Dentition sentence example

dentition
  • The dentition is i, c 1, p 4, m L total 42.
    2
    0
  • In the true poisonous snakes the maxillary dentition has undergone a special modification.
    2
    0
  • In the wombats (Phascolomys) the dentition is i.
    2
    2
  • On the other hand, there are those who believe that the functional dentition (other than the replacing premolar and the molars) correspond to the milk-dentition of placentals, and that the rudimentary tooth-germs represent a "prelacteal" dentition.
    1
    0
  • In the pig-footed bandicoot (Choeropus castanotis) the dentition generally resembles that of Perameles, but the canines are less developed, and in the upper jaw two-rooted.
    1
    1
    Advertisement
  • The mode of succession of the teeth in the mastodons exhibits so many stages of the process by which the dentition of elephants has been derived from that of more ordinary mammals.
    0
    0
  • - Front View of Skull of the Tasmanian Devil (Sarcophilus ursinus) to exhibit polyprotodont type of dentition.
    0
    0
  • - Front view of Skull of the Koala (Phascolarctus cinereus) to exhibit Diprotodont type of dentition.
    0
    0
  • The tail is long and in some cases prehensile; the first hind-toe may be either large, small or absent; the dentition usually includes three pairs of upper and one of lower incisors, and six or seven pairs of cheekteeth in each jaw; the stomach is either simple or sadculated, without a cardiac gland; and there are four teats.
    0
    0
  • The remaining members of the family may be included in the sub family Phalangerinae, characterized by the normal nature of the dentition (which shows redimentary lower canines) and tongue.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • The same deposits have yielded remains of small mammals whose dentition approximates more nearly to that of either polyprotodont marsupials or insectivores; and these may be conveniently noticed here without prejudice to their true affinities.
    0
    0
  • The dentition normally comprises the typical series of 44 teeth, although in some instances the first premolar is wanting.
    0
    0
  • colias, and well characterized by their dentition and coloration.
    0
    0
  • In the Titanotheroidea the dentition may be expressed by the formula i: oru, ci, p T 4,, my.
    0
    0
  • Tapir Group. the Tapiroidea the dentition may be either the full 44, or lack the first premolar in the lower or in both jaws.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • In the Tapiridae the dentition may be reduced below the typical 44 by the loss of the first lower premolar.
    0
    0
  • In America the family is represented by Heptodon, of the Middle Eocene, which differs from the early members of the tapir-stock in having a long gap between the lower canine and first premolar; the dentition is complete, and the upper premolars are simple.
    0
    0
  • Finally, we have the family Rhinocerotidae, which includes the existing representatives of the group. In this family the dentition has undergone considerable reduction, and may be represented inclusive of all the variations, by the formula i a or a m a The first upper incisor, whenpresent, has an 430r2; PP antero-posteriorly elongated crown, but the second is small; when fully developed, the lower canine is a large forwardly directed tusk-like tooth with sharp cutting-edges, and biting against the first upper incisor.
    0
    0
  • As regards the dentition of the existing species, the cheek-series consists of the four premolars and three molars above and below, all in contact and closely resembling each other, except the first, which is much smaller than the rest and often deciduous; the others gradually increasing in size up to the penultimate.
    0
    0
  • Above all, the dentition, which exhibits almost endless modifications, in most cases is difficult to ascertain and to appreciate in its subtle distinctions.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • - Nostrils lateral; dentition well developed.
    0
    0
  • The upper premolar and molar teeth are not alike, the former being single and the latter two-lobed; and the last lower molar of both first and second dentition is almost invariably threelobed.
    0
    0
  • They agree, for instance, with that family in the presence of a descending flange at the hinder end of each side of the lower jaw; but their dentition is of a more generalized type, comprising the full series of 44 teeth, among which the incisors and canines are of normal form, but specially enlarged, and developing roots in the usual manner.
    0
    0
  • In Ancodon (Hyopotamus) the cusps on the molars are taller, so that the dentition is more decidedly selenodont; the distribution of this genus includes not only Europe, Asia and North Africa, but also Egypt where it occurs in Upper Eocene beds in company with the European genus Rhagatherium, which is nearer Anthracotherium.
    0
    0
  • As might have been supposed from their dentition, the bears are omnivorous; but.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • In their general structure the Iguanidae closely resemble the Agamidae, from which they differ mainly by the pleurodont dentition.
    0
    0
  • Louis Dollo especially has Fossorial Amphibious Digitigrade Grass Herb Herbivorous Shrub Fruit Root Dentition reduced Omnivorous Fish Carnivorous-{Flesh Carrion contributed most brilliant discussions of the theory of alternations of habitat as applied to the interpretation of the anatomy of the marsupials, of many kinds of fishes, of such reptiles as the herbivorous dinosaurs of the Upper Cretaceous.
    0
    0
  • - Dentition of Boar (Sus scrofa).
    0
    0
  • Milk dentition: i.
    0
    0
  • The milk-dentition, and even the early condition of the permanent dentition, is formed on the same general type as that of Sus, except that certain teeth are absent, the formula being 13 i cl, total 34; but as age advances all the teeth have a tendency to disappear, except the canines and the posterior molars, but these, which in some cases are the only teeth left in the jaws, attain an extraordinary development.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Choeropotamus is a European Oligocene genus with bunodont molars which show a conspicuous basal cingulum in the lower dentition; the first premolar is absent.
    0
    0
  • Praecardiidae.-Shell equivalve with hinge dentition as in Arca.
    0
    0
  • The dentition is peculiar on account of the great size and complexity of the last upper molar, which is composed of about twelve plates, and exceeds in length the three teeth in front.
    0
    0
  • The dentition includes one pair of premolars above and below, and rooted or rootless molars with but few enamel folds.
    0
    0
  • On account of certain structural peculiarities, the rats of Madagascar, which have a dentition like that of the cricetine Muridae, are separated as a distinct family, Nesomyidae.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Forsyth-Major, "On some Miocene Squirrels, with Remarks on the Dentition and Classification of the Sciuridae," Proc. Zool.
    0
    0
  • The dentition in the adult is i.
    0
    0
  • Although it has the deciduous dentition, Mme Pavlow considers herself justified in referring the Kherson skull to the genus Procamelus previously known only from the Lower Pliocene or Upper Miocene strata of North America, and differing from modern camels, among other features, by the retention of a fuller series of premolar teeth.
    0
    0
  • In the skull the socket of the eye is surrounded by bone; while the dentition begins to approximate to the camel type - notably by the circumstance that the lower canine is either separated by a gap from the outermost incisors, or that its crown assumes a backwardly curved shape.
    0
    0
  • An allied extinct genus (Eschatius) is also distinguished by certain features in the dentition.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • The dentition comprises the typical 44 teeth, of which the molars are short-crowned, with four crescentic cusps on those of the upper jaw (selenodont type).
    0
    0
  • But the dentition of the palate is very different; the small teeth, which are in a single row, as in the jaws, form a long transverse, continuous or interrupted series behind the inner nares or choanae.
    0
    0
  • But a year later, the second generation having reached sexual maturity, new broods were produced, and out of these some individuals lost their gills and dorsal crest, developed movable eyelids, changed their dentition, and assumed yellow spots, - in fact, took on all the characters of Amblystoma tigrinum.
    0
    0
  • The dentition of the kangaroos, functionally considered, thus consists of sharp-edged incisors, most developed near the median line of the mouth, for the purpose of cropping herbage, and ridged or tuberculated molars for crushing.
    0
    0
  • Jackals resemble wolves and dogs in their dentition, the round eye-pupils, the period of gestation, and to a large extent also in habits.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • - Upper and Lower Teeth of one side of the Mouth of a Dolphin (Lagenorhynchus), as an example of the homoeodont type of dentition.
    0
    0
  • most mammals with a complicated type of dentition; these milkteeth being shed at a comparatively early period (occasionally even in utero), when they are succeeded by the larger permanent series, which is the only other ever developed.
    0
    0
  • Both the milk and the permanent dentition display the aforesaid complexity of the hinder teeth as compared with those in front, and since the number of milk-teeth is always considerably less than that of the permanent set, it follows that the hinder milkteeth are usually more complex than the teeth of which they are the predecessors in the permanent series, and represent functionally, not their immediate successors, but those more posterior permanent teeth which have no direct predecessors.
    0
    0
  • In mammals, such as dolphins and some armadillos, which have a large series of similar teeth, not always constant in number in different individuals, there may indeed be differences in the two sides; but, apart from these in describing the dentition of any mammal, it is generally sufficient to give the number and characters of the teeth of one side only.
    0
    0
  • Such a dentition is called " homoeodont " (Gr.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • A dentition with its component parts so differently formed that these distinctive terms are applicable to them is called heterodont (Gr.
    0
    0
  • In most cases, though by no means invariably, mammals with a heterodont dentition are also diphyodont (Gr.
    0
    0
  • This general arrangement is obvious in a considerable number of mammals; and examination shows that, under great modifications in detail, there is a remarkable uniformity of essential characters in the dentition of a large number of members of the class belonging to different orders and not otherwise closely allied, so much that it LS ' 'C FIG.
    0
    0
  • The third upper molar (m 3) is the only tooth wanting to complete the typical heterodont mammalian dentition.
    0
    0
  • is possible to formulate a common plan of dentition from which the others have been derived by the alteration of some and the suppression of other members of the series, and occasionally, but very rarely, by addition.
    0
    0
  • In this generalized form of mammalian dentition the total number of teeth present is 44, or II above and II below on each side.
    0
    0
  • For the sake of brevity the complete dentition is described by the following formula, the numbers above the line representing the teeth of the upper, those below the line those of the lower jaw: incisors 3-31-1 4-4 3-3 _ 11-11 total 44.
    0
    0
  • When there is a marked difference between the premolars and molars of the permanent dentition, the first milk-molar resembles a premolar, while the last has the characters of the posterior molar.
    0
    0
  • With the exception of the Cetacea, most of the Edentata, and the Sirenia, in which the teeth, when present, have been specialized in a retrograde or aberrant manner, the placental mammals as a whole have a dentition conforming more or less closely to the foregoing type.
    0
    0
  • The most remarkable feature about the marsupial dentition is that, at most, only a single pair of teeth is replaced in each jaw; this pair, on the assumption that there are four premolars, representing the third of that series.
    0
    0
  • With the exception of this replacing pair of teeth in each jaw, it is considered by many authorities that the marsupial dentition corresponds to the deciduous, or milk, dentition of placentals.
    0
    0
  • If this be really the case, the rudiments of an earlier set of teeth which have been detected in the jaws of some members of the order, represent, not the milk-series, but a prelacteal dentition.
    0
    0
  • In different groups of mammals the dentition is variously specialized in accordance with the nature of the food on which the members of these groups subsist.
    0
    0
  • From this point of view the various adaptive modifications of mammalian dentition may be roughly grouped under the headings of piscivorous, carnivorous, insectivorous, omnivorous and herbivorous.
    0
    0
  • The fish-eating, or piscivorous, type of dentition is exemplified under two phases in the dolphins and in the seals (being in the latter instance a kind of retrograde modification from the carnivorous type).
    0
    0
  • In the dolphins the teeth form simple cones, but in the seals they are often trident-like; while in the otters the dentition differs but little from the ordinary carnivorous type.
    0
    0
  • It may be explained that the Theromorpha, or Anomodontia, are those extinct reptiles so common in the early Secondary (Triassic) deposits of South Africa, some of which present a remarkable resemblance in their dentition and skeleton to mammals, while others come equally near amphibians.
    0
    0
  • The dentition of the horse, when all the teeth are in place, is expressed by the formula i.
    0
    0
  • At three years the second and third premolars, and the third molar have appeared, at from three and a half to four years the second incisor, at four to four and a half years the canine, and, finally, at five years, the third incisor, completing the permanent dentition.
    0
    0
  • Up to this period the age of the horse is clearly shown by the condition of dentition, and for some time longer indications can be obtained from the wear of the incisors, though this depends to a certain extent upon the hardness of the food or other circumstances.
    0
    0
  • Dimorphognathus, from West Africa, is the unique example of a sexual dimorphism in the dentition, the males being provided with a series of large sharp teeth in the lower jaw, which in the female, as in most other members of the family, is edentulous.
    0
    0
  • These facts militate strongly against the importance which was once attached to the dentition in the classification of the tailless batrachians.
    0
    0
  • Mostly large forms from the Trias (a few Permian), with true labyrinthic dentition.
    0
    0
  • Dentition.
    0
    0
  • In all the dentition is of the hypsodont type, with the hollows of the cheek-teeth filled by cement, the premolars molariform, and the first small and generally deciduous.
    0
    0
  • deciduous dentition develop together as an interdependent system.
    0
    0
  • Others are less complimentary of the benefits of classification using dentition.
    0
    0
  • This prepares the palatal arch for the developing dentition.
    0
    0
  • Hence upright posture, sophisticated speech and deciduous dentition develop together as an interdependent system.
    0
    0
  • There is no change of teeth from milk to permanent dentition.
    0
    0
  • Two separate studies demonstrated no significant difference between dental check frequency and decayed, missing and filled teeth in deciduous or mixed dentition.
    0
    0
  • Children from lower socio-economic classes have worse dental health and higher levels of caries in their primary dentition 10,11.
    0
    0
  • The use of a rapid sequence induction technique needs be balanced against the risks of difficult intubation in chronically ill patients with poor dentition.
    0
    0
  • Day 1 - Aims of course: Learning a repeatable method of treatment of the anterior dentition.
    0
    0
  • dentition checks might be the best compromise.
    0
    0
  • dentition status ' .
    0
    0
  • Unfortunately the homology of the functional series does not by any means end the uncertainty connected with the marsupial dentition; as there is also a difference of opinion with regard to the serial homology of some of the cheek-teeth.
    0
    0
  • It may be added that the formula given above shows that the marsupial dentition may comprise more teeth than the 44 which form the normal full placental complement.
    0
    0
  • The largest representative of the family is the Tasmanian wolf,' or thylacine, alone representing the genus Thylacinus, in which the dentition numbers i.
    0
    0
  • The genus Phascologale comprises a number of small marsupials, none exceeding a rat in size, differing from the dasyures in possessing an additional premolar - the dentition being i.
    0
    0
  • The koala, or "native bear" (Phascolarctus cinereus), which differs widely from the wombats in its arboreal habits, is less specialized as regards its dentition, of which the formula is i., c., p. -{- m.
    0
    0
  • In the adult the dentition (fig.
    0
    0
  • Elachistodonidae.- Represented by Elachistodon westermanni of Bengal, with the same peculiar dentition and with sharp hypapophyses on the vertebrae of the lower neck, as described of Dasypeltis (see above).
    0
    0
  • In the typical genus Sus, as exemplified by domesticated pigs (see PIG) and the wild boar (see Boar), the dentition is i.
    0
    0
  • Dentition (fig.
    0
    0
  • -Skull and Dentition of Tree-Hyrax(Procavirl dorsalis) Xi.
    0
    0
  • The simplest dentition is that of many species of dolphin (fig.
    0
    0
  • In the dolphins, and in a somewhat less marked degree among the seals, this type of dentition consists of an extensive series of conical, nearly equal-sized, sharp-pointed teeth, implanted in an elongated and rather narrow mouth (fig.
    0
    0
  • L. "Normal Formation and Development Defects of the Human Dentition."
    0
    0
  • The two differ in certain details of dentition, and in the greater development in the former of the parachute, especially the interfemoral portion, which in the latter is almost absent.
    0
    1
  • The dentition is i.
    0
    1
  • there are no external ear-conchs; and the dentition includes four pairs of upper, and three of lower, incisors, and distinctly tritubercular cheek-teeth.
    0
    1
  • As regards the recent forms, the dentition in the fully adult animal consists only of incisors and cheek-teeth, the formula being i.
    0
    1