Delicate sentence example

delicate
  • He is very soft and delicate yet.
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  • Alondra was attractive in a delicate way - her features more refined.
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  • Shadows played across the delicate, pert features.
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  • She felt delicate and feminine in his arms.
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  • King Sun laughed softly to himself when the delicate jars began to melt and break.
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  • Her pink hair was up in a bun that revealed the delicate cut of her elfin features.
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  • But there's nothing pale or delicate about Helen.
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  • He desperately wanted to kiss her, but resisted, sensing the delicate balance between them.
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  • Tucked into the braids were delicate flowers that circled her head like a golden crown.
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  • Though her hair was pink, there was no mistaking the delicate facial features, porcelain skin and large eyes of the woman who tormented him his entire life then dumped the underworld on him.
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  • He took in her delicate features and felt a familiar warmth stir his blood.
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  • Even ice begins with delicate crystal leaves, as if it had flowed into moulds which the fronds of waterplants have impressed on the watery mirror.
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  • What would it be like to run her hands over Darkyn's lean frame the way she had Gabriel's, to feel his sharp teeth nip the delicate skin of her inner thighs and breasts?
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  • Thus in a time of trouble ever memorable to him after the birth of their first child who was delicate, when they had to change the wet nurse three times and Natasha fell ill from despair, Pierre one day told her of Rousseau's view, with which he quite agreed, that to have a wet nurse is unnatural and harmful.
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  • They emerged into the morning sun, and Xander shielded his delicate eyes from the brightness.
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  • Amid the scattered property and the crowd on the open space, she, in her rich satin cloak with a bright lilac shawl on her head, suggested a delicate exotic plant thrown out onto the snow.
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  • He did not sing like a trained singer who knows he is listened to, but like the birds, evidently giving vent to the sounds in the same way that one stretches oneself or walks about to get rid of stiffness, and the sounds were always high-pitched, mournful, delicate, and almost feminine, and his face at such times was very serious.
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  • Jessi covered her mouth, willing him not to say anything stupid to her delicate cousin.
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  • She pulled up her muslin sleeve and showed him a red scar on her long, slender, delicate arm, high above the elbow on that part that is covered even by a ball dress.
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  • Near the end of May, the sand cherry (Cerasus pumila) adorned the sides of the path with its delicate flowers arranged in umbels cylindrically about its short stems, which last, in the fall, weighed down with good-sized and handsome cherries, fell over in wreaths like rays on every side.
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  • The introduction of trunnionless guns recoiling axially through a fixed cradle enabled sights to be attached to the non-recoil parts of the mounting, so that the necessity of removing a delicate telescopic sight every round disappeared, and Q?'
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  • The layered, heavily textured soundscapes are gone, replaced by a collection of eight delicate, extremely melodic pieces.
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  • In the rest of the bowel the lining is a delicate mucous membrane or mucosa.
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  • Mahi mahi wrapped in plantain leaf and served with a salad of palm heart shavings and green papaya was a delicate mix of flavors.
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  • The new High Summer Collection features ruched tops, provocative beachwear, silk combat trousers and a khaki parka made of delicate parachute silk.
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  • Some of the joys of ascorbic acid are that it produces a range of color from delicate pastels to vivid colors of striking intensity.
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  • Magical harmonic progressions in the delicate coda prepare the way for the energy of the finale.
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  • She did not know and would not have believed it, but beneath the layer of slime that covered her soul and seemed to her impenetrable, delicate young shoots of grass were already sprouting, which taking root would so cover with their living verdure the grief that weighed her down that it would soon no longer be seen or noticed.
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  • A large salad bar is suitable to vegetarian guests, and restaurant patrons can finish their meals with a robust cheesecake or a delicate chocolate mousse.
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  • They occur in particular in relation with the orifice of the zooecium, and with that of the compensation-sac. This delicate structure is frequently guarded by an avicularium at its entrance, while avicularia are also commonly found on either side of the operculum or in other positions close to that structure.
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  • There came a reaction of taste and sense, but the delicate spirit of Tennyson had been wounded.
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  • A great shock of rough, dusky, dark hair; bright, laughing, hazel eyes; massive aquiline face, most massive yet most delicate; of sallow brown complexion, almost Indian-looking, clothes cynically loose, free-and-easy, smokes infinite tobacco.
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  • Although exceedingly near-sighted, Tennyson was a very close observer of nature, and at the age of eighty his dark and glowing eyes, which were still strong, continued to permit him to enjoy the delicate features of country life around him, both at Aldworth and in the Isle of Wight.
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  • The most important of these trades was the manufacture and dyeing of delicate woollen stuffs and carpets.
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  • Delicate patterns cover all the framework of the panelling and fill the panels themselves; at two stages, where there is a check in the line of the coving, rows of half-figures of saints are minutely painted on blue or gold grounds, forming a scheme of indescribably splendid decoration.
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  • These two painters were among the ablest of Giotto's followers, and adorned Verona and Padua with a number of very beautiful frescoes, rich in composition, delicate in colour, and remarkable for their highly finished modelling and detail.
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  • He rose to great celebrity as an architect, and designed many graceful and richly sculptured buildings in Venice, Rome and even in France; he used classical forms with great taste and skill, and with much of the freedom of the older medieval architects, and was specially remarkable for his rich and delicate sculptured decorations.
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  • He conceived it as " a religious monopoly " to which " the nation at large contributes," while " Presbyterians alone receive," and which placed him in " a relation to the state " so " seriously objectionable " as to be " impossible to hold."5 The invidious distinction it drew between Presbyterians on the one hand, and Catholics, Friends, freethinking Christians, unbelievers and Jews on the other, who were compelled to support a ministry they " conscientiously disapproved," offended his always delicate conscience; while possibly the intellectual and ecclesiastical atmosphere of the city proved uncongenial to his liberal magnanimity.
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  • While a comparison of his expositions of the Pauline and Johannine Christologies with the earlier Unitarian exegesis in which he had been trained shows how wide is the interval, the work does not represent a mind that had throughout its history lived and worked in the delicate and judicial investigations he here tried to conduct.
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  • Japan also experiences a vast number of petty vibrations not perceptible without the aid of delicate instruments.
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  • Small in stature, with a well-knit frame, the cheekbones prominent, the face generally round, the nose and neck short, a marked tendency to prognathism, the chest broad and well developed, the trunk long, the hands small and delicate this Malay type is found in nearly all the islands along the east coast of the Asiatic continent as well as in southern China and in the extreme south-west of Korean peninsula.
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  • They have undoubtedly a fine sense of color, and a similarly delicate and subtle feeling for harmonious blending of brilliant and sober hues.
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  • Both these compounds afford delicate, unobtrusive and effective grounds for inlaying with gold, silver and other metals, as well as for sculpture, whether incised or in relief.
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  • The latter once exhibited inTkyO a silver game-cock with soft plumage and surface modelling of the most delicate character.
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  • Indeed, of this porcelain it may be said that, from the monster pieces of blue-and-white manufactured at Setovases six feet high and garden pillar-lamps half as tall again do not dismay the BishU ceramistto tiny coffee-cups decorated in Tokyo, with theil delicate miniatures of birds, flowers, insects, fishes and so forth, everything indicates the death of the old severe aestheticism.
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  • Chocolate or dove-colored grounds with delicate diapers in gold and engobe; brown or black faience with white, yellow and pink designs incised or in relief; pottery curiously and deftly marbled by combinations of various colored clays these and many other kinds are to be found, all, however, presenting one common feature, namely, skilful finger-moulding and a slight roughening of the surface as though it had received the impression of coarse linen or crape before baking.
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  • The Imari ware, even though its thick biscuit and generally ungraceful shapes be omitted from the account, shows no enamels that can rival the exquisitely soft, broken tints of the famille rose; and the Kakiemon porcelain, for all its rich though chaste contrasts, lacks the delicate transmitted tints of the shell-like kwan-yao.
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  • There remains, too, a wide domain in which the Chinese developed high skill, whereas the Japanese can scarcely be said to have entered it at all; namely, the domain of monochromes and polychromes, striking every note of color from the richest to the most delicate; the domain of truit and fiamb glazes, of yO-pien-yao (transmutation ware), and of egg-shell with incised or translucid decoration.
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  • He took for model the rich and delicate liquid-dawn monochrome, and succeeded in producing some specimens of considerable merit.
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  • He has not succeeded in winning great distinction, but he manufactures some very delicate monochromes, fully deserving to be classed among prominent evidences of the new departure.
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  • He excels in his representations of landscapes and waterscapes, and has succeeded -in transferring to gold-lacquer panels tender and delicate pictures of natures softest moodspictures that show balance, richness, harmony and a fine sense of decorative proportion.
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  • The base, usually of copper, was as thin as cardboard; the cloisons, exceedingly fine and delicate, were laid on with care and accuracy; the colors were even, and the designs showed artistic judgment.
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  • A more delicate method consists in adding a very little anthraquinone and sodium amalgam; absolute alcohol gives a green coloration, but in the presence of minute traces of water a red coloration appears.
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  • This most fundamental point was finally settled by a more delicate test, devised by Lord Kelvin, and carried out in conjunction with Joule (1854), which showed that the fundamental assumption W =H in isothermal expansion was very nearly true for permanent gases, and that F'(t) must therefore vary very nearly as J/T.
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  • But owing to the large thermal capacity of his calorimeter, the test, though sufficient for his immediate purpose, was not delicate enough to detect and measure the small deviations which actually exist.
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  • As a boy his health was delicate, so that it was thought best for him to spend much of his time at his grandfather Hall's home in Medford rather than in the city.
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  • In the Roman religion, on a feast of thanksgiving for a great victory, couches were spread in the temples for the gods, whose images were taken down from their pedestals and laid on the couches, and tables set before them loaded with delicate viands.
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  • The answer to this was found experimentally by Arthur Schuster, who suspended the whole instrument in delicate equilibrium, and observed the effect of introducing the radiation.
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  • The problem of the stresses in rarefied gaseous media arising from inequalities of temperature, which is thereby opened out, involves some of the most delicate considerations in molecular physics.
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  • By thus controlling and partially eliminating the aggregate gas-effect, they succeeded in making a small radiometer, horizontally suspended, into a delicate and reliable measurer of the intensity of the radiation incident on it.
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  • Comparatively only a few species are, for part of their lives, denizens of fresh water; these, as larvae, are parasitic on the eggs or larvae of other aquatic insects, the little hymenopteron, Polynema natans, one of the " fairy-flies " - swims through the water by strokes of her delicate wings in search of a dragon-fly's egg in which to lay her own egg, while the rare Agriotypus dives after the case of a caddis-worm.
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  • Pteropod ooze is merely a local variety of globigerina ooze in which the comparatively large but very delicate spindleshaped shells of pteropods happen to abound.
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  • In addition to this most delicate and rapid craft, he had his umiak or freight boat, sometimes called woman's boat.
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  • Of the long-billed paradise birds the most remarkable is that known as the "twelve-wired" (Seleucides alba), its delicate yellow plumes, twelve of which are transformed into wire-like bristles.
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  • In these lectures Duchesne touches cleverly upon the most delicate problems, and, without any elaborate display of erudition, presents conclusions of which account must be taken.
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  • The Dar-el-Bey contains numerous rooms beautifully decorated in the Moorish style of the 18th century; and the judgment hall has a domed roof adorned with the delicate arabesque plaster-work known as Nuksh hadida.
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  • Like Ostia, Puteoli was considered a special port of Rome, and, on account of the safety and convenience of its harbour, it was preferred to Ostia for the landing of the more costly and delicate wares.
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  • When they have been reduced to the correct thickness they are examined by the " tryer," who cuts out one or two blanks from each fillet with a hand machine and weighs them on a delicate balance.
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  • Gold and silver coins are examined and tested by ringing, and each coin is then weighed separately by being passed over delicate automatic balances.
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  • The latter is a beautiful Renaissance structure, with a magnificent facade and a delicate spire, and contains a grand hall, the Kaisersaal, in which every Whit Monday a play, Der Meistertrunk, which commemorates the capture of the town by Tilly in 1631, is performed.
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  • The above analysis is rough, since even distantly placed sections, indeed the two parts themselves, are interrelated by delicate complex references on and back.
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  • Among the few critically satisfactory French books, Abbe Loisy's Le Quatrieme evangile (1903) stands pre-eminent for delicate psychological analysis and continuous sense of the book's closely knit unity; whilst Pere Th.
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  • The natural song of the canary is loud and clear; and in their native groves the males, especially during the pairing season, pour forth their song with such ardour as sometimes to burst the delicate vessels of the throat.
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  • The cloister, one of the purest and most graceful works of the 13th century, is surrounded by double lines of slender columns carrying pointed arcades, between which delicate floral designs are carved.
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  • Further, personal and domestic relations with the ruling families abroad give openings in delicate cases for saying more, and saying it at once more gently and more efficaciously, than could be ventured in the formal correspondence and rude contacts of government.
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  • Sir Charles Metcalfe's success in this delicate position was very marked, but unfortunately his health compelled his resignation and return to England in 1842.
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  • He was a delicate boy, but when the war of 1870 broke out his mother sent him to the army, to win popularity for him, and the government journals vaunted his bravery.
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  • The margin of rhododendron beds, where there are sheltered recesses amongst the plants, suits many of the more delicate species well, partial shade Lily of the Valley (Convallaria majalis).
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  • The most destructive is Botrytis cinerea which forms orangebrown or buff specks on the stems, pedicels, leaves and flower-buds, which increase in size and become covered with a delicate grey mould, completely destroying or disfiguring the parts attacked.
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  • The spores formed on the delicate grey mould are carried during the summer from one plant to another, thus spreading the disease, and also germinate in the soil where the fungus may remain passive during the winter producing a new crop of spores next spring, or sometimes attacking the scales of the bulbs forming small black hard bodies embedded in the flesh.
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  • The convection of a medium thus polarized involves electric disturbance, and therefore must contribute to the true electric current; the determination of this constituent of the current is the most delicate point in the investigation.
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  • In the northern United States, in May, " legions of these delicate minute flies fill the air at twilight, hovering over wheat-fields and shrubbery.
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  • He was a delicate child, and, his father dying in r850, his mother attended herself to his education.
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  • Though handicapped in his later years by delicate health, his intellectual grasp and wide knowledge and research gradually made him famous as a jurist and historian.
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  • Algerian prawns, especially those of Bona, are large and of a delicate flavour.
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  • He especially devoted himself to investigations of the radiation of heat from the sun and its absorption by the earth's atmosphere, and to that end devised various delicate methods and instruments, including his electric compensation pyrheliometer, invented in 1893, and apparatus for obtaining a photographic representation of the infra-red spectrum (1895).
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  • They in turn are much hunted for the sake of their delicate flesh.
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  • As Lee's chief and most trusted subordinate he was throughout charged with the execution of the more delicate and difficult operations of his commander's hazardous strategy.
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  • In Everett's life and career was a combination of the results of diligent training, unflinching industry, delicate literary tastes and unequalled acquaintance with modern international politics.
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  • It has been discovered that at the beginning of the Eocene the lake of Rilly occupied a vast area east of the present site of Paris; a water-course fell there in cascades, and Munier-Chalinas has reconstructed all the details of that singular locality; plants which loved moist places, such as Marchantia, Asplenium, the covered banks overshadowed by lindens, laurels, magnolias and palms; there also were found the vine and the ivy; mosses (Fontinalis) and Chara sheltered the crayfish (Astacus); insects and even flowers have left their delicate impressions in the travertine which formed the borders of this lake.
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  • In the interior, which is without transepts or aisles, the roodscreen and the choir-enclosure, which date from about 1500, are masterpieces of delicate sculpture; the vaulting and the walls are covered with paintings of the 15th and 16th centuries.
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  • The Kashmir, or rather Tibet, goat has a delicate head, with semi-pendulous ears, which are both long and wide.
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  • Those goats having a short, neat head, long, thin, ears, a delicate skin, small bones, and a long heavy coat, are for this purpose deemed the best.
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  • At a higher stage still we have the delicate movements necessary for Automatic Writing or Drawing.
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  • They take lovers from among men, and are often described as of delicate, unearthly, ravishing beauty.
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  • Some of his speeches in Great Britain, coming as they did from a French-Canadian, and revealing delicate appreciation of British sentiment and thorough comprehension of the genius of British institutions, excited great interest and enthusiasm, while one or two impassioned speeches in the Canadian parliament during the Boer war profoundly influenced opinion in Canada and had a pronounced effect throughout the empire.
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  • But his best work by far was in the invention of complicated and delicate mechanism for various purposes, in the construction of which he employed a staff of workmen trained to the highest degree of excellence.
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  • The shell-gland, sk, is later stage, in which a flattened out, and a delicate second invagination has beshell, s, appears on its sur gun - namely, that of the face.
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  • It is well known in England for its graceful habit, the slender, grey - or white - barked stem, the delicate, drooping branches and the quivering leaves, a bright, clear green in s p r i n g, becoming duller in the summer, but often keeping their greenness rather late into the 5 autumn.
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  • The vesiculae seminales are muscular sacs with a mucous lining which is thrown into a series of delicate net-like folds.
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  • Microscopically the prostate consists of masses of long, slender, slightly branching glands, embedded in unstriped muscle and fibrous tissue; these glands open by delicate ducts (about twenty in number) into the prostatic urethra, which will be.
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  • Near the lower part of the verumontanum is a little pouch, the utriculus masculinus, about one-eighth of an inch deep, the opening of which is guarded by a delicate membranous circular fold, the male hymen.
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  • With comparatively simple appliances, on the other hand, a skilled reeler, with trained eye and delicate touch, can produce raw silk of remarkably smooth and even quality.
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  • Raw silk, being still too fine and delicate for ordinary use, next undergoes a series of operations called throwing, the object of which is to twist and double it into more substantial yarn.
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  • Scouring renders all common silks, whether white or yellow in the raw, a brilliant pearly white, with a delicate soft flossy texture, from the fact that the fibres which were agglutinated in reeling, being now degummed, are separated from each other and show their individual tenuity in the yarn.
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  • The natural colour of tussur silk is a greyish fawn, and that shade it was found impossible to discharge by any of the ordinary bleaching agents, so as to obtain a basis for light and delicate dyes.
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  • This delicate art was carried even farther in the later volumes of Modern Painters by the school of engravers whom Ruskin inspired and gathered round him.
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  • In January 1793 he was appointed by Dundas to an office created to direct the execution of the Aliens Act; and in the discharge of his delicate duties he manifested such ability that in 1795 he was appointed under-secretary at war.
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  • Spectrum analysis thus passed quickly out of the stage in which its main purpose was " analysis " and became our most delicate and powerful method of investigating molecular properties; the old name being no longer appropriate, we now speak of the science of " Spectroscopy."
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  • The male organs consist of paired testes communicating by delicate canals with a protrusible penis.
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  • From December 1863 to March 1865 he was chairman of the committee on foreign affairs; as such, in 1864, he was unwilling to leave the delicate questions concerning the French occupation of Mexico entirely in the hands of the president and his secretary of state, and brought in a report very hostile to France, which was adopted in the House, but fortunately, as it proved later, was not adopted by the Senate.
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  • Since the Rev. William Ellis and a party of American missionaries first made the volcano known to the civilized ' Among the minqr phenomena of Hawaiian volcanoes are the delicate glassy fibres called Pele's hair by the Hawaiians, which are spun by the wind from the rising and falling drops of liquid lava, and blown over the edge or into the crevices of the crater.
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  • It cares not only for waifs and strays, but for cripples and delicate children.
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  • To him, also, in his capacity of theologian, the whole of Europe submitted every obscure, delicate or controverted question, whether legal problem or case of conscience.
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  • Glasgow buys largely of yarns and cloth, some considerable part of which is dyed or printed, for India and elsewhere, and has an indigenous manufacture and trade in fine goods such as book-muslins and lappets, a somewhat delicate department of manufacture which necessitates a slower running of machinery than is usual in Lancashire.
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  • Thus the bill becomes a most delicate organ of sensation, and by its means the bird, while probing for food, is at once able to distinguish the nature of the objects it encounters, though these are wholly out of sight.
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  • These were investigated by Tulasne in 1853, who gave them the name spermogonia The lower, ventral portion of the sperm09' gonium is lined by delicate hyphae, the sterigmata, which give origin to minute colourless cells, the spermatia.
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  • But except for this single instance of oversight or perversity her defence was throughout a masterpiece of indomitable ingenuity, of delicate and steadfast courage, of womanly dignity and genius.
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  • It is taken up from the interstices between the particles of soil exclusively by the finest subdivisions of the fibrils, and in many cases by the extremely delicate thread-like cells which project from them and which are known as root-hairs.
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  • In the case of the more delicate plants, the formation of roots is preceded by the production from the cambium of the cuttings of a succulent mass of tissue, the callus.
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  • Attention to this rule is specially important in the case of rare and delicate plants.
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  • These houses require careful management in early summer so as to induce the more delicate varieties of peaches and nectarines to complete and ripen their growth before cold, sunless weather sets in.
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  • To be successful the operation should be performed with a quick and light hand, so that no part of the delicate tissues be injured, as would happen if they were left for a time exposed, or if the bud were forced in like a wedge.
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  • In delicate cases, such as seedling gloxinias and begonias, it is best to lift the little seedling on the end of a flattish pointed stick, often cleft at the apex, pressing this into the new soil where the plant is to be placed, and liberating it and closing the earth about it by the aid of a similar stick held in the other hand.
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  • Larger plants do not need quite such delicate treatment, but care should be taken not to handle the roots roughly.
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  • Belladonna, the Belladonna Lily, 3 ft., has large funnel-shaped flowers in September, of a delicate rose colour.
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  • Chamaejasme, delicate rose, are some of the best.
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  • Any one of these soon comes to rest on a host-cell, and either pierces it and empties its contents into its cavity, where the further development occurs (Olpidium), or merely sends in delicate protoplasmic filaments (Rhizophydium) or a short hyphal tube of, at most, two or three cells, which acts as a haustorium, the further development taking place outside the cell-wall of the host (Chytridium).
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  • But the invaluable and rather delicate art of tempering the hardened steel by a very careful and gentle reheating, which removes its extreme brittleness though leaving most of ifs precious hardness, needs such skilful handling that it can hardly have become known until very long after the art of hot-forging.
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  • The Chinese prepare a rouge, said to be from safflower, which, spread on the cards on which it is sold, has a brilliant metallic green lustre, but when moistened and applied to the skin assumes a delicate carmine tint.
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  • A few such skins have been taken, but they are too delicate to be of any service.
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  • It cannot be regarded as an economical fur, as the pelt is too delicate to resist hard wear.
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  • The coats of the Bengal kind are short and of a dark orange brown with black stripes, those from east or further India are similar in colour, but longer in the hair, while those from north of the Himalayas and the mountains of China are not only huge in size, but have a very long soft hair of delicate orange brown with very white flanks, and marked generally with the blackest of stripes.
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  • In 1860 the delicate state of his health caused him to accept the living of Enniskillen.
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  • It is in this way that cabbages and savoys are rendered more delicate and nutritious.
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  • Hobbes duly replied, but not for publication, because he thought the subject a delicate one.
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  • All who have eaten it declare the flesh of the Tinamou to have a most delicate taste, as it has a most inviting appearance, the pectoral muscles being semi-opaque.
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  • Exceedingly delicate teas can therefore be used unimpaired.
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  • Where irrigation is carried on throughout the whole year, even when the supply of the river is at its lowest, the distribution of the water becomes a very delicate operation.
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  • The adjustment of the water by means of the sluices is a delicate operation when there is little water and also when there is much; in the latter case the fine earth may be washed away from some parts of the meadow; in the former case, by attempting too much with a limited water current, one may permit the languid streams to deposit their valuable suspended matters instead of carrying them forward to enrich the soil.
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  • His taste in cookery, formed in subterranean ordinaries and a la mode beef shops, was far from delicate.
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  • Lord Chesterfield well knew the value of such a compliment; and therefore, when the day of publication drew near, he exerted himself to soothe, by a show of zealous and at the same time of delicate and judicious kindness, the pride which he had so cruelly wounded.
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  • All the commoner sorts of fruitapples, pears, cherries, &c.grow everywhere, but the more delicate kinds, such as figs, apricots and peaches, are confined to the warmer districts.
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  • The goods manufactured, now no longer, as formerly, coarse in texture, vie with the finer and more delicate fabrics of Belfast.
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  • By modern mineralogists the name chalcedony is restricted to those kinds of silica which occur not in distinct crystals like ordinary quartz, but in concretionary, mammillated or stalactitic forms, which break with a fine splintery fracture, and display a delicate fibrous structure.
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  • The surface of chalcedony is occasionally coated with a delicate bluish bloom.
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  • He was a delicate child, and was sent as a day-scholar to a boarding-school near his home, kept by Mr William Littlewood.
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  • It is divided by the river into East Looe and West Looe; and is sheltered so completely by the surrounding hills that myrtles, geraniums, fuchsias and other delicate plants flourish at all seasons in the open air.
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  • It was full of delicate variety in the surfaces, and of elaborated close-packed lines of hair and ornaments.
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  • The latter development of glazing was in thin delicate apple-green ware with low relief designs.
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  • The blue or green color was made by fritting together silica, lime, alkaline carbonate and copper carbonate; the latter varied from 3% in delicate blues to 20% in deep purple.blues.
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  • In the dog it has been proved that after removal from the animal of every vestige of its cortex cerebri, it still executes habitual acts of great motor complexity requiring extraordinarily delicate adjustment of muscular contraction.
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  • He was a consummate artist in verse, and his impressions are given with the most delicate exactitude of phrase, and in a very fine strain of imagination.
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  • Almost every year from this time forward until near his death he published about Christmas time one or two of these unique stories, so delicate in their humour and pathos, and so masterly in their simplicity.
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  • In the second case the outer series (calyx of sepals) is generally green and leaf-like, its function being to protect the rest of the flower, especially in the bud; while the inner series (corolla of petals) is generally white or brightly coloured, and more delicate in structure, its function being to attract the particular insect or bird by agency of which pollination is effected.
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  • The mature pollengrain is, like other spores, a single cell; except in the case of some submerged aquatic plants, it has a double wall, a thin delicate wall of unaltered cellulose, the endospore or intine, and a tough outer cuticularized exospore or extine.
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  • Protoplasmic continuity has been observed in the delicate membrane closing the pit.
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  • Algae of more delicate texture than either Fucaceae or Laminariaceae also occur in the region exposed by the ebb of the tide, but these secure their exemption from desiccation either by retaining water in their meshes by capillary attraction, as in the case of Pilayella, or by growing among the tangles of the larger Fucaceae, as in the case of Polysiphonia fastigiate, or by growing in dense masses on rocks, as in the case of Laurencia pinnatifida.
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  • Besides his written notes, interesting traces of his travels exist in the shape of the scattered leaves of a sketch-book filled with delicate drawings in silverpoint, chiefly views of places and studies of portrait and costume.
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  • The walls are covered with varied stucco-work of most delicate pattern, surrounding many ancient escutcheons.
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  • Among the other wonders of the Alhambra are the Sala de la Justicia (Hall of Justice), the Patio del Mexuar (Court of the Council Chamber), the Patio de Daraxa (Court of the Vestibule), and the Peinador de la Reina (Queen's Robing Room), in which are to be seen the same delicate and beautiful architecture, the same costly and elegant decorations.
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  • He had to conduct the delicate negotiations which accompanied her return to Scotland, and though he was a supporter of the reformers on political grounds, he became her personal friend and was always willing to do her service.
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  • The bleak climate, however, the solitude, and the necessity of managing a household with a single servant, were excessively trying to a delicate woman, though Mrs Carlyle concealed from her husband the extent of her sacrifices.
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  • His work in black-and-white, his admirable illustrations in brushwork of Edinburgh and its neighbourhood, and also his pen-drawings, about which it has been declared that "his work contains all the subtleties and refinements of a most delicate etching," must also be noted.
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  • His grandfather was a respected tradesman in Worcester, and his father, who was born in that town in 1797, came up to London in 1820, and entered the office of a firm of discount brokers, in which he afterwards assumed a partnership. As a child the poet was delicate but studious.
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  • To go beyond this is a work of delicate discrimination.
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  • The gorgeous Pala d'oro, still in St Mark's at Venice, a gold retable covered with delicate reliefs and enriched with enamels and jewels, was the work of Byzantine artists during the 11th century.
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  • For delicate and spirited execution, together with refined gracefulness of design, it is unsurpassed by any similar work of art.
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  • It is of cast bronze enriched with delicate scroll-work foliage, and with numbers of well-modelled statuettes.
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  • Delicate pierced vessels of gilt brass, enriched by tooling and inlay of gold and silver, were among the chief specialties of the Persians.
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  • A process called by Europeans "damascening" (from Damascus, the chief seat of the export) was used to produce very delicate and rich surface ornament.
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  • Though delicate in health and in later life handicapped by deafness, he showed from the first marked ability and fighting force.
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  • The successive cuticles that are cast as growth proceeds are delicate in texture and sometimes separate from the underlying cuticle without being stripped off.
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  • They are invested by the sheaths of leaves, much used in packing oranges in south Europe, and the more delicate ones for cigarettes in South America.
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  • The bleached rhubarb, which has a very delicate flavour, is altered by covering the young leaves, as they sprout from the soil, with loose stones or an empty jar.
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  • It is entirely unlike the present coarse conventional ideal of sculptured beauty, and may even be traced in the delicate profiles on the so-called sun temple at Kanarak, built in the 12th century A.D.
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  • She was a poet of delicate power, but also possessed a lofty enthusiasm, a high conception of purity and justice, and a practical temper which led her to concern herself 1 See under Lowell, John.
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  • By numerous delicate experiments he proved that Boyle's law is only approximately true, and that those gases which are most readily liquefied diverge most widely from obedience to it.
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  • This involves refiguring, which is the most delicate and costly process of all.
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  • Mr Taft managed the delicate task of conducting negotiations with the Vatican without arousing the hostility of either Catholics or Protestants.
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  • The method requires very delicate weighing, as one calorie corresponds to less than two milligrammes of steam condensed; but the successful application of the method to the very difficult problem of measuring the specific heat of a gas at constant volume, shows that these and other difficulties have been very skilfully overcome.
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  • In 1898 he had to deal with the delicate situation caused by Captain Marchand's occupation of Fashoda, for which, as he admitted in a speech in the chamber on the 23rd of January 1899, he accepted full responsibility, since it arose directly out of the Liotard expedition, which he had himself organized while minister for the colonies; and in March 1899 he concluded an agreement with Great Britain by which the difficulty was finally adjusted, and France consolidated her vast colonial empire in North-West Africa.
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  • Her plump beauty was often remarked - notably by Washington Irving - in contrast to her husband's delicate and feeble figure and wizened face - for even in his prime Madison was, as Henry Adams says, "a small man, quiet, somewhat precise in manner, pleasant, fond of conversation, with a certain mixture of ease and dignity in his address."
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  • It is evident that this is a very delicate method of determining the wetness z, but, since with dry saturated steam at low pressures this formula always gives negative values of the wetness, it is clear that Regnault's numerical coefficients must be wrong.
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  • The women are delicate in frame, with small hands and feet, fair complexions, beautiful black eyes, finely arched eyebrows, and a profusion of long black hair, which they dress to perfection, and ornament with pearls and gems. The Parsees are much more liberal in their treatment of women than any other Asiatic race; they allow them to appear freely in public, and leave them the entire management of household affairs.
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  • Certain markings on slates and sandstones, such as the "fucoids" of Scandinavia and Scotland, the Phycoides of the Fichtelgebirge, Eophyton and other seaweed-like impressions, may indeed be the casts of fucoid plants; but it is by no means sure that many of them are not mere inorganic imitative markings or the tracks or casts of worms. Oldhamia, a delicate branching body, abundant in the Cambrian of the south-east of Ireland, is probably a calcareous alga, but its precise nature has not been satisfactorily determined.
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  • It is only when we come to consider such delicate questions as the influence of tidal friction that other standards become necessary.
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  • It may even be suspected that anecdotes in praise of Peisistratus and Hipparchus were a delicate form of flattery addressed to the reigning Ptolemy.
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  • As it is unlikely that these delicate insects could be transported across seachannels, their wide and discontinuous range suggests both their great antiquity and the former existence of continental tracts over which they may have travelled to their present stations.
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  • If carefully prepared there is no objection to these basis wines from a hygienic point of view, although they have not the delicate qualities and stimulating effects of natural wines; unfortunately, however, these wines have in the past been vended on a large scale in a manner calculated to deceive the consumer as to their real nature, but energetic measures, which have of late been taken in most countries affected by this trade, have done much to mitigate the evil.
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  • The red wines include the elegant and delicate (though not unstable) wines of the Gironde, and again the full, though not coarse, wines of the Burgundy district.
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  • At the same time, their acidity is very low and their bouquet characteristically delicate and elegant.
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  • The Sauternes generally are full-bodied wines, very luscious and yet delicate; they possess a special seve, or, in other words, that special taste which, while it remains in the mouth, leaves the palate perfectly fresh.
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  • This process, which takes several weeks, is a very delicate one, and requires much skill on the part of the workman.
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  • Whereas the Rhine wines of the finer descriptions Moselle, are as a rule fairly full bodied and of marked vinosity, the Moselle wines are mostly light and of a somewhat delicate nature.
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  • At the age of twenty he was received advocate, and about the same time he gained some reputation as a writer of piquant and delicate poems. In 1810 he received from Napoleon I.
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  • Last of all the nielloed plate was very highly polished, till it presented the appearance of a smooth metal surface enriched with a delicate design in fine grey-black lines.
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  • It is a pax with a very rich and delicate niello picture of the coronation of the Virgin; the composition is very full, and the work almost microscopic in minuteness; it was made in 1452.
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  • About the year 1893 he began to publish short stories, some of which, such as Enris, The Fortress of Matthias, The Old Man of Korpela and Finland's Flag, are delicate works of art, while they reveal to a very interesting degree the temper and ambitions of the contemporary Finnish population.
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  • The merest pleasurelover may consistently say that he prefers a single glass of good champagne to several bottles of cooking-sherry; the slight but delicate experience of the single glass of good wine may fairly be regarded as preferable to the more massive but coarser experience of the large quantity of bad wine.
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  • His health being then, as always, extremely delicate, he probably received much of his instruction at home.
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  • It is unadvisable to ripple the flax so severely as to break or tear the delicate fibres at the upper part of the stem.
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  • This preparation is technically called " making-ready," and is an operation requiring much time and care, especially in the case of illustrated work, where artistic appreciation and skill on the part of the workman is of great assistance in obtaining satisfactory and delicate results.
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  • In considering the evidence it is a delicate task to avoid confusing its meaning for its age with that which has appeared the only natural or appropriate one to subsequent interpreters (whether Jewish or Christian) who have been necessarily influenced by their environment and by contemporary thought.
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  • Naturally delicate and highly-strung, he was profoundly stirred by the horrors of the siege of Lyons.
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  • The parrot tribe form one of the most pre-eminently tropical groups of birds, only a few species extending into the warmer temperate regions; yet even the most exclusively tropical genera are by no means delicate birds as regards climate.
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  • The fibre bleaches with facility, up to a certain point, sufficient to enable it to take brilliant and delicate shades of dye colour, but it is with great difficulty brought to a pure white by bleaching.
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  • Delicate in early life, Helmholtz became by habit a student, and his father at the same time directed his thoughts to natural phenomena.
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  • Gyllenborg (1731-1808) was a less accomplished poet, less delicate and touching, more rhetorical and artificial.
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  • His mystical lyrics, entitled Liljor i Saron (" Lilies in Sharon "; 1820), and his sonnets, which are the best in Swedish, may be recommended as among the most delicate products of the Scandinavian mind.
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  • Archbishop Corrigan became his coadjutor in 1880 because of the failure of McCloskey's always delicate health.
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  • On his return from a delicate mission to Copenhagen, he presented to the empress "a memorial on political affairs" which comprised the first plan of a partition of Turkey between Russia and Austria.
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  • For inflammation of the mouth a similar combination is used as a mouth wash, in the throat as a gargle, and in the nose as a wash and sometimes as an ointment or spray, the ointment possessing the advantage of protecting the delicate nasal mucous membrane from irritation by stopping the entrance of irritant dust into the nasal cavities.
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  • The spores of the fungus pass the winter in the soil and the delicate mycelium attacks the young shoots in the summer.
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  • Owing to his delicate health the boy's early education was carried on at home; though he was able to spend some time at the neighbouring university of Cahors.
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  • It has been found possible to grow pure cultures of various diatoms, and by feeding these to delicate larvae kept in sterilized sea-water, great successes have been attained.
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  • If it is a risky matter to plant out the robust young fry of trout under an age of three months, it would seem to be an infinitely more speculative proceeding to plant out the delicate week-old larvae of sea-fishes in an environment which teems with predaceous enemies.
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  • In the 14th century, however, we still find the Parlement referring delicate affairs to the king; but in the 15th century it had acquired a jurisdiction independent in principle.
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  • In this condition there is complete electrical insulation between the jets, as may be proved by the inclusion in the circuit of a delicate galvanometer, and a low electro-motive force.
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  • The reaction of the media must in every case be carefully attended to, a neutral or slightly alkaline reaction being, as a rule, most suitable; for delicate work it may be necessary to standardize the reaction by titration methods.
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  • The inner face .of the arches, with the spandrils and the pilasters which support them, are covered with flowers and foliage of delicate design and dainty execution, crusted in green serpentine, blue lapis lazuli and red and purple porphyry.
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  • The design of this mosque is Mahommedan, but the wonderfully delicate ornamentation of its western façade and other remaining parts is Hindu.
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  • The official hydrochloride, C17H19N03 HC1+3H20, forms delicate needles.
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  • It crystallizes in shining rhombic prisms from its aqueous solution and as delicate needles from alcohol.
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  • Micaceous iron ore consists of delicate steel-grey scales of specular haematite, unctuous to the touch, used as a lubricant and also as a pigment.
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  • Under his direction the Addressers and the Resolutioners coalesced, and he was entrusted with the difficult and delicate negotiations with the crown, which aimed at effecting a compromise between the Pragmatic Sanction of 1719, which established the indivisibility of the Habsburg monarchy, and the March decrees of 1848.
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  • In nearly all Crustacea the antennules and often also the antennae bear groups of hair-like filaments in which the chitinous cuticle is extremely delicate and which do not taper to a point but end bluntly.
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  • This is partly due to the fact that many important forms must have escaped fossilization altogether owing to their small size and delicate structure, while very many of those actually preserved are known only from the carapace or shell, the limbs being absent or represented only by indecipherable fragments.
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  • They destroy the young buds, shoots and fruits, and attack the young plants in their most delicate organs.
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  • The elytra are to the delicate wings of some insects what the thick anterior margins are to stronger wings.
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  • The figure-of-8 and kite-like action of the wing referred to lead us to explain how it happens that the wing, which in many instances is a comparatively small and delicate organ, can yet attack the air with such vigour as to extract from it the recoil necessary to elevate and propel the flying creature.
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  • That the posterior margin of the wing yields to a slight extent during both the down and up strokes will readily be admitted, alike because of the very delicate and highly elastic properties of the posterior margins of the wing, and because of the comparatively great force employed in its propulsion; but that it does not yield to the extent stated by Marey is a matter of absolute certainty.
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  • In 1829 he married a beautiful but delicate young woman, Miss Ellen Tucker of Concord, and was installed as associate minister of the Second Church (Unitarian) in Boston.
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  • This succulent berry is in some cases highly perfumed, and affords a delicate fruit for the dessert-table, as in the case of the "granadilla" (P. quadrangularis), P. edulis, P. macrocarpa, and various species of Tacsonia known as "curubas" in Spanish South America; P. laurifolia is the water-lemon, and P. maliformis the sweet calabash of the West Indies.
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  • They are hypogynous, and have long and very delicate filaments, and large, linear or oblong two-celled anthers, dorsifixed and ultimately very versatile, deeply indented at each end, and commonly exserted and pendulous.
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  • Aira is a genus of delicate annuals with slender hair-like branches of the panicle.
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  • Rivers now met with marked favour at court, being entrusted with a delicate mission to the elector of Hanover in 1710, which was followed by his appointment in 1711 as master-general of the ordnance, a post hitherto held by Marlborough himself.
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  • The leaves at once invite a comparison with ferns; the numerous long hairs which form a delicate woolly covering on young leaves recall the hairs of certain ferns, but agree more closely with the long filamentous hairs of recent cycads.
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  • These bands, which may serve to strengthen the central cylinder, have been compared with the netting surrounding the delicate wall of an inflated balloon.
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  • In the Comus, sive Phagesiposia Cimmeria; Somnium (1608, and at Oxford, 1634), a moral allegory by a Dutch author, Hendrik van der Putten, or Erycius Puteanus, the conception is more nearly akin to Milton's, and Comus is a being whose enticements are more disguised and delicate than those of Jonson's deity.
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  • Several of the varieties are cut into gems and ornaments, balance weights, pivot supports for delicate instruments, agate mortars, &c.; or used for engraving, for instance, cameos and the elaborately carved crystal vases of ancient and medieval times.
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  • Sometimes they float above the surface, sometimes they are connected with it by stems or branches, and they show delicate striated detail like cirrus cloud.
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  • Broadly speaking his work in those very 'eighties was not so good as the labour, essentially delicate and fresh and just, of some years earlier, nor had it always the attractiveness of the impulsive deliverances of some years later, when the inspired sketch was the thing that he generally stopped at.
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  • And it must be said that his time was better employed in original investigations than it would have been had he spent it in observations made even with the best of instruments, infinitely better than if he had spent it on those of the observatory, which, however good originally, were then totally unfit for the delicate requirements of modern astronomy.
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  • The end knife-edges are adjusted and tightly jammed into exact position by means of wedge pieces and set screws, and the beam is furnished with delicate adjusting weights at its top. The position of the beam with respect to the horizontal is shown by a horizontal pointer (not shown) projecting from one end of it, which plays past a scale, each division of which corresponds to the i l oth or i hth of a grain according to the size and delicacy of the machine.
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  • Those made by some of the best makers for the most delicate machines are formed to an angle of about 80° between the sides, with the finished edge ground to an angle varying from 110° to 120°.
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  • He soon gained his commander's confidence, which he reciprocated with the most devoted attachment, and was entrusted with the delicate duties of a confidential secretary, which he performed with much tact and skill.
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  • This operation is both more costly and more delicate than the roasting of pyrites, but it is now perfectly well understood, and gas is obtained from blende furnaces hardly inferior in quality to that yielded by pyrites kilns.
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  • The back and sides of the body appear to be grey, an effect produced by delicate transverse pencillings of black on a dull white ground.
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  • Philadelphus (309-246), was of a delicate constitution, no Macedonian warrior-chief of the old style.
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  • The seclusion of these rural sojourns, originally dictated by delicate health, was as wholesome to the mind as to the body.
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  • The air of Pau agrees with invalids and delicate constitutions, and St Jean-de-Luz and Biarritz are much frequented by winter visitors.
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  • The manufacturing industries assisted by the government developed rapidly during the later years of the 19th century, notably metal-working, especially such branches of it as require exact and delicate workmanship. Of particular importance are iron and steel goods, locomotives (for which Esslingen enjoys a great reputation), machinery, motor-cars, bicycles, small arms (in the Mauser factory at Oberndorf), all kinds of scientific and artistic appliances, pianos (at Stuttgart), organs and other musical instruments, photographic apparatus, clocks (in the Black Forest),.
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  • From what has been said it will be evident that the artificial fertilization of wheat is a very delicate operation.
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  • The wild flora of Iceland is small and delicate, with bright bloom, the heaths being especially admired.
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  • The most delicate indication of an atmosphere would be through the refraction of the light of a star when seen coincident with the limb of the moon.
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  • The agreement thus brought about between the results deduced from the law of radiation and the most delicate observa tions of the quantity of heat radiated is of great interest, as showing that the theory of cosmicai temperature now rests upon a sound basis.
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  • He was a delicate child, in direct contrast to a strong race of forebears, and inherited from his mother a refined, retiring disposition and a love for books.
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  • The general colour is a delicate pale brown, with about a dozen and a half darker cross-bars, which are often connected by a still darker dorso-lateral streak, enclosing large oval spots.
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  • It is winged, and the face is smooth and delicate in contour.
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  • Antimony gives no reaction under these conditions, so that the method can be used to detect arsenic in the presence of antimony, but the test is not so delicate as either Reinsch's or Marsh's method.
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  • But this young king, aged only twenty, very much in love with his young wife and excessively fond of pleasure, soon wrecked the delicate poise of his mental faculties in the festivities of the Hotel SaintPaul; and a violent attack of Pierre de Craon on the constable de Clisson having led to an expedition against his accomplice, the duke of Brittany, Charles was seized by insanity on the road.
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  • Versailles, where the delicate refinements of Italy and the grave politeness of Spain were fused and mingled with French vivacity, became the centre of national life and a model for foreign royalties; hence if Versailles has played a considerable part in the history of civilization, it also seriously modified the life of France.
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  • In this way a delicate test for slight traces of double refraction is obtained.
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  • In the early years of the Restoration the king and Canovas acted in concert in two most delicate matters.
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  • When Canovas found himself deserted on so delicate a matter by a numerous section of his party, he resigned, and advised the queen to send for Sagasta and the Liberals.
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  • The study of the spirants, c, 1, 1; g, j is made a very delicate one by the circumstance that the interdental pronunciation of c, 1 on the one hand, and the guttural pronunciation of g, j on the other, are of comparatively recent date, and convey no notion of the value of these letters before the 17th century.
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  • Then so far as regards longevity, the period of a worker-bee's existence is not measured by numbering its days but simply by wear and tear, the marvellous intricacy and wonderful perfection of its framework being so delicate in construction that after six or seven weeks of strenuous toil, such as the bee undergoes in summer time, the little creature's labour is ended by a natural death.
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  • His health, always delicate, had been further weakened, according to popular report, by a slow poison prepared for him by the king of Navarre.
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  • The pterygoids are delicate slender slips of bone attached to the hinder border of the palatines, and supported externally by, and generally welded with, the rough pterygoid plates of the alisphenoid, with no pterygoid fossa between.
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  • The thin-skinned progeny of thoroughbred or Arab stock is too delicate to live unless when hand-fed - and hand-feeding is not according to custom.
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  • She translated Sensier's biography of Millet, and painted, before her marriage in 1874, studies in flowers and ideal heads, much admired for their feeling and delicate colouring.
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  • The campaigns of Lucullus and Pompey brought Rome into delicate relations with Parthia.
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  • The objective screw micrometer is, however, not sufficiently delicate, and is only used when comparatively large objects are to be measured, and especially for objects whose edges do not appear at the same time in the field of view.
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  • Abbe, through the so-called delicate ray transmission, suggested a way by which the quality of the images of objectives can be observed.
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  • He had just become connected with the Revue de Paris, when his delicate constitution succumbed to a slight attack of illness on the 19th of October 1894.
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  • Few have written French with greater purity than Feuillet, and his style, reserved in form and never excessive in ornament, but full of wit and delicate animation, is in admirable uniformity with his subjects and his treatment.
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  • The sepals are generally of a greenish colour; their function is mainly protective, shielding the more delicate internal organs before the flower opens.
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  • Although petals are usually very thin and delicate in their texture, they occasionally become thick and fleshy, as in Stapelia and Rafflesia; or dry, as in heaths; or hard and stiff, as in Xylopia.
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  • The commercial value of tea, coffee, wine and other beverages may be said to depend largely on the delicate aroma which they owe to the presence of minute quantities of ethereal oils.
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  • Even the most delicate tissues, such as cambium and phloem, the endosperm of seeds, or the formative tissue of the growing-point, are frequently preserved cell for cell, both in calcareous and silicious material.
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  • In some species of Annularia the extremely delicate ultimate twigs, bearing whorls of small lanceolate leaves, give a characteristic habit, suggesting that they may have belonged to herbaceous plants; other Annulariae, however, have been traced with certainty into connexion with the stems of large Calamites.
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  • The synangia consist of a stout wall composed of thick-walled cells, succeeded by a layer of more delicate and smaller elements; and internal to the wall occur two rows of sporangial loculi containing microspores.
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  • Delicate health, by which he was more or less handicapped throughout his life, prevented his going to college, but he was naturally a diligent student.
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  • On a mucous membrane or a delicate skin it exerts an irritant action, which occurs more quickly than on a thickened epidermis, such as the scalp, and according to the strength and period of application there may result redness, a blister, or an ulcer.
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  • His senses were quick and delicate; and, though of weak constitution, he escaped by strict regimen all serious illness.
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  • The pope refused to recognize the new kingdom even before the occupation of Rome, and the latter event rendered relations between church and state for many years extremely delicate.
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  • The delicate bas-reliefs of botany and medicine, history and astronomy, have been judged by some writers to be Grecian, on account of the ancient appearance of their marble, their inscriptions in Greek and Latin, and others that have never been deciphered.
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  • How could she explain in a delicate manner, why she had virtually given up dating?
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  • Damian understood the delicate balance between Good and Evil, just as he understood the Black God had the power to overturn that balance as long as the Guardians were powerless.
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  • The woman in his arms was too delicate, too vulnerable, to face the lusty beast within him.
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  • She felt dwarfed and delicate next to the mass of roped muscle and taut skin.
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  • He couldn't risk alienating the woman in his bed, partly because she was still too delicate, too new to his world to take the next step and partly because he was still leery of the powers of an Oracle.
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  • She slept peacefully, her delicate features and shapely body at ease as she slept on her stomach.
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  • A half-demon outcast didn.t deserve anything so delicate or beautiful, but Death help him, he wanted her more than anything else in his life.
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  • They had six legs with little pads for feet instead of toes and claws, a delicate snout not quite the length of an anteater's lined with fine hairs and tiny teeth used to vacuum up mold, dust, and dirt that was its main food source, and an odd habit of climbing walls with hidden suckers in its padded feet.
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  • She was independent, an odd contrast given that she was far too delicate to defend herself if left to face the planet's dangers on her own.
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  • She bit back her smile and returned to her myriad of ornaments, carefully laying a tissue paper over a packed box of delicate pieces, merged memories of two families, joined now by a few items of their first Christmas together.
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  • The florist disappeared into the back as Jackson paced, then returned with a delicate star-shaped orchid.
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  • The trees would continue to bloom for the rest of his years, filling the orchard with delicate pink-white petals.
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  • The finest of his merchant father's wares - -from delicate silver to well-bred horses to marble statues - -were packed in the hold alongside rare fruits and animals.
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  • Sweet, rich and concentrated with a lovely crisp acidity and a delicate balance between floral and fruit tones.
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  • They are delicious, the Nairac having a delicate apricot and lychee savor to it.
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  • It is a delicate fish and not easily kept by amateur aquarists.
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  • Their 1992 Riesling is an elegant wine with a delicate fruity aroma.
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  • Jones ' guitar lines switch from delicate arpeggio one minute to towering riff the next.
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  • The flavor of Chinese artichokes is both delicate and delicious.
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  • Carol is known for her attention to detail and delicate artistic beading.
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  • In " Company " Sue is playing the part of ' Susan ', a delicate southern belle who is married to Peter.
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  • Back to Top The bhakti path... The bhakti path... The bhakti path winds in a delicate way.
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  • With more delicate constructions, we employ sponges and soft bristled brushes to gently groom the face fiber and allow a gentle cleaning action.
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  • The tips of its delicate pink petals peered above the clasping green calyx.
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  • My double short cappuccino was served in a nice delicate white cup.
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  • Pick early in the day, taking care not to bruise the delicate blooms.
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  • The touches are seldom light, or delicate; the brush is heavy, the color loaded; the picture appears a gross caricature.
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  • Their camera flashes lit up the pale, delicate face of a woman in a black chador, who turned out to be Shirin.
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  • Smart tailoring with a masculine edge is softened by the addition of blouses or tops in slippery silks or delicate chiffons.
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  • You will enjoy the modern comfort of the rooms which are decorated with delicate wood furnishings.
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  • From delicate elderflower cordial to hearty Yorkshire puds, weâve selected the finest of English fare.
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  • It is decorated with delicate pink lace and a removable velvet flower corsage.
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  • Freshly homemade, custard has a delicate flavor all of its own.
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  • This easy angled slab (for a scramble) only has small holds and can feel a bit delicate at times.
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  • Grown as a shrub or against a sunny wall it produces extraordinarily delicate, yellow, waxy flowers with the exotic aroma of allspice!
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  • Finally the brittle skin is peeled away to reveal beautifully delicate markings and smoky blushes.
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  • The aircraft are extremely delicate to weather, especially wind.
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  • Talking about having a good poke, any news on the rather delicate matter I asked you about?
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  • A very delicate blade devised for very delicate work.
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  • The TIE Fighter may look delicate, but in actual fact it is quite robust and the wings clip on and off easily.
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  • A tall hardy perennial, fennel has delicate, bright green foliage and yellow flowers.
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  • It's a beautiful, beautiful guitar, but, you know, it's been about and it feels quite delicate.
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  • While the valves appear very delicate, the collagen in their structure makes them enormously strong.
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  • The holes range from a delicate pitch to a rocky dell on the eighth to a thrilling second along the shoreline on the ninth.
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  • But your language has been very delicate and perhaps even diplomatic, dare one say.
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  • As for Martinelli he was too discreet and delicate a man to ask me about my new boarder.
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  • Our range features gorgeous embellishments such as stitching, beads, ribbons and delicate papers.
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  • Under the glass is a table cover on which the church members signed their names which were then outlined in delicate embroidery.
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  • My gaze follows down to her hands, fingers entwined together, tightly holding a small photograph encased in a delicate silver frame.
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  • It features exquisite, lace kissed edges and has delicate, adjustable straps.
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  • Inside, admire the delicate fan vaulting on the ceiling.
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  • So you get femme fatale, eclectic, delicate, timeless and wild!
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  • It's so delicate yet so very ferocious, the mixture of DJ Shadow and The Deftones.
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  • As soon as he heard my name he began speaking to me in a tone of the most delicate flattery.
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  • The fossil history of snakes is very poorly known, since snake skeletons are very delicate and do not fossilize easily.
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  • Cookies can feature a simple frosting or include delicate icing details.
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  • It has a very full-bodied flavor and delicate sweetness as a medium roast.
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  • Also quite delicate, with cherry flavors and a slightly gamey background, is Oracle Shiraz 2001 (Oddbins ).
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  • The delicate can be seen in items knitted in fine silver wire decorated with pearls or semi-precious gemstones.
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  • Try any of the species gladiolus they are beautiful and delicate and really quite different from the loud and sometimes brash cultivated varieties.
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  • A textile hanging which is delicate and purely decorative should not be described as a rug.
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  • We had juicy, delicate king fish with a good coating of subtle native spices.
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  • The luxurious soft silk of this cami is trimmed with delicate lace.