Demesne sentence example

demesne
  • To the west of the town lies Woburn Park, the demesne of Woburn Abbey,.
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  • Land held in ancient demesne is sometimes also called customary freehold.
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  • In 1087 the king held the manor of Wendover, and therefore it belonged to the ancient demesne of the crown.
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  • The demesne of Studley Royal (marquess of Ripon) contains the ruins.
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  • A portion of the manor, generally about a third, constituted the lord's demesne, which, though sometimes separate, usually consisted of strips intermingled with those of his villeins.
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  • In English legal history, "ancient" tenure or demesne refers to what was crown property in the time of Edward the Confessor or William the Conqueror.
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  • There were special privileges surrounding tenancies of these lands, such as freedom from tolls and duties, exemption from danegeld and amercement, from sitting on juries, &c. Hence, the phrase "ancient demesne" came to be applied to the tenure by which the lands were held.
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  • But what the Third Crusade showed most clearly was that the crusading movement was being lost to the papacy, and becoming part of the demesne of the secular state - organized by the state on its own basis of taxation, and conducted by the state according to its own method of negotiation.
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  • The other most notable open spaces wholly or partly within the county are Hampstead Heath in the north-west, a wild, high-lying tract preserved to a great extent in its natural state, and in the south-west Wimbledon Common, Putney Heath and the royal demesne of Richmond Park, which from its higher parts commands a wonderful view up the rich valley of the Thames.
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  • He built a new and handsome palace at Drogheda, and he repaired the old disused palace at Armagh and bestowed on it a demesne of 300 acres.
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  • In the course of these three days, or whatever the number was, many requirements of the demesne had to be met.
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  • Adjoining the town is Garbally Castle, the seat of the earl of Clancarty, into the demesne of which the great fair extends from the town.
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  • Gradually the landowners discovered that the only practical way out of their difficulties was to give up the old custom of working the manorial demesne by the forced labor of their villeins, and to cut it up into farms which were rented out to free tenants, and cultivated by them.
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  • He kept to the old system of revenues from the demesne and from imposts that were reactionary in their effect, such as the taille, aids, salt-tax (gabelle) and customs; only he managed them better.
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  • The treatise on husbandry of Walter of Henley, dating from the early 13th century, is very valuable as describing the management of the demesne under the twoor three-field system.
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  • Ancient demesne signified lands or manors vested in the king at the time of the Norman Conquest.
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  • Wetzlar was originally a royal demesne, and in the 12th century became a free imperial town.
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  • At the time of the Domesday Survey East Looe was assessed under Pendrym, which was of the king's demesne and West Looe under Hamelin's manor of Trelowia.
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  • There was one exception to this harsh treatment of villeins, namely, the rustic tenantry in manors of ancient demesne, that is, in estates which had belonged to the crown before the Conquest, had a standing-ground even against their lords as regards the tenure of their plots and the fixity of their services.
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  • Even if they exacted the full rigour of service from the survivors, they could not get their broad demesne lands properly tilled.
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  • The manor, royal demesne in 1086, was granted by Edmund Plantagenet in 1285 to the house of Ashridge, and the town developed under monastic protection.
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  • At the conquest Wimborne was a royal borough, ancient demesne of the crown, and part of the manor of Kingston Lacy, which Henry I.
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  • The distinction between khalsa land, or the imperial demesne, and jagir lands, granted revenue free or at quit rent in reward for services, also dates from the time of Akbar.
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  • It confirms to his free burgesses of Esse the liberties enjoyed by them under his ancestors, viz.: burgage tenure, exemption from all jurisdiction save the "hundred court of the said town," suit of court limited to three times a year, a reeve of their own election, pasturage in his demesne lands on certain terms, a limited control of trade and shipping, and a fair in the middle of the town.
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  • In Anglo-Saxon times the property of the king consisted of (a) his private estate, (b) the demesne of the crown, comprising palaces, &c., and (c) rights over the folkland of the kingdom.
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  • He did subdue Aquitaine completely, thanks to his brother Charibert, with whom he had avoided dividing the kingdom, and he tried to restore his own demesne, which had been despoiled by the granting of benefices or by the pious frauds of the Church.
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  • He was the actual creator of the communes, although an interested creator, since they made a breach in the fortress of feudalism and extended the royal authority far beyond the kings demesne.
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  • Here, besides the viceregal demesne and lodge and the magazine, are a zoological garden, a people's garden, the Wellington monument, two barracks, the Hibernian military school, the "Fifteen Acres," a natural amphitheatre (of much greater extent than its name implies) used as a review ground, and a racecourse.
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  • He transferred in fact the fairs and markets from the demesne lands of the Bloyous in Marazion to those of the prior.
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  • A material point for the application of the privilege consists in the fact that ancient demesne has to be proved from the time before the Conquest, and this shows clearly that the theory was partly derived from the recognition of tenant right in villeins of the Anglo-Saxon period who, as we have said above, were mostly ceorls, that is, freeborn men.
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  • After the Conquest it became a demesne of the crown, and it was bestowed by Henry II.
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  • Certainty and legal protection were so essential that even villain holdings were treated as villain socage when legal protection was obtainable for it, as was actually the case with the peasants on Ancient demesne who could sue their lords by the little writ of right and the Monstraverunt.
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  • It would seem that the manorial grudges between landowner and peasant, which had been so fierce in the 14th century, had died down as the lords abandoned the old system of working their demesne by villein labor.
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  • It is from demesne as used in sense (a) that the modern restricted use of the word comes, i.e.
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  • To the north of the town is Knowsley Park, the demesne of the earls of Derby, with a mansion of various dates from the 15th century onward, containing a fine collection of pictures.
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  • As already indicated above, certain lands are exempt from payment of tithes while in the occupation of their owners, either by reason of their having been parcel of the possessions of any privileged order, or by reason of their being of the tenure of ancient demesne and exempt whilst in the tenure, occupation or manurance of the Crown, its tenants, farmers and lessees or under-tenants, although they are subject to tithes when aliened or occupied by subjects not being such; and in these and in all such cases, with the consent of such owners, a fixed rent charge may be substituted for any contingent rent charge imposed on them (2 & 3 Vict.
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  • The demesne borders the Derwent, and is of great beauty, part being laid out in formal gardens and straight avenues.
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  • In 1086 it was a hamlet in the demesne of the royal manor of Lothingland.
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  • Among the fine environs of the town the demesne of Caher Park is especially noteworthy.
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  • Merewald, king of Mercia, is said to have founded a religious house in Leominster (Llanlieni, Leofminstre, Lempster) in 660, and a nunnery existed here until the Conquest, when the place became a royal demesne.
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  • At that time it was the custom to call up the whole able-bodied population of the manor, with the exception of the housewives for two, three or more days of mowing and reaping on the lord's fields; to these boon-works the peasantry was asked or invited by special summons, and their value was so far appreciated that the villagers were usually treated to meals in cases where they were again and again called off from their own fields to the demesne.
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  • By the Conqueror it had been given to the count of Mortain by whom it was held in demesne.
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  • confirmed to the burgesses a grant of freedom from toll on the ground that Walsall was ancient demesne of the Crown.
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  • Shaftesbury was a borough containing 104 houses in the king's demesne during the reign of Edward the Confessor; in 1086, 38 houses had been destroyed, but it was still the seat of a mint with three mint-masters.
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  • only so far as they had been carried out to the injury of the landowners and outside of the royal demesne."
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  • In the course of two generations the farmers who paid rent for these holdings became more and more numerous, and demesne land tilled by villein-service grew more and more rare.
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  • king of England, Richard Cc~ur de Lion, as powerful, AnguStuS besides being younger and more energetic. Philips and ambition could not rest satisfied with the petty Richard principalities of Amiens, Vermandois and Valois, ~~ur do which he had added to the royal demesne.
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  • The Great North Road passes through Highgate, which is supposed to have received its name from the toll-gate erected by the bishop of London when the road was formed through his demesne in the 14th century.
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  • demesne of the crown.
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  • If there was no heir, the lands went back to the king's demesne.
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  • The manor, part of Fulham, had no demesne, and apart from a brief period before c.
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  • demesne subsequently passed through various families, and is now the property of the Countess of Clarendon.
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  • By order of Louis X11 these had been in an Etat General which included both demesne and extraordinary income.
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  • demesne held by the Leighs was sold in 34 lots.
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  • From 1458 the manorial demesne was let on 10year leases at £ 8 a year.
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  • At Domesday survey, the manor, which had belonged to Earl Alger, was part of the royal demesne.
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  • The manor of Melbourne was part of the ancient demesne of the crown.
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  • Luthrie House is a handsome mansion, finely situated in a well-planted demesne.
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  • demesne farmland in 1646, (fn.
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  • demesne woodland (lowland woodland pasture and parkland) includes that at The Argory (a National Trust property ).
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  • demesne lands.
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  • demesne farm could be let on a leasehold.
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  • demesne wood was in hand and Sir Wm.
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  • demesne accounts, which has been submitted for publication.
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  • The Act provides a procedure for the voluntary registration of demesne land.
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  • 1 The form " demesne " is an Anglo-French spelling of the Old Fr.
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  • This demesne land, originally held at the will of the lord, in course of time came to acquire fixity of tenure, and developed into the modern copyhold (see MANOR).
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  • Joseph Paxton and Thomas Smith were employed to landscape the demesne with serpentine walks and formal gardens.
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  • The men of Lowestoft as tenants on ancient demesne of the crown possessed many privileges, but had no definite burghal rights until 1885.
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  • yearly are found among the possessions of the lords of Alverton, of which manor it formed a portion of the demesne lands.
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  • A seignory appendant passes with the grant of the manor; a seignory in gross - that is, a seignory which has been severed from the demesne lands of the manor to which it was originally appendant - must be specially conveyed by deed of grant.
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  • In Domesday it was royal demesne and during the following centuries figures in numerous grants generally as the dowry of queens.
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  • DEMESNE (DEMEINE, DEMAIN, DOMAIN, &C.), 1 that portion of the lands of a manor not granted out in freehold tenancy, but (a) retained by the lord of the manor for his own use and occupation or (b) let out as tenemental land to his retainers or "villani."
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  • Demesne of the crown, or royal demesne, was that part of the crown lands not granted out to feudal tenants, but which remained under the management of stewards appointed by the crown.
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  • south of the town, but its authentic history begins with the Domesday survey, which relates that the manor had been royal demesne of Edward the Confessor and now paid X10 a year to the Conqueror.
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  • Presumably their chief duty was to undertake a share in the cultivation of the demesne land.
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  • They weighed especially heavily on the so-called Ugedasmaend, who were forced to work two or three days a week in the demesne lands.
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  • If, however, the two conditions mentioned were forthcoming, villeins, or, as they were technically called, villein socmen of ancient demesne manors, could resist any attempt of their lords to encroach on their rights by depriving them of their holdings or increasing the amount of their customary services.
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  • A number of cases arising from these privileges of the men of ancient demesne are published in the Notebook of Bracton and in the Abbreviatio placitorum.
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  • This class was largely reinforced, when after the extinction of the royal house of Hohenstaufen in the 13th century, a great number of towns founded by them on their demesne successfully claimed immediate subjection to the crown.
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  • The manor of Cheddar was a royal demesne in Saxon times, and the witenagemot was held there in 966 and 968.
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  • The kings, like private individuals and ecclesiastical establishments, made use of the beneficium to reward their servants; till finally their demesne was so reduced by these perpetual grants that they took to distributing among their champions land owning the overlordship of the Church, or granted their own lands for single lives only.
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  • demesne against such pillagers as Hugh of Le Puiset or Thomas of Marie.
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  • Cirencester (Cirneceaster, Cyrenceaster, Cyringceaster) is described in Domesday as ancient demesne of the crown.
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  • In this period of anarchy the native princes of Glamorgan had their principal demesne, not at the camp but a mile to the north at Llystalybont, now merely a thatched farmhouse, while some Saxon invaders threw up within the camp a large moated mound on which the Normans about the beginning of the 12th century built the great shellkeep which is practically all that remains of their original castle.
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  • In 1086 it was assessed as royal demesne, and a market was held here at this date.
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  • On the other hand the gebur seems not to have been liable to payments of this kind, presumably because the land which he cultivated formed part of the demesne (inland) of his lord.
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  • It is also to be noticed that the Domesday Survey constantly mentions the terra villanorum as opposed to the demesne in the estates or manors of the time, and that the land of the rustics is taxed separately for the geld, so that the distinction between the property of the lord and that of the peasant dependent on him is clearly marked and by no means devoid of practical importance.
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