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degrees

degrees Sentence Examples

  • "103 degrees," he announced.

  • We stood back to back, holding hands and baby-stepped three hundred and sixty degrees, taking in the breath taking scene in all directions.

  • He was successful, in varying degrees in locating ninety-six.

  • Even 'spectacular' has degrees.

  • The slope dropped at a precarious angle, impossible to maneuver unsecured, only a few degrees from the perpendicular.

  • Yes, my metabolism is a lot faster than a human, so my temperature runs about a hundred and two degrees.

  • It was a good twenty degrees warmer than when they got up this morning and the snow was even beginning to melt - a sure thing to bring on kidding.

  • The temperature of his tent seemed to drop by ten degrees.

  • It must be nearly 115 degrees.

  • The thermometer nailed to the porch read eighty-five degrees.

  • Hutton took charge of the literary side of the paper, and by degrees his own articles became and remained up to the last one of the best-known features of serious and thoughtful English journalism.

  • The atmospheric temperature should range from 60° to 65° till the mushrooms appear, when it may drop a few degrees, but not lower than 55°.

  • The other members of the group are relative and dependent, and only to be understood as in various degrees subordinate to the primitive conception.

  • Having discovered this prime or absolute member of the group, we proceed to consider the degrees in which the other members enter into relation with it.

  • The herm is a dry work and the head upon the coins shows various degrees of idealization.

  • The most important educational institutions are the Birmingham medical college and college of pharmacy; the Birmingham dental college; a school of art and a conservatory of music. At East Lake station, in the north-east of the city, is Howard College (Baptist; founded at Marion, Perry county, in 1841 as an academy; granted first collegiate degrees in 1848; opened in East Lake in 1887); and 2 m.

  • It is a mighty river, rising in the Rocky Mountains, and crossing eighteen degrees of longitude.

  • Higher education is represented by the provincial university, which teaches science and mathematics, holds examinations, distributes scholarships, and grants degrees in all subjects.

  • and other degrees, and for university and college offices.

  • Great attention is given to the education of the ministry, a considerable number of whom, in recent years, have taken arts degrees at Oxford and Cambridge.

  • The law of 1880 reserved to the state faculties the right to confer degrees, and the law of 1896 established various universities each containing one or more faculties.

  • The faculties of letters and sciences, besides granting the Baccalaurat de lenseignement secondaire, confer the degrees of licentiate and doctor (la Licence, le Doctoral).

  • The faculties of theology confer the degrees of bachelor, lice~itiate and doctor of theology.

  • The faculties of law confer the same degrees in law and also grant certificates of capacity, which enable the holder to practise as an avou; a licence is necessary for the profession of barrister.

  • Students of the private faculties have to be examined by and take their degrees from the state faculties.

  • The work of the faculties of medicine and pharmacy is in some measure shared by the icoles su~irieures de pharmacie (Paris, Montpellier, Nancy), which grant the highest degrees in pharmacy, and by the icoles de p1cm exercice de mdecine et de pharmacie (Marseilles, Rennes and Nantes) and the more numerous coles preparaloires de mdecine et de pharmacie; there are also coles preparatolres a lenseignement supirieur des sciences ci des lettres at Chambry, Rouen and Nantes.

  • His conclusions were that the group "has never been nearer the mainland than it is now, nor have its members been at any time closer together"; and that the character of the flora and fauna is the result of species straggling over from America, at long intervals of time, to the different islets, where in their isolation they have gradually varied in different degrees and ways from their ancestors.

  • His starting-point was on the Fitzroy Downs, north of the river Condamine, in Queensland, between the 26th and 27th degrees of S.

  • and 127° E., two degrees within the Western Australian boundary, was forced to return.

  • Forrest traversed seventeen degrees of desert in five months, a very wonderful achievement,.

  • When the Liberals returned to power in 1880 he was raised to the peerage as Viscount Sherbrooke, but from 1875 till his death at Warlingham, Surrey, on the 27th of July 1892, his health was constantly failing, and by degrees he figured less and less in public life.

  • in 1921, having also been made previously a member of the Amsterdam and Copenhagen Academies, while the universities of Geneva, Manchester, Rostock and Princeton conferred honorary degrees on him.

  • Toller) describes a thegn as "one engaged in a king's or a queen's service, whether in the household or in the country," and adds, "the word in this case seems gradually to acquire a technical meaning, and to become a term denoting a class, containing, however, several degrees."

  • In ordinary circumstances the angle of immersion i varies between six and nine degrees.

  • of the deep-sea cables within the first twelve years, placed the probable life of a cable as low as fifteen years, but the weeding out of unserviceable types of construction, and the general improvement in materials, have by degrees extended that first estimate, until now the limit may be safely placed at not less than forty years.

  • We see by degrees - in general outline or upon general principles 9 - that what is is no other than what must be.

  • There is no idea of government, but in each sept there is a head, who has attained that position by degrees on account of some tacitly admitted superiority and commands a limited respect and some obedience.

  • So, too, in his psychology he speaks of the several degrees of mind as arising according to a progressive necessity.

  • This movement is said to go forth from God to the animated heaven, stars, visible world and man, which represent decreasing degrees of cognition.

  • All organic forms are at bottom but one organization, and the inorganic world shows the same formative activity in various degrees or potences.

  • In his Entwickelungsgeschichte der Thiere (p. 264) he distinctly tells us that the law of growing individuality is " the fundamental thought which goes through all forms and degrees of animal development and all single relations.

  • Degrees in science and pharmacy are granted by the universities of Manchester and Glasgow, and other universities were in 1910 considering the question of granting degrees.

  • degrees at Oxford, Edinburgh and Dublin, and was made a fellow of the Royal Society.

  • The gametophyte is a small thalloid structure which shows varying degrees of independence affording an interesting transition to the next group.

  • A consideration of these facts emphasizes still more fully the view with which we set out, that all living substance is fundamentally, the same, though differentiated both anatomically and physiologically in many directions and in different degrees.

  • The protoplasm is in a condition of instability and is continually breaking down to a certain extent, giving rise to various substances of different degrees of complexity, some of which are again built up by it into its own substances, and others, more simple in composition, are given off.

  • All chlorophyll plants require light, but in very different degrees, as exemplified even in the United Kingdom by the shade-bearing beech and yew contrasted with the light-demanding larch and birch; and as with temperature so with light, every plant and even every organ has its optimum of illumination.

  • The various degrees of parasitism are to a certain extent explained by the foregoing.

  • But even when inside it does not follow that the Fungus can kill the cell, and many cases are known where the Fungus can break throtigh the cells first lines of defence (cell-wall and protoplasmic lining); but the struggle goes on at close quarters, and various degrees of hypertrophy, accumulation of plastic bodies or secretions, discolorations, &c.,, indicate the suffering of the still living cell.

  • Another effect is that different degrees of homology have to be recognized, just as there are different degrees of relationship or affinity between individual plants.

  • which inhabits the same latitudes in Central America, not many degrees farther to the west; but no instance perhaps can be cited, which shows more strikingly the difference between a continental and an'insular fauna, since, making every allowance for the ravages, of cultivation by civilized man, the contrary is the case, and possibly no area of land so highly favoured by nature is so poorly furnished with the, higher forms of animal life.

  • In June 1828 he received priest's orders; in April and November of the same year he took his degrees of B.D.

  • The normal ambo, when the church contained only one, had three stages or degrees, one above the other, and it was usually mounted by a flight of steps at each end.

  • For, as almost everywhere else, this Teutonic nobility admits of degrees, though it is yet harder to say in what the degrees of nobility consisted than to say in what nobility consisted itself.

  • A court seems more natural where a chain of degrees leads gradually up from the lowest subject to the throne than when all beneath the throne are nearly on a level.

  • been reduced to five, while the privileges granted to young men who have received various degrees of education have been slightly extended.

  • America, those of 46° to 32° being distributed over twenty degrees of latitude.

  • degrees from all the Scottish universities, was from 1896 to 1899 lord rector of Edinburgh University and from 1900 chancellor of St.

  • We have not the slightest reason to think that the radiation from the sun is measurably weaker now than it was a couple of thousand years ago, yet it can be shown that, if the sun were merely radiating heat as simply a hot body, then it would cool some degrees every year, and must have cooled many thousands of degrees within the time covered by historical records.

  • since the initial and final temperatures, which alone determine the variation in the thermal effect, are in almost all cases within the ordinary laboratory range of a few degrees, this influence may in general be neglected without serious error.

  • There is British Baluch Baluchistan par excellence, and there is the rest of Baluchistan which exists in various degrees of independence, but is everywhere subject to British control.

  • At Aden the minimum is a few degrees below 70°, the maximum not much exceeding 90°.

  • His connexion with Magdalen had perhaps terminated with his resignation of the bursarship, though he supplicated for the degrees of B.D.

  • The Logic, an eminently practical work, written from the point of view of Locke, is in five parts, dealing with (1) the nature of the human mind, its faculties and operations; (2) ideas and their kinds; (3) the true and the false, and the various degrees of knowledge; (4) reasoning and argumentation; (5) method and the ordering of our thoughts.

  • gradualis, of or belonging to steps or degrees; gradus, step), advancing or taking place by degrees or step by step; hence used of a slow progress or a gentle declivity or slope, opposed to steep or precipitous.

  • A few problems lead to indeterminate equations of the third and fourth degrees, an easy indeterminate equation of the sixth degree being also found.

  • All those who wished for peace and orderly government came by degrees to oppose the Directors; and, seeing that the latter clung to Jacobinical catchwords and methods, public opinion tended to become "moderate" or even royalist.

  • Only by degrees did the events of the 19th of Brumaire stand out in their real significance; for the new consuls, installed at the Luxemburg palace, and somewhat later at the Tuileries, took care that the new constitution, which they along with the two commissions were now secretly drawing up, should not be promulgated until Paris and France had settled down to the ordinary life of pleasure and toil.

  • Napcleon was now able by degrees to dispense with all republican forms (the last to go was the Republican Calendar, which ceased on the 1st of January 1806), and the scene at the coronation in Notre Dame on the 2nd of December 1804 was frankly imperial in splendour and in the egotism which led Napoleon to wave aside the pope, Pius VII., at the supreme moment and crown himself.

  • That the different ranks or degrees of circular groups exhibited in the animal kingdom are Nine k in number, each being involved within the other."

  • Therefore the flesh, especially of the larger kinds, is of a red colour; and the energy of their muscular action causes the temperature of their blood to be several degrees higher than in other fishes.

  • The majority, however, were laymen, of all kinds and degrees - nobles, artisans, scholars, students, labouring men.

  • The First Crusade, far more than any other, became the theme of a multitude of writings, whose different degrees of value it is allimportant to distinguish.

  • northwards through about two degrees.

  • By legislative enactment whites and blacks living in adultery are to be punished by imprisonment or fine; divorces may be secured only after two years' residence in the state and on the ground of physical incapacity, adultery, extreme cruelty, habitual indulgence in violent temper, habitual drunkenness, desertion for one year, previous marriage still existing, or such relationship of the parties as is within the degrees for which marriage is prohibited by law.

  • In it Maclaurin developed several theorems due to Newton, and introduced the method of generating conics which bears his name, and showed that many curves of the third and fourth degrees can be described by the intersection of two movable angles.

  • This paper is principally based on the following general theorem, which is a remarkable extension of Pascal's hexagram: "If a polygon move so that each of its sides passes through a fixed point, and if all its summits except one describe curves of the degrees m, n, p, &c., respectively, then the free summit moves on a curve of the degree 2mnp. ..

  • It follows that putting n for the mean motion and T for the period of revolution we shall have in degrees nT=3600.

  • By degrees the inhabited area began to comprise the open ground to the north-west, the nearer portion of the later Ceramicus, or " potters' field " (afterwards divided by the walls of Themistocles into the Inner and Outer Ceramicus), and eventually extended to the north and east of the citadel, which, by the beginning of the 5th century B.C., had become the centre of a circular or wheel-shaped city, 7rOXtos TpOXOEU OS ciKpa Kapnva (Oracle apud Herod.

  • The ordinary variation is from 3 to 4 degrees, the mean maximum reading in the shade in a cooler district being about 105° as against 108° in the hotter ones for the month of May, and 79° as against 83° for the month of December.

  • In 1484 he went to Michael House, Cambridge, where he took his degrees in arts in 1487 and 1491, and, after filling several offices in the university, became master of his college in 1499.

  • The main principles of this system have been maintained, Slope Degrees 80 75 ' '70 FIG.

  • Even a general map may be trusted, as long as we keep within ten degrees of its centre.

  • It should be noted that he places Syene only two degrees to the east of Alexandria instead of three degrees, the actual meridian distance between the two places; a difference which would result from an error of only 7° is the orientation of the map used by Ptolemy.

  • Parallels and meridians were represented by straight lines intersecting each other at right angles, the relative proportions between degrees of longitude and latitude being retained only along the parallel of Rhodes.

  • The correct relations in the length of degrees of latitude and longitude are maintained in the first case along the latitude of Thule and the equator, in the second along the parallel of Agisymba, the equator and the parallels of Meroe, Syene and Thule.

  • Robert Barclay, writing some twenty years later, admits of degrees of perfection, and the possibility of a fall from it (Apology, Prop. viii.).

  • From the southern boundary line for two and a half degrees north the prairie is dry, but of good soil, which grows excellent crops when irrigated.

  • The relics having been removed, the visits of pilgrims naturally ceased, and by degrees the very existence of those wonderful subterranean cemeteries was forgotten.

  • Starting with the firmest belief in the old traditional view, his own researches by degrees opened his eyes to the truth, now universally recognized, that the catacombs were exclusively the work of the Christians, and were constructed for the interment of the dead.

  • These, the grossest and most deficient of all forms, are also divided into ten degrees, each lower than the other.

  • State education is of three degrees: primary, secondary and superior.

  • These rights are of simple possession, but they are transmissible in certain degrees to the heirs of the possessor.

  • Promotion was regular, but was obtainable only by entering at an early age one of the medresses or colleges; the student, after passing through the successive degrees of danishmend, mulazim and muderris, became first a molla, then a judge, rising to the higher ranks as fortune and opportunity offered.

  • The remaining colonial possessions of France, and of Holland, then wholly dependent on her, were conquered by degrees, and the ports in which privateers were fitted out to cruise against British commerce in distant seas were gradually rendered harmless.

  • She was at first left undisturbed, but by degrees the château itself became taboo, and her visitors found themselves punished heavily.

  • He gathered by degrees around him "a kind of feudal clan of servants and retainers," and he plunged, with more generous ardour than coolness of judgment, into the troubled politics of the country.

  • In addition to these departments provided for in the organic act, the university included in 1909 colleges of dentistry (three-year course), pharmacy (two-year and three-year courses), a school of mines (1891; four-year course, leading to the degree of Engineer of Mines or Metallurgical Engineer), a school of analytical and applied chemistry (four-year courses, leading to the degree of Bachelor in Science in Chemistry, or in Chemical Engineering), a college of education (1906; three-year course, after two years of college work, leading to a Master's degree), a graduate school (with courses leading to the degrees of Master of Arts, of Science and of Laws, and of Doctor of Philosophy, of Science and of Civil Law), and a university summer school.

  • Now, suppose f and 4) to have a common factor x--y, f(x) =f1(x)(x--y); 4,(x) =4,1(x)(x--y), f l and 41 being of degrees m-1 and ni respectively; we have the identity ch i (x)f(x) =fl(x)4,(x) of degree m+n-I.

  • Hence, finally, the resultant is expressed in terms of the coefficients of the three equations, and since it is at once seen to be of degree mn in the coefficient of the third equation, by symmetry it must be of degrees np and pm in the coefficients of the first and second equations respectively.

  • Cayley, however, has shown that, whatever be the degrees of the three equations, it is possible to represent the resultant as the quotient of two determinants (Salmon, l.c. p. 89).

  • It is the resultant of k polynomials each of degree m-I, and thus contains the coefficients of each form to the degree (m-I)'-1; hence the total degrees in the coefficients of the k forms is, by addition, k (m - 1) k - 1; it may further be shown that the weight of each term of the resultant is constant and equal to m(m-I) - (Salmon, l.c. p. loo).

  • The degree of the separation is the sum of the degrees of the component separates.

  • which have different coefficients, the same variables, and are of the same or different degrees in the variables; we may transform them all by the same substitution, so that they become _, _, _, _, _, _, f(a °, a, a 2, ...; (b 0, b, b 2, ...; 1, S2),....

  • A particular quantic of the system may be of the same or different degrees in the pairs of variables which it involves, and these degrees may vary from quantic to quantic of the system.

  • A 1 1+/ 2 12, A 2E1 +/ 2 2 2) we find that the leftand right-hand sides are of degrees nO and 2w+e respectively in A,, �l, A 2, /22, and thence nO = 2w �E.

  • It will be a useful exercise for the reader to interpret the corresponding covariants of the general quantic, to show that some of them are simple powers or products of other covariants of lower degrees and order.

  • Now the symbolic expression of the seminvariant can be expanded by the binomial theorem so as to be exhibited as a sum of products of seminvariants, of lower degrees if alai 0-2a2 +...+crea0 can be broken up into any two portions (alai -1-0-2a2-1-��� +asas) +(as+1as +1 +o-8+2as+2+��� +ooae), such that Q1 +a2+...

  • Q 1 The Unreduced Generating Function Which Enumerates The Covariants Of Degrees 0, 0' In The Coefficients And Order E In The Variables.

  • 1 Ab' Establishing The Ground Forms Of Degrees Order (I, O; I), (O, I; I), (I, I; O), Viz: The Linear Forms Themselves And Their Jacobian J Ab.

  • For The Degrees I, 2, The Asyzygetic Forms Are Enumerated By Z.

  • 1 And The Actual Forms For The First Three Weights Are 1 Aobzo, (Ao B 1 A 1 B O) Bo, (A O B 2 A 1 2 0 Bo, Ao(B2, 3 A1B2 A2B1 A O (B L B 2 3B O B 3) A I (B 2 1 2B 0 B 2); Amongst These Forms Are Included All The Asyzygetic Forms Of Degrees 1, 1, Multiplied By Bo, And Also All The Perpetuants Of The Second Binary Form Multiplied By Ao; Hence We Have To Subtract From The 2 Generating Function 1Z And 1 Z Z2, And Obtain The Generating Function Of Perpetuants Of Degrees I, 2.

  • In General It Is A Seminvariant Of Degrees 0, 0', And Weight 0 0' S; To This There Is An Exception, Viz., When 0=O, Or When 0'=O, The Corresponding Partial Degrees Are 1 And 1.

  • When 0=0' =O, We Have The General Perpetuant Of Degrees I, I.

  • For The Case In Hand, From The Simplest Perpetuant Of Degrees I, 2, We Derive The Perpetuants Of Weight W, Ao(21W 2)B A1(21"R 3) I A2(21" 4)B ..� Man 2(2)B, Ao(221W 4(B Al(221W 5)B A2 (221 " S)B ...

  • We Cannot, By This Method, Easily Discuss The Perpetuants Of Degrees 2, 2, Because A Syzygy Presents Itself As Early As Weight 2.

  • Proceeding as we did in the case of the single binary form we find that for a given total degree 0+0', the condition which expresses reducibility is of total degree in the coefficients a and T; combining this with the knowledge of the generating function of asyzygetic forms of degrees 0, 0', we find that the perpetuants, of these degrees are enumerated by z26"'-11 -z.

  • The substitution for x, y in terms of X, Y is the most general linear substitution in virtue of the four degrees of arbitrariness introduced, viz.

  • The streets are of all widths, and of all degrees of crookedness, and run in all directions.

  • If, however, this non-magnetic substance is cooled to a temperature a few degrees below freezing-point, it becomes as strongly magnetic as average cast-iron (µ = 62 for H = 40), and retains its magnetic properties indefinitely at ordinary temperatures.

  • m., passing through more than twelve degrees of longitude or 750 m.

  • Instead of following the motion of each individual part of a material system, he showed that, if we determine its configuration by a sufficient number of variables, whose number is that of the degrees of freedom to move (there being as many equations as the system has degrees of freedom), the kinetic and potential energies of the system can be expressed in terms of these, and the differential equations of motion thence deduced by simple differentiation.

  • From Luang Prabang the river cuts its way southwards for two degrees through a lonely jungle country among receding hills of low elevation.

  • Of the seven degrees, those mystics not yet beyond the third, Miles, were not in full communion, and were called inrnpETOUVTES (servants); while the fourth degree, Leo, admitted them into the class of the fully initiate, the (participants).

  • The time requisite for the several degrees is unknown, and may have been determined by the Patres, who conferred them in a solemn ceremony called Sacramentum, in which the initial step was an oath never to divulge what should be revealed, and for which the mystic had been specially prepared by lustral purification, prolonged abstinence, and severe deprivations.

  • A sacred communion of bread, water and possibly wine, compared by the Christian apologists to the Eucharist, was administered to the mystic who was entering upon one of the advanced degrees, perhaps Leo.

  • The worthy soul ascended to its former home in the skies by seven gates or degrees, while the unworthy soul descended to the realms of Ahriman.

  • It was one of the first universities to admit women students to its classes and degrees, and its alumni are brought into close bonds of sympathy and activity by a students' union.

  • The college is an ancient corporate body, with a charter of the year 1505, and exercises the powers of instructing in surgery and of giving degrees.

  • Under the Lombards the civil government was in the hands of a gastaldo, under the Carolingians of a count, whose authority, by slow degrees and a course of events similar to what took place in other Italian communes, gave way to that of the bishop, whose power in turn gradually diminished and was superseded by that of the consuls and the commonwealth.

  • The university provides instruction and grants degrees in arts, law, medicine, science and engineering; instruction in theology, however, is given, not by the university, but by the different affiliated colleges.

  • In other words, we note philosophy gradually extending its claims. Dialectic is, to begin with, a merely secular art, and only by degrees are its terms and distinctions applied to the subject-matter of theology.

  • He took the degrees of M.B.

  • The treatment of equations of the second and higher degrees introduces imaginary and complex numbers, the theory of which is a special subject.

  • In internal politics he became, by degrees, the absolute ruler of the country.

  • In the fifteen " songs of degrees " (Ps.

  • 5) and other Jewish traditions, these psalms were sung by the Levites at the Feast of Tabernacles on the fifteen steps or degrees that led from the women's to the men's court.

  • A variation of a very few degrees in the blood itself produces death.

  • Owing to the different circumstances which have attended their migrations, the Thai peoples have attained to varying degrees of civilization.

  • (310-379) declared war on Rome about 337, there ensued almost immediately a somewhat violent persecution of the Persian Christians, which continued in varying degrees for about 40 years.

  • The gradual replacement of Syriac by Arabic as the vernacular language of Mesopotamia by degrees transformed the Syriac from a living to a dead language.

  • The reactions of the tissues vary in degrees according to the nature and severity of the injury.

  • In the preservation of immunity then, in its various degrees and kinds, not only is the chemistry of the blood to be studied, but also its histology.

  • Among the drawbacks of this temper, which on the whole made for progress, was the rise of a school of excessive scepticism, which, forgetting the value of the accumulated stores of empiricism, despised those degrees of moral certainty that, in so complex a study and so tentative a practice as medicine, must be our portion for the present, and even for a long future, however great the triumphs of medicine may become.

  • Highly complex as are all animal tissues, or nearly all, yet in this category of high complexity are degrees higher and higher again of which we can form little conception, so elaborate they are, so peculiar in their respective properties, and probably so fugitive.

  • On the other hand, the reagents by which such modifications are apt to be produced are not necessarily simple; many of them likewise are known to be of very high degrees of complexity, approaching perhaps in complexity the molecules to which they are akin.

  • An enormous accumulation of lunatics of all sorts and degrees seems to have paralysed public authorities, who, at vast expense in buildings, mass them more or less indiscriminately in barracks, and expect that their sundry and difficult disorders can be properly studied and treated by a medical superintendent charged with the whole domestic establishment, with a few young assistants under him.

  • The University of London was incorporated by royal charter in 1836, as an examining body for conferring degrees.

  • The province lies to the east of the Bay of Bengal, and covers a range of country extending from the Pakchan river in 9° 55' north latitude to the Naga and Chingpaw, or Kachin hills, lying roughly between the 27th and 28th degrees of north latitude; and from the Bay of Bengal on the west to the Mekong river, the boundary of the dependent Shan States on the east, that is to say, roughly, between the 92nd and tooth degrees of east longitude.

  • It is highest in the central zone, the mean of the maximum readings in such districts as Magwe, Myingyan, Kyaukse, Mandalay and Shwebo in the month of May being close on 100° F., while in the littoral and sub-montane districts it is nearly ten degrees less.

  • The mean of the minimum readings in December in the central zone districts is a few degrees under 60° F.

  • and in the littoral districts a few degrees over that figure.

  • is registered, and on the grass in the cold weather ten degrees of frost are not uncommon.

  • At the principal towns benches of honorary magistrates, exercising powers of various degrees, have been constituted.

  • There may be said to be three degrees of strictness in the observances of the Sikhs.

  • The quality of plasticity is developed to very different degrees in different metals, and even in the same species it depends on temperature, and may be modified by mechanical or physical operations.

  • The puma has an exceedingly wide range of geographical distribution, extending over a hundred degrees of latitude, from Canada in the north to Patagonia in the south, and formerly was generally diffused in suitable localities from the Atlantic to the Pacific Ocean, but the advances of civilization have curtailed the extent of the districts which it inhabits.

  • They may be grown outside in England during the summer months, but a few degrees of frost is fatal to them.

  • of the metal, taking water as 800 times denser than air on the average, in round numbers, and formula (to) may be written n tan 6=ir, or n6=180, when 6 is a small angle, and given in degrees.

  • Almost all " Hittitologues " assume a connexion between the monuments and the Kheta-Khatti-Hittites, but in various degrees; e.g.

  • Fire heat must be at first applied very gently, and may range about 55° at night, and from 65° to 70° by day, but a few degrees more may be given them as the buds break and the new shoots appear.

  • The temperature should be gradually increased from 60° to 80°, or 90° by sun heat, and a bottom heat a few degrees higher must be maintained during their growth.

  • per ton, then canes with juice indicating in degrees Beaume to° 9° 8° 7° 6° and containing in sugar..

  • It shows the comparative results of working with juice of the degrees of density mentioned above, under the conditions described, for one day of 24 hours, and the real value, as raw material for manufacture, of cane giving juice of 6° B.

  • There are various degrees of hereditary chiefships, and a supreme chief recognized by all.

  • In the operation of ploughing the furrow slice is separated from the soil below, and although in humid soils this layer may be left to settle by degrees, in semi-arid regions this loosened layer becomes.

  • The employment of the precarium by the Church seems to have been one of the surest means by which this form of landholding was carried over from the Romans to the Frankish period and developed into new forms. It came to be made by degrees the subject of written contract, by which the rights of the holder were more definitely defined and protected than had been the case in Roman law.

  • The lord's court took the place of the public court in civil, and even by degrees in criminal cases.

  • He reorganized the committee of public education (law of the 27th of February 1880), and proposed a regulation for the conferring of university degrees, which, though rejected, aroused violent polemics because the 7th article took away from the unauthorized religious orders the right to teach.

  • 1 In practice the prerogative is extremely valuable, when used with discretion, as a means of adjusting the different degrees of moral guilt in crimes or of rectifying a miscarriage of justice.

  • If N be the length of the unheated mercury column in degrees, t the temperature of this column (generally determined by a small thermometer placed with its bulb at the middle of the column), and T the temperature recorded by the thermometer, then the corrected temperature of the vapour is T-+o 000143 (T - t) N (T.

  • There was a brilliant exhibition of meteors on the 10th of April 1803, and in other years meteors have been very abundant on about the 19th to the 21st of April, shooting from a radiant a few degrees south-west of a Lyrae.

  • Everything is air at different degrees of density, and under the influence of heat, which expands, and of cold, which contracts its volume, it gives rise to the several phases of existence.

  • He entered St John's College, Cambridge, as a fellow-commoner in 1701, and took degrees of LL.B.

  • It would seem that the Trematodes present various degrees of such adaptation, for whilst some - e.g.

  • In higher degrees, where full correction might increase the myopia by inducing a strain of the accommodation, somewhat weaker glasses should be used for near work.

  • In the highest degrees the complete correction may be employed, but lorgnettes are generally preferred, as they can be removed when the eyes become fatigued.

  • In the slighter forms no inconvenience may result; but in higher degrees prolonged work is apt to give rise to aching and watering of the eyes, headache, inability to read or sew for any length of time, and even to double vision and internal strabismus.

  • The lower forms of life prefigure man in unequal degrees of imperfection; they exist for his sake, but they are not regarded as representing necessary antecedent conditions of human existence.

  • By degrees, however, the progresses of the feudal chiefs to and from Yedo, which at first were simple and economical, developed features of competitive magnificence, and the importance of good roads and suitable accommodation received increased attention.

  • The Rhine valley is the warmest district in Germany, but the higher elevations of the Black Forest record the greatest degrees of cold experienced in the south.

  • In God there are three infinite and uncreated "degrees" of being, and in man and all things corresponding three degrees, finite and created.

  • Buchtel College provides three courses leading to the degrees of A.B., Ph.B.

  • The college meets with strong support from the enlightened portion of the Mussulman community, whose aim is to raise it to the status of a university, with the power of conferring degrees.

  • But in both East and West, this theory of his became established only by very imperceptible degrees, and indeed, strictly speaking, the process was never completed.

  • Among Protestant churches again there are minor doctrinal differences, which are held with various degrees of exclusiveness or liberality according to the degree of departure from the Roman Catholic Church.

  • The canonists define the degrees of suspicion as "light" calling for vigilance, "vehement" demanding denunciation, and "violent" requiring punishment.

  • He held honorary degrees at the universities of Oxford, Cambridge, Dublin, Edinburgh and Durham, was an Associate of the Institute of France; a Commander of the Legion of Honour, and of the Order of Leopold.

  • He was president of the Royal Society of Canada, and of the Canadian Society of Arts, and received numerous honorary degrees.

  • We know now that in so far as life and living matter can be investigated by science, animals and plants cannot be described as being alive in different degrees.

  • Sherman had the good fortune to learn the art of command by degrees.

  • The quantity of alcohol present in an aqueous solution is determined by a comparison of its specific gravity with standard tables, or directly by the use of an alcoholometer, which is a hydrometer graduated so as to read per cents by weight (degrees according to Richter) or volume per cents (degrees according to Tralles).

  • The "quantity at proof" is given by the formula: - quantity of sample X (degrees over or under proof + ioo) divided by ioo.

  • of temperature (o' - o") is small, the figure ABCD may be regarded as a parallelogram, and its area W as equal to the rectangle BE XEC. This is accurately true in the limit when (0' - 0") is infinitesimal, but in practice it is necessary to measure specific heats, &c., over finite ranges of temperature, and the error involved is generally negligible if the range does not exceed a few degrees.

  • If two monatomic molecules, having energy of translation only, equivalent to 3 degrees of freedom, combined to form a diatomic molecule with 5 degrees of freedom, the energy lost would.

  • If two diatomic molecules, having each 5 degrees of freedom, combine to form a molecule with 6 degrees of freedom, we should have n = 2, or the energy lost would be 2pc per unit mass.

  • If the molecules and molecular aggregates were more complicated, and the number of degrees of freedom of the aggregates were limited to 6, or were the same as for single molecules, we should have n-= so/R.

  • The archbishop also continues to grant degrees in the faculties of theology, music and law, which are known as Lambeth degrees.

  • Many subjects with strong powers of "visualization," or seeing things "in the mind's eye," cannot scry; others are successful in various degrees.

  • Thus, by degrees, the reproduction of the original text became of secondary importance, and merely served as a pretext for the discussion of topics that had little or no bearing on the context.

  • In 1704 he was sent to the English College at Douai, where he was ordained a priest in 1716, took his degrees in divinity, and was appointed professor in that faculty.

  • The cavalry of his left wing stood fast, west of Doon Hill, as a pivot of manoeuvre, the northern face of Doon (where the ground rises from the burn at an average slope of fifteen degrees and is even steeper near the summit) he left unoccupied.

  • The influence that Rosicrucianism had in the modernizing of ancient Freemasonry early in the 18th century must have been slight, if any, though it is likely that as the century advanced, and additional ceremonies were grafted on to the first three degrees, Rosicrucian tenets were occasionally introduced into the later rituals.

  • Oxford, Edinburgh and Glasgow gave him honorary degrees; the two Scottish universities made him lord rector.

  • When the pledge, given by the Treaty of Amiens, to restore the Order of St John with a national Maltese "langue," could not be fulfilled, political leaders began demanding instead the re-establishment of the " Consiglio Popolare " of Norman times (without reflecting that it never had legislative power); but by degrees popular aspirations developed in favour of a free constitution on English lines.

  • and a long pause ensued, while the 220 guns, which [by ',degrees ', had unlimbered behind them, brought St Privat and Roncourt under fire.

  • Fortunately, by the superb gallantry of some of the company officers and men, the new arrivals were induced to recognize their mistake, and by degrees about 10 p.m.

  • But the Allied main army took a long time to defile over the Scheldt and could form up (on the left of Cadogan's detachment) only slowly and by degrees.

  • He conceived methods for the general resolution of equations of the second, third and fourth degrees different from those of Ferro and Ferrari, with which, however, it is difficult to believe him to have been unacquainted.

  • He devised an approximate numerical solution of equations of the second and third degrees, wherein Leonardo of Pisa must have preceded him, but by a method every vestige of which is completely lost.

  • Upon the resignation of the latter the trustees appointed Temple, who in that year (1858) had taken the degrees of B.D.

  • The temperature of maximum density of sea-water of any specific gravity was found by Knudsen to be given with sufficient accuracy for all practical purposes by the formula 0 = 3.950.2660 -0, where 0 is the temperature of maximum density in degrees centigrade.

  • Pt = Po(' +0 00367t) and can thus be reduced to its value at o° C. Sigurd Stenius has calculated tables of osmotic pressure for sea-water of different degrees of concentration.

  • The yellow solution is made up of i part of neutral potassium chromate in 199 parts of water, and to give the various degrees of the scale, 1, 2, 3, 4, &c.,% of the yellow solution is mixed with 99, 9 8, 97, 96, &c.,% of the blue in successive tubes.

  • Fox, of the Central Laboratory of the International Council at Christiania, has investigated the relation of the atmospheric gases to sea-water by very exact experimental methods and arrived at the following expressions for the absorption of oxygen and nitrogen by sea-water of different degrees of concentration.

  • The formulae show the number of cubic centimetres of gas absorbed by i litre of sea-water; t indicates the temperature in degrees centigrade and CI the salinity as shown by the amount of chlorine per mille: 02 = 10.291 - 0 .

  • or 9 Fahrenheit degrees higher than the water of the Bay of Bengal at the same depth.

  • This is actually the case; the Carboniferous, Cretaceous and Jurassic systems (qq.v.) contain coal-bearing strata though in unequal degrees,- the first being known as the Coal Measures proper, while the others are of small economic value in Great Britain, though more productive in workable coals on the continent of Europe.

  • - The writings of the church Fathers give sufficient evidence that two degrees of excommunication, the a.diopiaµos and the a4 opu rµ r 7ravreVis, as they were generally called, were in use during, or at least soon after, the apostolic age.

  • In February parliament discovered that " by divers sundry old authentic histories and chronicles " it was manifest that the realm of England was an empire governed by one supreme head, the king, to whom all sorts and degrees of people - both clergy and laity - ought to bear next to God a natural and humble obedience, and that to him God had given the authority finally to determine all causes and contentions in the realm, " without restraint, or provocation to any foreign princes or potentates of the world."

  • The settlers by degrees threw off the control of the proprietors who had received grants from the crown and had promoted the first settlements.

  • Occupying 135 degrees of latitude, living on the shores of frozen or of tropical waters; at altitudes varying from sea-level to several thousands of feet; in forests, grassy prairies or deserts; here starved, there in plenty; with a night here of six months' duration, there twelve hours long; here among health-giving winds, and there cursed with malaria - this brown man became, in different culture provinces, brunette or black, tall or short, long-headed or short-headed, and developed on his own hemisphere variations from an average type.

  • Among the Cordilleras in their western and interior drainages, over a space covering more than twenty degrees of latitude, the student comes again upon massive ruins.

  • 3) was graduated in degrees only.

  • 4 that if the gun and target are on the same horizontal plane the axis can be equally well directed by inclining it to the horizontal through the requisite number of degrees.

  • This was arranged for by a movable leaf carrying the sighting V, worked by means of a mill-headed screw provided with a scale in degrees and fractions to the same radius as the elevation scale, and an arrowb head for reading.

  • The tangent sight was graduated in yards as well as degrees and had also a fuze scale.

  • If now the telescope be directed on the target and this level be brought to the centre of its run, the angle of sight can be read - if afterwards any range ordered is put on the sight and the gun truly layed, this bubble will be found in the centre of its run - so that if thereafter the target becomes obscured the gun can be relayed by elevating till the bubble is in the centre of its run, or at a completely concealed target the angle of sight can, if the range and difference of level are known or can be measured from somewhere near the gun, be put on by means of the micrometer screw, and the gun subsequently layed by putting the range in yards or degrees on the sight drum and elevating or depressing till the bubble is central.

  • Howitzer sights are vertical and do not allow for drift; they are graduated in degrees only.

  • 18), on the gun, graduated in degrees read by a " reader " on the carriage.

  • In subsequent patterns all the deflection was given on the tangent sight, which was provided with two scales, the upper one graduated in knots for speed of ship, and the lower one in degrees.

  • No part of this matter is to be found in the following documents, which present us in varying degrees of accuracy with The Two Ways: (i.) the Epistle of Barnabas, chaps.

  • At the most moderate estimate, his travels covered a space of thirty-one degrees of longitude, or 1700 miles, and twenty-four of latitude, or nearly the same distance.

  • Ideas or notions are never true, but only probable; nevertheless, there are degrees of probability, and hence degrees of belief, leading to action.

  • In the first degree there is a strong persuasion of the propriety of the impression made; the second and third degrees are produced by comparisons of the impression with others associated with it, and an analysis of itself.

  • For functions of higher degrees in x the formulae become more complicated.

  • The 6th is related to degrees of courage, resolution, rashness or timidity; the 7th indicates sensitiveness, morality, good conduct, or immorality, overbearing temper and self-will.

  • 17), has expressed itself in varying degrees at different times, according as conditions were favourable or the reverse.

  • A temperature of - 20° or lower is never attained in the southern portion, seldom in the central, but is often passed, by 5 or to degrees, in the Adirondacks and in the higher parts of the plateau.

  • degrees from Harvard, Yale, Johns Hopkins, Aberdeen, St.

  • The university of New Zealand is an examining body, and grants honours, degrees and scholarships.

  • It is empowered by royal charter to confer degrees entitled to rank and consideration throughout the British dominions, as fully as if they were granted by any university in the United Kingdom.

  • Thus there is many " a pedagogue to Christ," and the Christian visible means and expressions are the culmination and measure of what, in various degrees and forms, accompanies every sincerely striving soul throughout all human history.

  • Honorary academic degrees were conferred upon him by the universities of Cairo, Christiania, Berlin, Cambridge and Oxford, and he was given both popular and official ovations of almost royal distinction - ovations which were repeated by his own countrymen on his return to America.

  • Beginning with the throwing together of a few stray thoughts and quotations linked by a community of subject, the author by degrees acquires more and more certainty of hand, until he produces such masterpieces of apparent desultoriness and real unity as the essay "Sur des vers de Virgile."

  • By degrees, he obtains a full confession - not from the serpent, whose speech might not have been edifying, but from Adam and Eve.

  • Its object was to exhibit by means of certain formulas the way in which the products of agriculture, which is the only source of wealth, would in a state of perfect liberty be distributed among the several classes of the community (namely, the productive classes of the proprietors and cultivators of land, and the unproductive class composed of manufacturers and merchants), and to represent by other formulas the modes of distribution which take place under systems of Governmental restraint and regulation, with the evil results arising to the whole society from different degrees of such violations of the natural order.

  • He formed new musical projects, and he was introduced by degrees to many people of rank and influence, among them Madame d'Epinay (q.v.), to whom in 1747 he was introduced by her lover M.

  • In civil life it had a marked effect in stimulating the training movement and raising the status of the nurse; but substantial results were only obtained by degrees.

  • The current in the shunt coil lags 90 degrees behind the impressed electromotive force of the circuit to be measured; hence if the main current is in step with the potential difference of the terminals of the supply mains, which is the case when the supply is given wholly to electric lamps, then the field due to the main coil differs from that due to the shunt coil by 90 degrees.

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