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derbyshire

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derbyshire

derbyshire Sentence Examples

  • There are pleasant recreation grounds on the Derbyshire side of the river.

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  • In Edward II.'s time, the king's forest of the Peak, in Derbyshire, is especially mentioned as infested with wolves, and it was not until the reign of Henry VII.

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  • DERBYSHIRE, a north midland county of England, bounded N.

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  • The principal river is the Trent, which, rising in the Staffordshire moorlands, intersects the southern part of Derbyshire, and forms part of its boundary with Leicestershire.

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  • The other principal rivers are the following: - The Dane rises at the junction of the three counties, Staffordshire, Cheshire and Derbyshire.

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  • direction, divides Derbyshire from Cheshire, and falls into the Mersey.

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  • The Dove rises on the southern slope, and flows as the boundary stream between Derbyshire and Staffordshire for nearly its entire course.

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  • The Erewash is the boundary stream between Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire.

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  • Five well-contrasted types of scenery in Derbyshire are clearly traceable to as many varieties of rock; the bleak dry uplands of the north and east, with deep-cut ravines and swift clear streams, are due to the great mass of Mountain Limestone; round the limestone boundary are the valleys with soft outlines in the Pendleside Shales; these are succeeded by the rugged moorlands, covered with heather and peat, which are due to the Millstone Grit series; eastward lies the Derbyshire Coalfield with its gently moulded grasscovered hills; southward is the more level tract of red Triassic rocks.

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  • Among the higher altitudes of north Derbyshire, where the soil is poor and the climate harsh, grain is unable to flourish, while even in the more sheltered parts of this region the harvest is usually belated.

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  • Derbyshire cheeses are exported or sent to London in considerable quantities; and cheese fairs are held in various parts of the county, as at Ashbourne and Derby.

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  • The manufactures of Derbyshire are both numerous and important, embracing silks, cotton hosiery, iron, woollen manufactures, lace, elastic web and brewing.

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  • Besides lead, gypsum and zinc are raised, to a small extent; and for the quarrying of limestone Derbyshire is one of the principal English counties.

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  • The earliest English settlements in the district which is now Derbyshire were those of the West Angles, who in the course of their northern conquests in the 6th century pushed their way up the valleys of the Derwent and the Dove, where they became known as the Pecsaetan.

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  • Derbyshire probably originated as a shire in the time of ZEthelstan, but for long it maintained a very close connexion with Nottinghamshire, and the Domesday Survey gives a list of local customs affecting the two counties alike.

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  • The villages of Appleby, Oakthorpe, Donisthorpe, Stretton-en-le-Field, Willesley, Chilcote and Measham were reckoned as part of Derbyshire in 1086, although separated from it by the Leicestershire parishes of Over and Nether Seat.

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  • The assizes for Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire were held at Nottingham until the reign of Henry III., when they were held alternately at Nottingham and Derby until 1569, after which the Derbyshire assizes were held at Derby.

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  • The greatest landholder in Derbyshire at the time of the Domesday Survey was Henry de Ferrers, who owned almost the whole of the modern hundred of Appletree.

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  • Few Englishmen retained estates of any importance after the Conquest, but one, Elfin, an under-tenant of Henry de Ferrers, not only held a considerable property but was the ancestor of the Derbyshire family of Brailsford, The families of Shirley and Gresley can also boast an unbroken descent.

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  • At the time of the Wars of the Roses discontent was rife in Derbyshire, and riots broke out in 1443, but the county did not lend active support to either party.

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  • Derbyshire has always been mainly a mining and manufacturing county, though the rich land in the south formerly produced large quantities of corn.

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  • Iron has also been produced in Derbyshire from an early date, and coal mines were worked at Norton and Alfreton in the beginning of the 14th century.

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  • Derbyshire is rich in ecclesiastical architecture as a whole.

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  • Among ancient mansions Derbyshire possesses one of the most famous in England in Haddon Hall, of the 15th century.

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  • The ceremony has been revived also in several other Derbyshire villages.

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  • See Davies, New Historical and Descriptive View of Derbyshire (Belper, 1811); D.

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  • (London, 1817); Maunder, Derbyshire Miners' Glossary (Bakewell, 1824); R.

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  • Simpson, Collection of Fragments illustrative of the History of Derbyshire (1826); S.

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  • Bateman, Vestiges of the Antiquities of Derbyshire (London, 1848); L.

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  • Jewitt, Ballads and Songs of Derbyshire (London, 1867); J.

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  • C. Cox, Notes on the Churches of Derbyshire (Chester, 1875), and Three Centuries of Derbyshire Annals (2 vols., London, 1890); R.

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  • P. Yeatman, Feudal History of the County of Derby (3 vols., London, 1886-1895) Victoria County History, Derbyshire.

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  • See also Notts and Derbyshire Notes and Queries.

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  • It is known as cawk in the Derbyshire lead mines.

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  • HEANOR, an urban district in the Ilkeston parliamentary division of Derbyshire, England, ro m.

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  • The first commercial exploitation of importance appears to have been the distillation of the oil at Alfreton in Derbyshire by James Young.

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  • Having served his apprenticeship as gardener from the age of fifteen, and himself constructed a large lake when gardener to Battlesden in 1821, he was in 1823 employed in the arboretum at Chiswick, the seat of the duke of Devonshire, and eventually became superintendent of the duke's gardens and grounds at Chatsworth, and manager of his Derbyshire estates.

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  • The principal English lead mines are in Derbyshire; but there are also mines at Allandale and other parts of western Northumberland, at Alston Moor and other parts of Cumberland, in the western parts of Durham, in Swaledale and Arkendale and other parts of Yorkshire, in Salop, in Cornwall, in the Mendip Hills in Somersetshire, and in the Isle of Man.

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  • It may also be accompanied by pyrites, galena, arsenides and antimonides, quartz, calcite, dolomite, &c. It is widely distributed, and is particularly abundant in Germany (the Harz, Silesia), Austro-Hungary, Belgium, the United States and in England (Cumberland, Derbyshire, Cornwall, North Wales).

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  • The famous Enfield cedar was planted by Dr Robert Uvedale, (1642-1722), a noted schoolmaster and horticulturist, between 1662-1670, and an old cedar at Bretby Park in Derbyshire is known to have been planted in 1676.

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  • ILKESTON, a market town and municipal borough, in the Ilkeston parliamentary division of Derbyshire, England, 9 m.

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  • His family had held a good position in Derbyshire and Nottinghamshire since the 12th century, the name appearing as Sent Cheveroll in the roll of Battle Abbey, and William inherited large estates from his father.

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  • He was admitted at Gray's Inn in 1667, and in 1670 he was elected member of parliament for Derbyshire.

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  • Sacheverell was one of the managers on behalf of the Commons at the trial of Lord Stafford in Westminster Hall; but took no further part in public affairs till after the elections of March 1681, when he was returned unopposed for Derbyshire.

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  • - Long-wall method of working Coal in Derbyshire.

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  • 7, which represents an area of about 500 acres of the bottom hard steam coal at Shipley in Derbyshire.

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  • The mineral is also met with in metalliferous veins, though much less frequently than pyrites; for example the "cockscomb pyrites" of the lead mines of Derbyshire and Cumberland.

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  • SWADLINCOTE, a town in the southern parliamentary division of Derbyshire, England, 15 m.

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  • thick, the exterior stones are granite, the interior, half Bramley Fall and half from Painshaw, Derbyshire.

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  • When, after not a few displays of his strange humour, he professed himself tired of the capital, 23 Hume procured him a country abode in the house of Mr Davenport at Wootton in Derbyshire.

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  • ASHBOURNE, a market-town in the western parliamentary division of Derbyshire, England, 13 m.

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  • JOSEPH BOSWORTH (1789-1876), British Anglo-Saxon scholar, was born in Derbyshire in 1789.

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  • In the lead-mining districts of Derbyshire and the north of England the ore occurs as veins and flats in the Carboniferous Limestone series, whilst in Cornwall the veins traverse clay-slates.

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  • Galena is met with at all places where lead is mined; of localities which have yielded finely crystallized specimens the following may be selected for mention: Derbyshire, Alston in Cumberland, Laxey in the Isle of Man (where crystals measuring almost a foot across have been found), Neudorf in the Harz, Rossie in New York and Joplin in Missouri.

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  • MATLOCK, a market town in the western parliamentary division of Derbyshire, England, on the river Derwent, 17 m.

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  • MELBOURNE, a market town in the southern parliamentary division of Derbyshire, England, 8 m.

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  • Sixteen years later disorder broke out in north Britain, apparently in the district between the Cheviots and the Derbyshire hills, and was repressed with difficulty after four or five years' fighting.

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  • lead in Somerset, Shropshire, Flintshire and Derbyshire; iron in the west Sussex Weald, the Forest of Dean, and (to a slight extent) elsewhere.

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  • ALFRETON, a market town in the mid-parliamentary division of Derbyshire, England, 14 m.

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  • COTTON GOODS AND YARN The two great sections of the cotton industry are yarn and cloth, and in Great Britain the production of both of these is mainly in South Lancashire, though the area extends to parts of Cheshire, Yorkshire and Derbyshire, and there is a Scottish branch, besides certain isolated ventures in other parts of the country.

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  • DRONFIELD, an urban district in the north-eastern parliamentary division of Derbyshire, England, 6 m.

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  • Certain British coalfields have yielded good specimens: Archaeoptilus, from the Derbyshire coalfield, had a spread of wing extending to more than 14 in.; some specimens (Brodia) still exhibit traces of brilliant wing colours.

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  • Most of the British iron works lie in and near the important coal-fields in Scotland between the mouth of the Clyde and the Forth, in Cleveland and Durham, in Cumberland and Lancashire, in south Yorkshire, Derbyshire, and Lincolnshire, in Staffordshire and Northamptonshire, and in south Wales in spite of its lack of ore.

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  • ANTHONY BABINGTON (1561-1586), English conspirator, son of Henry Babington of Dethick in Derbyshire, and of Mary, daughter of George, Lord Darcy, was born in October 1561, and was brought up secretly a Roman Catholic. As a youth he served at Sheffield as page to Mary queen of Scots, for whom he early felt an ardent devotion.

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  • 323-340), giving an account of a short excursion from Chatsworth to view the seven wonders of the Derbyshire Peak, were written before 1628 (in 1626 or 1627), though not published till 1636.

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  • In the course of the next seven years in Derbyshire and abroad, Hobbes took his pupil over rhetoric, 2 logic, astronomy, and the principles of law, with other subjects.

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  • After 1675, he passed his time at his patron's seats in Derbyshire, occupied to the last with intellectual work in the early morning and in the afternoon hours, which it had long been his habit to devote to thinking and to writing.

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  • Mention may be made of the brilliant black crystals from Alston Moor in Cumberland, St Agnes in Cornwall and Derbyshire.

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  • BOLSOVER, an urban district in the north-eastern parliamentary division of Derbyshire, England, 52 m.

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  • A cement for Derbyshire spar and china, &c., is composed of 7 parts of rosin and i of wax, with a little plaster of Paris; a small quantity only should be applied to the surfaces to be united, for, as a general rule, the thinner the stratum of a cement, the more powerful its action.

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  • Solutrian "finds" have been also made in the caves of Les Eyzies and Laugerie Haute, and in the Lower Beds of Cresswell Cave (Derbyshire).

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  • In this and subsequent years the disease was widely diffused in England - for instance, Oxford, Derbyshire, Newcastle.

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  • (1) In 1632 a severe epidemic, apparently plague, was in Derbyshire.

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  • The notion that ancient burial mounds were liable to be inhabited by dragons was common in the Germanic world: there is perhaps a trace of it in the Derbyshire place-name Drakelow, which means " dragon's barrow."

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  • ELATERITE, also termed Elastic Bitumen and Mineral Caoutchouc, a mineral hydrocarbon, which occurs at Castleton in Derbyshire, in the lead mines of Odin and elsewhere.

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  • But his operations were at first greatly fettered by want of capital, until Jedediah Strutt, having satisfied himself of the value of the machines, entered with his partner, Samuel Need, into partnership with him, and enabled him in 1771 to build a second factory, on a much larger scale, at Cromford in Derbyshire, the machinery of which was turned by a water-wheel.

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  • In 1847 Lyon Playfair informed him of a spring of petroleum which had made its appearance at Ridding's Colliery at Alfreton in Derbyshire, and in the following year he began to utilize it for making both burning and lubricating oils.

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  • Thus it appears that of the coal raised in England the county of Durham contributes about 22%, Yorkshire 17%, Lancashire 16%, Stafford and Derbyshire each about 9%, and Northumberland 7%; while of the coal raised in Wales 85% is contributed by the county of Glamorgan; and that the coal production of England and Wales together constitutes, in quantity and value, 85% of the whole production of the United Kingdom.

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  • FLORENCE NIGHTINGALE (1820-1910), younger daughter of William Edward Nightingale of Embley Park, Hampshire, and Lea Hurst, Derbyshire, was born at Florence on the 15th of May 1820, and named after that city, but her childhood was spent in England, chiefly in Derbyshire.

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  • BUXTON, a market town and fashionable health-resort in the High Peak parliamentary division of Derbyshire, England, on the London & North-Western and Midland railways, 36 m.

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  • BELPER, a market-town in the mid-parliamentary division of Derbyshire, England, on the river Derwent, 7 m.

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  • He had been made a privy councillor in 1760, lord lieutenant of Derbyshire in 1762, and LL.D.

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  • The dark violet fluor-spar of Derbyshire, known locally as "Blue John," is.

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  • Government House, which is situated near the Maidan and Eden Gardens, is the residence of the viceroy; it was built by Lord Wellesley in 1799, and is a fine pile situated in grounds covering six acres, and modelled upon Kedleston Hall in Derbyshire, one of the Adam buildings.

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  • JOSEPH GEORGE CUMMING (1812-1868), English geologist and archaeologist, was born at Matlock in Derbyshire on the 15th of February 1812.

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  • The tableland called the Peak of Derbyshire, in the south of the Pennine system, is 2088 ft.

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  • It includes the whole of Northumberland and Durham, the West Riding of Yorkshire, most of Lancashire and Derbyshire, the north of Staffordshire and the west of Nottinghamshire.

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  • The belt of Millstone Grit south of the Aire, lying between the great coal-fields of the West Riding and Lancashire, has a lower elevation, and forms grassy uplands and dales; but farther south, the finest scenery of the whole region occurs in the limestones of Derbyshire, in which the range terminates.

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  • There are remarkable features underground as well as on the surface, the caverns and subterranean streams of Yorkshire and Derbyshire being amongst the deepest that have yet been explored.

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  • South of the Pennines, the Red rocks extend eastward in a great sweep through the south of Derbyshire, Warwick, the west of Leicestershire, and the east of Nottingham, their margin being approximately marked by the Avon, flowing south-west, and the Soar and Trent, flowing north-east.

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  • The great populous area which covers south Lancashire and the West Riding of Yorkshire, and extends beyond them into Cheshire, Derbyshire, Staffordshire and Nottinghamshire, is not in reality a unit.

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  • There is no county, however, in which the single crop of wheat or barley stands pre-eminently above others, and in the case of the upland counties of Cumberland, Westmorland and Derbyshire, the metropolitan county of Middlesex, and Monmouthshire, these crops are quite insignificant.

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  • Derbyshire, Leicester- Live stock.

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  • Derbyshire.

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  • The railways having the heaviest coal traffic are the North-Eastern, which monopolizes the traffic of Northumberland and Durham; the Midland, commanding the Derbyshire, Yorkshire and East Midland traffic, and some of the Welsh; the London & North Western, whose principal sources are the Lancashire, Staffordshire 1 The figure 17.76 is the percentage for the whole of Yorkshire.

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  • For the production of lead the principal counties are Derbyshire, Durham and Stanhope, but the industry is not extensive, and is confined to a few places in each county.

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  • For limestone the principal localities are in Durham, Derbyshire and Yorkshire, while for chalk-quarrying Kent is pre-eminent among a group of southeastern counties, including Hampshire, Sussex and Surrey, with Essex.

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  • The industry has extended into the adjacent parts of Cheshire, the West Riding of Yorkshire and Derbyshire.

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  • Among other textile industries attaching to definite localities may be mentioned the silk manufacture of eastern Staffordshire and Cheshire, as at Congleton and Macclesfield; and the hosiery and lace manufactures of Nottinghamshire, Derbyshire and Leicestershire.

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  • JOHN CLIFFORD (1836-), British Nonconformist minister and politician, son of a warp-machinist at Sawley, Derbyshire, was born on the 16th of October 1836.

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  • NEW MILLS, an urban district in the High Peak parliamentary division of Derbyshire, England, at the confluence of the rivers Goyt and Kinder, on the border of Cheshire, 13 m.

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  • In Derbyshire, Leicestershire, Lincolnshire, part of Northamptonshire, Nottinghamshire, Rutlandshire (of later formation) and Yorkshire we have the counties divided into "wapentakes" instead of "hundreds," again a mark of Danish influence.

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  • Of Derbyshire Gritstone neither sex has horns.

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  • The so-called "Limestones" of the Derbyshire hills are really Leicesters.

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  • Similar remains have been met with in the caves of Wales, and in England as far north as Derbyshire (Cresswell), proving that over the whole of southern and middle England men, in precisely the same stage of rude civilization, hunted the rhinoceros, the mammoth and other extinct animals.

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  • He died at Melbourne House, Derbyshire, on the 24th of November 1848.

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  • A disturbance that was almost an armed insurrection, which broke out in Derbyshire in June of this year, seemed to justify the severity of the government; it was suppressed without great difficulty, and three of the ringleaders were executed.

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  • Coals of this character are obtained in England from the Newcastle and Durham field, South Yorkshire, Derbyshire and Barnsley districts, and an idea of their ultimate composition may be derived from the following table: Our knowledge of the composition of coal is limited to the total amount of carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen, oxygen and foreign materials which it contains; and at present we know practically but little of the way in which these bodies are combined.

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  • The name of Wye belongs also to two smaller English rivers - (I) a right-bank tributary of the Derbyshire Derwent, rising in the uplands near Buxton, and having part of its early course through one of the caverns characteristic of the district; (2) a left-bank tributary of the Thames, watering the valley of the Chilterns in which lies Wycombe and joining the main river near Bourne End.

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  • GLOSSOP, a market town and municipal borough, in the High Peak parliamentary division of Derbyshire, England, on the extreme northern border of the county; 13 m.

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  • It is the chief seat of the cotton manufacture in Derbyshire, and it has also woollen and paper mills, dye and print works, and bleaching greens.

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  • The Midland company has a branch from Newark to Lincoln, and the Lancashire, Derbyshire, and East Coast line terminates at Lincoln.

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  • After taking his degree he became assistant master at Repton in Derbyshire; after taking orders he was appointed curate of Norton-under-Hales in Shropshire.

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  • The town lies pleasantly on high ground near the river Dove, a western tributary of the Trent, here the boundary with Derbyshire.

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  • ALLESTREE, or [[Allestry, Richard]] (1619-1681), royalist divine and provost of Eton College, son of Robert Allestree, and a descendant of an ancient Derbyshire family, was born at Uppington in Shropshire.

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  • CHAPEL-EN-LE-FRITH, a market town in the High Peak parliamentary division of Derbyshire, England, 20 m.

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  • The original kingdom seems to have lain in the upper basin of the Trent, comprising the greater part of Derbyshire and Staffordshire, the northern parts of Warwickshire and Leicestershire, and the southern part of Nottinghamshire.

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  • An investigation is underway by Derbyshire police into the theft of a lorry-load of tires and the alleged abduction of the vehicle's driver.

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  • Derbyshire forms an archdeaconry in the diocese of Lichfield, and contains nineteen rural deaneries.

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  • Nicholas Courtney signing autograph 's at a show in Alfreton Derbyshire in late 2001.

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  • battlefield cemetery at Repton, Derbyshire.

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  • The price of the day included a plastic beaker stenciled with the Bonanza day and the Derbyshire Beaver Birthday mascot Furry Fred.

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  • bosun's store was given by a previous Chief Officer of the Derbyshire.

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  • Here in our factory in Bakewell, Derbyshire UK, you will see our experienced chocolatiers at work.

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  • Monica le Doux Newton was born in Belper, Derbyshire in 1912; the daughter of a country clergyman.

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  • commanding eminence, said to be the highest point in South Derbyshire.

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  • Derbyshire constabulary was set to be merged with four other constabularies under Government plans to create a single East Midlands force.

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  • Return to top of page emigration and Immigration Some Emigrants from Derbyshire to Australia and New Zealand - brief biographical details of known emigrants.

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  • Alport Hill is a commanding eminence, said to be the highest point in South Derbyshire.

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  • KEEP OUT A council committee discussed the future of the development blueprint for South Derbyshire in secret behind closed doors.

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  • Return to top of page gazetteers The transcription of the section for Derbyshire from the National Gazetteer (1868) provided by Colin Hinson.

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  • gingerbread cottage is the ideal base for exploring unspoiled Derbyshire.

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  • Dawn is a practicing homeopath in Derbyshire and teacher at various colleges.

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  • John Smedley has been making fine knitwear in Derbyshire for over 200 years.

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  • mouldingeresford (Plastics ), Belper, Derbyshire, UK Glass fiber fabricators & moldings manufacturers.

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  • From 1771, Arkwright developed a new town at Cromford in Derbyshire.

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  • A substantial portion of the Peak District National Park lies within Derbyshire.

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  • Projects undertaken on tips in Derbyshire have successfully rehabilitated these areas.

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  • Q Could you please send me an immunization schedule for Derbyshire?

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  • The remainder of the week was spent with Prof. Ed Derbyshire, looking at various aspects of glacial sedimentology.

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  • shire district of Derbyshire Dales employed 380 people in 2004.

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  • Derbyshire caves are rather singular in that tho many of them possess deep drops, there are only three open potholes of any note.

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  • Connections Derbyshire Is your child safe surfing the net?

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  • River Mease Derbyshire; Leicestershire; Staffordshire The River Mease is a good example of a riverine population of spined loach Cobitis taenia.

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  • Search on for our top tot THE SEARCH is on to find the Derbyshire Times Child of the Year 2006.

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  • LONG EATON, an urban district in the Ilkeston parliamentary division of Derbyshire, England, Io m.

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  • BAKEWELL, a market-town in the western parliamentary division of Derbyshire, England, on the river Wye, 25 m.

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  • WIRKSWORTH, a market town in the western parliamentary division of Derbyshire, England, 14 m.

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  • BURTON-UPON-TRENT, a market town and municipal and county borough in the Burton parliamentary division of Staffordshire and the Southern parliamentary division of Derbyshire, England; lying mainly upon the left bank of the Trent, in Staffordshire.

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  • CHESTERFIELD, a market town and municipal borough in the Chesterfield parliamentary division of Derbyshire, England, 24 m.

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  • Besides the attractions of its scenery Derbyshire possesses, in Buxton, Matlock and Bakewell, three health resorts in much favour on account of their medicinal springs.

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  • The miners of Derbyshire formed an independent community under the jurisdiction of a steward and barmasters, who held two Barmote courts every year.

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  • The first commercial exploitation of importance appears to have been the distillation of the oil at Alfreton in Derbyshire by James Young,.

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  • The mountain breeds include the Cheviot, Scotch Black-face, Lonk, Rough Swaledale, Derbyshire Gritstone, Penistone, Limestone, Herdwick, Dartmoor, Exmoor and Welsh Mountain.

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  • The shire district of Derbyshire Dales employed 380 people in 2004.

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  • Matt Derbyshire gave Blackburn a second minute lead with a shot that took a wicked deflexion on its way past Wolves keeper Carl Ikeme.

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