Delicacy sentence example

delicacy
  • Delicacy of health compelled his retirement in the autumn of 1835.
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  • The flesh of the American beaver is eaten by the Indians, and when roasted in the skin is esteemed a delicacy and is said to taste like pork.
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  • Thus the restoration and interpretation of the poems is one of peculiar delicacy and difficulty.
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  • The imperfections of the thermopile, with which he began his work, led him, about 1880, to the invention of the bolometer, an instrument of extraordinary delicacy, which in its most refined form is believed to be capable of detecting a change of temperature amounting to less than one-hundred-millionth of a degree Centigrade.
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  • Her singing was both warmth of sound and delicacy of nuance.
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  • and softened lights, combined with depth and delicacy of hjame.
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  • This error diminishes as the diameter of the stem is reduced, but is sensible in the case of the thinnest stem which can be employed, and is the chief source of error in the employment of Nicholson's hydrometer, which otherwise would be an instrument of extreme delicacy and precision.
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  • Many brilliant specimens of these mens work survive, their general features being that the motives are naturalistic, that the quality of the metal is exceptionally fine, that in addition to beautifully clear casting obtained by highly skilled use of the cera-perduta process, the chisel was employed to impart delicacy and finish to the design, and that modelling in high relief is most successfully introduced.
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  • He tells us with honest and simple pride that when his patron Harley fell out, and Godolphin came in, he for three years held no communication with the former, and seems quite incapable of comprehending the delicacy which would have obliged him to follow Harley's fallen fortunes.
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  • On account of its delicacy no web is more difficult to see than one of the orbicular type above described.
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  • A situation - hazardous in spite of its comic substratum - between Thaumasta and the pretended Parthenophil is conducted, as Gifford points out, with real delicacy; but the comic scenes are merely stagy, notwithstanding, or by reason of, the effort expended on them by the author.
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  • As an article of food the boar's head was long considered a special delicacy, and its serving was attended with much ceremonial.
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  • It is, however, in her daily life that one can best measure the delicacy of her senses and her manual skill.
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  • The excessive delicacy of his constitution, not pampered appetite, exacted some unusual indulgences.
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  • Most Japanese decorative designs consist of natural objects, treated sometimes in a more 1~hi0 or less conventional manner, but always distinguished by delicacy of touch, graceful freedom of conception and delightfully harmonized tints.
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  • Works of this description probably belong to the period when Egypt passed under Roman domination, as similar objects, though of inferior delicacy, appear to have been made in Rome.
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  • In these and other dramatic writings, more remarkable perhaps for poetic than for stage effects, Doczi still maintains his brilliancy of diction and the delicacy of his poetic touch.
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  • Moronobu was a consummate artist, with all the delicacy and calligraphic force of the best of the Tosa masters, whom he undoubtedly strove to emulate in style; and his pictures are not only the most beautiful but also the most trustworthy records of the Fife of his time.
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  • They are remarkable for skill in the massing of light and shade, richness and delicacy of colouring, and for the admirable style in which the drapery of the figures is handled, Bartolommeo having been the first to introduce and use the lay-figure with joints.
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  • The probable reason for the wall-lines being concentric is that lines passing over the radii as nearly as possible at right angles are the shortest that can be laid on; they therefore use up a smaller quantity of silk and take a shorter time to spin than threads crossing the radii in any other direction; and at the same time they afford them the greatest possible support compatible with delicacy and strength of construction.
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  • One, headed by Namikawa Yasuyuki of KiOto, took for its objects N the utmost delicacy and perfection of technique, rich ness of decoration, purity of design and harmony of color.
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  • The design is an imitation of twining and interlaced branches, a marvel of delicacy and grace, and finer than anything of the kind to be found in Agra or Delhi.
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  • His full-length of Lady Mary Coke is remarkable for the skill and delicacy with which the white satin drapery is managed; while in the portrait of his brown-eyed wife, the eldest daughter of Sir Alexander Lindsay of Evelick, in the Scottish National Gallery, we have a sweetness and tenderness which shows the painter at his highest.
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  • Yet Coleridge was perfectly just in his remark; and the metrical anarchy of the "Madelines" and "Adelines" of the 1830 volume showed that Tennyson, with all his delicacy of modulation, had not yet mastered the arts of verse.
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  • Clouds, mountains, landscapes, towers, churches, trees, flowers and herbs were drawn with wonderful precision, minuteness of detail and delicacy of hand, solely to recall some specific aspect of nature or art, of which he wished to retain a record.
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  • When ripe the seeds are much esteemed as a delicacy, while in France much oil of fine quality is extracted from them by pressure.
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  • There seems no good reason why in modern performances the pianoforte should not be used for the purpose; if only accompanists can be trained to acquire the necessary delicacy of touch, and can be made to understand that, if they cannot extemporize the necessary polyphony, and so have to play something definitely written for them, it is not a mass of interesting detail which they are to bring to the public ear.
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  • The certainty with which tissues can now be fixed in the state they were in when living, and the delicacy with which they can be stained differentially, have been the means of opening up a new world of exploration.
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  • Some of the last-named are represented with such truth of colouring and delicacy of detail that even the separate feathers of the wings and tail are well distinguished, although, as in an example in the British Museum, a human-headed hawk, the piece which contains the figure may not exceed 4 in.
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  • By careful selection and preparation of pate, glaze and pigments, Dr Wagener proved not only that the manufacture was reasonably feasible, but also that decoration thus applied to pottery possesses unique delicacy and softness.
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  • In short, the little chisel becomes in his fingers a painters brush, and when it is remembered that, the basis upon which he works being simply a thread of silk, his hand must be trained to such delicacy of muscular effort as to be capable of arresting the edge of the knile at varying depths within the diameter of the tiny filament, the difficulty of the achievement will be understood.
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  • But with a strange want of delicacy, to use the mildest term, she made love at the same time to a young Venetian doctor whom she had called in, by name Pagello.
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  • He was remarkable as a painter of decorative landscapes and classic ruins, somewhat in the style of Canaletto, but without his delicacy of touch; he appears also to have been influenced by Nicolas Poussin.
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  • The Luneburger Heide yields an excellent breed of sheep, the Heidschnucken, which equal the Southdowns of England in delicacy of flavour.
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  • The sculpture from this treasury, which ornamented its frieze and pediment, is of great interest in the history of the development of the art, and the fragments of architectural mouldings are of great delicacy and beauty.
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  • It was regarded as doubtful whether his health could withstand the severity of English winters, and the delicacy of his physique and the languor of his manner helped to create the impression that, however great his intellectual powers might be, he had neither the bodily strength nor the energy of character requisite for a political career.
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  • Natasha unconsciously felt this delicacy and so found great pleasure in his society.
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  • As a critic he was second to none in his own time, and even yet one can admire the delicacy and the skill with which he handles his subject.
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  • La Chute d'un ange, in which the Byronic influence is more obvious than in any other of Lamartine's works, and in which some have also seen that of Alfred de Vigny, is more ambitious in theme, and less regulated by scrupulous conditions of delicacy in handling, than most of its author's poetry.
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  • Kenzan, adopted his style, and left a reputation as a decorator of pottery hardly less brilliant than Krins in that of lacquer; and a later follower, HOitsu (1762-1828), greatly excelled the master in delicacy and refinement, although inferior to him in vigour and invention.
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  • The wholesale jam manufacturers of the present day use this sugar; they boil the jam in vacuo and secure a product that will last a long time without deteriorating, but it lacks the delicacy and distinctive flavour of fruit preserved by a careful housekeeper, who boils it in an open pan with cane sugar to a less density, though exposed for a short time to a greater heat.
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  • The manufacturing methods are elaborate and careful, and the produce has in its choicest qualities a particular delicacy and bouquet possessed by no other variety of tea.
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  • Thus he suggests that man has not eyes of a microscopic delicacy, because he would receive no great advantage from such acute organs, since though adding indefinitely to his speculative knowledge of the physical world they would 1 Yet he leaves open the question whether the Deity has annexed thought to matter as a faculty, or whether it rests on a distinct spiritual principle.
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  • The Polynemidae, which range from the Atlantic through the Indian Ocean to the Pacific, supply animals from which isinglass is prepared; one of them, the mango-fish, esteemed a great delicacy, inhabits the seas from the Bay of Bengal to Siam.
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  • 289), who admittedly had it from Waterton, and stated that it was "an admirable contrivance of nature to increase the delicacy of the organ of smell;" but R.
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  • In 1902 Marconi invented two forms of magnetic detector, one of which he developed into an electric wave detector of extraordinary delicacy and utility.
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  • The richness, profusion and microscopic accuracy of their decoration could scarcely have been surpassed; but, with very rare exceptions, their lack of delicacy of technique disqualifies them to rank as fine porcelains.
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  • She took no pains with her manners or with delicacy of speech, or with her toilet, or to show herself to her husband in her most becoming attitudes, or to avoid inconveniencing him by being too exacting.
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  • Its value as a delicacy for the table, once so highly esteemed, has long vanished.
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  • The bow adds a touch of delicacy to a pretty little shoe.
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  • Hurd wrote two acrimonious defences of Warburton: On the Delicacy of Friendship (1755), in answer to Dr J.
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  • The disk, 30 with its small projecting handle enables the 2 segments of the divided object to be moved rapidly or with any required delicacy relative to each other.
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  • Franklin's position in France was a difficult one from the start, because of the delicacy of the task of getting French aid at a time when France was unready openly to take sides against Great Britain.
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  • During the long apprenticeship that educated Japanese serve to acquire the power of writing with the brush the complicated characters borrowed from Chinese, they unconsciously cultivate the habit of minute observation and the power of accurate imitation, and with these the delicacy of touch and freedom of hand which only long practice can give.
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  • Chesterfield had long been celebrated for the politeness of his manners, the brilliancy of his wit, and the delicacy of his taste.
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  • Humans are a delicacy.
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  • 1850), one of the most gifted modern lyrical poets of Hungary, has the charm of tenderness and delicacy together with that of a peculiar and original style, his Kurucz notcik being so far his most successful attempt at romantic lyrics.
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  • Queen Elizabeth, with the almost incredible want of tact or instinctive delicacy which distinguished and disfigured her vigorous intelligence, had recently proposed as a suitor to the queen of Scots her own low-born favourite, Lord Robert Dudley, the widower if not the murderer of Amy Robsart; and she now protested against the project of marriage between Mary and Darnley.
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  • He had a sprightly wit, some delicacy of feeling, and some generous impulses which made him amiable.
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  • We know with how much truth, fulness and decision, and with how much tact and delicacy, the queen, aided by Prince Albert, took a principal part on behalf .of the nation in the painful question of the Spanish marriages."
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  • The worm itself, after the cocoon has been used, is eaten and is esteemed a delicacy.
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  • IntheXllthDynastythe soldering of the thin cells for the cloisonnee inlaid pectorals, on to the base plate, is a marvellous piece of delicacy; every cell has to be perfectly true in form, and yet all soldered, apparently simultaneously, as the heat could not be applied to successive portions (M.D.
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  • Herring-pies were a great delicacy.
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  • 17),shows the beginning of convention, but yet has a delicacy about the mouth which surpasses later works.
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  • In later times the main work was in mosaics of extreme delicacy.
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  • Man differs from them in the absence of a hairy coat; in the development of a large lobule to the external ear; in his fully erect attitude; in his flattened foot with the non-opposable great toe; in the straight limb-bones; in the wider pelvis; in the marked sigmoid flexure of his spine; in the perfection of the muscular movements of the arm; in the delicacy of hand; in the smallness of the canine teeth and other dental peculiarities; in the development of a chin; and in the small size of his jaws compared to the relatively great size of the cranium.
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  • Tapering the arches to add delicacy to the ring.
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  • At the same time, the delicacy and flirtatiousness of the pattern is also reminiscent of similar designs such as filigree, Edwardian, and Celtic engagement rings.
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  • The KiOto artists process is much easier than that of his rivals, and although his monochromes are often of most pleasing delicacy and fine tone, they do not belong to the same category of technical excellence as the wares they imitate.
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  • Few sins of omission can be charged against Garrick as a manager, but he refused Home's Douglas, and made the wrong choice between False Delicacy and The Good Natur'd Man.
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  • being sawn in shape by copper tools fed with emery, and the whole finished with a perfection of proportion and delicacy not seen on other granite work.
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  • Thus in the central district of Val de Penas and in the Rioja region (situated between Old Castile and Navarre) in the north-east are produced red wines which in regard to vinosity, body and in some other respects resemble the heavier clarets or burgundies of France - although not possessing the delicacy and elegance of the latter.
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  • Actions of great complexity and delicacy of adjustment are daily executed by each of us without what is ordinarily understood as volition, and without more than a mere shred of memory attached thereto.
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  • In Phoenician commerce salt and salt fish - the latter a valued delicacy in the ancient world - always formed an important item.
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  • The work is celebrated for its delicacy and refinement, but lacks the life and character of that in earlier ages.
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  • The durability and the extraordinary ductility and pliancy of gold, its power of being subdivided, drawn out or flattened into wire or leaf of almost infinite fineness, have led to its being used for works where great minuteness and delicacy of execution were required; while its beauty and rarity have, for the most part, limited its use to objects of adornment and luxury, as distinct from those of utility.
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  • The great fluidity of bronze when melted, the slightness of its contraction on solidifying, together with its density and hardness, make it especially suitable for casting, and allow of its taking the impress of the mould with extreme sharpness and delicacy.
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  • In beauty, durability and delicacy of surface it is very inferior to bronze, and, though of some commercial importance, has been of but little use in the production of works of art.
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  • In its hot plastic state iron can be formed and modelled under the hammer to almost any degree of refinement, while its great strength allows it to be beaten out into leaves and ornaments of almost paperlike thinness and delicacy.
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  • Of game-birds, the floriken (Sypheotis aurita) is valued as much for its rarity as for the delicacy of its flesh.
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  • Freedom from tremor, ease and delicacy of movement and facility of directing the instrument to any desired object in the heavens are the primary qualifications.
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  • The question of at what point, in a war of conquest, the state succession becomes operative is one of great delicacy.
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  • ridibundus, are a source of no small profit to their proprietors, - the eggs, which are rightly accounted a great delicacy, being taken on an orderly system up to a certain day, and the birds carefully protected.
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  • These epics had meanwhile been made the subject of a work which for exhaustive learning and delicacy of artistic perception has few rivals in the history of philology, the Epic Cycle of F.
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  • In Virgil's poetry a sense of the greatness of Rome and Italy is the leading motive of a passionate rhetoric, partly veiled by the " chosen delicacy " of his language.
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  • He was educated privately, partly on account of the delicacy of his health, and partly that he might act as amanuensis to his father, who had lost his sight.
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  • Although other parts of France produce excellent wines, the Gironde is easily first if high and stable character, elegance and delicacy, variety and quantity are considered together.
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  • A cod's head was considered a great delicacy.
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  • For a man whose gait is a little ungainly, he has always possessed such delicacy of touch, such deft balance.
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  • Never having indulged in that particular delicacy, I cannot vouch for the accuracy of the description.
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  • Every little girl enjoys mingling the ethereal fairy wings with the delicacy of the ballerina whether she plans to dance in The Nutcracker or not.
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  • The delicacy of the designs reflects filigree influences, and most of his designs have an overall retro or vintage appeal.
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  • In these circumstances the task of Mr Henry Cloete was one of great difficulty and delicacy.
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  • This office he actually held for the long period of forty-two years; and it was in this official capacity that he wrote the Histoire du renouvellement del' Academie des Sciences (Paris, 3 vols., 1708, 1717, 1722) containing extracts and analyses of the proceedings, and also the -loges of the members, written with great simplicity and delicacy.
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  • The magnificent sheen and richness of the pure kin-makie (gold lacquer) are wanting, but in their place we have inimitable tenderness and delicacy.
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  • There is also a small export by the natives of the flesh of young albatrosses and other sea-birds, boiled down and cured, for the Maoris of New Zealand, by whom it is reckoned a delicacy.
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  • At the same time, there is no reason to believe that the finer European wines will be entirely displaced, inasmuch as these are characterized by qualities of delicacy and breed which cannot be reproduced at will.
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  • At the present day they are extremely bare, and in this respect almost repellent; but the lack of colour is compensated by the delicacy of the outlines, the minute articulation of the minor ridges and valleys, and the symmetrical grouping of the several mountains.
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  • discussion of particular duties included in the Summa theologiae; in which, for the most part, an excellent combination of moral elevation with sobriety of judgment is shown, though on certain points the scholastic pedantry of definition and distinction is unfavourable to due delicacy of treatment.
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  • Sousliks are eaten by the inhabitants of the Russian steppes, who consider their flesh an especial delicacy.
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  • They also make from straw and papyrus peel strong and beautiful mats and baskets in great variety, some of much fineness and delicacy, and also hats resembling those of Panama.
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  • The ordinary cattle of the province is the small humped kind, Bos indicus, and forms an article of export to Russia, the humps, smoked, being much in demand as a delicacy.
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  • WHITEBAIT, the vernacular name of the small fish which appears in large shoals in the estuary of the Thames during the summer months, and is held in great esteem as a delicacy for the table.
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  • The Thames being unequal to the supply of the large demand for this delicacy, large quantities of whitebait are now brought to London and other markets from many parts of the coast.
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  • Cynthia asked as she cut her sandwich with her customary delicacy.
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  • Indigenous to Scotland the wee globular beastie is considered a delicacy among the upper echelons of society.
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  • The most delightful came in white chiffon; it had all the delicacy of a wispy cloud.
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  • You may also come across conch chowder - a keys specialty, tiny blue crabs - a Florida delicacy and fresh scallops.
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  • conch chowder - a keys specialty, tiny blue crabs - a Florida delicacy and fresh scallops.
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  • culinary delicacy.
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  • There was a good mix of sightseeing, culture, tasting the local delicacy (guinea-pig) as well as time to ourselves.
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  • That night they sampled the local delicacy - reindeer - and stayed in a 4-star hotel - the Hotel Santa Claus!
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  • delicacy enjoyed by Scots at any time of the day.
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  • One of its claims to fame was an ingrediant for a culinary delicacy.
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  • Then, with the utmost delicacy, unroll as much as you can.
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  • delicacy in some parts of the world.
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  • delicacy of feeling.
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  • delicacy of touch, which is apparent even in his highly textured oils.
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  • delicacy special room, called a banquet, was being set aside for eating these delicacies.
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  • delicacy variety of delicious delicacies are designed to be served with tea, even for large parties.
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  • delicacy fish delicacies are the perfect gift for colleagues, friends and family at any time of the year.
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  • dilettante gentleman may mourn a loss of feminine delicacy.
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  • We started by making ' stuffed dormouse ', which was a Roman delicacy.
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  • fino cask has left a fine delicacy.
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  • flamingo tongues were a common delicacy at Roman feasts.
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  • force-feedcalled delicacy is produced from the diseased swollen liver of ducks and geese which have been cruelly force-fed.
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  • An Inca delicacy, often on the menu in the highlands, is roast guinea pig.
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  • pork scratchings, which for some are a rare delicacy.
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  • sisterly affection or delicacy of mind.
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  • wee globular beastie is considered a delicacy among the upper echelons of society.
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  • In Southern India they delight in hill-forest, where the undergrowth is largely formed of bamboo, the tender shoots of which form a favourite delicacy; but during the rains they venture out to feed on the open grass tracts.
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  • In 1902 Marconi invented two forms of magnetic detector, one of which he developed into an electric wave detector of extraordinary delicacy and utility (see Proc. Roy.
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  • There is, however, very great delicacy of perception or appreciation on the part of the sense organ, stimuli being responded to which are quite incapable of impressing themselves upon the most highly differentiated animal.
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  • His cheerful conversation, his smart and lively sallies, a singular mixture of malice of speech with goodness of heart, and of delicacy of wit with simplicity of manners, rendered him a pleasing and interesting companion; and if his manner was sometimes plain almost to the extent of rudeness, it probably set all the better an example of a much-needed reform to the class to which he belonged.
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  • The situation resulting from the Jameson raid (see Transvaal and South Africa) was one of the greatest delicacy and difficulty, and Mr Chamberlain, now colonial secretary, selected Milner as Lord Rosmead's successor.
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  • Its fame as a delicacy is perpetuated by many later writers, Ben Jonson among them, and Pennant says that in his time (1766) it sold for half-a-crown or five shillings.
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  • Broad effects of richness and splendour captivate the former, whereas the latter looks for delicacy of finish, accuracy of detail and, above all, evidences of artistic competence.
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  • Nothing could surpass the delicacy of the works executed at the Sanseishas atelier in Tokyo, but unfortunately such productions were above the standard of the customers for whom they were intended.
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  • Though not endowed with the strength and originality of mind that characterized Tyndale's work, Coverdale showed great discrimination in the handling and use of his authorities, and moreover a certain delicacy and happy ease in his rendering of the Biblical text, to which we owe not a few of the beautiful expressions of our present Bible.
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  • Adept as she was in the most exquisite delicacy of dissimulation, the most salient note of her original disposition was daring rather than subtlety.
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  • The group of two longnecked gazelles facing a palm tree is of extraordinary refinement, and shows the, artistic consciousness in every part; the symmetric rendering of the palm tree, reduced to fit the scale of the animals, the dainty grace of the smooth gazelles contrasted with the rugged stem, the delicacy of the long flowing curves and the fine indications of the joints, all show a sense of design which has rarely been equalled in the ceaseless repetitions of the tree and supporters motive during every age since.
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  • The finest pottery, often painted but all hand-made without the wheel, belongs to the prehistoric period; so also do the finest flint implements, which, in the delicacy and exactitude of their form and flaking, surpass all that is known from other countries.
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  • A polemical essayist of elaborate delicacy of style is Hjalmar Soderberg (b.
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  • His style may lack the classic qualities of French prose - lightness, delicacy, sparkle; it certainly has not Daudet's colour and felicity of x xvril.
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  • Her sense of touch has sensibly increased during the year, and has gained in acuteness and delicacy.
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  • She offered them a plate of pie each and they ate with relish - wheatear pie was considered a great delicacy.
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  • Because a butterfly is a small and relatively unobtrusive accent, they can easily fit into most wedding decors to add a small touch of delicacy and innocence without overpowering the wedding.
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  • It has a fine red colour, and unites delicacy and a high bouquet with a sweet elegant taste.
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  • for "fig-pecker"), a small migratory bird of the warbler (Sylviidae) family, which frequents fig-trees and vineyards, and, when fattened, is considered a great delicacy.
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  • The excessive mortality of European troops in India, and the delicacy of the children of European parents, do not affect the real question of acclimatization under proper conditions.
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  • The more modern of the two was built by two brothers, rich merchants, between the years 1197 and 1247, and for delicacy of carving and minute beauty of detail stands almost unrivalled, even in this land of patient and lavish labour.
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  • A large species of barnacle, Balanus psittacus, is found in great abundance from Concepcion to Puerto Montt, and is not only eaten by the natives, by whom it is called Pico, but is also esteemed a great delicacy in the markets of Valparaiso and Santiago.
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  • The strength of the astringent application and the mode of its administration are varied according to the delicacy and position of the mucous membrane affected.
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  • Before he left school his constitutional delicacy of frame, increased by swimming the New River in his clothes, began to give him serious discomfort.
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  • Kimberley (the new secretary of state for the colonies) announcing his reca11.3 Frere's task was one of extreme delicacy; he chose to face difficulties rather than evade them, and had he been unfettered in his Sir Bartle action might have accomplished much more than Frere.
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  • The Hindus eat it mixed with honey as a delicacy, equal quantities being put into a hollow joint, coated externally with clay, and thus roasted over a fire.
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  • In the social drama, Ernesto Biester, and in comedy Fernando Caldeira, also no mean lyric poet, are two of the principal names, and the latter's pieces, A Mantilha da Renda and A Madrugada, have a delicacy and vivacity which justifies their success.
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  • It is recognized that the great fertility of fishes is nature's provision to meet a high mortality - greater in sea-fishes with minute pelagic eggs than in fresh-water fishes with larger-yolked eggs, partly because of the greater risks of marine pelagic life, and partly because of the greater delicacy of marine larvae at the time of hatching.
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  • Now it is the abode of the jewellers and ivory-workers of Delhi, but the jewels are seldom valuable and the carving has lost much of its old delicacy.
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  • In Trinidad the young are esteemed a great delicacy for the table by many, though some persons object to their peculiar scent, which resembles that of a cockroach (Blatta), and consequently refuse to eat them.
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  • The distinction does not seem to lie principally in the range and delicacy of direct sensation, as may be judged from such well-known facts as man's inferiority to the eagle in sight, or to the dog in scent.
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  • The dolphin was formerly supposed to be a fish, and allowed to be eaten by Roman Catholics when the use of flesh was prohibited, and it seems to have been esteemed as a delicacy by the French.
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  • For their production, therefore, dividing engines of extraordinary trueness and delicacy must be employed, and in the construction of such machines Rowland's engineering skill brought him conspicuous success.
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  • The saurians are represented on land by several species of lizard, some of them conspicuous for their brilliant colouring, and by the large "iguana," whose flesh is considered a great delicacy.
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  • Sir Gordon Sprigg, who after a political crisis of considerable delicacy, succeeded Mr Schreiner and for the fourth time became prime minister, was able to pass the Bill with the co-operation of Mr Schreiner and his section.
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  • The nature of sterilization, and the difficulties in securing it, as well as the extreme delicacy of the manipulations necessary, made it possible for a very long time to be doubtful as to the application of the phrase omne vivum e vivo to the microscopic world, and there still remain a few belated supporters of abiogenesis.
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  • Along with several other species, notably Ctenosura acanthinura, which is omnivorous, likewise called iguana, the common iguana is much sought after in tropical America; the natives esteem its flesh a delicacy, and capture it by slipping a noose round its neck as it sits in fancied security on the branch of a tree.
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  • The end knife-edges are adjusted and tightly jammed into exact position by means of wedge pieces and set screws, and the beam is furnished with delicate adjusting weights at its top. The position of the beam with respect to the horizontal is shown by a horizontal pointer (not shown) projecting from one end of it, which plays past a scale, each division of which corresponds to the i l oth or i hth of a grain according to the size and delicacy of the machine.
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  • For the weighing of very small quantities with balances of great delicacy, the following method is adopted: - If the balance be in perfect adjustment, and 1 be the length of each arm, and w a very minute difference of the weights in the two scale-pans, by which the beam is deflected from the horizontal by a very small angle (/), it can easily be shown that tan 0, or 4), varies as w XI.
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  • The treatment of the subject, the atmosphere which surrounds it, the delicacy in which the little prattling ways of the nuns, their jealousies, their tiny trifles, are presented, takes the reader entirely by surprise.
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  • Many of the phenomena of Winter are suggestive of an inexpressible tenderness and fragile delicacy.
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  • Princess Mary understood this and appreciated his delicacy.
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  • I think it would not be very likely to promote sisterly affection or delicacy of mind.
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  • Her singing was both wamth of sound and delicacy of nuance.
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  • Our special today is roasted abalone, a seafood delicacy.
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  • Daisy Marc Jacobs Pour Sephora Pretty Pouch Trio: Branching out a bit, this logo-embossed set of gold cosmetic bags is inspired by the delicacy of Daisy.
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  • A high protein delicacy, caviar is best served chilled on a bed of ice with crackers, or toast points, and chilled vodka.
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  • Another favored delicacy is Naem- a fermented minced pork sausage wrapped in a banana leaf.
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  • A few of the smaller species rival in delicacy of form and color some of the charming Maidenhair Ferns, and may be associated with flowering plants, or those of fine foliage.
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  • The brown tortoise shell, however, manages to convey a touch of delicacy.
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  • In general, Rioja wines are aromatic, flavorful, earthy, and display nuance and delicacy.
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  • Strokes are made with the greatest delicacy, and appropriate techniques are taught by licensed massage therapists to ensure that the infant is treated with accepted physical touch.
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  • Greater Delicacy: Because micro pave rings use such small stones, they can be incorporated into very delicate, intricate designs that are impossible with larger accent stones.
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  • Christine (Y&R) - The name of Lauralee Bell's signature role, the delicacy is offset by her professional acumen and determination.
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  • Using gentle flight and delicacy when gracing a flower, the butterfly is the perfect picture of leisure and happiness.
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  • Other cultures, such as Indonesia, eat dragonflies as a delicacy.
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  • Many people aren't quite sure how to classify this delicious tropical delicacy.
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  • wheatear pie was considered a great delicacy.
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  • Under such powers the webs can be brought into apparent contact with such precision and delicacy that the uncertainty of measurement seems to lie as much in the estimation of the fraction of the division of the head as in the accuracy of the contact.
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  • His reasoning centered on his own delicacy, which had frequently been offended by Catherine 's vivacious, open character.
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  • Southern sweet potato soufflé is a delicacy not limited to south of the Mason-Dixon line.
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  • Grilled Asparagus: Combining the gourmet flavor of asparagus with open flame cooking is pure genius, and this recipe walks you through how to prepare this delicious delicacy.
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