Democratic sentence example

democratic
  • You have to split this in a nice democratic fashion.

    364
    116
  • They were too moderate to please the people, too democratic for the nobles.

    297
    134
  • He was defeated as Democratic candidate for governor in 1864.

    87
    31
  • With the rapid growth of extreme democratic ideas the Feuillants soon began to be looked upon as reactionaries, and to be classed with "aristocrats."

    79
    47
  • The parliamentary system of government in the United Kingdom allows there to be a democratic style of making decisions.

    46
    14
    Advertisement
  • He acted with good sense and moderation, and, although by no means a believer in democratic ideas, he saw the necessity of satisfying public opinion and frankly gave his support to larger measures of reform.

    52
    35
  • Politically the Maoris have always been democratic. No approach to a monarchy ever existed.

    38
    21
  • Democratic principles were gaining ground among the Roman Catholics as well as the Presbyterians.

    40
    28
  • He rejoiced that the breaking up of the French schools by the revolution had rendered necessary the foundation of Maynooth College, which he foresaw would draw the sympathies of the clergy into more democratic channels.

    30
    19
  • His work Democratic (1859) led to a political prosecution and imprisonment.

    26
    17
    Advertisement
  • Joseph Bonaparte, then occupaFrench envoy to the Vatican, encouraged democratic tion of manifestations; and one of them, at the close of 1797, Rome.

    40
    31
  • The Democratic and Silver parties united, with the result that the state's electoral vote went to Bryan and Sewall, the Democratic nominees, while the Silver party retained most of the state offices.

    6
    1
  • In attempts to do so, alike in national and in state politics, it impaired its morale by internal dissension, by intrigues,and by inconsistent factious opposition to Democratic measures on grounds of ultra-strict construction.

    6
    1
  • In the following gubernatorial campaign this was made an issue by his Democratic opponent, who appealed to those in sympathy with the strikers.

    5
    1
  • In 1 9 05 he was Democratic candidate for mayor of New York on the Municipal Ownership ticket, and four years later on the Independence League ticket; in 1906 he was candidate for governor of New York on the Democratic and Independence League tickets, in every instance being defeated.

    77
    74
    Advertisement
  • Having failed to secure a re-election to the Senate in '887, Harrison was nominated by the Republican party for the presidency in 1888, and defeated Grover Cleveland, the candidate of the Democratic party, receiving 233 electoral votes to Cleveland's 168.

    3
    0
  • Ultimately the Bonapartes had to flee from Corsica (11th of June 1793), an event which clinched Napoleon's decision to identify his fortunes with those of the French republic. His ardent democratic opinions rendered the change natural when Paoli and his compatriots declared for an alliance with England.

    3
    0
  • Vallandigham, the Democratic leader, was deported from the state by military order, and the Republicans were successful in the elections of 1863 and 1864.

    3
    0
  • Democratic governors were elected in 1873, 1877, 1883, 1889, 1905, 1908 and 1910.

    3
    0
  • The Liberals only retained the confidence of the king by postponing the realization of almost all their democratic and reforming programme, and limiting their efforts to financial reorganization and treaties of commerce.

    2
    0
    Advertisement
  • It was made a special subject of criticism by the Democratic party of the North, which was now organizing itself on the basis of a discontinuance of the war, to endeavour to win the presidential election of the following year.

    2
    0
  • As Lincoln's first presidential term of four years neared its end, the Democratic party gathered itself for a supreme effort to regain the ascendancy lost in 1860.

    2
    0
  • The Democratic National Convention adopted (August 29, 1864) a resolution (drafted by Vallandigham) declaring the war a failure, and demanding a cessation of hostilities; it nominated M'Clellan for president, and instead of adjourning sine die as usual, remained organized, and subject to be convened at any time and place by the executive national committee.

    2
    0
  • In many of them there had been for more than a century a struggle between the old patrician families and the democratic gilds.

    2
    0
  • Thus in his day the government of the imperial cities became more democratic and industry and trade flourished as they had never before done.

    1
    0
    Advertisement
  • They were disturbed by democratic movements in many of the cities and they were threatened by the changing politics of the three northern kingdoms, Norway, Sweden and Denmark, and by their union in 1397; their trading successes had raised up powerful enemies and had embroiled them with England and with Flanders, and the Teutonic Order and neighboring princes were not slow to take advantage of their other difficulties.

    1
    0
  • After a struggle, the Anabaptists obtained control of Mnster and for a short time governed the town in accordance with their own peculiar ideas, while at LUbeck, under the burgomaster Jurgen Wullenweber, a democratic government was also established.

    1
    0
  • It was revised in a democratic sense, but the imperial title was maintained, and a narrow majority decided that it should be hereditary.

    1
    0
  • To them must be added others which were more local, as the Voikspartei or Peoples party in Wurttemberg, which kept alive the extreme democratic principles of 1848, but was opposed to Socialism.

    1
    0
  • In the elections of 1907, indeed, the Social Democratic party, owing to the unparalleled exertion of the government, had a set-back, its representation in parliament sinking to 43; but at the International Socialist Congress, which met at Stuttgart on the 18th of August, Herr Bebel was able to point oui that, in spite of its defeat at the polls, the Socialist cause had actually gained strength in the country, their total poll having increased from 3,010,771.

    1
    0
    Advertisement
  • The church contains a brass of the 14th a Democratic governor was elected.

    1
    0
  • In 1849 he was elected to the United States Senate as the result of a coalition between the Democrats and a small group of Free-Soilers in the state legislature; and for some years thereafter, except in 1852, when he rejoined the Free-Soilers, he classed himself as an Independent Democrat, though he was out of harmony with the leaders of the Democratic party.

    1
    0
  • Toward the end of his life he gradually drifted back toward his old Democratic position, and made an unsuccessful effort to secure the nomination of the Democratic party for the presidency in 1872.

    1
    0
  • The Plea for the Constitution (403 B.C.) is interesting for the manner in which it argues that the wellbeing of Athens-now stripped of empire-is bound up with the maintenance of democratic principles.

    1
    0
  • Rumanians These allotments were slightly modified at the polls by the victory of some Social Democratic candidates not susceptible of strict racial classification.

    1
    0
    Advertisement
  • The democratic states of the Peloponnese were driven, partly by the intrigues of Alcibiades, now anti-Laconian, into alliance with Athens, with the object of establishing a democratic Peloponnese under the leadership of Argos.

    1
    0
  • This policy - which was presumably that of Nicias in opposition to Alcibiades - having failed, the way was cleared for a reassertion of that policy of western conquest which had always had advocates from Themistocles onward in Athens,' and was part of the democratic programme.

    1
    0
  • On the other hand, a democratic rising in Samos prevented the rebellion of that island, which for the remainder of the war was invaluable to Athens as a stronghold lying between the two great centres of the struggle.

    1
    0
  • This government (which received no support from the armament in Samos) had a brief life, and on the final revolt of Euboea was replaced by the old democratic system.

    1
    0
  • This idea is disproved by Thucydides' own narrative, which shows that down to 418 (the battle of Mantinea) Sparta tolerated democratic governments in Peloponnesus itself - e.g.

    1
    0
    Advertisement
  • It was only after that date that democracy was suppressed in the Peloponnesian League, and even then Mantinea remained democratic. In point of fact, it was only when Lysander became the representative of Spartan foreign policy - i.e.

    1
    0
  • The "philosophic" declamations perhaps constituted its chief interest for the general public, and its significance as a contribution to democratic propaganda.

    1
    0
  • The building was erected within three months, to replace one destroyed by fire, for the National Democratic Convention which met here on the 4th of July 1900.

    1
    0
  • They are generally slow of speech and manner, and somewhat irresolute, but take an eager interest in current politics, and are generally fairly educated men of extreme democratic principles.

    1
    0
  • The Liberal Eiderdansk party was for dividing Schleswig into three distinct administrative belts, according as the various nationalities predomin ated (language rescripts of '85),but German sentiment was opposed to any such settlement and, still worse, the great continental powers looked askance on the new Danish constitution as far too democratic. The substance of the notes embodying the exchange of views, in 1851 and 1852, between the German great powers and Denmark, was promulgated, on the 28th of January 1852, in the new constitutional decree which, together with the documents on which it was founded, was known as the Conventions of 1851 and 1852.

    1
    0
    Advertisement
  • He was a delegate to the Democratic National Convention in 1884 and in 1885 declined President Cleveland's offer of the first assistant postmaster-generalship. He was appointed a member of the second division of the N.Y.

    1
    0
  • He was a delegate-at-large from New York to the National Democratic Convention in 1912.

    1
    0
  • But the other professors rose in arms, forbade him to enter the mosque, and in 1879 procured his exile on the pretext that he entertained democratic and revolutionary ideas.

    1
    0
  • He was a Democratic member of the United States Senate from December 1834 until March 1845, ardently supporting President Jackson, and was secretary of state in the cabinet of President Polk from 1845 to 1849 - a period marked by the annexation of Texas, the Mexican War, and negotiations with Great Britain relative to the Oregon question.

    1
    0
  • Subsequently he joined the Democratic party and was a representative in Congress from 1881 to 1887.

    1
    0
    Advertisement
  • He was prominent in Democratic politics, was a member of the Illinois House of Representatives in 1836-1838, was state auditor in 1841-1843, was judge of the supreme court of the state in 1843-1845, and was commissioner of the U.S. General Land Office in 1845-1847.

    1
    0
  • For ten or twelve years this movement had been gaining ground in England, and the Social Democratic Federation was formed in 1881.

    1
    0
  • In 1795 he wrote thirteen letters (signed "Germanicus") defending the President in his attack on the American Jacobin or democratic societies.

    1
    0
  • The democratic Urbina now became practically dictator, and as the attempt of Flores to reinstate Noboa proved a total failure, he was quickly succeeded in 1856 by General Francisco Robles, who, among other progressive measures, secured the adoption of the French system of coinage, weights and measures.

    1
    0
  • This was the first time that the Democratic Party had been defeated, its organization having been in control since the admission of Illinois to the Union.

    1
    0
  • This was at first political; the legislature of 1862 was Democratic, and for political purposes that body adopted resolutions against further conflict, and recommended an armistice, and a national convention to conclude peace.

    1
    0
  • The organization united locally, as in national politics, with the Democratic Party, with equally ineffective results.

    1
    0
  • A Democratic Liberal Party was organized in the same year, one of its leaders being Governor Palmer; consequently no party had a majority in the legislature elected in 1874.

    1
    0
  • It can scarcely be doubted that in spite of the powerful objections that have been advanced against examinations, they are, in the view of the majority of English people, an indispensable element in the social organization of a highly specialized democratic state, which prefers to trust nearly all decisions to committees rather than to individuals.

    1
    0
  • Five of the seven judges in 1837 were his appointees, and the majority of them were Southerners who had been educated under Democratic influences at a time when the slavery controversy was forcing the party to return to its original strict construction views.

    1
    0
  • In 1796 it was named Bloomfield in honour of General Joseph Bloomfield (1753-1823), who served (1775-1778) in the War of American Independence, reaching the rank of major, was governor of New Jersey in 1801-1802 and 1803-1812, brigadier general in the United States army during the War of 1812, and a Democratic representative in Congress from 1817 to 1821.

    1
    0
  • It turns away contemptuously and fiercely from the sentimental aspirations of reformers possessed by the democratic doctrine of the rights of the omnipotent nation.

    1
    0
  • The revolution of 1830 was a great blow to him, and the prospect of democratic advances almost made him ill.

    1
    0
  • The French Revolution, in which all Europe was engrossed, was in Goethe's eyes only another proof that the passing of the old regime meant the abrogation of all law and order, and he gave voice to his antagonism to the new democratic principles in the dramas Der Grosskophta (1792), Der Burgergeneral (1793), and in the unfinished fragments Die Aufgeregten and Das Miidchen von Oberkirch.

    1
    0
  • In 1500 he was elected chancellor of Cambridge University, an office not confined to noble lords until a much more democratic age, and in 1507 master of Pembroke Hall in the same university.

    1
    0
  • But his rooted aversion to the democratic theories imported from France, which were gradually winning their way into England, only grew stronger with advancing age.

    1
    0
  • These ideals are more religious than democratic.

    1
    0
  • This periodical was merged in the U.S. Democratic Review of New York in 5842.

    1
    0
  • In 1842-1844 and again in 1847-1850 he served in the state house of representatives, and became the recognized leader on the Democratic side; he was thrice defeated for Congress, and was twice an unsuccessful candidate for governor.

    1
    0
  • The passage of the Kansas-Nebraska Bill in 1854 had finally alienated him from the Democratic party, and he became one of the founders of the new Republican party in the state.

    1
    0
  • He opposed the acquisition by the United States of the Philippine Islands, became president of the Anti-Imperialistic League, and was a presidential elector on the Bryan (Democratic) ticket in 1900.

    1
    0
  • A more important result of Athenian intervention was the substitution of the democratic government for the oligarchy which had succeeded the early monarchy; at any rate forty years later we find that Argos possessed complete democratic institutions.

    1
    0
  • Unlike his Randolph connexions, Peter Jefferson was a whig and a thorough democrat; from him, and probably, too, from the Albemarle environment, his son came naturally by democratic inclinations.

    1
    0
  • Jefferson did not read excesses in Paris as warnings against democracy, but as warnings against the abuses ' Jefferson did not sympathize with the temper of his followers who condoned the zealous excesses of Genet, and in general with the"'misbehaviour "of the democratic clubs; but, as a student of English liberties, he could not accept Washington's doctrine that for a self-created permanent body to declare" this act unconstitutional, and that act pregnant with mischiefs "was" a stretch of arrogant presumption "which would, if unchecked," destroy the country."6 John Basset Moore, American Diplomacy (New York, 1905)..

    1
    0
  • His administration ended the possibility, probability or certainty - measure it as one will - of the development of Federalism in the direction of class government; and the party he formed, inspired by the creed he gave it, fixed the democratic future of the nation.

    1
    0
  • In 1912 he was vice-chairman of the Democratic National Committee and during most of the campaign was acting chairman because of the illness of Chairman McCombs.

    1
    0
  • The old patrician council left the city to appeal to the Hansa and to the imperial authorities, while a new council with democratic tendencies, elected chiefly from the gilds, took their place.

    1
    0
  • Still Lubeck, even when nearly isolated, strove to preserve its predominance in a war with Denmark (1501-12), supporting Gustavus Vasa in Sweden, lording it over the north of Europe during the years 1534 and 1535 in the person of Jurgen Wullenweber, the democratic burgomaster, who professed the most advanced principles of the Reformation, and engaging with Sweden in a severe naval war (1536-70).

    1
    0
  • He became influential in Pennsylvania politics, and in1845-1849served in the United States Senate, being elected by a combination of Democratic, Whig and "American" votes to succeed James Buchanan.

    1
    0
  • In 1857 he was elected to the United States Senate as a Republican, despite a Democratic majority in the state legislature, a fact that gave rise to charges of bribery.

    1
    0
  • In 65 B.C. he even thought of defending Catiline on a charge of extortion, and delivered two brilliant speeches on behalf of Gaius Cornelius, tribune in 67 B.C., a leader of the democratic party.

    1
    0
  • In the 18th century the influences at work in the American colonies developed democratic notions.

    1
    0
  • The most permanent interest of the history of the United States is the picture it offers of a primitive democratic society transformed by prosperity and the acquisition of capital into a great republican commonwealth.

    1
    0
  • The denunciations of the "money power" and the reiteration of democratic dogmas deserve earnest attention.

    1
    0
  • The way in which Jackson accomplished these things was such that it cost the country ten years of the severest liquidation, and left conflicting traditions of public policy in the Democratic party.

    1
    0
  • A majority of the members elected to each of the two houses suffices to propose a constitutional amendment, which the people may then accept by a mere majority of all votes cast at an election for the legislature (an unusually democratic provision); no more than three amendments, however, can be proposed or submitted at the same time.

    1
    0
  • From the beginning the state has been unswervingly Democratic, save in the Reconstruction years, though often with heavy Whig or Republican minorities.

    1
    0
  • At the outbreak of the World War he was parliamentary leader of the Social Democratic party in the Reichstag, but in 1916 he seceded with the Independent Socialists, who refused to vote the estimate and war credits, and became their leader.

    1
    0
  • Until the Civil War the division between the Whig and Democratic parties, whose organization in California preceded statehood, was essentially based on slavery.

    1
    0
  • During the 14th and 15th centuries revolutions and counter-revolutions, sometimes accompanied by considerable slaughter, were frequent, and a great variety of more democratic constitutions were tried.

    1
    0
  • On the whole it must be said that in those towns where the democratic party gained the upper hand an unruly policy abroad and a narrowminded protection at home resulted.

    1
    0
  • Conditions both in Ohio and in Congress had placed him, and were to keep him for twenty years, in an attitude of aggressive and uncompromising partisanship. His Congressional district was naturally Democratic, and its boundaries were changed two or three times by Democratic legislatures for the purpose of so grouping Democratic strongholds as to cause his defeat.

    1
    0
  • He was prominent in the debate which resulted in the defeat of the Democratic Morrison Tariff Bill in 1884, and, as minority leader of the Ways and Means committee, in the defeat of the Mills Bill for the revision of the tariff in 1887-1888.

    1
    0
  • In the United States the McKinley Tariff Bill was one of the main causes of the Democratic victory in the Congressional elections of 1890, in which McKinley himself was defeated by an extraordinary Democratic gerrymander of his Congressional district.

    1
    0
  • The National Democratic Convention declared for the immediate opening of the mints to the free and unlimited coinage of silver at the ratio with gold of 16 to 1; and it nominated for the presidency William Jennings Bryan of Nebraska, who also received the nomination of the People's party and of the National Silver party.

    1
    0
  • The Democratic tariff in 1893 had been enacted as part of the general revenue measure, which included an income-tax.

    1
    0
  • As the result of the polling in November, 292 Republican presidential electors were chosen, and 155 Democratic electors, elected in Colorado, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, and the Southern states, represented the final strength of the Bryan and Stevenson ticket.

    1
    0
  • The Republican popular vote was 7,207,923, and the Democratic 6,358,133.

    1
    0
  • He was called from it to co-operate with Lamennais in the editorship of L'Avenir, a journal established to advocate the union of the democratic principle with ultramontanism.

    1
    0
  • This was ultimately determined by his growing distrust of Austria and his perennial hatred of the democratic regime of France.

    1
    0
  • Of all the federal governments of Greece, this league was the most certainly democratic in constitution.

    1
    0
  • Here, in company with Giuseppe Mazzini and other advanced politicians, they formed a "European Democratic Committee."

    1
    0
  • In national elections the state has supported the Democratic party, except in 1860, when its vote was cast for John Bell, the candidate of the Constitutional Union party.

    1
    0
  • He soon became prominent as one of the leaders of the Democratic party in the state, and for many years was a member of the so-called "Albany Regency," a group of Democrats who between about 1820 and 1850 exercised a virtual control over their party in New York, dictating nominations and appointments and distributing patronage.

    1
    0
  • Lacordaire and Montalembert, however, continued their democratic campaign, by no means without success; for the revolution of 1848, which drove Louis Philippe from the throne, was far less hostile to Catholicism than that of 1830.

    1
    0
  • Certainly his public pronouncements took on an increasingly democratic tone.

    1
    0
  • The numerous legends which have grown up round his name yield very little that can fairly be regarded as authentic. It seems that he carried on the democratic tradition of his house by helping to overthrow an oligarchic government which succeeded the tyranny in Agrigentum, and was invited by the citizens to become their king.

    1
    0
  • From 1837 to 1840 he was solicitor-general for the western circuit of his state; from 1843 to 1851 and from 1855 to 1857 he was a member of the National House of Representatives, becoming Democratic leader in that body in 1847, and serving as speaker in 1849-1851; from 1851 to 1853 he was governor of his state; and from March 1857 to December 1860 he was secretary of the treasury in President Buchanan's cabinet.

    1
    0
  • In 1784 he bitterly attacked the establishment of the order of the Cincinnati on the ground that it was a dangerous menace to democratic institutions.

    1
    0
  • When these two powers quarrelled after the peace of Nicias it remained loyal to the Spartans; but the latter thought it prudent to stiffen the oligarchic government against a nascent democratic movement.

    1
    0
  • On this occasion a powerful citizen named Euphron effected a democratic revolution and established himself tyrant by popular support.

    1
    0
  • In the party conflicts which succeeded the presidential election of 1824 he sided with the Jackson-Van Buren faction, and soon became recognized as leader of the Democratic forces.

    1
    0
  • When the Democratic national convention met in Baltimore in 1844 he was mentioned as a possible candidate for the vice-presidency but was suddenly brought forward as a "dark horse" and selected to head the ticket.

    1
    0
  • Bancroft's opinion is that Polk was "prudent, far-sighted, bold, exceeding any Democrat of his day in his undeviatingly correct exposition of Democratic principles."

    1
    0
  • The independent treasury plan originated during Van Buren's administration as a Democratic measure; it had been repealed by the Whigs in 1841, and was now re-enacted.

    1
    0
  • The first elections, April 1907, resulted in the election to the diet of about 40% representatives of the Social Democratic party, and nineteen women members.

    1
    0
  • He founded in 1868 a weekly democratic journal, L'Electeur libre, and in 1869 was elected both for Herault and Paris, electing to sit for the former.

    1
    0
  • Taken together with the liturgies, the " eisphora " placed a very heavy burden on the wealthier citizens, and this financial pressure accounts in great part for the hostility of the rich towards the democratic constitution that facilitated the imposition of graduated taxation and super-taxes - to use modern terms - on the larger incomes.

    1
    0
  • The request was granted, and the right of electing parish ministers was conferred by the Patronage Act 1874 on the congregation; thus a grievance of old standing, from which all the ecclesiastical troubles of a century and a half had sprung, was removed and the church placed on a thoroughly democratic basis.

    1
    0
  • The constitution of the city was at first democratic under Damiorgi, a senate and a general assembly.

    1
    0
  • Liebknecht was then expelled from the Social Democratic party and founded a faction of his own, which he called " die Sozialdemokratische Arbeitsgemeinschaft."

    1
    0
  • Although the rules of the Social Democratic party do not recognize a leader or president, Bebel subsequently became by far the most influential member of the party.

    1
    0
  • His attitude on this question made him very popular in America, and he was a strong, but unsuccessful, candidate for the Democratic nomination for the presidency in 1844.

    1
    0
  • His name was again prominent before the Democratic convention of 1852, which, however, finally nominated Franklin Pierce.

    1
    0
  • His ideas of popular sovereignty, however, were not inconsistent with the vigorous Democratic spirit of the west, of which he was a typical representative, and it is not clear that he believed that the application of this principle would result in the extension of slavery.

    1
    0
  • Where society is most primitive it is most democratic, as in Australia, and magico-religious powers are possessed by the whole body of fully initiated males, age, however, conferring increase of sacred lore and consequently of authority; whilst even at this stage the experts tend to form an inner circle of rulers.

    1
    0
  • As a matter of fact, the earlier and more democratic types of primitive society, uncontaminated by our civilization, do not present many features to which the modern conscience can take exception, but display rather the edifying spectacle of religious brotherhoods encouraging themselves by mystical communion to common effort.

    1
    0
  • Indeed, as the history of the higher religions shows, religion tends in the end to break away from secular government with its aristocratic traditions, and to revert to the more democratic spirit of the primitive age, having by now obtained a clearer consciousness of its purpose, yet nevertheless clinging to the inveterate forms of human ritual as still adequate to symbolize the consecration of life - the quickening of the will to face life earnestly.

    1
    0
  • Burchard (1812-1891), on the 29th of October 1884, in Blaine's presence, to characterize what, in his opinion, the Democratic party stood for.

    1
    0
  • In a word, they were the sound kernel of the still but partially developed Swedish constitution, the democratic safeguard against the monarchical tendency which was enveloping the rest of Europe.

    1
    0
  • A new race of politicians was springing up. Since 1719, when the influence of the few great territorial families had been merged in a multitude of needy gentlemen, the first estate had become the nursery and afterwards the stronghold of an opposition at once noble and democratic which found its natural leaders in such men as Count Carl Gyllenborg and Count Carl Gustaf Tessin.

    1
    0
  • When Courbet had made a name as an artist he grew ambitious of other glory; he tried to promote democratic and social science, and under the Empire he wrote essays and dissertations.

    1
    0
  • Up to 1830 the Liberal party, which favoured a free democratic regime, held the upper hand, but in that year the Conservatives, backed by a military rising led by General Joaquin Prieto, placed themselves in power after a sanguinary battle at Lircay.

    1
    0
  • Some democratic changes were made in the constitution, notably a law forbidding the re-election of a president, and the gradual and peaceful transition to a Liberal policy was a proof of the progress which the nation had made in political training.

    1
    0
  • At the end of the 18th and the beginning of the 19th century, the opening of new universities, co-operating with the suspicions of the various German governments as to the democratic opinions which obtained at Jena, militated against the university, which has never regained its former prosperity.

    1
    0
  • Alexander was received by the Ephesians in 334, and established democratic government.

    1
    0
  • The Cape of Good Hope subsequently " became not a colony of the Republic of the United Provinces, but a dependency of the ` Netherlands Chartered General East India Company ' for mercantile purposes; and to this fact principally can be traced the slow progress, in all but extension of territory, of a country which was settled by Europeans within thirty years of the time when the Pilgrim Fathers, the founders of a mighty empire, landed at Plymouth to plant democratic institutions and European civilization in the West."

    1
    0
  • He fully admitted that the cry which had become so popular since 1881 of " Africa for the Afrikanders " expressed a reasonable aspiration, but he constantly pointed out that its fulfilment could most had from the 16th century onward maintained a Y advantageously be sought, not, as the Kruger party and extremists of the Bond believed, by working for an independent South Africa, but by working for the development of South Africa as a whole on democratic, self-reliant, self-governing lines, under the shelter of the British flag.

    1
    0
  • It retained longer than the sister islands traces of feudal influence exerted by the landed proprietors, but has been gradually becoming more democratic. Under the Venetians it was divided into eight districts, and an elaborate system of police was in force; since its annexation to Greece it has been broken up into twenty demarchies, each with its separate jurisdiction and revenues, and the police system has been abolished.

    1
    0
  • Three years later the Spartan garrison was expelled, and a democratic constitution definitely set up in place of the traditional oligarchy.

    1
    0
  • He now declared for Marius and the democratic party, though of Marius himself as a man he had the worst opinion.

    1
    0
  • On Sulla's return from the East in 83, Sertorius went to Spain, where he represented the Marian or democratic party, but without receiving any definite commission or appointment.

    1
    0
  • Pombal liberated the monarchy from clerical domination, and thus unwittingly opened the door to those " French principles," or democratic ideas, which spread rapidly after his downfall in 1 777 .

    1
    0
  • Meanwhile a two-fold reaction - on one side clericalist, on the other democratic - had set in against the reforms of Pombal.

    1
    0
  • This body suppressed the Inquisition and drew up a highly democratic constitution, by which all citizens were declared equal before the law and eligible to any office; all class privileges were abolished, the liberty of the Press was guaranteed, and the government of the country was vested in a single chamber, subject only to the suspensive veto of the Crown.

    1
    0
  • The central government, like that of the constituent cities, was of a democratic cast.

    1
    0
  • Lastly, though Sallust's vivid narrative is consistent throughout, it is obvious that he cherished very bitter feelings against the democratic party.

    1
    0
  • His cousin, William Campbell Preston Breckinridge (1837-1904), was a Democratic representative in Congress from 1885 to 1893.

    1
    0
  • In 1849 he was elected a Democratic member of the Kentucky legislature, and in1851-1855he served in the national House of Representatives.

    1
    0
  • In 1860 he was nominated for the presidency by the pro-slavery seceders from the Democratic national convention, and received a total of 72 electoral votes, including those of every Southern state except Virginia, Kentucky, Tennessee and Missouri.

    1
    0
  • The anti-Roman or Hussite movement was largely a democratic one, and it is therefore natural that the national language rather than Latin should have been used in the writings that belong to this period.

    1
    0
  • From the beginning of its government under its first state constitution in 1835 until 1855 Michigan had a Democratic administration with the exception of the years 1840-1842, when opposition to the financial measures of the Democrats placed the Whigs in power.

    1
    0
  • But it was in Michigan that the Republican party received its first official recognition, at a state convention held at Jackson on the 6th of July 1857, and from the beginning of the following year the administration has been Republican with the exception of two terms from 1883 to 1885, and from 1891 to 1893, when it was again Democratic.

    1
    0
  • Largely to attract the votes of Democratic malcontents the Whig convention nominated for the vice-presidencyJohn Tyler, who had previously been identified with the Democratic party.

    1
    0
  • He pursued his policy of playing into the hands of the sovereign whilst keeping up the appearances of a Liberal, almost democratic, leader, skilful in debate, a trimmer par excellence, and abler in opposition than in office.

    0
    0
  • In 78 he was consul with Marcus Aemilius Lepidus, who after the death of Sulla proposed the overthrow of his constitution, the re-establishment of the distribution of grain, the recall of the banished, and other democratic measures.

    0
    0
  • Among the newspapers of New Haven are the Morning Journal and Courier (1832, Republican), whose weekly edition, the Connecticut Herald and Weekly Journal, was established as the New Haven Journal in 1766; the Palladium (Republican; daily, 1840; weekly, 1828); the Evening Register (Independent; daily, 1840; weekly, 1812); and the Union (1873), a Democratic evening paper.

    0
    0
  • Cox, the Democratic nominee, also from Ohio; he carried, generally by immense majorities, all the northern states and all but one of the states on the border between North and South, and he cut down materially the Democratic majorities in the South.

    0
    0
  • The sweeping character of his victory was due less to his own personal strength or to the weakness of Cox than to the national reaction against the Democratic party and the popular feeling against President Wilson.

    0
    0
  • He displayed his political tact in the choice of the American delegation, which was led by Secretary Hughes and included, besides Elihu Root, two members of the Senate, Lodge and Underwood, the Republican and Democratic leaders respectively.

    0
    0
  • For a time Ranke was now engaged in an occupation of a different nature, for he was appointed editor of a periodical in which Friedrich Perthes designed to defend the Prussian government against the democratic press.

    0
    0
  • He belonged to what was called the Great German party, and opposed the project of reconstituting Germany under the leadership of Prussia; he defended the government against the liberal and democratic opposition; at this time he began the struggle against the secularization of schools, which continued throughout his life.

    0
    0
  • Drew (1827-1900), the Democratic candidate for governor, then secured a mandamus from the circuit court restraining the board from going behind the face of the election returns; this was not obeyed and a similar mandamus was therefore obtained from the supreme court of Florida, which declared that the board had no right to determine the legality of a particular vote.

    0
    0
  • According to the new count thus ordered, the Democratic state ticket was elected.

    0
    0
  • By a similar process the board's decision in favour of the election of Republican presidential electors was nullified, and the Democratic electors were declared the successful candidates; but the electoral commission, appointed by Congress, reversed this decision.

    0
    0
  • After 1876, however, he returned to the Democratic party, and from January to March 1877 served out in Congress the unexpired term of Smith Ely, elected mayor of New York City.

    0
    0
  • Identifying himself with the Democratic party, he served in the state House of Representatives in 1848, and was a prominent member of the convention for the revision of the state constitution in 1850-1851, a representative in Congress (1851-18s5), commissioner of the United States General Land Office (1855-1859), a United States senator (1863-1869), and governor of Indiana (1873-1877).

    0
    0
  • From 1868 until his death he was put forward for nomination for the presidency at every Democratic convention save that of 1872.

    0
    0
  • Both in 1876 and 1884, after his failure to receive the nomination for the presidency, he was nominated by the Democratic National Convention for vice-president, his nomination in each of these conventions being made partly, it seems, with the hope of gaining "greenback" votes - Hendricks had opposed the immediate resumption of specie payments.

    0
    0
  • At the Democratic Convention for the nomination of a presidential candidate held at Baltimore in 1912, he led on 27 ballots, and had a clear majority on eight, but he was finally defeated by Woodrow Wilson of New Jersey.

    0
    0
  • He was a member of the Virginia Committee of Safety from August to December 1775, and of the Virginia Convention in 1775 and 1776; and in 1776 he drew up the Virginia Constitution and the famous Bill of Rights, a radically democratic document which had great influence on American political institutions.

    0
    0
  • With James Madison and Thomas Jefferson, Mason carried through the Virginia legislature measures disestablishing the Episcopal Church and protecting all forms of worship. In politics he was a radical republican, who believed that local government should be kept strong and central government weak; his democratic theories had much influence in Virginia and other southern and western states.

    0
    0
  • He became the leader and spokesman of the democratic party in the Connexion which claimed for the laity the free election of class-leaders and stewards, and equal representation with ministers at Conference.

    0
    0
  • The whole affair was obviously a political move, probably engineered by Caesar, his object being to make the democratic leaders the rulers of the state.

    0
    0
  • In 1677 the fundamental laws of West New Jersey were published, and recognized in a most absolute form the principles of democratic equality and perfect freedom of conscience.

    0
    0
  • A personal quarrel with President Grant led in 1872, however, to his joining the Liberal-Republican revolt in supportof Horace Greeley, and as the Liberal-Republican and Democratic candidate he was defeated for re-election.

    0
    0
  • In 1874 he was successful as a Democratic candidate, serving one term (1875-1877).

    0
    0
  • Since 1 9 00 a white Republican Party has made some headway in Louisiana politics, but in national and state elections the state has been uninterruptedly and overwhelmingly Democratic since 1877.

    0
    0
  • Robertson, Democratic Republican (resigned).

    0
    0
  • Thibodaux, Democratic Republican (acting).

    0
    0
  • Johnson, Democratic Republican Pierre Derbigny, Democratic Republican (died in office) .

    0
    0
  • He had joined the Social Democratic movement which in those days was spreading widely in Russia.

    0
    0
  • But in spite of statements in which ancient authors have represented Aristides as a democratic reformer, it is certain that the period following the Persian wars during which he shaped Athenian policy was one of conservative reaction.

    0
    0
  • The theory was purely democratic, but was all ready to be transformed, by means of a series of fictions and implications, into an imperialist doctrine; and in like manner it contained a visionary plan of reformation which ended, not in the separation of the church from the state, but in the subjection of the church to the state.

    0
    0
  • Here his democratic theory still more clearly leads up to a proclamation of the imperial omnipotence.

    0
    0
  • In July 1857 a convention chosen to form a state constitution was found on assembling to be so evenly divided between the Republican and Democratic parties that organization was impossible, and the members proceeded to their work in two separate bodies.

    0
    0
  • In 1685, at the invitation of the popular leaders, the Danes appeared before Hamburg demanding the traditional homage; they were repulsed, but the internal troubles continued, culminating in 1708 in the victory of the democratic factions.

    0
    0
  • From 1831 to 1833 he was a Democratic member of the United States Senate, in which he advocated a compromise tariff and strongly supported Jackson's position in regard to nullification.

    0
    0
  • The Hussite movement was also a democratic one, an uprising of the peasantry against the landowners at a period when a third of the soil belonged to the clergy.

    0
    0
  • The ecclesiastical organization of Tabor had a somewhat puritanic character, and the government was established on a thoroughly democratic basis.

    0
    0
  • The almost uninterrupted series of victories of the Hussites now rendered vain all hope of subduing them by force of arms. Moreover, the conspicuously democratic character of the Hussite movement caused the German princes, who were afraid that such views might extend to their own countries, to desire peace.

    0
    0
  • Men of Pinckney's type were not in sympathy with the progressive democratic spirit of America, and they began to withdraw from politics after about 1800.

    0
    0
  • In May the Democratic convention, the first held by that party, had nominated him for vice-president on the Jackson ticket, notwithstanding the strong opposition to him which existed in many states.

    0
    0
  • In May 1835 Van Buren was unanimously nominated by the Democratic convention at Baltimore.

    0
    0
  • The revolt against Democratic rule was undoubtedly serious, but a study of the popular vote shows that the election of Harrison, the Whig candidate, was less of a revolution than many affected to think.

    0
    0
  • In the Democratic convention, though he had a majority of the votes, he did not have the twothirds which the rule of the convention required, and after eight ballots his name was withdrawn.

    0
    0
  • The alake exercises little authority apart from his council, the form of government being largely democratic. Revenue is chiefly derived from tolls or import duties.

    0
    0
  • A popular and successful democratic leader, he cannot, however, be ranked among the great statesmen of the republic. As a general he was headstrong and selfsufficient and seems to have owed his victories chiefly to personal boldness favoured by good fortune.

    0
    0
  • There he soon became conspicuous both as a lawyer and as a politician, attracting particular attention by his speeches during the presidential campaign of 1888 on behalf of the candidates of the Democratic party.

    0
    0
  • In a campaign largely restricted to the question of free-silver coinage he was defeated for re-election in 1894, and subsequently was also defeated as the Democratic candidate for the United States Senate.

    0
    0
  • The Democratic party was even more radically divided on the question of monetary policy than the Republican; and President Cleveland, by securing the repeal of the silver purchase clause in the Sherman Act by Republican votes, had alienated a great majority of his party.

    0
    0
  • In the Democratic national convention at Chicago in 1896, during a long and heated debate with regard to the party platform, Bryan, in advocating the "plank" declaring for the free coinage of silver, of which he was the author, delivered a celebrated speech containing the passage, "You shall not press down upon the brow of labour this crown of thorns; you shall not crucify mankind upon a cross of gold."

    0
    0
  • This speech made him the idol of the "silver" majority of the convention and brought him the Democratic nomination for the presidency on the following day.

    0
    0
  • In 1904 although not actively a candidate for the Democratic nomination (which eventually went to Judge Parker), he was to the very last considered a possible nominee; and he strenuously opposed in the convention the repudiation by the conservative element of the stand taken in the two previous campaigns.

    0
    0
  • He was again nominated for the presidency by the Democratic party in 1908.

    0
    0
  • Although to some extent looked down upon by the senate as following a dishonourable occupation, they had as a rule sided with the latter, as being at least less hostile to them than the democratic party.

    0
    0
  • The organization of the Protestant Church was formerly connected with the corporation of the nobles of Livonia and Courland, but the rights of presentation pertaining to the manorial estates of the knights and to the Government estates have been abolished by the introduction of a democratic free church.

    0
    0
  • The experiment of republican government had proved so discreditable, and had so wearied the country of cabals, that men hitherto known for their sympathy with democratic principles became more monarchical than the regent himself; and under this influence a movement to give the regency into the hands of the princess Donna Januaria, now in her 18th year, was set on foot.

    0
    0
  • For some time Siena remained faithful to the Ghibelline cause; nevertheless Guelf and democratic sentiments began to make head.

    0
    0
  • But, though now admitted to power through the burgher reaction, as a concession to democratic ideas, and to cause a split among the greater people, they enjoyed very limited privileges.'

    0
    0
  • In 1844 he was chosen as a presidential elector on the Polk and Dallas ticket; in February 1845 he married Miss Varina Howell (1826-1906) of Mississippi (a granddaughter of Governor Richard Howell of New Jersey), and in the same year became a Democratic representative in Congress.

    0
    0
  • He resigned from the Senate in 1851 to become a candidate of the Democratic States-Rights Party for the governorship of his state against Foote, the candidate of the Union Democrats.

    0
    0
  • To his insistence in 1860 that the Democratic party should support his claim to the protection of slavery in the territories by the Federal government, the disruption of that party was in large measure due.

    0
    0
  • In the assertion of their national aspirations, confused as these were with the new democratic ideals, the Magyars had had the support of the German democrats who temporarily held the reins of power in Vienna.

    0
    0
  • Moreover, by refusing the royal terms, the Coalition had forced the crown into an alliance with the extreme democratic elements in the state.

    0
    0
  • Thurii had a democratic constitution and good laws, and, though we hear little of its history till in 390 it received a severe defeat from the rising power of the Lucanians, many beautiful coins testify to the wealth and splendour of its days of prosperity.

    0
    0
  • The power of the collective episcopate to maintain Catholic unity was disproved long before it was overshadowed by the centralized authority of Rome; before the Reformation, its last efforts to assert its supremacy in the Western Church, at the councils of Basel and Constance, had broken down; and the religious revolution of the 16th century left it largely discredited and exposed to a double attack, by the papal monarchy on the one hand and the democratic Presbyterian model on the other.

    0
    0
  • At the opening sitting (May 30) Czechs, Poles and Ruthenes defined their national attitude in formal resolutions, and the Slovene leader, Father Korosec, in the name of the Yugoslays, demanded " the union of all the Yugoslav territories of the Monarchy in an independent state organism, free from the rule of any foreign nation, and resting on a democratic basis, under the sceptre of the Habsburg-Lorraine Dynasty."

    0
    0
  • Moreover the collapse of Tsarism had deprived Mr. Pasic of his strongest support abroad, and forced him to abandon his narrowly Orthodox basis and bring his policy more into line with modern democratic tendencies.

    0
    0
  • After affirming that the Serbs, Croats and Slovenes constitute a single nation and appealing to the right of self-determination, it declared in favour of complete national unity under the Karagjorgjevic dynasty, " a constitutional democratic and parliamentary monarchy, equality of the three national names and flags, of the Cyrilline and Latin alphabets, and of the Orthodox Catholic and Mussulman religions, equal rights for all citizens, universal suffrage in parliamentary and municipal life, and the freedom of the Adriatic to all nations."

    0
    0
  • During 1919 internal politics centred in a struggle between the Radicals, who still possessed the best party machine and stood for a narrowly Serbian as opposed to a Yugoslav programme, and the newly constituted Democratic party, which absorbed most of the Serbian Opposition parties, the old Serbo-Croat coalition of Zagreb, and the Slovene Liberals.

    0
    0
  • This outrage, which was traced to the Communists, provided fresh proof that the Democratic leader Draskovic, as Minister of the Interior, was justified in his charges of widespread terrorist conspiracy and even in the much debated Decrees (Obznane) by which he sought to combat them.

    0
    0
  • These were all men of progressive, in some respects democratic, views, and in thus forming his cabinet General Botha showed his determination not to be dominated by the " back veld " Boers.

    0
    0
  • He was twice banished for attempting to overthrow the oligarchical party in Syracuse; in 317 he returned with an army of mercenaries under a solemn oath to observe the democratic constitution which was then set up. Having banished or murdered some Io,000 citizens, and thus made himself master of Syracuse, he created a strong army and fleet and subdued the greater part of Sicily.

    0
    0
  • Syracuse thus became a democratic commonwealth.

    0
    0
  • Hermocrates, the best of counsellors for external affairs, is suspected, and seemingly with reason, of disloyalty to the democratic constitution.

    0
    0
  • As the reign of Louis Philippe went on, Lamartine, who had previously been a liberal royalist, something after the fashion of Chateaubriand, became more and more democratic in his opinions.

    0
    0
  • The Argus, founded in 1813 by Jesse Buel (1778-1839) and edited from 1824 to 1854 by Edwin Croswell (1797-1871), was long the organ of the coterie of New York politicians known as the "Albany Regency," and was one of the most influential Democratic papers in the United States.

    0
    0
  • The law had to be declared and applied by the people itself in its communities, while the spokesmen of the people were neither democratic majorities nor individual experts, but a few leading men - the twelve eldest thanes or some similar quorum.

    0
    0
  • The whole constitution of the republic, although of very democratic tendencies, seemed designed to promote civil strife and weaken the central power.

    0
    0
  • His elder brother, John Quincy Adams (1833-1894), a graduate of Harvard (1853), practised law, and was a Democratic member for several terms of the Massachusetts general court.

    0
    0
  • In 1872 he was nominated for vice-president by the Democratic faction that refused to support Horace Greeley.

    0
    0
  • Moreover, borough government in England seems to have been mainly democratic until the r4th or 15th century; there was no oligarchy to be depressed or suppressed.

    0
    0
  • While many continental municipalities were becoming more democratic in the 14th century, those of England were drifting towards oligarchy, towards government by a close "select body."

    0
    0
  • Arabian tradition tells of their prince Jabala ibn Aiham who accepted Islam, after fighting against it, but finding it too democratic, returned to Christianity and exile in the Roman empire.

    0
    0
  • While in exile he was elected supreme commander of the Knights of the Golden Circle in Ohio and received the Democratic nomination for governor of Ohio, but was defeated.

    0
    0
  • In 1864 he returned to Ohio, took active part in the campaign of that year, wrote part of the National Democratic platform at Chicago, and assisted to nominate McClellan for the presidency.

    0
    0
  • He thus initiated what was known as the "New Departure" Democratic movement.

    0
    0
  • This bill was passed by the Democratic House on the 21st of July, and was then so amended by a Republican Senate as to be unacceptable to the house.

    0
    0
  • During the free silver controversy he adhered to the Cleveland section of the Democratic party, and failed to be re-elected when his term in the Senate expired in 1899.

    0
    0
  • Leaving the Democratic party on the Kansas-Nebraska issue, he assisted in the formation of the Republican party in Connecticut, and was its candidate for governor in 1856; he was a delegate to the Republican national conventions of 1856 and 1860.

    0
    0
  • It is asserted by some writers, especially by Tronci, that in the 12th century Pisa adopted a more democratic form of government.

    0
    0
  • The Berbers are organized in tribes with purely democratic government and laws of their own, which are not those of the Koran.

    0
    0
  • The Democratic party nominated the one available Democrat who had the smallest chance of beating him - Horatio Seymour, lately governor of New York, an excellent statesman, but at that time hopeless as a candidate because of his attitude during the war.

    0
    0
  • On the other hand the democratic tone which distinguishes Micah from Isaiah, and his announcement of the impending fall of the capital (the deliverance of which from the Assyrian appears to Isaiah as the necessary condition for the preservation of the seed of a new and better kingdom), are explained by the fact that, while Isaiah lived in the centre of affairs, Micah, a provincial prophet, sees the capital and the aristocracy entirely from the side of a man of the oppressed people, and foretells the utter ruin of both.

    0
    0
  • The former were in general associated with the Democratic party, the latter with the Whigs.

    0
    0
  • In presidential campaigns the state has been Federalist, 1792-1800; Democratic Republican, 1804; Federalist, 1808-1812; Democratic Republican, 1816-1820; Adams (Republican), 1824-1828; National Republican, 1832; Democratic, 1836; Whig, 1840-1848; Democratic, 1852; and Republican since 1856.

    0
    0
  • Paul Mumford (acting), Democratic Republican Henry Smith, „ „ „ Isaac Wilbour, James Fenner, Democratic Republican.

    0
    0
  • Arthur Fenner became a Democratic Republican about 1800.

    0
    0
  • But it makes some difference to the future of a democratic state whether its leading men are eagerly on the look-out for something to revolutionize, or approach a constitutional change by the gradual processes of conviction and conversion.

    0
    0
  • There is some evidence that before the Civil War there was a Democratic secret organization of the same name, with its principal membership in the Southern States.

    0
    0
  • Vilas, a lawyer and Democratic politician, emigrated in 1851 to Madison, Wisconsin.

    0
    0
  • He was a delegate to the Democratic National Convention of 1896, but withdrew after the adoption of the free-silver plank.

    0
    0
  • He then became one of the chief organizers of the National (or Gold) Democratic party, attended the convention at Indianapolis, and was chairman of its committee on resolutions.

    0
    0
  • But the internal quarrels between the Merli, or aristocratic faction, and the Malvezzi, or democratic faction, fomented as they were by the Spaniards, helped to ruin the city (1671-1678).

    0
    0
  • He sat in the Democratic left, and was elected vice-president in 1893 and 18 9 4.

    0
    0
  • These two were followed by the Democratic Review (1838-1852), the American Review (1845-1849), afterwards the American Whig Review (1850-1852), the Massachusetts Quarterly Review (1847-1850), and a few more.

    0
    0
  • Power passed into the hands of John de Witt, who represented the oligarchic element and the special interests of one province, Holland, and was taken from the Orange party which represented the more democratic element and the more general interests of the Seven Provinces.

    0
    0
  • In the month following these events his democratic brother, Marie-Joseph, had entered the Convention.

    0
    0
  • He settled in Leipzig as a journalist; but the democratic views expressed in some essays and the volumes of poems Glocke and Kanone (1481) and Irdische Phantasien (1842) led to his expulsion from Saxony in 1846.

    0
    0
  • In the winter of 1867 he was elected to fill the unexpired term, but a Democratic majority in the legislature prevented his re-election in 1869.

    0
    0
  • Its organization, adopted by the common synod, was the product of the new democratic ideal embodied in the Cleisthenic reforms, as interpreted by a just and moderate exponent.

    0
    0
  • The first to secede were the land powers of Greece proper, whose subordination Athens had endeavoured to guarantee by supporting the democratic parties in the various states.

    0
    0
  • In 1868 he was the Democratic candidate for vice-president on the ticket with Horatio Seymour.

    0
    0
  • In 1916 he was delegate-at-large to the Democratic National Convention.

    0
    0
  • At the Democratic National Convention in 1920 he had from the beginning strong support for the presidential nomination.

    0
    0
  • Villele, who before the promulgation of the charter had written some Observations sur le projet de constitution opposing it, as too democratic in character, naturally took his place on the extreme right with the ultra-royalists.

    0
    0
  • During his public life he had become a leader of the Democratic party in New York, Martin Van Buren being his closest associate.

    0
    0
  • Its character is distinctly democratic. The property qualification of state senators and the restriction of suffrage to those who have paid county or poll taxes are abolished; but suffrage is limited to male adults who can read the state constitution in English, and can write their names, unless physically disqualified, and who have registered.

    0
    0
  • In 1866 Tilden became chairman of the Democratic state committee, and soon came into conflict with.

    0
    0
  • In 1908-09 there was an unsuccessful attempt to pass in the legislature a constitutional amendment providing for state-wide prohibition; the amendment was favoured by the Democratic state platform, but the hostility of the legislature to Governor Campbell, who favoured the amendment, secured its defeat.

    0
    0
  • It has since been consistently Democratic. The supremacy of the party was threatened for a time by the growth of Populism, but the danger was ayoided by the acceptance of free silver, and the partial adoption of the Populist local programme.

    0
    0
  • In 1860 he presided over the National Democratic Convention which met first at Charleston and later at Baltimore, until he joined those who seceded from the regular convention; he then presided also over the convention of the seceding delegates, who nominated John C. Breckinridge for the presidency.

    0
    0
  • After 1856 Espartero resolutely declined to identify himself with active politics, though at every stage in the onward march of Spain towards more liberal and democratic institutions he was asked to take a leading part.

    0
    0
  • Thereafter he inclined more and more to the democratic side, though for the present he concerned himself mainly with financial questions.

    0
    0
  • Henceforth Christian's suspected democratic principles made him persona ingratissima at all the reactionary European courts, his own court included, and he and his second wife, Caroline Amelia of Augustenburg, whom he married in 1815, lived in comparative retirement as the leaders of the literary and scientific society of Copenhagen.

    0
    0
  • Its democratic constitution, which seems to have been entirely congenial to the population of small freeholders, and its ambition to gain control over the Alpheus watershed and both the Arcadian high roads to the isthmus, frequently estranged Mantineia from Sparta and threw it into the arms of Argos.

    0
    0
  • He was nominated for vice-president on the ticket with Woodrow Wilson at the Democratic National Convention in 1912 and was elected.

    0
    0
  • Although the tendency in Massachusetts is towards chartering as cities " towns " which have a population of 12,000 or more, the democratic institution of the town-meeting persists in many large municipalities which are still technically towns.'

    0
    0
  • Her leading politicians were out of sympathy with the conduct of national affairs (in the conduct of foreign relations, the distribution of political patronage, naval policy, the question of public debt) from 1804 - when Jefferson's party showed its complete supremacy - onward; and particularly after the passage of the Embargo Act of 1807, which caused great losses to Massachusetts commerce, and, so far from being accepted by her leaders as a proper diplomatic weapon, seemed to them designed in the interests of the Democratic party.

    0
    0
  • The Federalist domination had been succeeded by Whig rule in the state; but after the death of the great Whig, Daniel Webster, in 1852, all parties disintegrated, re-aligning themselves gradually in an aggressive anti-slavery party and the temporizing Democratic party.

    0
    0
  • First, for many years the Free-Soilers gained strength; then in 1855 in an extraordinary party upheaval the Know-Nothings quite broke up Democratic, Free-Soil and Whig organizations; the FreeSoilers however captured the Know-Nothing organization and directed it to their own ends; and by their junction with the anti-slavery Whigs there was formed the Republican party.

    0
    0
  • The victory of the democratic principle was entirely new in the Netherlands, though it had been anticipated in Florence, and was perhaps inspired by Italian example.

    0
    0
  • Inside the city the old aristocratic and democratic factions still carried on their traditional struggle, complicated now by religious difficulties.

    0
    0
  • An attempt of the democratic party to regain power was temporarily successful (January 10, 16ro); but the estates appealed to the States General and Maurice of Nassau, who had been appointed stadtholder on the death of Nuenar, put down the movement with a strong hand, and the Utrechters found themselves compelled to yield.

    0
    0
  • From this time, until the French Revolution, the ancient democratic institutions of the city remained nothing but a name; the rights of the community were exercised by a municipal aristocracy, who held all power in their own hands.

    0
    0
  • He was very popular with his associates and at the age of 29 was offered the Democratic nomination for the N.Y.

    0
    0
  • In 1911 he became Democratic leader in the Assembly and was appointed vice-chairman of the Factory Investigating Committee which made a searching inquiry into industrial conditions in the state, resulting in remedial legislation.

    0
    0
  • The patriotic action of the council and its attendant popularity enabled it to recover considerable administrative control, which it continued to exercise for the next eighteen years, although its deterioration in ability, becoming every year more noticeable, as well as the rapid rise of democratic ideas, prevented it from fully re-establishing the supremacy which Aristotle, with some exaggeration, attributes to it for this period.

    0
    0
  • Its prestige was seriously undermined by the conduct of individual members, whose corrupt use of power was exposed and punished by Ephialtes, the democratic leader.

    0
    0
  • In 1880 he received sixty-five votes on the first ballot for the presidential nomination at the Democratic National Convention at Cincinnati.

    0
    0
  • He had been a member of the Social Democratic Federation since 1883.

    0
    0
  • Two years later (1865) he was the Democratic candidate for district attorney, but was defeated.

    0
    0
  • In 1869 Cleveland was nominated by the Democratic party for the office of sheriff, and, despite the fact that Erie county was normally Republican by a decisive majority, was elected.

    0
    0
  • In 1884 the Democratic party had been out of power in national affairs for twenty-three years.

    0
    0
  • A tariff bill introduced in the House by William Lyne Wilson (1843-1900), of West Virginia, chairman of the Committee of Ways and Means, was so amended in the Senate, through the instrumentality of Senator Arthur Pue Gorman and a coterie of anti-administration democratic senators, that when the bill eventually came before him, although unwilling to veto it, the president signified his dissatisfaction with its too high rates by allowing it to become a law without his signature.

    0
    0
  • Toward the end of his second term the president became very much out of accord with his party on the free-silver question, in consequence of which the endorsement of the administration was withheld by the Democratic national convention at Chicago in 1896.

    0
    0
  • In early manhood he left the Democratic party, became a Republican, and as such was elected mayor of Utica in 1884.

    0
    0
  • Both of the South German journals were previously exponents of a very much more democratic trend of opinion than that which came to characterize them under the new proprietorship. Ancillary to these acquisitions large interests were secured by Stinnes in paper-works in order to make his newspapers independent of the paper market.

    0
    0
  • They had long been used, in their orderly democratic life, to manage their own ecclesiastical affairs.

    0
    0
  • His grandfather, Lewis Morris (1671-1746), inherited this in his political views, he distrusted the democratic tendencies of the Whigs, but a firm belief in the justice of the American cause led him to join their ranks.

    0
    0
  • In later times the measure of authority conceded to a pastor as the shepherd of a flock has been much diminished in consequence of the gradual development of democratic feeling in both minister and congregation.

    0
    0
  • Up to the election of Seward as governor, New York had usually been Democratic, largely through the predominating influence of Van Buren and the " Albany Regency."

    0
    0
  • After the defeat of Governor Silas Wright in 1846, however, the Democratic party split into two hostile factions known as the " Hunkers," or conservatives, and the " Barnburners," or radicals.

    0
    0
  • Only once between 1846 and the Civil War did the Democratic party regain control of the state - in 18J3-1855 Horatio Seymour was governor for a single term.

    0
    0
  • In 1884 Cleveland as the Democratic presidential nominee received the electoral vote of his state.

    0
    0
  • His opposition to the extreme democratic and revolutionary party made him unpopular with the mob, who broke his windows, as his liberalism made him suspected at court.

    0
    0
  • He was by occupation a worker in wood, but took to writing for Social Democratic newspapers, and was from 1897 to 1902 on the staff of the Konigsberger Volkszeitung and afterwards on that of the Volksstimme at Chemnitz.

    0
    0
  • Noske, notwithstanding the genuineness of his Republican and Social Democratic opinions, enjoyed con siderable popularity in the new army and with the reactionary friends of law and order, as a man of decided character, great energy and resourcefulness in times of crisis.

    0
    0
  • Under his father's patronage he joined in the conservative reaction which came to a head in 411, when hopes of a Persian alliance or peace with Sparta strengthened the existing dissatisfaction with the democratic rule.

    0
    0
  • Critias, however, fearing a renewal of the collapse of 411, disarmed the people and decided to remove Theramenes before he could create a new democratic party.

    0
    0
  • He returned to America in 1855, was a member of the state Senate in 1856-1857, and from 1857 to 1861 was a Democratic representative in Congress.

    0
    0
  • In the presidential campaign of 1844 one of the Democratic demands was " Fifty-four forty or fight."

    0
    0
  • Clark was one of the two Democratic claimants who had been denied a seat in the senate in 1890.

    0
    0
  • The president's uncle, Robert Barnwell Roosevelt (1829-1906), was a New York lawyer, New York state fish commissioner in 1866-68, a member of the Committee of Seventy which exposed the corruption of Tammany in New York City, a Democratic member of the national House of Representatives in 1871-73, U.S. minister to the Netherlands in 1888, and author of works on American game birds and fish.

    0
    0
  • The reply to this criticism is that Mr Blaine was the choice of the majority of the party, and that while Mr Roosevelt felt free to fight within the party vigorously for reform, he did not feel that the nomination justified a schism like that which occurred in the Democratic party over the free silver issue in 1896 - a schism which remained afterwards a hopeless weakness in that party.

    0
    0
  • The first demand of the overwhelmingly democratic diet returned under this reform bill was that the king should accept the German constitution elaborated by the Frankfort parliament.

    0
    0
  • The number of Social Democratic delegates in a diet of 80 members rose from 5 in 1885 to 14 in 1895.

    0
    0
  • The Social Democratic party endeavoured, indeed, to remove the last remains of the old electoral privilege in town and country; but the urgent motion which they brought in to this effect as early as July 8 1908 broke down, owing to a not unfounded anxiety lest in the Crown territories of mixed populations one nationality should predominate too much over another.

    0
    0
  • The extent of her family connexions, and the correspondence she maintained with foreign sovereigns, together with the confidence inspired by her personal character, often enabled her to smooth the rugged places of international relations; and she gradually became in later years the link between all parts of a democratic empire, the citizens of which felt a passionate loyalty for their venerable queen.

    0
    0
  • He was a member (1899) of the Schurman Philippine Commission, and in 1899 and 1900 was spoken of as a possible Democratic candidate for the presidency.

    0
    0
  • Like his brothers, Napoleon and Lucien, he embraced the French or democratic side, and on the victory of the Paolist party fled with his family from Corsica and sought refuge in France.

    0
    0
  • Their devotion to the national and democratic cause in Italy in 1830-1831 gave him much pleasure, which was overclouded by the death of the elder, Napoleon Louis, in the spring campaign of 1831 in the Romagna.

    0
    0
  • He soon rendered himself popular by his advanced democratic ideas, which he expressed on all possible occasions.

    0
    0
  • Privately he professed himself the representative of the Napoleonic tradition in its democratic aspect, and associated mainly with men of advanced political opinions.

    0
    0
  • The Democratic party (liberal-conservative) ruled from 1865 to 1870, and did much to improve the finances of the state.

    0
    0
  • In the Legislative Assembly the Girondists represented the principle of democratic revolution within and of patriotic defiance to the European powers without.

    0
    0
  • This Communist party established its own organ, the " Rude' Prdivo " (The Red Rights), in opposition to the " Pravo Lidu" (The Rights of the People), the organ of the Social Democratic party.

    0
    0
  • They were also in favour of a closer cooperation with the German democratic element in the State.

    0
    0
  • Of the German parties the strongest was again the Social Democratic party, originally numbering 31 deputies and 16 senators, but having subsequently lost three deputies who formed a German Communist party acting more or less in concert with the Czechoslovak Communists.

    0
    0
  • The democratic sentiment of the Czechoslovak nation, and its maturity in social matters, resulted in the adoption of a social po