Deliquescent sentence example

deliquescent
  • The acid is very deliquescent, and oxidizes on exposure to air to phosphoric acid.
    5
    0
  • It gives the normal sulphate as a yellow, deliquescent, amorphous mass when treated with nitric acid.
    3
    2
  • The chloride, SmC1 3.6H 2 0, is a deliquescent solid which when heated in hydrochloric acid gas to 180° C. yields the anhydrous chloride.
    2
    1
  • I t is deliquescent, and melts at 23° C. (M.
    1
    0
  • Acetamide,, CH 3 �Conh 2j is a white deliquescent crystalline solid, which melts at 82-83° C. and boils at 222° C. It is usually prepared.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Cadmium nitrate, Cd(N03)2.4H20, is a deliquescent salt, which may be obtained by dissolving either the metal, or its oxide or carbonate in dilute nitric acid.
    0
    0
  • Ruthenium sulphate, Ru(S04)2, as obtained by oxidizing the sulphide, is an orange-yellow mass which is deliquescent and dissolves in water, the solution possessing a strongly acid reaction.
    0
    0
  • It was found advantageous not to work for acid but for a basic calcium nitrate (normal calcium nitrate being very deliquescent); for this purpose the acid is treated with the requisite amount of milk of lime.
    0
    0
  • Besides the rock-salt, which is excavated by blasting, the saline deposits of Stassfurt yield a considerable quantity of deliquescent salts and other saline products, which have encouraged the foundation of numerous chemical factories in the town and in the neighbouring village of Leopoldshall, which lies in Anhalt territory.
    0
    0
  • It is obtained as fine lemon yellow deliquescent prisms by evaporating a solution of any of the oxides in nitric acid.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • 66) actually records the discovery which effected the conversion of deliquescent silicate of soda into permanent glass.
    0
    0
  • The chief applications of Chile saltpetre are in the nitric acid industry, and in the manufacture of ordinary saltpetre for making gunpowder, ordinary Chile saltpetre being unsuitable by reason of its deliquescent nature, a property, however, not exhibited by the perfectly pure salt.
    0
    0
  • Zinc bromide, ZnBr 2, and Zinc iodide, Zn12, are deliquescent solids formed by the direct union of their elements.
    0
    0
  • It forms deliquescent crystals, which are readily soluble in alcohol and melt at ioo° C. When heated for some time at 130° C. it yields fumaric acid (q.v.), and on rapid heating at 180° C. gives maleic anhydride and fumaric acid.
    0
    0
  • Auric chloride, or gold trichloride, AuC1 3, is a dark rubyred or reddish-brown, crystalline, deliquescent powder obtained by dissolving the metal in aqua regia.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Caesium hydroxide, Cs(OH) 2, obtained by the decomposition of the sulphate with baryta water,is a greyish-white deliquescent solid,which melts at a red heat and absorbs carbon dioxide rapidly.
    0
    0
  • Whereas calcium chloride, bromide, and iodide are deliquescent solids, the fluoride is practically insoluble in water; this is a parallelism to the soluble silver fluoride, and the insoluble chloride, bromide and iodide.
    0
    0
  • Calcium iodide and bromide are white deliquescent solids and closely resemble the chloride.
    0
    0
  • Calcium nitrate, Ca(N0,)2.4H20, is a highly deliquescent salt, crystallizing in monoclinic prisms, and occurring in various natural waters, as an efflorescence in limestone caverns, and in the neighbourhood of decaying nitrogenous organic matter.
    0
    0
  • These deposits, in addition to common salt, include the following minerals: sylvine, KC1; carnallite, KC1 MgC12.6H20 (transparent, deliquescent crystals, often red with diffused oxide of iron); kainite, K 2 SO 4 MgSO 4 MgC1 2 6H 2 O (hard crystalline masses, permanent in the air); kieserite MgS04 H20 (only very slowly dissolved by water); besides polyhalite, MgSO 4 K 2 SO 4.2CaSO 4.2H20anhydrite, CaSO 4; salt, NaC1, and some minor components.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • It forms a grey brittle mass, having a conchoidal fracture; it is very deliquescent, combining very energetically with water to form caustic potash.
    0
    0
  • - Potassium fluoride, KF, is a very deliquescent salt, crystallizing in cubes and having a sharp saline taste, which is formed by neutralizing potassium carbonate or hydroxide with hydrofluoric acid and concentrating in platinum vessels.
    0
    0
  • This salt is very deliquescent; it melts at 45°, and at 100° decomposes into iodine and potassium iodide.
    0
    0
  • Potassium sulphite, K 2 S0 3, is prepared by saturating a potash solution with sulphur dioxide, adding a second equivalent of potash, and crystallizing in a vacuum, when the salt separates as small deliquescent, hexagonal crystals.
    0
    0
  • It is a colourless, crystalline, deliquescent solid which melts at 135° C., and at 140° C. is completely decomposed into iodine pentoxide, water and oxygen.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Potassium cyanide is an excessively poisonous, colourless, deliquescent solid; it is readily soluble in water, but almost insoluble in absolute alcohol.
    0
    0
  • Chromic thiocyanate, Cr(SCN) 3, an amorphous deliquescent mass, is formed by dissolving the hydroxide in thiocyanic acid and drying over sulphuric acid.
    0
    0
  • With the exception of the fluoride, these substances are readily soluble in water and arc deliquescent.
    0
    0
  • Magnesium Nitrate, Mg(NO 3) 2.6H 2 O, is a colourless, deliquescent, crystalline solid obtained by dissolving magnesium or its carbonate in nitric acid, and concentrating the solution.
    0
    0
  • Deville first selected the chloride as his raw material, but observing it to be volatile and extremely deliquescent, he soon substituted in its place a double chloride of aluminium and sodium.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • The nitrate, Al(N03)3, is obtained as deliquescent crystals (with 81120) by evaporating a solution of the hydroxide in nitric acid.
    0
    0
  • Its hydrochloride melts at 163° C., and crystallizes from alcohol in colourless deliquescent prisms. Acetic anhydride converts the base into an acetamino-dimethyl pyrimidine, acetic acid and acetamide being also formed.
    0
    0
  • It forms a deliquescent crystalline mass.
    0
    0
  • It is deliquescent, and readily soluble in water, from which it separates on concentration in crystals of composition BeC1 2.4H 2 0.
    0
    0
  • The nitrate Be(NO,)2.3H20 is prepared by adding barium nitrate to ber y llium sulphate solution; it crystallizes with difficulty and is very deliquescent.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • It crystallizes in deliquescent prisms and melts with partial decomposition at 119-120° C. It behaves as a ketonic acid, being reduced in aqueous solution by sodium amalgam to tartronic acid, and also combining with phenylhydrazine and hydroxylamine.
    0
    0
  • The sea salt thus made is collected into small heaps on the paths around the basins or the floors of the basins themselves, and here it undergoes a first partial purification, the more deliquescent salts (especially the magnesium.
    0
    0
  • Pure halite consists only of sodium chloride, but salt usually contains certain magnesium ccmpounds rendering it deliquescent.
    0
    0
  • Thallic chloride, T1C1 3, is obtained by treating the monochloride with chlorine under water; evaporation in a vacuum gives colourless deliquescent crystals of T1C1,.H20.
    0
    0
  • The excess of acid is removed by spreading the mass on a porous plate, the residue stirred for some hours with nitric acid, again spread on a porous plate, and finally dried quickly at about 130° C. It is a dark green deliquescent powder which decomposes on heating or on exposure to moist air.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • PIPERAZIN, a substance formed by the action of sodium glycol on ethylene-diamine hydrochloride, consisting of small alkaline deliquescent crystals with a saline taste and soluble in water.
    0
    0
  • It is a brown deliquescent powder, which rapidly forms the green hydrated salt CuC1 21 2H 2 0 on exposure.
    0
    0
  • The stibonium iodide on treatment with moist silver oxide gives the corresponding tetramethyl stibonium hydroxide, Sb(CH 3)40H, which forms deliquescent crystals, of alkaline reaction, and absorbs carbon dioxide readily.
    0
    0
  • It is deliquescent, and dissolves in half its weight of water to form a strongly alkaline liquid.
    0
    0
  • It absorbs carbon dioxide, but is not deliquescent.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Lithium chloride LiC1, prepared by heating the metal in chlorine, or by dissolving the oxide or carbonate in hydrochloric acid, is exceedingly deliquescent, melts below a red heat, and is very soluble in alcohol.
    0
    0
  • It crystallizes in colourless cubes, is deliquescent, and often inflames spontaneously on exposure to air.
    0
    0
  • They are highly deliquescent, and form with water a mixture of phosphorous and phosphoric acids: P204+3H20 = H3P03+ H 3 PO 4.
    0
    0
  • It is extremely deliquescent, hissing when thrown into water, with which it combines to form phosphoric acid.
    0
    0
  • Deliquescent, rectangular tablets of H 4 P 2062H 2 O separate out on concentrating a solution in a vacuum, which on drying further give the acid, which melts at 55°, and decomposes suddenly when heated to 70° into phosphorous and metaphosphoric acids with a certain amount of hydrogen phosphide.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • It is very deliquescent, and freely dissolves in water and alcohol.
    0
    0
  • It forms red crystalline double salts with the chlorides of the metals of the alkalis and of the 1 By solution in concentrated hydrochloric acid, a yellow liquid is obtained, which on concentration over sulphuric acid gives yellow deliquescent crusts of ferroso-ferric chloride, Fe3C118H20.
    0
    0
  • It closely resembles the chloride in being deliquescent, dissolving ferric hydrate, and in yielding basic salts.
    0
    0
  • It is very deliquescent and readily soluble in water.
    0
    0
  • The trichloride, VC1 31 is a deliquescent solid formed when the tetrachloride is heated in a retort as long as chlorine is given off (Roscoe), or by heating vanadium trisulphide in a current of chlorine and fractionally distilling the resulting product at 150° C. in a current of carbon dioxide (Halberstadt, Ber., 1882, 15, p. 1619).
    0
    0
  • Arsenic tribromide, AsBr3, is formed by the direct union of arsenic and bromine, and subsequent distillation from the excess of arsenic; it forms colourless deliquescent prisms which melt at 20 0 -25° C., and boil at 220° C. Water decomposes it, a small quantity of water leading to the formation of the oxybromide, AsOBr, whilst a large excess of water gives arsenious oxide, As4O6.
    0
    0
  • Three chlorides of indium are known: the trichloride, InC13j a deliquescent salt, formed by heating a mixture of the oxide and carbon in a current of chlorine; the dichloride, InCl2, obtained by heating the metal in hydrochloric acid gas; and the monochloride, InCl, which is prepared by distilling the vapour of the dichloride over metallic indium.
    0
    0
  • Concentration of the aqueous solution in a desiccator gives a deposit of crystals of a very deliquescent salt, H21n2(S04)4.8H20.
    0
    0
  • From its aqueous solution, concentrated hydrochloric acid precipitates hydrocobalticyanic acid, H 3 Co(CN) 61 as a colourless solid which is very deliquescent, and is not attacked by concentrated hydrochloric and nitric acids.
    0
    0
  • Besides these there are numerous other black-gilled species which find a place in baskets - some species far too small to bear any resemblance to a mushroom, others large and deliquescent, generally belonging to the stumpand dung-borne genus Coprinus.
    0
    0
  • Acetamide,, CH 3 �Conh 2j is a white deliquescent crystalline solid, which melts at 82-83° C. and boils at 222° C. It is usually prepared.
    0
    0
  • Since potassium nitrate is generally more serviceable than the sodium salt, whose deliquescent properties inhibit its use for gunpowder manufacture, the latter salt, of which immense natural deposits occur (see below (2) Chile saltpetre), is converted into ordinary saltpetre in immense quantities.
    0
    0
  • It forms deliquescent crystals, which are readily soluble in alcohol and melt at ioo° C. When heated for some time at 130° C. it yields fumaric acid (q.v.), and on rapid heating at 180° C. gives maleic anhydride and fumaric acid.
    0
    0
  • The chloride, SmC1 3.6H 2 0, is a deliquescent solid which when heated in hydrochloric acid gas to 180° C. yields the anhydrous chloride.
    0
    0
  • This salt is very deliquescent; it melts at 45°, and at 100° decomposes into iodine and potassium iodide.
    0
    0
  • It is a colourless, crystalline, deliquescent solid which melts at 135° C., and at 140° C. is completely decomposed into iodine pentoxide, water and oxygen.
    0
    0
  • Its hydrochloride melts at 163° C., and crystallizes from alcohol in colourless deliquescent prisms. Acetic anhydride converts the base into an acetamino-dimethyl pyrimidine, acetic acid and acetamide being also formed.
    0
    0
  • It crystallizes in deliquescent prisms and melts with partial decomposition at 119-120° C. It behaves as a ketonic acid, being reduced in aqueous solution by sodium amalgam to tartronic acid, and also combining with phenylhydrazine and hydroxylamine.
    0
    0
  • Manganese trioxide, Mn03, is obtained in small quantity as an unstable deliquescent red solid by dropping a solution of potassium permanganate in sulphuric acid on to dry sodium carbonate (B.
    0
    0
  • The excess of acid is removed by spreading the mass on a porous plate, the residue stirred for some hours with nitric acid, again spread on a porous plate, and finally dried quickly at about 130° C. It is a dark green deliquescent powder which decomposes on heating or on exposure to moist air.
    0
    0
  • It forms very deliquescent long white needles melting at 75.5° C. and boiling at 215-220° C. The bromide, iodide and sulphate are known, as is also gallium ammonium alum.
    0
    0
  • It is a colourless deliquescent solid of specific gravity 3.06; it 'melts at 73-2° C. (H.
    0
    0
  • It melts at 27° C. and boils at 243° C. Resorcin disulphonic Acid (HO) 2 C 6 H 2 (HSO 3) 2, is a deliquescent mass obtained by the action of sulphuric acid on resorcin (H.
    0
    0
  • Deliquescent, rectangular tablets of H 4 P 2062H 2 O separate out on concentrating a solution in a vacuum, which on drying further give the acid, which melts at 55°, and decomposes suddenly when heated to 70° into phosphorous and metaphosphoric acids with a certain amount of hydrogen phosphide.
    0
    0
  • It is very deliquescent, and readily dissolves in water, forming a brown or yellow solution, from which several hydrates may be separated (see Solution).
    0
    0
  • The trichloride, VC1 31 is a deliquescent solid formed when the tetrachloride is heated in a retort as long as chlorine is given off (Roscoe), or by heating vanadium trisulphide in a current of chlorine and fractionally distilling the resulting product at 150° C. in a current of carbon dioxide (Halberstadt, Ber., 1882, 15, p. 1619).
    0
    0
  • Arsenic tribromide, AsBr3, is formed by the direct union of arsenic and bromine, and subsequent distillation from the excess of arsenic; it forms colourless deliquescent prisms which melt at 20 0 -25° C., and boil at 220° C. Water decomposes it, a small quantity of water leading to the formation of the oxybromide, AsOBr, whilst a large excess of water gives arsenious oxide, As4O6.
    0
    0
  • I t is deliquescent, and melts at 23° C. (M.
    0
    0
  • It forms a yellowishwhite deliquescent mass, which melts on heating, and at a sufficiently high temperature it yields a dark red liquid.
    0
    1
  • The free acid forms dark red deliquescent crystals and is obtained by decomposing the silver salt with hydrochloric acid, or the barium salt with dilute sulphuric acid.
    0
    1
  • It forms very deliquescent long white needles melting at 75.5° C. and boiling at 215-220° C. The bromide, iodide and sulphate are known, as is also gallium ammonium alum.
    0
    1
  • The oxide, Yb203, is white and forms colourless salts; the crystallized chloride, YbC1 3.6H 2 0, forms colourless, deliquescent crystals; the anhydrous chloride sublimes on heating (C. Matignon, Ann.
    0
    1
  • Thorium nitrate, Th(NO 3) 4.12H 2 O, forms white deliquescent tables very soluble in water.
    0
    2