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denominational

denominational

denominational Sentence Examples

  • This act was amended in 1897 to meet the wishes of the Roman Catholic minority, but separate schools were not reestablished; nor was the council divided into denominational committees.

  • In 1908 seven weekly, one daily, and two monthly papers (four denominational) were published at Holland, five of them in Dutch.

  • Not included in these figures are classes for children of members and " attenders," which are usually held before or during a portion of the time of the morning meeting for worship; in these distinctly denominational teaching is given.

  • As the chief representative of the Church of England in the House of Lords, his firmness, combined with broadmindedness, in regard to the attitude of the nonconformists towards denominational education, made his influence widely felt.

  • There are in addition many private and denominational schools and colleges not receiving state aid.

  • (In 1906 members of the Dutch community established a " Christian National Education " organization and opened a number of denominational schools.) Secondary education is provided in the towns and high schools are maintained at Pretoria, Johannesburg and Potchefstroom.

  • From a party-political point of view the period of Sir Henry Campbell-Bannerman's premiership was chiefly marked by the continued controversies remaining from the general election of 1906, - tariff reform and free trade, the South African question and the allied Liberal policy for abolishing Chinese labour, the administration of Ireland, and the amendment of the Education Act of 1902 so as to remove its supposed denominational character.

  • In 1909 a Chaplains' Department of the Territorial Force was formed; there is no denominational restriction.

  • This last was chartered and became independent of any denominational control in 1870, and was superintended by Samuel Chapman Armstrong from 1868 to 1893.

  • This tendency to denominational union is manifest partly in the work of the various educational and missionary societies which have been enumerated, but more strikingly in the institution of the National Council, which is convened at intervals of three years, and is composed of ministers and lay delegates representing the churches.

  • Denominational) Schools, but in March 1905 an agreement was come to whereby these schools were amalgamated with the government schools, and in June 1905 a further agreement was arrived at between the government and the leading religious denominations.

  • Denominational colleges are Yankton College (1882) and Redfield College (1887), both Congregational; Huron College (1883, Presbyterian), and Dakota Wesleyan University (1885; Methodist Episcopal) at Mitchell.

  • Among the private and denominational colleges in Kentucky are Central University (Presbyterian), at Danville; Transylvania University, at Lexington; Georgetown College (Baptist) at Georgetown; Kentucky Wesleyan College (M.E.

  • The British North America Act imposes on the provincial legislatures the duty of legislating on educational matters, the privileges of the denominational and separate schools in Ontario and Quebec being specially safeguarded.

  • Under the British North American Act the control of education was reserved for the provincial governments, with a stipulation that all rights enjoyed by denominational schools at the time of confederation should be respected.

  • Pro vincial control has caused some diversity of management; the interpretation of the denominational agreement has led to acute differences of opinion which have invaded the field of politics.

  • It has no denominational limits, and is largely supported by the "Evangelical" section of the 'Church of England.

  • Changing front, in 1868, in league with the orthodox, they tried to make these denominational; but as the Liberals defeated their attempt, they founded schools of their own.

  • This action was opposed by the church of New York City, and partly through this difference and partly because of quarrels over the denominational control of King's College (now Columbia), five members of the Coetus seceded, and as the president of the Coetus was one of them they took the records with them; they were called the Conferentie; they organized independently in 1764 and carried on a bitter warfare with the Coetus (now more properly called the American Classis), which in 1766 (and again in 1770) obtained a charter for Queen's (now Rutgers) College at New Brunswick.

  • The Denominational.-The course of denominational work may be seen in the way in which the London Society and the American Board were gradually left to the Congregationalists, it being recognized that while fraternity was maintained, the widest results could only be obtained as appeal was made directly to the members of each separate denomination.

  • After a period of stress and uncertainty, due very largely to the variety of denominational creed and polity, matters assumed an easier condition, the missionaries recognizing the national characteristics and aiming at guidance rather than control.

  • In 1889 the state recognized private denominational schools, and in 1900 passed a law of compulsory attendance.

  • Under the act of 1898 they are trained either in the state training-colleges, or in state-aided municipal, and private denominational colleges; or else by means of state or private state-aided courses of instruction.

  • Besides the university there are about a score of denominational colleges or academies, of which half-a-dozen are for coloured students.

  • Among the large denominational colleges are Philander Smith College, Little Rock (Methodist Episcopal, 1877); Ouachita College, Arkadelphia (Baptist, 1886); Hendrix College, Conway (Methodist Episcopal, South, 1884); and Arkansas College, Batesville (Presbyterian, 1872).

  • In 1906 there were also five state normal schools (at Chico, Los Angeles, San Diego, San Francisco, and San Jose), and a considerable number of denominational colleges.

  • This we should expect indeed from its insistence upon individual freedom; yet, notwithstanding certain notable exceptions, amid the diversity there is a substantial unity, a unity which in our day finds expression in common organizations for great practical ends, for example in the " Bible Societies," " Tract Societies," the " Young Men's Christian Associations," " Societies of Christian Endeavour," &c., which disregard denominational lines.

  • Both as leader of Union Chapel and in denominational affairs his courage and discretion, his simple faith, combined with a broadminded sympathy with the intellectual movements of the time, made his ministry a widespread influence for good.

  • Colorado College (1874) at Colorado Springs, Christian but not denominational, and the University of Denver, Methodist, are on independent to;: 4 c terling i r ` j `ia Perad°x Cany02 ' ity sse o [y H..

  • Besides these, which were voluntary colleges not under denominational control, the General Baptists maintained a college since 1797, which, since the amalgamation of the two Baptist bodies, has become also a voluntary institution, though previously supported by the General Baptist Association.

  • The Warren Association (1767) was organized under the influence of Manning and Smith on the model of the Philadelphia, and became a chief agency for the consolidation of denominational life, the promotion of denominational education and the securing of religious liberty.

  • In 1751 the Charleston Association was formed, also on the model of the Philadelphia, and proved an element of denominational strength.

  • By 1812 there were in the United States 173,972 Baptist church members, the denominational numerical strength having considerably more than doubled since the beginning of the 19th century.

  • These became highly efficient in promoting foreign and domestic missions, Sundayschool organization, denominational literature and education.

  • In 1905 a General Baptist Convention for America was formed for the promotion of fellowship, comity and denominational esprit de corps, but this organization is not to interfere with the sectionalorganizationsorto undertake any kind of administrativework.

  • There is a denominational system of primary and higher education.

  • Among the denominational institutions are the Theological Seminary (Presbyterian) at Princeton; the Drew Theological Seminary (Methodist Episcopal) at Madison; Seton Hall College (Roman Catholic), at South Orange; St Peter's College (Roman Catholic) at Jersey City; St Benedict's College (Roman Catholic) at Newark; the German Theological School of Newark 1 The state's title to its riparian lands was established, after a long controversy, in 1870 in the case of Stevens v.

  • Other denominational agencies have been concerned with the printing and circulation of Swedenborgian literature, a training college for the ministry (founded in 1852), and a Ministers' Aid Fund (18J4), and an Orphanage (1881).

  • His great contribution to his Church was the body of denominational literature he left.

  • He was the first (1847) to urge the necessity of a Universalist denominational college, and this did much towards the establishment of Tufts.

  • Other denominational schools are: St Mary's Academy (1875; Roman Catholic) in Salt Lake City; All Hallows College (1886; Roman Catholic) in Salt Lake City; Westminster College (1897; Presbyterian) in Salt Lake City, and Presbyterian academies at Logan, Springville and Mt.

  • There are many denominational charities, especially Mormon, the entire state being divided into ecclesiastical units or " stakes " for charity organization.

  • Into this movement he threw himself with militant ardour, his own goods being distrained upon, with those of numerous other Nonconformists, rather than that any contribution should be made by them in taxation for the purpose of an Education Act which in their opinion was calculated to support denominational religious teaching in the schools.

  • In the following year it was resolved that the basis of representation should be neither personal (as in the Anglican Church Congress) nor denominational, but territorial.

  • The Manchester Education Union and the Birmingham Education League had already formulated in the provinces the two opposing theories, the former standing for the preservation of denominational interests, the latter advocating secular rate-aided education as the only means of protecting Nonconformity against the Church.

  • Several denominational colleges, receiving no government aid, do the same work in a greater or less degree, the best known being St Aidan's (Roman Catholic) College and Kingswood (Wesleyan) College, both at Graham's Town.

  • The opposition to Cornell's plan was bitter, especially on the part of denominational schools and press, but incorporation was secured, and the trustees first met on the 5th of September 1865.

  • In the suburbs there are three denominational schools, the Nebraska Wesleyan University (Methodist Episcopal, 1888) at University Place; Union College (Seventh Day Adventists, 1891) at College View; and Cotner University (Disciples of Christ, 1889, incorporated as the Nebraska Christian University) at Bethany.

  • In addition to the state schools, various flourishing private or denominational institutions are maintained.

  • Again, however, denominational affiliation makes little difference to matters of national identity and constitutional preference.

  • denominational affiliation, or ideological positions.

  • denominational boundaries makes it a difficult area for the lone scholar.

  • denominational state schools in Scotland are Roman Catholic.

  • denominational backgrounds - about 60% would be Anglican.

  • denominational barriers should separate those who had a true faith in common.

  • denominational labels or the lack of them do not matter at all.

  • These people were, and are, thoroughly denominational.

  • Since the early 1980s, many private schools - particularly denominational schools - have integrated with the state system.

  • The alternative is to send their children to the local denominational school with whose ethos they may profoundly disagree.

  • many nonconformists already accept this principle and do not make a claim for denominational schools within the public system.

  • Again, however, denominational affiliation makes little difference to matters of national identity and constitutional preference.

  • If the structures restrict the number of ordained people then we have to ask whether the denominational tail is n't wagging the gospel dog!

  • But the prolonged controversy over the bill, and its withdrawal in the autumn owing to the refusal of the government to accept modifications made by the House of Lords in the denominational interest, made his retention of that office impossible, and he was transferred (January 1907) to the post of chief secretary for Ireland, which he subsequently retained when Mr Asquith became prime minister in 1908.

  • This act was amended in 1897 to meet the wishes of the Roman Catholic minority, but separate schools were not reestablished; nor was the council divided into denominational committees.

  • In 1877 Grant was appointed principal of Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario, which through his exertions and influence expanded from a small denominational college into a large and influential educational centre; and he attracted to it an exceptionally able body of professors whose influence in speculation and research was widely felt during the quarter of a century that he remained at its head.

  • In 1908 seven weekly, one daily, and two monthly papers (four denominational) were published at Holland, five of them in Dutch.

  • Not included in these figures are classes for children of members and " attenders," which are usually held before or during a portion of the time of the morning meeting for worship; in these distinctly denominational teaching is given.

  • As the chief representative of the Church of England in the House of Lords, his firmness, combined with broadmindedness, in regard to the attitude of the nonconformists towards denominational education, made his influence widely felt.

  • There are in addition many private and denominational schools and colleges not receiving state aid.

  • (In 1906 members of the Dutch community established a " Christian National Education " organization and opened a number of denominational schools.) Secondary education is provided in the towns and high schools are maintained at Pretoria, Johannesburg and Potchefstroom.

  • From a party-political point of view the period of Sir Henry Campbell-Bannerman's premiership was chiefly marked by the continued controversies remaining from the general election of 1906, - tariff reform and free trade, the South African question and the allied Liberal policy for abolishing Chinese labour, the administration of Ireland, and the amendment of the Education Act of 1902 so as to remove its supposed denominational character.

  • In 1909 a Chaplains' Department of the Territorial Force was formed; there is no denominational restriction.

  • Denominational schools are: Baylor University (Baptist; 1845), at Waco, with a medical department at Dallas; the East Texas Normal and Industrial Academy (Baptist; 1905), at Tyler; Trinity University (Cumberland Presbyterian; 1869), at Waxahachie; Austin College (Presbyterian; 1850), at Sherman; South-western University (Methodist Episcopal; 1873), at Georgetown, with a medical department at Dallas; the Polytechnic College (Methodist Episcopal, South; 1891), at Fort Worth; Texas Holiness College (Holiness; 1899), at Peniel, near Greenville; Texas Christian University (Christian; 1873 until 1895 at Thorp's Spring; until 1902 Add-Ran College), at Waco; St Edward's College (Roman Catholic, under the Congregation of the Holy Cross; 1885), at Austin; St Mary's University (1854; since 1884 under the Society of Jesus), at Galveston; St Basil's College (under the Basilian Fathers; 1899), at Waco; for girls, Baylor Female College (Baptist; 1845), at Belton; San Antonio Female College (Methodist Episcopal, South; 1894), at San Antonio; North Texas Female College (Methodist Episcopal, South; 1877), at Sherman; and the Academy of Our Lady of the Lake, under the Sisters of Divine Providence, at San Antonio; and for negroes Paul Quinn College (African Methodist Episcopal; 1881), at Waco; Tillotson College (Congregational; 1881), at Austin; Samuel Huston College (Methodist Episcopal; 1900), at Austin; Bishop College (Baptist; 1881), at Marshall; Wiley University (Methodist Episcopal; 1873), at Marshall; and Texas College (Coloured Methodist Episcopal; 1895), at Tyler.

  • This last was chartered and became independent of any denominational control in 1870, and was superintended by Samuel Chapman Armstrong from 1868 to 1893.

  • It was this decision which for the first time gave to Congregationalists a true feeling of denominational unity (see below).

  • This tendency to denominational union is manifest partly in the work of the various educational and missionary societies which have been enumerated, but more strikingly in the institution of the National Council, which is convened at intervals of three years, and is composed of ministers and lay delegates representing the churches.

  • Denominational) Schools, but in March 1905 an agreement was come to whereby these schools were amalgamated with the government schools, and in June 1905 a further agreement was arrived at between the government and the leading religious denominations.

  • Denominational colleges are Yankton College (1882) and Redfield College (1887), both Congregational; Huron College (1883, Presbyterian), and Dakota Wesleyan University (1885; Methodist Episcopal) at Mitchell.

  • Among the private and denominational colleges in Kentucky are Central University (Presbyterian), at Danville; Transylvania University, at Lexington; Georgetown College (Baptist) at Georgetown; Kentucky Wesleyan College (M.E.

  • The British North America Act imposes on the provincial legislatures the duty of legislating on educational matters, the privileges of the denominational and separate schools in Ontario and Quebec being specially safeguarded.

  • Under the British North American Act the control of education was reserved for the provincial governments, with a stipulation that all rights enjoyed by denominational schools at the time of confederation should be respected.

  • Pro vincial control has caused some diversity of management; the interpretation of the denominational agreement has led to acute differences of opinion which have invaded the field of politics.

  • Among the institutions generally grouped as denominational are - Baptist: Mercer University, at Macon (Penfield, 1837; Macon, 1871), Shorter College (1877) at Rome, Spelman Seminary (1881) in Atlanta for negro women and girls, and Bessie Tift College, formerly Monroe College (1849) for women, at Forsyth; Methodist Episcopal: Emory College (1836), at Oxford, and Wesleyan Female College (1836) at Macon, both largely endowed by George Ingraham Seney (1837-1893), and the latter one of the earliest colleges for women in the country; Methodist Episcopal Church, South: Young Harris College (r855) at Young Harris, Andrew Female College (1854) at Cuthbert, and Dalton Female College (1872) at Dalton; Presbyterian: Agnes Scott College at Decatur; and African Methodist Episcopal: Morris Brown College (1885) at Atlanta.

  • It has no denominational limits, and is largely supported by the "Evangelical" section of the 'Church of England.

  • Changing front, in 1868, in league with the orthodox, they tried to make these denominational; but as the Liberals defeated their attempt, they founded schools of their own.

  • This action was opposed by the church of New York City, and partly through this difference and partly because of quarrels over the denominational control of King's College (now Columbia), five members of the Coetus seceded, and as the president of the Coetus was one of them they took the records with them; they were called the Conferentie; they organized independently in 1764 and carried on a bitter warfare with the Coetus (now more properly called the American Classis), which in 1766 (and again in 1770) obtained a charter for Queen's (now Rutgers) College at New Brunswick.

  • The Denominational.-The course of denominational work may be seen in the way in which the London Society and the American Board were gradually left to the Congregationalists, it being recognized that while fraternity was maintained, the widest results could only be obtained as appeal was made directly to the members of each separate denomination.

  • After a period of stress and uncertainty, due very largely to the variety of denominational creed and polity, matters assumed an easier condition, the missionaries recognizing the national characteristics and aiming at guidance rather than control.

  • In 1889 the state recognized private denominational schools, and in 1900 passed a law of compulsory attendance.

  • Under the act of 1898 they are trained either in the state training-colleges, or in state-aided municipal, and private denominational colleges; or else by means of state or private state-aided courses of instruction.

  • Besides the university there are about a score of denominational colleges or academies, of which half-a-dozen are for coloured students.

  • Among the large denominational colleges are Philander Smith College, Little Rock (Methodist Episcopal, 1877); Ouachita College, Arkadelphia (Baptist, 1886); Hendrix College, Conway (Methodist Episcopal, South, 1884); and Arkansas College, Batesville (Presbyterian, 1872).

  • In 1906 there were also five state normal schools (at Chico, Los Angeles, San Diego, San Francisco, and San Jose), and a considerable number of denominational colleges.

  • This we should expect indeed from its insistence upon individual freedom; yet, notwithstanding certain notable exceptions, amid the diversity there is a substantial unity, a unity which in our day finds expression in common organizations for great practical ends, for example in the " Bible Societies," " Tract Societies," the " Young Men's Christian Associations," " Societies of Christian Endeavour," &c., which disregard denominational lines.

  • Both as leader of Union Chapel and in denominational affairs his courage and discretion, his simple faith, combined with a broadminded sympathy with the intellectual movements of the time, made his ministry a widespread influence for good.

  • Colorado College (1874) at Colorado Springs, Christian but not denominational, and the University of Denver, Methodist, are on independent to;: 4 c terling i r ` j `ia Perad°x Cany02 ' ity sse o [y H..

  • Besides these, which were voluntary colleges not under denominational control, the General Baptists maintained a college since 1797, which, since the amalgamation of the two Baptist bodies, has become also a voluntary institution, though previously supported by the General Baptist Association.

  • The Warren Association (1767) was organized under the influence of Manning and Smith on the model of the Philadelphia, and became a chief agency for the consolidation of denominational life, the promotion of denominational education and the securing of religious liberty.

  • In 1751 the Charleston Association was formed, also on the model of the Philadelphia, and proved an element of denominational strength.

  • By 1812 there were in the United States 173,972 Baptist church members, the denominational numerical strength having considerably more than doubled since the beginning of the 19th century.

  • These became highly efficient in promoting foreign and domestic missions, Sundayschool organization, denominational literature and education.

  • In 1905 a General Baptist Convention for America was formed for the promotion of fellowship, comity and denominational esprit de corps, but this organization is not to interfere with the sectionalorganizationsorto undertake any kind of administrativework.

  • There is a denominational system of primary and higher education.

  • Among the denominational institutions are the Theological Seminary (Presbyterian) at Princeton; the Drew Theological Seminary (Methodist Episcopal) at Madison; Seton Hall College (Roman Catholic), at South Orange; St Peter's College (Roman Catholic) at Jersey City; St Benedict's College (Roman Catholic) at Newark; the German Theological School of Newark 1 The state's title to its riparian lands was established, after a long controversy, in 1870 in the case of Stevens v.

  • Other denominational agencies have been concerned with the printing and circulation of Swedenborgian literature, a training college for the ministry (founded in 1852), and a Ministers' Aid Fund (18J4), and an Orphanage (1881).

  • His great contribution to his Church was the body of denominational literature he left.

  • He was the first (1847) to urge the necessity of a Universalist denominational college, and this did much towards the establishment of Tufts.

  • Other denominational schools are: St Mary's Academy (1875; Roman Catholic) in Salt Lake City; All Hallows College (1886; Roman Catholic) in Salt Lake City; Westminster College (1897; Presbyterian) in Salt Lake City, and Presbyterian academies at Logan, Springville and Mt.

  • There are many denominational charities, especially Mormon, the entire state being divided into ecclesiastical units or " stakes " for charity organization.

  • Into this movement he threw himself with militant ardour, his own goods being distrained upon, with those of numerous other Nonconformists, rather than that any contribution should be made by them in taxation for the purpose of an Education Act which in their opinion was calculated to support denominational religious teaching in the schools.

  • In the following year it was resolved that the basis of representation should be neither personal (as in the Anglican Church Congress) nor denominational, but territorial.

  • The Manchester Education Union and the Birmingham Education League had already formulated in the provinces the two opposing theories, the former standing for the preservation of denominational interests, the latter advocating secular rate-aided education as the only means of protecting Nonconformity against the Church.

  • The Dissenters were by no means satisfied with Forster's "conscience clause" as contained in the bill, and they regarded him, the ex-Quaker, as a deserter from their own side; while they resented the "25th clause," permitting school boards to pay the fees of needy children at denominational schools out of the rates, as an insidious attack upon themselves.

  • Several denominational colleges, receiving no government aid, do the same work in a greater or less degree, the best known being St Aidan's (Roman Catholic) College and Kingswood (Wesleyan) College, both at Graham's Town.

  • The opposition to Cornell's plan was bitter, especially on the part of denominational schools and press, but incorporation was secured, and the trustees first met on the 5th of September 1865.

  • In the suburbs there are three denominational schools, the Nebraska Wesleyan University (Methodist Episcopal, 1888) at University Place; Union College (Seventh Day Adventists, 1891) at College View; and Cotner University (Disciples of Christ, 1889, incorporated as the Nebraska Christian University) at Bethany.

  • In addition to the state schools, various flourishing private or denominational institutions are maintained.

  • If the structures restrict the number of ordained people then we have to ask whether the denominational tail is n't wagging the gospel dog !

  • As you look at examples of high school graduation prayers, remember that these are words of great importance, whether the prayer is denominational, non-denominational, or secular.

  • There are meditation groups for nearly every major religious group; check with your own religious tradition or seek out a non denominational approach that suits your needs.

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