Deity by words or writing.

    0
    0
  • He thus writes S+02=S02+7110o cal., which expresses the fact that the intrinsic energy of the quantities of sulphur and oxygen considered exceeds that of the sulphur dioxide derived from them by 71100 cal.

    0
    0
  • COUNT OF MONTFERRAT, a title derived from a territory south of the Po and east of Turin, and held by a family who were in the 12th century one of the most considerable in Lombardy.

    0
    0
  • Festus found Judaea infested with robbers and the sicarii, who mingled with the crowds at the feasts and stabbed their enemies with the daggers (sicae) from which their name was derived.

    0
    0
  • The principal wealth of the island is derived from its olive groves; notwithstanding the destruction of many thousands of trees during each successive insurrection, the production is apparently undiminished, and will probably increase very considerably owing to the planting of young trees and the improved methods of cultivation which the Government is endeavouring to promote.

    0
    0
  • Notwithstanding the advance of £160,000 made by the four protecting powers after the institution of autonomous government and the profits (£61,937) derived from the issue of a new currency in 1900, there was at the beginning of 1906 an accumulated deficit of £23,470, which represents the floating debt.

    0
    0
  • The story of the baetylus, or stone swallowed by Saturn under the belief that it was his son, the Cretan Zeus, seems to cover the same idea and has been derived from the same Semitic word.

    0
    0
  • Some of these objects, such as certain forms of swords and vases, seem to be of local fabric, but derived from originals going back to the beginning of the Late Minoan age.

    0
    0
  • It was from this source that he derived the wisdom which enabled him to give to the Cretans the excellent system of laws and governments that earned for him the reputation of being the greatest legislator of antiquity.

    0
    0
  • c. xv.) it is derived from Eostre, or Ostdra, the Anglo-Saxon goddess of spring, to whom the month answering to our April, and called Eostur-monath, was dedicated.

    0
    0
  • country; (3) the Octave of Easter, during which the newlybaptized wore their white garments, which they laid aside on the Sunday after Easter, known as Dominica in albis depositis from this custom; another name for this Sunday was Pascha clausum, or the close of Easter, and from a clipping of the word "close" the English name of "Low" Sunday is believed to be derived; (4) Eastertide proper, or the paschal season beginning at Easter and lasting till Whit Sunday, during the whole of which time the festival character of the Easter season was maintained.

    0
    0
  • The town dates from 1780 and owes its rise to the granite quarries at Craignair and elsewhere in the vicinity, from which were derived the supplies used in the construction of the Thames Embankment, the docks at Odessa and Liverpool and other works.

    0
    0
  • The fossils are few, and in some cases probably derived from the underlying formations.

    0
    0
  • The revenue derived from the sales and leases of this land constitutes an endowment fund upon which the state as trustee pays 6% interest.

    0
    0
  • All the Semitic languages' are built up from triliteral roots: that is, the great majority of the words are derived from a simple verbal form, of which the essential elements are three consonants.

    0
    0
  • The Syriac alphabet, which derived its letters from forms ultimately akin to those of the Old Hebrew and Phoenician alphabets, has the same twenty-two letters as the Hebrew.

    0
    0
  • - As in the other Semitic languages, these stand almost entirely outside the system of triliteral roots, being mainly derived from certain demonstrative letters or particles.

    0
    0
  • He derived a revenue from taxes which he was empowered to exact.

    0
    0
  • The systematic theosophy of Plotinus and his successors does not belong to the present article, except so far as it is the presupposition of their mysticism; but, inasmuch as the mysticism of the medieval Church is directly derived from Neoplatonism through the speculations of the pseudo-Dionysius, Neoplatonic mysticism fills an important section in any historical review of the subject.

    0
    0
  • 1207); but, while the movements just mentioned were reformatory without being heretical, this is very far from being the case with the mystical pantheism derived by Amalric from the writings of Erigena.

    0
    0
  • Biisgen that the sweet secretion (honey-dew) of the aphids is not derived, as generally believed, from the paired cornicles on the fifth abdominal segment, but from the intestine, whence it exudes in drops and is swallowed by the ants.

    0
    0
  • It would appear probable, however, that the former of these words was derived from an Assyrian or Hebrew root, which signifies the west or setting sun, and the latter from a corresponding root meaning the east or rising sun, and that they were used at one time to imply the west and the east.

    0
    0
  • The people of Cochin-China are called Anam; it is probably from a corruption of their name for the capital of Tongking, Kechao, that the Portuguese Cochin has been derived.

    0
    0
  • The Manchus and Mongols are chiefly Buddhist, with letters derived from the ancient Syriac. The Manchus are now said to be gradually falling under the influence of Chinese civilization, and to be losing their old nomadic habits, and even their peculiar language.

    0
    0
  • The name of Aryan has been given to the races speaking languages derived from, or akin to, the ancient form of Sanskrit, who now occupy the temperate zone extending from the Mediterranean, across the highlands of Asia Minor, Persia and Afghanistan, to India.

    0
    0
  • The languages of the south are Dravidian, not Sanskritic. The letters of both classes of languages, which also vary considerably, are all modifications of the ancient Pali, and probably derived from the Dravidians, not from the Aryans.

    0
    0
  • Thus Greece excelled the Eastern countries from whom she may have derived her civilization, and Buddhism had a far more brilliant career outside India than in it.

    0
    0
  • Much of this art is Greek in origin, being derived from the Perso-Greek states on the north-west frontiers.

    0
    0
  • Korea received its civilization and religion from China, but differs in language, and to some extent in customs. An alphabet derived from Indian sources is in use as well as Chinese writing.

    0
    0
  • Such civilization as the Mongols possess is a mixture of Chinese and Indian, the latter derived chiefly through Tibet, but their alphabet is a curious instance of transplantation.

    0
    0
  • Such principles are not derived from sensation, but are "suggested" on occasion of sensation, in such a way as to constitute the necessary conditions of our having perceptive experience at all.

    0
    0
  • The name of Holborn was formerly derived from Old Bourne, a tributary of the Fleet, the valley of which is clearly seen where Holborn Viaduct crosses Farringdon Street.

    0
    0
  • The name of Bloomsbury is commonly derived from William Blemund, a lord of the manor in the 15th century.

    0
    0
  • where this condition is usually not to be observed, there is embryological evidence that the existing state of affairs is derived from this.

    0
    0
  • Bergh (for Lumbricus and Criodrilus), whose figures show a derivation of the entire nephridium from mesoblast, and an absence of any connexion between successive nephridia by any continuous band, epiblastic or mesoblastic. A midway position is taken up by Wilson, who asserts the mesoblastic formation of the funnel, but also asserts the presence of a continuous band of epiblast from which certainly the terminal vesicle of the nephridium, and doubtfully the glandular part of the tube is derived.

    0
    0
  • We have thus the replacement of a spermatheca, corresponding to those of the remaining families of Oligochaeta, and derived, as is believed, from the epidermis, by a structure performing the same function, but derived from the mesoblastic tissues, and with a cavity which is coelom.

    0
    0
  • The water supply of the city is derived from eight deep wells.

    0
    0
  • that of the prince as representing within the limits of his dominions the monarchy of God over all things, culminated in the 17th century in the doctrine of the divine right of kings, and was defined in the famous dictum of Louis XIV.: L'etat c'est moil The conception of monarchy was derived through Christianity from the theocracies of the East; it was the underlying principle of the medieval empire and also of the medieval papacy, the rule of the popes during the period of its greatest development being sometimes called "the papal.

    0
    0
  • in 1510; and the college appears to have derived no advantage from Wolsey's subsequent greatness.

    0
    0
  • Her efforts to restore it in1526-1528were ineffectual; her prestige had depended upon her reputation for wealth derived from the fact that she had acted in recent years as the paymaster of Europe.

    0
    0
  • The appeal to Rome was a natural course to be advocated by Wolsey, whose despotism over the English church depended upon an authority derived from Rome; but it was probably a mistake.

    0
    0
  • The word is derived from Lat.

    0
    0
  • He derived much of his information from the letters of important personages, which he sometimes inserts, but much more from conversation with the eye-witnesses of events.

    0
    0
  • At the root of the work lies a theory, whencesoever derived, which identified the Goths with the Scythians, whose country Darius Hystaspes invaded, and with the Getae of Dacia, whom Trajan conquered.

    0
    0
  • avw,uaXla, unevenness, derived from a y -, privative, and ouaXbs, even), a deviation from the common rule.

    0
    0
  • Cultivated pears, whose number is enormous, are without doubt derived from one or two wild species widely distributed throughout Europe and western Asia, and sometimes forming part of the natural vegetation of the forests.

    0
    0
  • Scanty information on its agriculture is to be derived from the Works and Days of Hesiod (about the 8th century B.C.), the Oeconomicus of Xenophon (4th century B.C.), the History of Plants and the Origin of Plants of Theophrastus (4th century B.C.).

    0
    0
  • The gradual advance in the price of farm produce soon after the year 1760, occasioned by the increase of popula tion and of wealth derived from manufactures and 1760 to 1815.

    0
    0
  • The non-nitrogenous substance (the fat) in the increase in live weight of an animal is, at any rate in great part, if not entirely, derived from the non-nitrogenous constituents of the food.

    0
    0
  • In the course of the next few years he wrote comparatively little, but he continued his reading, and also derived much, benefit from discussions held twice a week at Grote's house in Threadneedle Street.

    0
    0
  • Thus the productive power of England was unrivalled, and her manufactures and business men, under a regime rapidly approximating to complete freedom of trade, could reap the full advantages to be derived from the possession of great national resources and production by machinery.

    0
    0
  • The gonaduct, therefore, is derived from the topographically right kidney.

    0
    0
  • This conclusion has shown that the Euthyneura do not represent an archaic form of Gastropoda, but are themselves derived from streptoneurous forms. The difference between the two sub-classes has been shown to be slight; certain of the more archaic Tectibranchia (Actaeon) and Pulmonata (Chilina) still have the visceral commissure long and not untwisted.

    0
    0
  • It will be remembered that, according to Spengel, the osphradium of mollusca is definitely and intimately related to the gill-plume or ctenidium, being always placed near the base of that organ; further, Spengel has shown that the nerve-supply of this olfactory organ is always derived from the visceral loop. Accord ingly, the nerve-supply FIG.

    0
    0
  • o, Mouth; other letters as in a totally distinct series of functional gills, which are not derived from the modification of the typical molluscan ctenidium.

    0
    0
  • The condition usually spoken of as a " proboscis " appears to be derived from the condition of a simple rostrum (having the mouth at its extremity) by the process of incomplete introversion of that simple rostrum.

    0
    0
  • The first is flaccid and sluggish in its movements, and has not much power of contraction; its epipodial lobes are enormously developed and extend far forward along the body; it gives out when handled an abundance of purple liquid, which is derived from cutaneous glands situated on the under side of the free edge of the mantle.

    0
    0
  • Grosvenor these nematocysts are derived from the hydroids on which the animals feed.

    0
    0
  • Euthyneurous Gastropoda, probably derived from ancestral forms similar to the Tectibranchiate Opisthobranchia by adaptation to a terrestrial life.

    0
    0
  • The invaginated cells (derived from the division of the four big cells) form the endoderm or arch-enteron; the outer cells are the ectoderm.

    0
    0
  • The body-cavity and the muscular, fibrous and vascular tissues are traced partly to two symmetrically disposed " mesoblasts," which bud off from the invaginated arch-enteron, partly to cells derived from the ectoderm, which at a very early stage is connected by long processes with the invaginated endoderm.

    0
    0
  • This, however, is not the primitive form of the legend, which a close examination shows to be derived from the following story related by Eusebius in his Historia Ecclesiastica (vii.

    0
    0
  • The father's literary tastes, general inquisitiveness, and powers of intrigue reappeared in Napoleon, who, however, derived from his mother Letizia (a descendant of the Ramolino and Pietra Santa families) the force of will, the power of forming a quick decision and of maintaining it against all odds, which made him so terrible an opponent both in war and in diplomacy.

    0
    0
  • General du Teil, younger brother of the baron, had recently published a work, L' Usage de l'artillerie nouvelle; and it is now known that Bonaparte derived from this work and from those of Guibert and Bourcet that leading principle, concentration of effort against one point of the enemy's line, which he had advocated at Toulon and which he everywhere put in force in his campaigns.

    0
    0
  • Here Arsaces and his brother Tiridates are derived from the royal house of the Achaemenids, probably from Artaxerxes II.; the young Tiridates is insulted by the prefect Agathocles or Pherecles; in revenge the brothers with five companions (corresponding to the seven Persians of Darius) slay him, and Arsaces becomes king.

    0
    0
  • History of an inferential and summary sort only can be derived from monuments in the absence of written records.

    0
    0
  • Even in that event, the information which would be derived from the Cnossian tablets would probably make but a small addition to history, since in very large part they are evidently mere inventories of tribute and stores.

    0
    0
  • Others again cite the old-established power and productivity of Crete; the immense advantage it derived from insularity, natural fertility and geographical relation to the wider area of east Mediterranean civilizations; and the absence of evidence elsewhere for the gradual growth of a culture powerful enough to dominate the Aegean.

    0
    0
  • Hume's empiricism, combined with a belief in biological evolution (derived from Herbert Spencer), was the chief feature in English thought during the third quarter of the 10th century.

    0
    0
  • For our knowledge of their doctrinal system, however, we still depend chiefly upon the sacred books already mentioned, consisting of fragments of very various antiquity derived from an older literature.8 Of these the largest and most important is the Sidra' rabbd (" Great Book"), known also as Ginza - ("Treasure"), consisting of two unequal parts, of which the larger is called yamina (to the right hand) and the smaller s'znala (to the left hand), because of the manner in which they are bound together.

    0
    0
  • those derived from sedimentary and those derived from igneous rocks, or, as they have been called, the "paraschists" and the "orthoschists."

    0
    0
  • and of the muscid flies, an anterior and a posterior endodermThe embryo thus becomes transferred to the dorsal face of the egg, rudiment both derived from the " endoblast " become apparent but at a later stage it undergoes reversion to its original ventral at an early stage, in close association with the stomodaeum and position.

    0
    0
  • He finds that the endoderm arises may be readily distinguished, six of which subsequently enter into from an anterior and a posterior rudiment derived from the " endothe formation of the head, three going to the thorax and twelve to blast," that many of the cells of these rudiments wander into the the abdomen.

    0
    0
  • The two modes of growth are directly opposed, and at first sight it appears that this fact negatives the view that Endopterygota have been derived from Exopterygota.

    0
    0
  • The wingless forms in question are always allied to winged forms, and there is every reason to believe that they have been really derived from winged forms. There are also insects (fleas, &c.) in which metamorphosis of a " complete " character exists, though the insects never develop wings.

    0
    0
  • He also admitted among his characteristics a physiological consideration (apparently derived from Oken 1) dividing the class A y es into two sections Altrices and Praecoces, according as the young were fed by their parents or, from the first, fed themselves.

    0
    0
  • 1 Indeed, the study of this memoir, limited though it be in scope, could not fail to convince any one that it proceeded from the mind of one who taught with the authority derived directly from original knowledge, and not from association with the scribes - a conviction that has become strengthened as, in a series of successive memoirs, the stores of more than twenty years' silent observation and unremitting research were unfolded, and, more than that, the hidden forces of the science of morphology were gradually brought to bear upon almost each subject that came under discussion.

    0
    0
  • Our knowledge of the Indian Hunas is chiefly derived from coins, from a few inscriptions distributed from the Punjab to central India, and from the account of the Chinese pilgrim Hsuan Tsang, who visited the country just a century after the death of Mihiragula.

    0
    0
  • The almuce was originally a head-covering only, worn by the clergy, but adopted also by the laity, and the German word Miitze, " cap," is later than the introduction of the almuce in church, and is derived from it (M.

    0
    0
  • in diameter, and by a dome over each of the arms. The plan is derived from the Church of the Holy Apostles at Constantinople, now covered by the mosque of Mahommed II., and bears a strong resemblance to the plan of St Front at Perigueux in France (I 120).

    0
    0
  • The word Fondaco (derived through Arabic from the Greek iravSoxE-ov), as applied to some of the Venetian palaces, denotes the mercantile headquarters of a foreign trading nation.

    0
    0
  • The doge assumed the title of duke of Dalmatia, and a great step was taken towards the supremacy of Venice in the Adriatic, which was essential to the free development of her commerce and also enabled her to reap the pecuniary advantages to be derived from the Crusades.

    0
    0
  • The school revenues are derived from the sale and rental of public lands granted by Congress, and of the salt and swamp lands devoted by the state to such purposes, from a uniform levy of one mill on each dollar of taxable property in the state, from local levies (averaging 7.2 mills in township districts and 10.07 mills in separate districts in 1908), from certain fines and licences, and from tuition fees paid by non-resident pupils.

    0
    0
  • Three institutions for higher education are supported in large measure by the state: Ohio University at Athens, founded in 1804 on the proceeds derived from two townships granted by Congress to the Ohio Company; Miami University (chartered in 1809) at Oxford, which received the proceeds from a township granted by Congress in the Symmes purchase; and Ohio State University (1873) at Columbus, which received the proceeds from the lands granted by Congress under the act of 1862 for the establishment of agricultural and mechanical colleges, and reorganized as a university in 1878.

    0
    0
  • About one-half of the annual common school fund is derived from local taxes; the state levy for this fund in 1909 was one mill, and the total receipts were $2,382,353.

    0
    0
  • The university fund is derived from special taxes levied for the four institutions which receive aid from the state; in 1909 the levy was 0.245 mills and the total receipts were $582,843.

    0
    0
  • 18, however, from which the Chronicler derived his statement, reads " Tamar " in the Hebrew text, with " Tadmor " in the Hebrew margin; there can be no doubt that the text is right and refers to Tamar in the land of Judah (Ezek.

    0
    0
  • This letter corresponds to the second symbol in the Phoenician alphabet, and appears in the same position in all the European alphabets, except those derived, like the Russian, from medieval Greek, in which the pronunciation of this symbol had changed from b to v.

    0
    0
  • Egyptian cotton is usually regarded as being derived from the same species.

    0
    0
  • Amongst the varieties of cotton which are derived from this species appear to be Pernambuco, Maranham, Ceara, Aracaty and Maceio cottons.

    0
    0
  • Levant cotton is derived from this species.

    0
    0
  • The profit derived from the 20% thus removed is a very large one.

    0
    0
  • At the close of the war in 1815 the revival of trade led to an increased demand, and the progress of cotton cultivation in America became rapid and continuous, until at length about 85% of the raw material used by English manufacturers was derived from this one source.

    0
    0
  • As most of the Lancashire cotton mills lie far from Manchester, direct importations to that city do not usually dispense with a " handling," and frequently save little or nothing in freight rates, though in some cases the economy derived from direct importation is considerable.

    0
    0
  • The impurities occasionally present in commercial citric acid are salts of potassium and sodium, traces of iron, lead and copper derived from the vessels used for its evaporation and crystallization, and free sulphuric, tartaric and even oxalic acid.

    0
    0
  • Oil fields are being continually opened up in other parts of the world, and whilst America still maintains her position as the largest petroleum producer, the world's supplies are now being derived from a steadily increasing number of centres.

    0
    0
  • As early as 1804, Humboldt expressed the opinion that petroleum was produced by distillation from deep-seated strata, and Karl Reichenbach in 1834, suggested that it was derived from the action of heat on the turpentine of pine-trees, whilst Brunet, in 1838, adumbrated a similar theory of origin on the ground of certain laboratory experiments.

    0
    0
  • Among those who have considered that it is derived from the decomposition of both animal and vegetable marine organisms may be mentioned J.

    0
    0
  • Sugar and maize; lemons, apricots and melons; cotton, muslin and damask; lilac and purple (azure and gules are words derived Fulk of Anjou, = Melisinda Alice = Bohemund II.

    0
    0
  • Consequently south Palestine has been continuously " Arabized "; and indeed the whole of Syria has been characterized by racial and religious fusions, and by civilization of a singularly syncretic and derived kind, of which the ancient Phoenician is a sufficient example.

    0
    0
  • The art of writing was, derived by the Arabs from the Syrians.

    0
    0
  • From these lands the Egyptian kings often derived rich booty, so that in those days Syria must have been civilized and prosperous.

    0
    0
  • These posterior brain-lobes, which in all Heteronemertines are in direct continuity of tissue with the upper pair of principal lobes, cease to have this intimate connexion in the Metanemertini; and, although still constituted of (I) a ciliated duct, opening out externally, (2) nervous tissue surrounding it, and (3) histological elements distinctly different from the nervous, and most probably directly derived from the oesophageal outgrowths, they are nevertheless here no longer constantly situated behind the upper brain-lobes and directly connected with them, but are found sometimes behind, sometimes beside and sometimes before the brain-lobes.

    0
    0
  • The proboscis is an invagination from the epiblast; the proboscidian sheath appears in the mesoblast, but is perhaps originally derived from the hypoblast.

    0
    0
  • Some positive idea of his speculations may be derived from two of his observations: the one in which he notices that the parts of animals and plants are in general rounded in form, and the other dealing with the sense of hearing, which, in virtue of its limited receptivity, he compares ' If this be the proper translation of Aulus Gellius, Noctes Atticae, x.

    0
    0
  • In the manufacture of fertilizers, the raw material for which is derived from the phosphate beds, Florida's aggregate product in 1900 was valued at $500,239, and in 1905 at $1,590,371, an increase of 217.9% in five years.

    0
    0
  • This sulphur again was not ordinary sulphur, but some principle derived from it, which constituted the philosopher's stone or elixir - white for silver and yellow or 1 " Some traditionary knowledge might be secreted in the temples and monasteries of Egypt; much useful experience might have been acquired in the practice of arts and manufactures, but the science of chemistry owes its origin and improvement to the industry of the Saracens.

    0
    0
  • It may be noted that the word " alembic " is derived from the Greek "cup," with the Arabic article prefixed, and that the instrument is figured in the MSS.

    0
    0
  • Our knowledge of Lanfranc's polemics is chiefly derived from the tract De cor pore et sanguine Domini which he wrote many years later (after 1079) when Berengar had been finally condemned.

    0
    0
  • The story of Memnon was the subject of the lost Aethiopis of Arctinus of Miletus; the chief source from which our knowledge of him is derived is the second book of the Posthomerica of Quintus Smyrnaeus (itself probably an adaptation of the works of Arctinus and Lesches), where his exploits and death are described at length.

    0
    0
  • Knowledge of Neolithic times is derived principally from four sources, Tumuli or ancient burial-mounds, the Lake-dwellings of Switzerland, the Kitchenmiddens of Denmark and the Bone-Caves.

    0
    0
  • In the next place comes the evidence derived from the whole range of ancient literature and specially from descriptions of the city or its different localities.

    0
    0
  • These early fortifications of the Acropolis, ascribed to the primitive non-hellenic Pelasgi, must be distinguished from the Pelasgicum or Pelargicum, which was in all prob ab i l i ty an encircling wall, built round the base of the g citadel and furnished with nine gates from which it derived the name of Enneapylon.

    0
    0
  • The Agrippeum, a covered theatre, derived its name from Vipsanius Agrippa, whose statue was set up, about 27 B.C., beneath the north wing of the Acropolis propylaea, on the high rectangular base still remaining.

    0
    0
  • The name of the village was derived from a Swede, Jeremiah Dobbs, whose family probably moved hither from Delaware, and who at the beginning of the last quarter of the 18th century had a skiff ferry, which was kept up by his family for a century afterwards.

    0
    0
  • Bradley, "is ultimately derived from the great Aryan sunmyth.

    0
    0
  • On the foothills and in the less rugged mountain districts there is a thin but rich clay soil derived from coral limestone.

    0
    0
  • Whether it was derived from the Canaanites, who had similar festivals (Judges xxix.

    0
    0
  • It is from an incidental remark of his own, namely, that the year of the siege of Mount Badon - one of the battles fought between the Saxons and the Britons - was also the year of his own nativity, that the date of his birth has been derived; the place, however, is not mentioned.

    0
    0
  • The revenue derived from the tax in the first year of its levy amounted to £1,200,000.

    0
    0
  • aes, in its derived sense of "money"), the name (in full, aerarium stabulum, treasure-house) given in ancient Rome to the public treasury, and in a secondary sense to the public finances.

    0
    0
  • The climax of Mahommedan work in India is reached in that of the Mogul emperors at Agra, Delhi and Fatehpur-Sikri, in which there is a very close resemblance in design to the mosques of Syria, Egypt, and Persia; the four-centred arch, which is in the Mogul style, finds general acceptance, and was probably derived from Persian sources.

    0
    0
  • 37, where Atargatis is derived from &Tep Far050s,"without Gatis," - a queen who is said to have forbidden the eating of fish).

    0
    0
  • Spinoza derived from Crescas his distinction between attributes and properties; he shared Crescas's views on creation and free will, and in the whole trend of his thought the influence of Crescas is strongly marked.

    0
    0
  • (1) particles derived by limiting mechanical subdivision, the modern molecule, and (2) particles derived from the first class by chemical subdivision, i.e.

    0
    0
  • If two compounds combined, the + signs of the free compounds were discarded, and the number of atoms denoted by an Arabic index placed after the elements, and from these modified symbols the symbol of the new compound was derived in the same manner as simple compounds were built up from their elements.

    0
    0
  • Dumas went no further that thus epitomizing his observations; and the next development was made in 1836 by Auguste Laurent, who, having amplified and discussed the applicability of Dumas' views, promulgated his Nucleus Theory, which assumed the existence of " original nuclei or radicals " (radicaux or noyaux fondamentaux) composed of carbon and hydrogen, and " derived nuclei " (radicaux or noyaux derives) formed from the original nuclei by the substitution of hydrogen or the addition of other elements, and having properties closely related to the primary nuclei.

    0
    0
  • Williamson showed how alcohol and ether were to be regarded as derived from water by substituting one or both hydrogen atoms by the ethyl group; he derived acids and the acid anhydrides from the same type; and from a comparison of many inorganic and the simple organic compounds he concluded that this notion of a " water-type " clarified, in no small measure, the conception of the structure of compounds.

    0
    0
  • There also exists an extensive class of compounds termed the " heterocyclic series " - these compounds are derived from ring systems containing atoms other than carbon; this class is more generally allied to the aromatic series than to the aliphatic.

    0
    0
  • This compound may be considered as derived from methane, CH 4, by replacing a hydrogen atom by the monovalent group CH 3, known as methyl; hence ethane may be named " methylmethane."

    0
    0
  • We derived this substance from ethane by introducing a meth y l group; hence it may be termed " methylethane."

    0
    0
  • Deferring the detailed discussion of cyclic or ringed hydrocarbons, a correlation of the various types or classes of compounds which may be derived from hydrocarbon nuclei will now be given.

    0
    0
  • From the primary amines are derived the diazo compounds and azo compounds; closely related are the hydrazines (q.v.).

    0
    0
  • Thus from the acid-amides, which we have seen to be closely related to the acids themselves, we obtain, by replacing the carbonyl oxygen by chlorine, the acidamido-chlorides, R CC1 2 NH 2, from which are derived the imido-chlorides, R CC1:NH, by loss of one molecule of hydrochloric acid.

    0
    0
  • compounds derived by substituting aliphatic radicals in the benzene nucleus; such a compound is methylbenzene or toluene, C 6 H 5 CH 3.

    0
    0
  • It remains, therefore, to consider Erlenmeyer's formula and those derived from the centric hypothesis.

    0
    0
  • The more important types are derived from aromatic nuclei, benzene, naphthalene, &c.; the ortho-di-derivatives of the first named, lending themselves particularly to the formation of condensed nuclei.

    0
    0
  • Thiophene yields a similar series: isothiazole (only known as the condensed ring, isobenzothiazole), thiazole, diazosulphides, piazthioles, azosulphimes and thiobiazole (the formulae are easily derived from the preceding series by replacing oxygen by sulphur).

    0
    0
  • From the pyrone ring the following series of compounds are derived (for brevity, the hydrogen atoms are not printed): Penthiophene gives, by a similar introduction of nitrogen atoms, penthiazoline, corresponding to meta-oxazine, and para-thiazine, CH 2 CH 2o CH CO „ .„0 C ?

    0
    0
  • By the indirect method Kopp derived the following atomic volumes: C. 0.

    0
    0
  • it must remain constant for the same substance at any temperature and in any form) that quantitative relations between refractivity and chemical composition can be derived.

    0
    0
  • By subtracting the value for CH 2, which may be derived from two substances belonging to the same homologous series, from the molecular refraction of methane, CH 4, the value of hydrogen is obtained; subtracting this from CH 2, the value of carbon is determined.

    0
    0
  • Interesting conclusions as to the early ethnology of Egypt have been derived from the systematic examination of the necropolises of Nubia, necessitated by the heightening of the Aswan dam, as a consequence of which the northern portion of the valley S.

    0
    0
  • Syria in fact is beginning to take shape in our minds as perhaps the most ancient seat of civilization in the world, the common source from which Babylonia and Egypt derived those items of culture in which, in the early period, they resemble one another.

    0
    0
  • The question as to whether copper really was first used in Egypt is not yet resolved, and many arguments can be brought against the theory of Egyptian origin and in favour of one in Syria or further north.26 Egypt has also recently been credited with being the inceptor of the whole " megalithic (or heliolithic, as the fashionable word now is) culture " of mankind, from Britain to China and (literally) Peru or at any rate Mexico via the Pacific Isles.27 The theory is that the achievements of the Egyptians in great stone architecture at the time of the pyramid-builders so impressed their contemporaries that they were imitated in the surrounding lands, by the Libyans and Syrians, that the fame of them was carried by the Phoenicians further afield, and that early Arab and Indian traders passed on the megalithic idea to Farther India, and thence to Polynesia and so on so that both the teocalli of Teotihuacan and Stonehenge are ultimately derived through cromlechs and dolmens innumerable from the stone pyramid of Saqqara, built by Imhotep, the architect of King Zoser, about 3100 B.C. (afterwards deified as the patron of science and architecture).

    0
    0
  • dynasty, derived from his work at Kerma and Defufa,43 are of great historical importance.

    0
    0
  • The name is derived from that of a Frankish tribe, the Hessi.

    0
    0
  • DOUROUCOULI, apparently the native name (perhaps derived from their cries) of a small group of American monkeys ranging from Nicaragua to Amazonia and eastern Peru, and forming the genus Nyctipithecus.

    0
    0
  • 626); but some such support is so obviously required by the necessities of a despot's position that we need not suppose it derived from any particular precedent.

    0
    0
  • Isobutyl alcohol, (CH 3) 2 CH CH 2 OH, the butyl alcohol of fermentation, is a primary alcohol derived from isobutane.

    0
    0
  • It is a liquid, smelling like fusel oil and boiling at 108.4° C. Methyl ethyl carbinol, CH 3 C 2 H 5 CHOH, is the secondary alcohol derived from nbutane.

    0
    0
  • He derived his surname from the fact that his ancestors were burgraves or chatelains of the town; his parents, who belonged to illustrious Flemish families, were probably the Jean Chastellain and his wife Marie de Masmines mentioned in the town records in 1425 and 1432.

    0
    0
  • Though produced by crossing, it now generally breeds true to colour, at times throwing back, however, to the silver greys from which it was derived.

    0
    0
  • The words map and chart are derived from mappa and charta, the former being the Latin for napkin or cloth, the latter for papyrus or parchment.

    0
    0
  • In Italian, Spanish and Portuguese the word mappa has retained its place, by the side of carta, for marine charts, but in other languages both kinds of maps 1 are generally known by a word derived from the Latin charta, as carte in French, Karte in German, Kaart in Dutch.

    0
    0
  • Its scanty nomenclature is almost wholly derived from the " Historiae adversum paganos " of Paulus Orosius (418).

    0
    0
  • More than half the nomenclature of the map is derived from Orosius, an annotated Anglo-Saxon version of which had been produced by King Alfred (871-901).

    0
    0
  • The outlines of several medieval maps resemble each other to such an extent that there can be no doubt that they are derived from the same original source.

    0
    0
  • The poodle is probably derived from spaniels, but is of slighter, more graceful build, and is pre-eminent even among spaniels for intelligence.

    0
    0
  • The breed is almost certainly derived from water-spaniels, with a strong admixture of Newfoundland blood.

    0
    0
  • probably the stock from which all the English races of hounds have been derived.

    0
    0
  • One account says that it was caused by a broken bridge which delayed the Conqueror's advance to the north, but this is known to have been at Ferrybridge, three miles away; a second says that the new name was derived from a Norman town called Pontfrete, which, however, never existed; and a third that it was caused by the breaking of a bridge in 1153 on the arrival of the archbishop of York, St William,.

    0
    0
  • The name Visby is derived from the old Norse y e (sanctuary) and by (town).

    0
    0
  • Responsible government after the British model is followed, and the revenue is chiefly derived from grants from the Dominion government.

    0
    0
  • So complete was their control that they are estimated to have derived from it more than 200 millions sterling while it lasted.

    0
    0
  • The name is derived from the Norse faar, a sheep (a derivation better seen in the Faroe Isles).

    0
    0
  • An excellent water supply is derived from the mountains.

    0
    0
  • the shrine of the goddess of Rummin, a name no doubt derived from the ancient name Lumbini.

    0
    0
  • They believed that Cain derived his existence from the superior power, and Abel from the inferior power, and that in this respect he was the first of a line which included Esau, Korah, the Sodomites and Judas Iscariot.

    0
    0
  • It was derived from the Greek Kara.

    0
    0
  • PORPOISE (sometimes spelled Porpus and Porpesse), a name derived from the 0.

    0
    0
  • Gaulanitis (which probably derived its name from the city of refuge, Golan, the site of which has not yet been discovered) is represented by the modern Jaulan, a province extending from the Jordan lakes to the Haj Road.

    0
    0
  • There are mountains in Cuba from one end of the island to the other, but they are not derived from any central mass and are not continuous.

    0
    0
  • At the base there is often an arkose, composed largely of fragments of serpentine and granite derived from the ancient floor.

    0
    0
  • The corojo palm (Cocos crispa) rivals the royal palm in beauty and utility; oil, sugar, drink and wood are derived from it.

    0
    0
  • Deep residual clay soils derived from underlying limestones, and coloured red or black according to the predominance of oxides of iron or vegetable detritus, characterize the plains.

    0
    0
  • More than half of the revenue was derived from customs duties (two-thirds of the total being collected at Havana).

    0
    0
  • OXIMES, in organic chemistry, compounds containing the grouping > C: N OH, derived from aldehydes and ketones by condensing them with hydroxylamine.

    0
    0
  • Those derived from aldehydes are known as aldoximes, those from ketones as ketoximes.

    0
    0
  • The city's water-supply is derived from the Chile river and is considered dangerous to new arrivals because of the quantity of saline and organic matter contained.

    0
    0
  • Thus, to say that a pen is an entity and the class of pens is an entity is merely a play upon the word "entity"; the second sense of "entity" (if any) is indeed derived from the first, but has a more complex signification.

    0
    0
  • Viewing the subject as a whole, and apart from remote developments which have not in fact seriously influenced the great structure of the mathematics of the European races, it may be said to have had its origin with the Greeks, working on pre-existing fragmentary lines of thought derived from the Egyptians and Phoenicians.

    0
    0
  • The material is largely calcareous, and has probably been derived from the disintegration of the reefs, and from the shells of animals living in the shallows.

    0
    0
  • In an unsuccessful war against the Croats (1322-26), from which Venice derived the sole advantage, the ban appears to have learned the value of sea-power; immediately afterwards he occupied the principality of Ilium and the Dalmatian littoral between Spalato and the river Narenta.

    0
    0
  • in 1448; and from this title is derived the name Herzegovina, or "the Duchy."

    0
    0
  • Its general progress may be seen in the increase of the fishery revenue - derived from duties, permits, &c. - of the public debt administration.

    0
    0
  • Hence the vast majority of the people whom we are accustomed to think of as Ottomans are so only by adoption, being really the descendants of Seljuks or Seljukian subjects, who had derived from Persia whatever they possessed of civilization or of literary taste.

    0
    0
  • Interpreted in the most general sense, these decrees, which enacted that the council of Constance derived its power immediately from Jesus Christ, and that every one, even the pope, was bound to obey it and every legitimately assembled general council in all that concerned faith, reform, union, &c., were tantamount to the overturning of the constitution of the church by establishing the superiority of the council over the pope.

    0
    0
  • From them he derived a sound knowledge of artillery and fortification, and particularly of mountain warfare, which latter was destined to prove of inestimable service to him in his first campaigns of 1794-95 and 1796.

    0
    0
  • All the buildings, both public and private, are constructed of furnaceburnt bricks of a yellowish-red colour, principally derived from the ruins of other places, chiefly Madain (Ctesiphon), Wasit and Babylon, which have been plundered at various times to furnish materials for the construction of Bagdad.

    0
    0
  • The staff of Armenian bishops is reminiscent of that of the West, from which it is apparently derived; that of the vartapeds is encircled at the upper end by one or two snakes.

    0
    0
  • The little we know of him is mainly derived from his own works.

    0
    0
  • Others have regarded it as a work similar to the first, and derived from Theodorus.

    0
    0
  • The name of Bower was derived from a queen's residence attached to the ancient royal hunting-lodge in the vicinity.

    0
    0
  • The last distinctive epithet was derived from the little hamlet in the vicinity which furnished shelter, not only to the workmen, but to the monks of St Jerome who were afterwards to be in possession of the monastery; and the hamlet itself is generally but perhaps erroneously supposed to be indebted for its name to the scoriae or dross of certain old iron mines.

    0
    0
  • The name Atlas given to these mountains by Europeans - but never used by the native races - is derived from that of the mythical Greek god represented as carrying the globe on his shoulders, and applied to the high and distant mountains of the west, where Atlas was supposed to dwell.

    0
    0
  • Water power is derived (in part, by an 18 m.

    0
    0
  • As to their present name, signifying in its present Russian spelling "self-eaters," many ingenious theories have been advanced, but that proposed by Schrenk, who derived the name "Samo-yedes" from "Syroyadtsy," or "raw-eaters," leaves much to be desired.

    0
    0
  • The surname Miaoulis, which was added to his family name of Vokos, or Bokos, is said to be derived from the Turkish word miaoul, a felucca.

    0
    0
  • The name Kambuja, whence the European form Cambodia, is derived from the Hindu Kambu, the name of the mythical founder of the Khmer race; it seems to have been officially adopted by the Khmers as the title of their country about this period.

    0
    0
  • On the whole, greater weight is due to the evidence from botanical sources than to that derived from philology, particularly since the discovery both of the wild almond and of a form like a wild peach in Afghanistan.

    0
    0
  • It may, however, well be that both peach and almond are derived from some pre-existing and now extinct form whose descendants have spread over the whole geographic area mentioned; but this is a mere speculation, though indirect evidence in its support might be obtained from the nectarine, of which no mention is made in ancient literature, and which, as we have seen, originates from the peach and reproduces itself by seed, thus offering the characteristics of a species in the act of developing itself.

    0
    0
  • By applying these early in the season, great benefit may be derived from retarding the blossom till the frosty nights of spring have passed.

    0
    0
  • provided with transport facilities, which renders its cities the principal distributing centres both for the entire Northwest for coal shipped via the Great Lakes, and also for the eastern and middle Western states for the great staples, wheat and lumber, derived either from Minnesota itself or by means of its great transcontinental railways from the neighbouring Northwestern states and Canadian provinces.

    0
    0
  • Expenditures from the fund known as " The Internal Improvement Land Fund," derived from the sale of state lands, can be made only after the enactment for that purpose has been approved by the voters of the state; in 1881 the legislature, and in 1884 the popular vote, pledged the proceeds of this fund to the payment of Minnesota state railway adjustment bonds.

    0
    0
  • In one family, the Ptychoderidae, the medullary tube of the collar is connected at intermediate points with the epidermis by means of a variable number of unpaired outgrowths from its dorsal wall, generally containing an axial lumen derived from and in continuity with the central canal.

    0
    0
  • (8) Colouring matters derived from albumin.

    0
    0
  • Colouring matters derived from albumins include the " melanins " (Gr.

    0
    0
  • As to the origin of the name, it was long held to be derived from the river Yssel or Saal.

    0
    0
  • In aqueous solutions, for instance, a few hydrogen (H) and hydroxyl (OH) ions derived from the water are always present, and will be liberated if the other ions require a higher decomposition voltage and the current be kept so small that hydrogen and hydroxyl ions can be formed fast enough to carry all the current across the junction between solution and electrode.

    0
    0
  • The salt must therefore be derived from an acid, chloroplatinic acid, H 2 PtC1 6, and have the formula Na 2 PtC1 6, the ions being Na and PtCls", for if it were a double salt it would decompose as a mixture of sodium chloride and platinum chloride and both metals would go to the cathode.

    0
    0
  • - As already stated, the vestments of the great historical Churches of the East are derived from the same Graeco-Roman originals as those of the West, but in contradistinction to the latter they have remained practically stereotyped, both in character and number, for a thousand years; in the East, however, even more than in the West the tendency to gorgeous ornamentation has prevailed.

    0
    0
  • 3), and a collar-like ornament probably derived from the apparel of the Western amice (q.v.).

    0
    0
  • probably contain material derived from Simon, e.g.

    0
    0
  • RUBBER, INDIARUBBER or Caoutchouc (a word probably derived from Cahucha or Gaucho the names in Ecuador and Peru respectively for rubber or the tree producing it), the chief constituent of the coagulated milky juice or latex furnished by a number of different trees, shrubs and vines.

    0
    0
  • This has been ascribed by some to the presence in " wild " rubber of certain impurities derived either from the latex or introduced during the preparation of the rubber which are thought to enhance the physical properties of the caoutchouc. It is more probable, however,.

    0
    0
  • Most commercial rubber is derived from natural supplies, from the wild rubber trees of S.

    0
    0
  • " Para " rubber, which takes the first position in the market, is derived from species of Hevea, principally Hevea brasiliensis, of which there are enormous forests in the valleys of the Amazon and its tributaries, and also in Peru, Bolivia, Venezuela and Guiana.

    0
    0
  • " Ceara " or Manigoba rubber is derived from species of Manihot, chiefly Manihot Glaziovii, a native of S.

    0
    0
  • The rubber is usually dark in colour and is often contaminated with proteid impurities derived from the latex.

    0
    0
  • America which furnish rubber of secondary commercial importance are Hancornia speciosa, yielding the Mangabeira rubber of Brazil, and species of Sapium furnishing the Colombian rubber and much of the rubber of Guiana (derived from Sapium Jenmani), which is scarcely inferior to the rubber of Para.

    0
    0
  • Among these are species of Willughbeia and Leuconotis, from which much of the rubber exported from Borneo is derived; Parameria glandulifera, common in Siam and Borneo, and Urceola esculenta and Cryptostegia grandiflora, both common in Burma.

    0
    0
  • That derived from Brazil, however, is generally inferior, being mixed with wood and dirt.

    0
    0
  • Hevea and Castilloa, the resin is present in large proportion in the latex derived from young trees, and diminishes in amount as the tree ages.

    0
    0
  • True caoutchouc, the principal constituent of all rubbers, is probably essentially one and the same substance, from whatever botanical source it may have been derived.

    0
    0
  • In this respect it differs from gutta-percha, which, like caoutchouc, is derived from the latices of certain plants.

    0
    0
  • In the industrial working of indiarubber, the various impurities present in the crude " wild rubber (bark, dirt and the principal impurities derived from the latex, except resin) are removed by the following process: The lumps of crude caoutchouc are first softened by the prolonged action of hot water, and then cut into slices by means of a sharp knife - generally by hand, as thus any large stones or other foreign substances can be removed.

    0
    0
  • The word is commonly used in the Alexandrian Greek translation of the Old Testament (Septuagint) for the Hebrew word (ger) which is derived from a root (gur) denoting to sojourn.

    0
    0
  • The ordinary use of "hustings" at the present day for the platform from which a candidate speaks at a parliamentary or other election, or more widely for a political candidate's election campaign, is derived from the application of the word, first to the platform in the Guildhall on which the London court was held, and next to that from which the public nomination of candidates for a parliamentary election was formerly made, and from which the candidate addressed the electors.

    0
    0
  • alba), cabbage and its numerous forms derived from B.

    0
    0
  • The intermediate spaces are filled in according to information derived from various hunters.

    0
    0
  • The name mica is probably derived from the Latin micare, to shine, to glitter; the German word glimmer has the same meaning.

    0
    0
  • In any case, it is fairly certain that Tritogeneia means "water-born," although an old interpretation derived it from TpcTCO, a supposed Boeotian word meaning "head," which further points to the name having originated in Boeotia.

    0
    0
  • Occlusor muscle - its double origin (i.) is derived from the is shown.

    0
    0
  • The alake exercises little authority apart from his council, the form of government being largely democratic. Revenue is chiefly derived from tolls or import duties.

    0
    0
  • each of them satisfied by a common system of values; hence the equation R =o is derived on this supposition, and the vanishing of R expresses the condition that the equations can be satisfied by a common system of values assigned to the variables.

    0
    0
  • Xic-1, the coefficients being any polynomials, it is clear that the k differentials have, in common, the system of roots derived from X1= X 2 = ...

    0
    0
  • It is now to be remarked that the partition (/,A.1/2)1/42/A38...)can be derived from (m"13m�2sm"`38...) 1 2 3 is 2s 3s by substituting for the numbers mi., m 231 m 331 ...

    0
    0
  • A Similar Theorem Holds In The Case Of Any Number Of Binary Forms, The Mixed Seminvariants Being Derived From The Jacobians Of The Several Pairs Of Forms. If The Seminvariant Be Of Degree 0, 0' In The Coefficients, The Forms Of Orders P, Q Respectively, And The Weight W, The Degree Of The Covariant In The Variables Will Be P0 Qo' 2W =E, An Easy Generalization Of The Theorem Connected With A Single Form.

    0
    0
  • For the case 8=1, 0' =2, the condition is a i r 1 72 = A032=0; and the simplest perpetuant, derived directly from the product A 1 B 21 is (I)a(2)b-(21)b; the remainder of those enumerated by z3 I z.

    0
    0
  • To assist us in handling the symbolic products we have not only the identity (ab) cx + (bc) a x + (ca) bx =0, but also (ab) x x+ (b x) a + (ax) b x = 0, (ab)a+(bc)a s +(ca)a b = 0, and many others which may be derived from these in the manner which will be familiar to students of the works of Aronhold, Clebsch and Gordan.

    0
    0
  • If Hebrew, it might be derived from the root p rr (to embrace) as an intensive term of affection.

    0
    0
  • All native carbonate of lead seems to be derived from what was originally galena, which is always present in it as an admixture.

    0
    0
  • Lead generally functions as a divalent element of distinctly metallic character, yielding a definite series of salts derived from the oxide PbO.

    0
    0
  • From this accumulation of results most valuable evidence as to the history and more especially the internal administration of Africa under the Romans has been derived.

    0
    0
  • The term, with its adjective " formal " and the derived nouns " formality " and " formalism," is hence contemptuously used for that which is superficial, unessential, hypocritical: chap. xxiii.

    0
    0
  • be immediately derived, because the ratios of distances in the solar system are known with the last degree of of precision.

    0
    0
  • By the American photographs the distances between the centres of Venus and the sun, and the angles between the line adjoining the centres and the meridian, could be separately measured and a separate result for the parallax derived from each.

    0
    0
  • In 1895 Chandler, from a general discussion of all the observations, derived the value of 20.50".

    0
    0
  • Brown the value of the solar parallax derived by this method is about 8.773".

    0
    0
  • The following may be taken as the most probable values of the solar parallax, as derived independently by the five methods we have described: From measures of parallax.

    0
    0
  • Until 1820 all the artificial magnets in practical use derived their virtue, directly or indirectly, from the natural magnets found in the earth: it is now recognized that the source of all magnetism, not excepting that of the magnetic ore itself, is electricity, and it is usual to have direct recourse to electricity for producing magnetization, without the intermediary of the magnetic ore.

    0
    0
  • The magnetizing current, which is derived from the storage battery B, is regulated by the adjustable resistance R and measured by the galvanometer G.

    0
    0
  • Values of I are derived from (B -H)/477and of from B/H.

    0
    0
  • In all such magnetizable alloys the presence of manganese appears to be essential, and there can be little doubt that the magnetic quality of the mixtures is derived solely from this component.

    0
    0
  • He considers that Hall's is the fundamental phenomenon, and that the Nernst effect is essentially identical with it, the primary electromotive force in the case of the latter being that of the Thomson effect in the unequally heated metal, while in the Hall experiment it is derived from an external source.

    0
    0
  • The greatest of Gilbert's discoveries was that the globe of the earth was magnetic and a magnet; the evidence by which he supported this view was derived chiefly from ingenious experiments made with a spherical lodestone or lerrella, as he termed it, and from his original observation that an iron bar could be magnetized by the earth's force.

    0
    0
  • Soon after it was held by Robert Beaumeis, from whom it passed by female descent to the family of la Zouch, whence it derived the adjunct to its name, having been hitherto known as Ashby or Essebi.

    0
    0
  • Watase has shown, in a very convincing way, how by deepening the pit-like set of cells beneath a simple lens the more complex ommatidia of the compound eyes of Crustacea and Hexapoda may be derived from such a condition as that presented in the lateral eyes of Limulus and Scorpio.

    0
    0
  • other large Arachnids have not been derived from the scorpions directly, but have independently developed from aquatic ancestors, and from one of these independent groups - probably through the harvest-men from the spiders - the Acari have finally resulted.

    0
    0
  • It has been held that the forms with a small number of somites marked in the posterior carapace and numerous free somites between the anterior and posterior carapace, must be considered as anterior to those in which a great number of posterior somites are traceable in the metasomatic carapace, and that those in which the traces of distinct somites in the posterior or metasomatic carapace are most completely absent must be regarded as derived from those in which somites are well marked in the posterior 1 The writer is indebted to R.

    0
    0
  • The similarity of the form of their appendages to those of the scorpions suggests that they are a degenerate group derived from the latter, but the large size of the prae-genital somite in them would indicate a connexion with forms preceding the scorpions.

    0
    0
  • Christianity, moreover, moved by the same apocalyptic tendency as Judaism, gave birth to new Christian apocryphs, though, in the case of most of them, the subject matter was to a large extent traditional and derived from Jewish sources.

    0
    0
  • While the characteristic features of apocalyptic literature were derived from Judaism, those of Gnosticism sprang partly from Greek philosophy, partly from oriental religions.

    0
    0
  • Since this surplusage is in turn derived from the Septuagint, from which the old Latin version was translated, it thus follows that the difference between the Protestant and the Roman Catholic Old Testament is, roughly speaking, traceable to the difference between the Palestinian and the Alexandrian canons of the Old Testament.

    0
    0
  • 1-25) has given strong grounds for regarding the Acts of John and Peter as derived from one and the same author, but there are like affinities existing between the Acts of Peter and those of Paul.

    0
    0
  • Some of his citations are derived from the Gospel to the Egyptians.

    0
    0
  • Its scope may be briefly described as the reduction of the theory of mechanics to certain general formulae, from the simple development of which should be derived the equations necessary for the solution of each separate problem.

    0
    0
  • Thus a universal science of matter and motion was derived, by an unbroken sequence of deduction, from one radical principle; and analytical mechanics assumed the clear and complete form of logical perfection which it now wears.

    0
    0
  • Its name is said to be derived from the fact of troops having been stationed here since 1772.

    0
    0
  • India-rubber is derived principally from the Hevea guayanensis, sometimes called the Siphonia elastica, which is found on the Amazon and its tributaries as far inland as the foothills of the Andes.

    0
    0
  • According to a summary for the six years 1901 to 1906, derived from official sources and published in the annual Retrospecto of the Jornal do Commercio, of Rio de Janeiro, the values of the imports and exports for those years (exclusive of coin), reduced to pounds sterling at the average rate of exchange (or value of one milreis) for each year, were as follows: - Nearly 761% of the exports of 1906 were of coffee and rubber, the official valuations of these being: coffee 2 45,474,5 2 5 milreis gold (27,615,884), and rubber (including manigoba and mangabeira), 12 4,941,433 milreis gold (£14,055,911).

    0
    0
  • Palm, or piassava fibre, derived from the piassava palm, is used in the manufacture of brooms, brushes, &c. It is found as far south as southern Bahia, and the export could be very largely increased.

    0
    0
  • 2 The " old metals " consist of old iron, brass, &c., derived from railway material, machinery, &c., all imported, and should not be considered a Brazilian product.

    0
    0
  • The national revenue is derived largely from the duties on imports, the duties on exports having been surrendered to the states when the republic was organized.

    0
    0
  • Finding the spot chosen for the new town inconvenient, the colonists removed to the adjoining island of Sao Vicente, from which the captaincy derived its name.

    0
    0
  • The southern Picts ultimately subdued the Britons, and the castle became their chief stronghold until they were overthrown in 617 (or 629) by the Saxons under Edwin, king of Northumbria, from whom the name of Edinburgh is derived.

    0
    0
  • Revenue is derived chiefly from customs and excise, railways, land sales, posts and telegraphs and a capitation tax.

    0
    0
  • First, however, we must examine the form 'which this question assumed to the first medieval thinkers, and the source from which they derived it.

    0
    0
  • Bernard of Chartres, at the beginning of the 12th century, endeavoured, according to John of Salisbury, to reconcile Plato and Aristotle; but his doctrine is almost wholly derived from the former through St Augustine and the commentary of Chalcidius.

    0
    0
  • Hantzsch (Ber., 18 99, 3 2, pp. 577 et seq.) are probably derived from the isomeric iso-nitro compounds R: NO(OH), and thus the nitro derivatives are to be looked upon as pseudo-acids.

    0
    0
  • From the last-mentioned river are derived the terms Cisleithania and Transleithania, applied to Austria and Hungary respectively.

    0
    0
  • At the census of 1900 nearly 69% of the total population of the country derived their income from agriculture, forestry, horticulture and other agricultural pursuits.

    0
    0
  • 57, 8 9 6, 8 45 57,894,923 The ordinary revenue of the state is derived from direct and indirect taxation, monopolies, stamp dues, &c. In 1904 direct taxes amounted to £9,048,000, and the chief heads of direct taxes yielded as follows: ground tax, £2,317,000; trade tax, £1,879,000; income tax, £1,400,000; house tax, £1,000,000.

    0
    0
  • Delambre from the data there supplied marked the profit derived from the investigation by practical astronomy.

    0
    0
  • derived functions of f(x).

    0
    0
  • Thus we arrive at the differential coefficient of f(x) as the limit of the ratio of f (x+8) - f (x) to 0 when 0 is made indefinitely small; and this gives an interpretation of nx n-1 as the derived function of xn (� 45)� This conception of a limit enables us to deal with algebraical expressions which assume such forms as -° o for particular values of the variable (� 39 (iii.)).

    0
    0
  • From these are derived symbols of the type A i = ales+a2e2+...

    0
    0
  • These values are assumed to be independent, so we have 2n(n - I) derived units of the second species or order.

    0
    0
  • where E 1 (2), E2 2), &c., are the derived units of the second species.

    0
    0
  • By assuming the truth of the associative law of multiplication, and taking account of the reducing formulae for binary products, - 'el ' 'e2 ' 'e3 we may construct derived units of the third, fourth ...

    0
    0
  • An n-tuple linear algebra (also called a complex number system) deals with quantities of the type A=/aiei derived from n special units e l, e 2 ...

    0
    0
  • If, in the extensive calculus of the nth category, all the units (including i and the derived units E) are taken to be homologous instead of being distributed into species, we may regard it as a (2'-I)-tuple linear algebra, which, however, is not wholly associative.

    0
    0
  • The full title is ilm al jebr wa'l-mugabala, which contains the ideas of restitution and comparison, or opposition and comparison, or resolution and equation, jebr being derived from the verb jabara, to reunite, and mugabala, from gabala, to make equal.

    0
    0
  • Other writers have derived the word from the Arabic particle al (the definite article), and geber, meaning " man."

    0
    0
  • His principal discovery is concerned with equations, which he showed to be derived from the continued multiplication of as many simple factors as the highest power of the unknown, and he was thus enabled to deduce relations between the coefficients and various functions of the roots.

    0
    0
  • This is the Catholic view, common to all the ancient Churches whether of the West or East, and it is one that necessarily excludes from the union of Christendom all those Christian communities which possess no such apostolically derived ministry.

    0
    0
  • They were in close and cordial contact with the Serbian Government, but rightly insisted on retaining entire independence of action, their funds being derived from their wealthy S.

    0
    0
  • Analogous structures in any two animals compared were by Owen defined as structures performing similar functions, but not necessarily derived from the modification of one and the same part in the " plan " or " archetype " according to which the two animals compared were supposed to be constructed.

    0
    0
  • Homologous structures were such as, though greatly differing in appearance and detail from one another, and though performing widely different functions, yet were capable of being shown by adequate study of a series of intermediate forms to be derived from one and the same part or organ of the " plan-form " or " archetype."

    0
    0
  • of Their causes are extremely difficult to trace in detail, but it appears that they are largely due to a " shaking up " of the living matter which constitutes the fertilized germ or embryo-cell, by the process of mixture in it of the substance of two cells - the germcell and the sperm-cell - derived from two different individuals.

    0
    0
  • Weismann has also ingeniously argued from the structure of the egg-cell and sperm-cell, and from the way in which, and the period at which, they are derived in the course of the growth of the embryo from the egg - from the fertilized egg-cell - that it is impossible (it would be better to say highly improbable) that an alteration in parental structure could produce any exactly representative change in the substance of the germ or sperm-cells.

    0
    0
  • The view that instinct is the hereditarily fixed result of habit derived from experience long dominated all inquiry into the subject, but we may now expect to see a renewed and careful study of animal instincts carried out with the view of testing the applicability to each instance of the pure Darwinian theory without the aid of Lamarckism.

    0
    0
  • formulae derived by Stokes (Camb.

    0
    0
  • So far as the application to gratings is concerned, the same conclusion may be derived from (2).

    0
    0
  • 7rv 7rt 5 7r 5 v 9 The corresponding values of C and S were originally derived by A.

    0
    0
  • These architectural decorations are derived from a style of building found by the recent German expedition extant in an ancient church; courses of stone here alternate in the walls (both inside and out) with beams of wood held by circular clamps.

    0
    0
  • DALBERG, the name of an ancient and distinguished German noble family, derived from the hamlet and castle (now in ruins) of Dalberg or Dalburg near Kreuznach in the Rhine Province.

    0
    0
  • The name (Sp. "tall tree") was derived from a solitary redwood-tree standing in the outskirts of the city.

    0
    0
  • If forms two series of salts, one, the uranous compounds, are derived from the oxide U02, the other, the uranyl compounds, contain the divalent group U02.

    0
    0
  • We need not suppose that the Chronicler quotes from the Psalter or vice versa, the matter which they have in common being probably derived from certain traditional songs current among the Levitical singers.

    0
    0
  • The word, which was probably derived from some Greek bandmaster, was presumably an instruction for a musical interlude.

    0
    0
  • There is ample water power, and there are manufactures of paper, sash and blinds, fibre, &c. From a dam here power is derived for the General Electric Company at Schenectady.

    0
    0
  • expenditure of the Council was derived from and spent upon the Transvaal, so that had the accounts of the two colonies been entirely distinct the figures of the Transvaal budget for 1903-1907 would have balanced at about £8,500,000 a year.

    0
    0
  • The mathematical discussion of Airy showed that the primary rainbow is not situated directly on the line of minimum deviation, but at a slightly greater value; this means that the true angular radius of the bow is a little less than that derived from the geometrical theory.

    0
    0
  • No forms of matter which are either not living, or have not been derived from living matter, exhibit these three properties, nor any approach to the remarkable phenomena defined under the second and third heads.

    0
    0
  • In contradistinction to the Lao Pong Dam, who have derived their written language from the Burmese character, the eastern race has retained what appears to be the early form of the present Siamese writing, from which it differs little.

    0
    0
  • Lode tin, as tinstone derived from primary deposits is often termed, is mined in the ordinary method, the very hard gangue in which it occurs necessitating a liberal use of explosives.

    0
    0
  • Tin forms two well-marked series of salts, in one of which it is divalent, these salts being derived from stannous oxide, SnO, in the other it is tetravalent, this series being derived from stannic oxide, Sn02.

    0
    0
  • An account of his theological position, derived from the treatise of Babhai De unione, will be found in Labourt, op. cit.

    0
    0
  • The term "rulers" appears to be derived from Manichean speculation, or from the same cycle of myth which is reflected in Cor.

    0
    0
Browse other sentences examples →