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defiance

defiance

defiance Sentence Examples

  • Despite her defiance, her voice shook.

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  • There was challenge and defiance in her gaze.

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  • Aggravated by her second display of defiance in one night, he crossed to her and planted his hands on either side of her chair, demanding her attention.

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  • The leading British ship, the "Defiance" (74), carrying the flag of Rear-Admiral Graves, anchored just south of the Trekroner.

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  • It was in defiance of this right that Alva refused the claim of Counts Egmont and Horn to be tried by the knights of the Fleece in 1568.

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  • The motives of the earl's defiance were not altogether disinterested.

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  • The blatant defiance was so sweetly uttered, he didn't know how to respond.

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  • and his wife Mary of Lorraine, was born in December 1542, a few days before the death of her father, heart-broken by the disgrace of his arms at Solway Moss, where the disaffected nobles had declined to encounter an enemy of inferior force in the cause of a king whose systematic policy had been directed against the privileges of their order, and whose representative on the occasion was an unpopular favourite appointed general in defiance of their ill-will.

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  • would not have tolerated such a defiance of Catholic order for a moment.

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  • unnatural, seeing his defiance of the ordinary habits and standards of the world.

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  • By way of political defiance the Democrats of Ohio nominated Vallandigham for governor on the 11th of June.

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  • Having secured his coronation at Rome in October 1209, Otto repudiated the many pledges he had made to Innocent and began to act in defiance of the papal wishes.

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  • One of these, a young man named Thomas Scott, having treated Riel with defiance, was court-martialled for treason to the provisional government, condemned, and on the 4th of March 1870, shot in cold blood under the walls of Fort Garry.

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  • It was only after open defiance of the bishop of Regensburg that he obtained permission to continue his studies at Munich.

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  • One of these, a young man named Thomas Scott, having treated Riel with defiance, was court-martialled for treason to the provisional government, condemned, and on the 4th of March 1870, shot in cold blood under the walls of Fort Garry.

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  • Percy is said to have answered this defiance with the words, "Not here, but on the field."

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  • America had re-entered the field of competition, and was rapidly gaining ground so as to be able to bid defiance to the world.

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  • In defiance of an army which marched to the relief of the beleaguered city under Yusef the Almoravide, the Cid took Valencia after a siege of nine months, on the 15th of June 10 94 - the richest prize which up to that time had been recovered from the Moors.

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  • Percy is said to have answered this defiance with the words, "Not here, but on the field."

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  • He accompanied the primate to Rome in 1143, and also to the council of Reims (1148),(1148), which Theobald attended in defiance of a prohibition from the king.

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  • This defiance to the sovereigns of Russia and Austria rekindled the flames of war.

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  • resolved to wipe from the map of Europe an inconvenient rival, and without any warning, in defiance of all international equity, let loose his veterans upon Denmark a second time.

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  • This defiance to the sovereigns of Russia and Austria rekindled the flames of war.

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  • Vallandigham had returned to his home in defiance of his banishment beyond military lines, and was leniently suffered to remain.

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  • was not merely one of defiance towards supposed hostile forces within and without the Church; it was also strenuous in pushing on the R work of internal organization and reform.

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  • Hecker, however, was not at all ready to listen to them; on the contrary, he added to violence an absurd defiance, and offered an amnesty to the German princes on condition of their retiring within fourteen days into private life.

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  • Although the institution of the popular courts by Solon had within it the germ of democratic supremacy, it is clear that the immediate result was small; thus, in the next decade anarchia was continuous and Damasias held the archonship for more than two years in defiance of the new constitution; the prolonged dissension in this matter shows that the office of archon still retained its supreme importance.

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  • The defiance to Austria was emphasized when, on the 4th of June, he promised a deputation from Genoa that he.

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  • In 1517 the Portuguese effected a settlement, and in 1520 they fortified their port and bade defiance to the native besiegers.

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  • The next or the twin-born impulse of her indomitable nature was, as usual in all times of danger, one of passionate and high-spirited defiance on discovering the seizure of her papers.

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  • Round the town lies a cluster of suburban villages, Polish Folwark, Russian Folwark, Zinkovtsui, Karvasarui, &c.; and on the opposite side of the river, accessible by a wooden bridge, stands the castle which long frowned defiance across the Dniester to Khotin in Bessarabia.

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  • The government continued to struggle against this spirit of defiance; proclamations of James I.

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  • When this occurs, every member of each troop. sounds a bold roar of defiance at the opposite parties; and when one roars, all roar together, and each seems to vie with his comrades in the intensity and power of his voice.

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  • In 1690 he moved a famous amendment to the Corporation Bill, proposing the addition of a clause - the purport of which was misrepresented by Macaulay - for disqualifying for office for seven years municipal functionaries who in defiance of the majority of their colleagues had surrendered their charters to the Crown.

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  • But the prospect of a settlement roused the Italian Nationalists to a final effort: the Nitti Cabinet fell, and D'Annunzio, repeating his defiance of Europe, attempted a further raid upon Dalmatia.

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  • In 1910 the city had seven public parks (1120 acres), including Point Defiance, a thickly wooded park (about 640 acres), and, in the centre of the city, Wright Park, in which is the Seymour Conservatory.

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  • To the last he maintained the narrow standpoint of Pusey and Keble, in defiance of all the developments of modern thought and modern scholarship; and his latter years were embittered by the consciousness that the younger generation of the disciples of his school were beginning to make friends of the Mammon of scientific unrighteousness.

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  • First, the growth of the practice of " reservation " and " provision," by which the popes assumed the right to appoint their own nominees to vacant sees and other benefices, in defiance of the claims of the crown, the chapters and private patrons.

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  • Although relegated to a note (vii.), and propounded "Avec la defiance que doit inspirer tout ce qui n'est point un resultat de l'observation ou du calcul," it is plain, from the complacency with which he recurred to it 3 at a later date, that he regarded the speculation with considerable interest.

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  • His reactionary conservative temper was in complete harmony with the views of Bismarck and the emperor William, and with their powerful support he attempted, in defiance of modern democratic principles and even of the spirit of the constitution, to re-establish the old Prussian system of rigid discipline from above.

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  • Again, popularly, an unproved ex cathedra statement of any kind is called " dogmatic," with perhaps an insinuation that it is being obstinately adhered to without, or beyond, or in defiance of, obtainable evidence.

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  • popular outbreak and more bloodshed; the conspirators were put to death and Hiero's family was murdered; whilst the Carthaginian faction, under the pretence of delivering the city from its tyrants, got the upper hand and drew the citizens into open defiance of Rome.

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  • The complaint against the English prince which Count John I., in defiance of the treaty of Bretigny, himself carried to Paris, was the principal cause of the resumption of hostilities of 1369, and of the incessant defeats sustained by the English until the accession of their king Henry V.

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  • He returned on the eve of the abolition of the Shogunate, and followed Enomoto (q.v.) when the latter, sailing with the Tokugawa fleet to Yezo, attempted to establish a republic there in defiance of the newly organized government of the emperor.

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  • The reform movement had originally no connexion with ecclesiastical politics; but that came later when the leaders turned their attention to the abuses prevalent among the clergy, to the conditions obtaining in the Church in defiance of the ecclesiastical law.

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  • He regretted the necessity for flouting public opinion, which he would have preferred to carry with him; in due course he would make his peace with Liberal sentiment, when success should have justified his defiance of it.

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  • In the Second Punic War it thrice bade defiance to Hannibal; but in the Social War it was betrayed into the hands of the Samnites, who kept possession till Marius, with whom they had sided, was defeated by Sulla, who in 80 B.C. subjected it with the rest of Samnium.

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  • Beyond these ranges the country is further diversified by isolated hills rising abruptly from a common level, and presenting from their steep and nearly inaccessible scarps eligible sites for castles and strongholds, whence the mountaineers of Bundelkhand have frequently set at defiance the most powerful of the native states of India.

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  • But Charles's insatiable lust for conquest, and his ineradicable suspicion of Denmark, induced him, on the 17th of July, without any reasonable cause, without a declaration of war, in defiance of all international equity, to endeavour to despatch an inconvenient neighbour.

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  • It is, however, part of the personal history of Abd-ar-rahman that when in 763 he was compelled to fight at the very gate of his capital with rebels acting on' behalf of the Abbasids, and had won a signal victory, he cut off the heads of the leaders, filled them with salt and camphor and sent them as a defiance to the eastern caliph.

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  • In the Legislative Assembly the Girondists represented the principle of democratic revolution within and of patriotic defiance to the European powers without.

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  • This union took place in defiance of a prohibition which had been promulgated, in 1049, by the papal council of Reims. But the affinity of William and Matilda was so remote that political rather than moral considerations may have determined the pope's action.

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  • The first volume contains the " Colibris, Oiseaux-mouches, Jacamars et Promerops," the second the " Grimpereaux " and " Oiseaux de Paradis " - associations which set all the laws of systematic method at defiance.

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  • These hostages, when restored in 150, swelled the ranks of the proletariate opposition, whose leaders, to cover their maladministration at home, precipitated a war by attacking Sparta in defiance of Rome.

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  • (1859) Texas Christian University, Waco, Texas (1873, founded as Add Ran College at Thorpe's Springs, removing to Waco in 1895); Drake University, Des Moines, Iowa (1881); Milligan College, Milligan, Tennessee (1882); Defiance College, Defiance, O.

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  • The text sought permission and voiced defiance.

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  • Excommunication and interdict (April 17, 1606) were met with defiance.

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  • Lack of impulse control and authority defiance can be symptoms of medical conditions and psychological disorders.

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  • She stood, meeting his gaze with defiance.

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  • Here, on the 3rd of August 1795, General Wayne, the year after his victory over the Indians at Fallen Timbers, concluded with them the treaty of Greenville, the Indians agreeing to a cessation of hostilities and ceding to the United States a considerable portion of Ohio and a number of small tracts in Indiana, Illinois and Michigan (including the sites of Sandusky, Toledo, Defiance, Fort Wayne, Detroit, Mackinac, Peoria and Chicago), and the United States agreeing to pay to the Indians $20,000 worth of goods immediately and an annuity of goods, valued at $9500, for ever.

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  • This sufficed to provoke the defiance of the Danes, and on the 1st of February 1864 the Austrian and D h Prussian troops crossed the Eider.

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  • The proclamation of the new Joseph, emperor was a gage of defiance thrown down to Magyars 1848.

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  • The announcement of his determination caused the Opposition to rally against him, and when on the 18th of November the Liberal party adopted a " guillotine " motion by a show of hands in defiance of orthodox procedure, a section of the party seceded.

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  • In defiance of promises to the British government, orders were transmitted from Constantinople to Husain Pasha, the Turkish high admiral, to ensnare and put to death the principal beys.

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  • He cast out the spirit of negation, and henceforth the temper of his misery was changed to one, not of " whining," but of " indignation and grim fire-eyed defiance."

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  • In defiance of her commercial interests and of her popularity with the Moslem population of the Gulf, Great Britain set herself to suppress the trade, and executed a series of agreements with the chiefs of the Arabian littoral with this object.

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  • But Egmont depends for its interest almost solely on two characters, Egmont himself and Klarchen, Gretchen's counterpart; regarded as a drama, it demonstrates the futility of that defiance of convention and rules with which the Sturm and Drang set out.

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  • But now a commander had put an end to his defiance and had even returned his reproach unto him (Dan.

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  • In defiance of the law a gymnasium was set up under the shadow of the citadel.

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  • Few names or events stand out in the history of this period: perhaps the most interesting personality is that of the Druse prince Fakhr ud-Din (1595-1634), whose expulsion of the Arabs from the coast as far south as Acre and establishment of his own kingdom, in defiance of Ottoman authority - to say nothing of his dilettante cultivation of art, the result of a temporary sojourn in Italy - make him worth a passing notice.

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  • Unable to induce Burr to avow Federalist principles, influential Federalists, in defiance of the constitution, contemplated the desperate alternafive of preventing an election, and appointing an extra-constitutional (Federalist) president pro tern pore.

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  • However that may be, he soon repudiated this Danish princess, for whom he seems to have conceived an unconquerable aversion on the very morrow of his marriage to her, and in 1196, in defiance of the pope, who had refused to nullify his union with Ingeborg, married Agnes daughter of Bertold IV., duke of Meran.

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  • Wholesale and retail trade flourished all along the coast in defiance of prohibitory laws.

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  • Voices urged him to come to terms with Mehemet Ali, secure peace in Islam, and turn a united face of defiance against Europe; and for a while he harboured the idea.

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  • Thiers still maintained his warlike tone, and the king's speech prepared by him for the opening of the Chambers on the 28th of October was in effect a declaration of defiance to Europe.

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  • In 1899 it was found necessary to expel him, since his acts of aggression and defiance were no longer endurable.

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  • The polity of the new community, often founded in defiance of the home authorities, might either be a copy of that just left behind or be its direct political antithesis.

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  • Having been strongly fortified by Charles V., the city was in 1525 able to bid defiance to Francis I., who was so disastrously beaten in the vicinity, but two years later the French under Lautrec subjected it to a sack of seven days.

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  • The dragon hears Beowulf's shout of defiance, and rushes forth, breathing flames.

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  • When the Burgesses undertook in May 1769 to declare in vigorous resolutions that the right and power of taxation, direct and indirect, rested with the local assembly, the governor hastily dissolved them, but only to find the same men assembling in the Raleigh tavern in Williamsburg and issuing forth their resolutions in defiance of executive authority.

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  • With a few followers he escaped to Ireland, where his position as lordlieutenant was confirmed by an Irish parliament, and he ruled in full defiance of the English government.

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  • But the Slavophil movement, with its motto, " one law, one church, one tongue," acquired great influence in official circles, and its aim was, in defiance of the pledges of successive tsars, to subject Finland to Orthodoxy and autocracy.

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  • His reign was marked by a troublesome war with the Paulician heretics, an inheritance from his predecessor; the death of their able chief Chrysochir led to the definite subjection of this little state, of which the chief stronghold was Tephrice on the upper Euphrates, and which the Saracens had helped to bid a long defiance to the government of Constantinople.

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  • After the conquest of Peru by the Spaniards in the 16th century the natives were subjected to much tyranny and oppression, though it must in fairness be said that much of it was carried out in defiance of the efforts and the wishes of the Spanish home government, whose legislative efforts to protect the Indians from serfdom and ill-usage met with scant respect at the hands of the distant settlers and mine-owners, who bid defiance to the humane and protective regulations of the council of the Indies, and treated the unhappy natives little better than beasts of burden.

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  • Thereupon, in defiance of the archbishop, the abbe Baradere gave him the viaticum, while the rite of extreme unction was administered by the abbe Guillon, an opponent of the civil constitution, without consulting the archbishop or the parish cure.

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  • It was not a religious movement; and though, as a defiance of the accepted theology, its character was mainly theological, the deistical crusade belongs, not to the history of the church, or of dogma, but to the history of general culture.

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  • He is constantly admitting that on such and such an occasion he was terribly afraid; he confesses without the least shame that, when one of his followers suggested defiance of the Saracens and voluntary death, he (Joinville) paid not the least attention to him; nor does he attempt to gloss in any way his refusal to accompany St Louis on his unlucky second crusade, or his invincible conviction that it was better to be in mortal sin than to have the leprosy, or his decided preference for wine as little watered as might be, or any other weakness.

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  • Inside these walls the Bijapur kings bade defiance to all comers.

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  • His rival Athanaric seems to have tried to maintain his party for a while north of the Danube in defiance of the Huns; but he had presently to follow the example of the great mass of the nation.

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  • The coast of Alaska offers exceptional facilities for smuggling, and liquor has always been very plentiful; juries have steadily refused to convict offenders, and treasury officials have regularly collected revenue from saloons existing in defiance of law.

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  • He maintained an attitude of defiance and of "Roman resolution," smiled scornfully at his questioners, making no secret of his intentions, replied to the king, who asked why he would kill him, that the pope had excommunicated him, that "dangerous diseases require a desperate remedy," adding fiercely to the Scottish courtiers who surrounded him that "one of his objects was to blow back the Scots into Scotland."

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  • From the Hungarian and Russian sources, which are somewhat more precise, the date of the arrival of Dragosh, who is confused with the historical Bogdan Voda (1349-1365), appears to have been 1349, and his departure from Marmaros was carried out in defiance of his Hungarian suzerain.

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  • In defiance of treaties, however, the Porte continued to change the hospodars almost yearly and to exact extraordinary installation presents.

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  • On arrival, they found that the Transvaal Volksraad, in a spirit of defiance and even levity, had just passed a resolution offering four new seats in the Volksraad to the mining districts, and fifteen to exclusively burgher districts.

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  • (1859) Texas Christian University, Waco, Texas (1873, founded as Add Ran College at Thorpe's Springs, removing to Waco in 1895); Drake University, Des Moines, Iowa (1881); Milligan College, Milligan, Tennessee (1882); Defiance College, Defiance, O.

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  • Abbots more and more assumed almost episcopal state, and in defiance of the prohibition of early councils and the protests of St Bernard and others, adopted the episcopal insignia of mitre, ring, gloves and sandals.

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  • After a "reform" political campaign, the ousting in 1887 of a corrupt police judge by the mayor and city council, in defiance of an injunction of a federal court, led to a decision of the U.S. Supreme Court, favourable to the city authorities and important in questions of American municipal government.

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  • A riot at Edinburgh in 1637 quickly led to national resistance, and when in November 1638 the general assembly at Glasgow set Charless orders at defiance, he was compelled to choose between tame submission and immediate war.

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  • On the one hand, however, he alienated even reasonable opponents by offering no guarantees that equality so gained would not be converted into superiority by the aid of his own military force and of the assistance of the French king; whilst on the other hand he relied, even more strongly than his father had done, on the technical legality which exalted the prerogative in defiance of the spirit of the law.

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  • Still the claim to rule had, at least from the time of Henry III., been derived from hereditary descent, and the interruption, however frequently it might occur, had been regarded as something abnormal, only to be applied where there was an absolute necessity to prevent the wielder of executive authority from setting at defiance the determined purpose of the nation.

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  • Nor did he see that the passion for equality, like every great passion, justified itself, and that the problem was, not how to obtain liberty in defiance of it, but how so to guide it as to obtain liberty by it and through it.

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  • The view which Disraeli thus propounded in defiance of his previous opinions was confirmed by the electors on the dissolution of parliament.

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  • Marie Tudor (1833),(1833), his next play, was hardly more daring in its Shakespearean defiance of historic fact, and hardly more triumphant in its Shakespearean loyalty to the everlasting truth of human character and passion.

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  • (1754-1816), a prince whose model was Frederick the Great, took part in the war against France in defiance of the wishes of his people, and when the French again invaded and devastated the country he retired to Erlangen, where he remained until after the conclusion of the peace of Luneville in 1801.

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  • Flamsteed denounced the production as surreptitious; he committed to the flames three hundred copies, of which he obtained possession through the favour of Sir Robert Walpole; and, in defiance of bodily infirmities, vigorously prosecuted his designs for the entire and adequate publication of the materials he continued to accumulate.

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  • The unreflective moral consciousness never finds it difficult to distinguish between a man's power of willing and all the forces of circumstance, heredity and the like, which combine to form the temptations to which he may yield or bid defiance; and such facts as " remorse " and " penitence " are a continual testimony to man's sense of freedom.

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  • Not twenty years after Luther's defiance of the pope, the startling thesis " that all that Aristotle taught was false " was prosperously maintained by the youthful Ramus before the university of Paris; and almost contemporaneously the group of remarkable thinkers in Italy who heralded the dawn of modern physical science - Cardanus, Telesio, Patrizzi, Campanella, Bruno - began to propound their Aristotelian theories of the constitution of the physical universe.

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  • The war began, like every feudal war of that day, with a solemn defiance, and it was soon characterized by terrible disasters.

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  • The accusation against him was that he had written in contravention of the decree of 1616, and in defiance of the command of the Holy Office communicated to him by Cardinal Bellarmin; and his defence consisted mainly in a disavowal of his opinions, and an appeal to his good intentions.

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  • The attitude of the Church was practically one of defiance.

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  • In defiance of a recent ordinance prohibiting provincial assemblies, he presided over the estates of Picardy and Artois, and then over those of Champagne.

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  • He incurred the wrath of that king, who, angered at some act of defiance, ordered the massacre of every Fula in his dominions.

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  • She stood, meeting his gaze with defiance.

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  • Despite her defiance, her voice shook.

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  • Her eyes flashed with defiance, and she glowered at him.

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  • Aggravated by her second display of defiance in one night, he crossed to her and planted his hands on either side of her chair, demanding her attention.

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  • They may find a way to temper Anshan's defiance.

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  • The blatant defiance was so sweetly uttered, he didn't know how to respond.

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  • In spite of his admonition the door opened, not to Fred O'Connor, but to Claire Quincy who closed the door behind her and stood with nervous defiance at the foot of his bed.

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  • There was challenge and defiance in her gaze.

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  • The text sought permission and voiced defiance.

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  • Any Catholic who uses contraceptives in defiance of the Church are told they are being evil.

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  • defiance of gravity and any thoughts of the dragon.

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  • defiance of all logic and commonsense, Britain is going to spend £ 7.4 million on examining the health risks of mobile phones.

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  • defiance of the ban on strikes.

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  • defiance of the laws of Nature?

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  • defiance of UN resolutions, many more soldiers have been put in harms way.

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  • defiance of all international conventions.

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  • In every country there is an upland or outfield territory, which will always bid defiance to agriculture.

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  • The conference showed defiance by voting in favor of linking the basic pensions with average earnings.

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  • If I had been in their shoes and someone else had been in mine, I would have voted to continue the defiance.

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  • We've shown that for regimes that choose defiance, there are serious consequences.

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  • Martin McGuinness - his chief co-conspirator - has been shouting defiance on television North and South at democratic politicians.

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  • Teeth, bones, and hair, give the most lasting defiance to corruption.

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  • defiance in the face of the bastard bailiff can succeed.

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  • We have a right to expect that sentences will reflect the damage done to our social fabric by wilful defiance of the law.

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  • His paintings, with their unexpected juxtaposition of objects, are a deliberate defiance of common sense.

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  • It does this in virtue of a higher Law and in apparent defiance of the lower.

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  • Bush may well see this continued defiance by the people of Falluja as something that needs to be crushed.

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  • The Boston Tea Party was an act of open defiance against the British state, at that time the most powerful in the world.

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  • It was to live in direct defiance of the command of the Word of God.

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  • In the poem of 1711, the bard bids defiance to " Mars.

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  • Yet it too has stood firm, shoulder to shoulder with its neighbors, resolute in its defiance of the Dark.

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  • gesture of defiance!

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  • In defiance of the rain he was stalking among the horses, wrapped in an old scotch plaid.

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  • stand it too has stood firm, shoulder to shoulder with its neighbors, resolute in its defiance of the Dark.

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  • Like many Radicals, the leaders of the disturbances which broke out into open defiance and violence against authority, were probably well-intentioned men.

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  • wilful defiance of the law.

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  • They were probably not definite massed movements, such as would permit of the survival of distinctive lines of custom between tribe and tribe; but rather spasmodic movements, sometimes of tribes or of groups, sometimes only of families or even couples, the first caused by tribal wars, the second to escape punishment for some offence against tribal law, such as the defiance of the rules as to clan-marriages.

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  • On the charge of majestas (high treason) incurred by having left his province for Egypt without the consent of the senate and in defiance of the Sibylline books, he was acquitted; it is said that the judges were bribed, and even Cicero, who had recently attacked Gabinius with the utmost virulence, was persuaded by Pompey to say as little as he could in his evidence to damage his former enemy.

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  • Excommunication and interdict (April 17, 1606) were met with defiance.

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  • The personal nature of the tic binding Italy to France was illustrated by a .curious incident of the winter of I8o2I8O3~ Bonaparte, now First Consul for life, felt strong enough to impose his will on the Cisalpine Republic and to set at defiance one of the stipulations of the treaty of Lunville.

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  • As foreign minister of a young state which had attained unity in defiance of the most formidable religious organization in the world and in opposition to the traditional policy of France, it could but be ViscontiVenostas aim to uphold the dignity of his country while convincing European diplomacy that United Italy was an element of order and progress, and that the spiritual independence of the Roman pontiff had suffered no diminution.

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  • The government continued to struggle against this spirit of defiance; proclamations of James I.

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  • It was only after open defiance of the bishop of Regensburg that he obtained permission to continue his studies at Munich.

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  • But, when the zeal of Epiphanius was kindled against him, when Jerome, alarmed about his own reputation, and in defiance of his past attitude, turned against his once honoured teacher, and Theophilus, patriarch of Alexandria, found it prudent, for political reasons, and out of consideration for the uneducated monks, to condemn Origen - then his authority received a shock from which it never recovered.

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  • The defiance to Austria was emphasized when, on the 4th of June, he promised a deputation from Genoa that he.

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  • The first volume contains the " Colibris, Oiseaux-mouches, Jacamars et Promerops," the second the " Grimpereaux " and " Oiseaux de Paradis " - associations which set all the laws of systematic method at defiance.

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  • America had re-entered the field of competition, and was rapidly gaining ground so as to be able to bid defiance to the world.

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  • In defiance of an army which marched to the relief of the beleaguered city under Yusef the Almoravide, the Cid took Valencia after a siege of nine months, on the 15th of June 10 94 - the richest prize which up to that time had been recovered from the Moors.

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  • He accompanied the primate to Rome in 1143, and also to the council of Reims (1148),(1148), which Theobald attended in defiance of a prohibition from the king.

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  • The motives of the earl's defiance were not altogether disinterested.

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  • His daily attacks on the Mountain resulted, on the 15th of April 1793, in a demand by the commune for his exclusion from the assembly, but, undaunted, when the Parisian populace invaded the Chamber on the 2nd of June, Lanjuinais renewed his defiance of the victorious party.

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  • In the Second Punic War it thrice bade defiance to Hannibal; but in the Social War it was betrayed into the hands of the Samnites, who kept possession till Marius, with whom they had sided, was defeated by Sulla, who in 80 B.C. subjected it with the rest of Samnium.

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  • Eighteen years later, in 1638, it was besieged by Sultan Murad IV., with an army of 300,000 men and, after an obstinate resistance, forced to surrender, when, in defiance of the terms of capitulation, most of the inhabitants were massacred.

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  • But Charles's insatiable lust for conquest, and his ineradicable suspicion of Denmark, induced him, on the 17th of July, without any reasonable cause, without a declaration of war, in defiance of all international equity, to endeavour to despatch an inconvenient neighbour.

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  • This union took place in defiance of a prohibition which had been promulgated, in 1049, by the papal council of Reims. But the affinity of William and Matilda was so remote that political rather than moral considerations may have determined the pope's action.

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  • would not have tolerated such a defiance of Catholic order for a moment.

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  • 2 3, 1457), the diet which assembled on the banks of the Rakos, in defiance of the magnates and all foreign competitors, unanimously and enthusiastically elected Matthias Hunyadi king of Hungary (Ja n.

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  • Although relegated to a note (vii.), and propounded "Avec la defiance que doit inspirer tout ce qui n'est point un resultat de l'observation ou du calcul," it is plain, from the complacency with which he recurred to it 3 at a later date, that he regarded the speculation with considerable interest.

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  • But the prospect of a settlement roused the Italian Nationalists to a final effort: the Nitti Cabinet fell, and D'Annunzio, repeating his defiance of Europe, attempted a further raid upon Dalmatia.

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  • President Castro was for eight years a dictator, ruling by corrupt and revolutionary methods, and in defiance of obligations to the foreign creditors.

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  • popular outbreak and more bloodshed; the conspirators were put to death and Hiero's family was murdered; whilst the Carthaginian faction, under the pretence of delivering the city from its tyrants, got the upper hand and drew the citizens into open defiance of Rome.

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  • The complaint against the English prince which Count John I., in defiance of the treaty of Bretigny, himself carried to Paris, was the principal cause of the resumption of hostilities of 1369, and of the incessant defeats sustained by the English until the accession of their king Henry V.

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  • Hecker, however, was not at all ready to listen to them; on the contrary, he added to violence an absurd defiance, and offered an amnesty to the German princes on condition of their retiring within fourteen days into private life.

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  • In 1690 he moved a famous amendment to the Corporation Bill, proposing the addition of a clause - the purport of which was misrepresented by Macaulay - for disqualifying for office for seven years municipal functionaries who in defiance of the majority of their colleagues had surrendered their charters to the Crown.

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  • resolved to wipe from the map of Europe an inconvenient rival, and without any warning, in defiance of all international equity, let loose his veterans upon Denmark a second time.

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  • To the last he maintained the narrow standpoint of Pusey and Keble, in defiance of all the developments of modern thought and modern scholarship; and his latter years were embittered by the consciousness that the younger generation of the disciples of his school were beginning to make friends of the Mammon of scientific unrighteousness.

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  • Beyond these ranges the country is further diversified by isolated hills rising abruptly from a common level, and presenting from their steep and nearly inaccessible scarps eligible sites for castles and strongholds, whence the mountaineers of Bundelkhand have frequently set at defiance the most powerful of the native states of India.

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  • First, the growth of the practice of " reservation " and " provision," by which the popes assumed the right to appoint their own nominees to vacant sees and other benefices, in defiance of the claims of the crown, the chapters and private patrons.

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  • The "Wollner edict" of July 9, 1788, for the enforcement of Lutheran orthodoxy, and Teller's manly action, as member of the consistorial council, in defiance of it (cf.

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  • Again, popularly, an unproved ex cathedra statement of any kind is called " dogmatic," with perhaps an insinuation that it is being obstinately adhered to without, or beyond, or in defiance of, obtainable evidence.

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  • In 1517 the Portuguese effected a settlement, and in 1520 they fortified their port and bade defiance to the native besiegers.

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  • In the Legislative Assembly the Girondists represented the principle of democratic revolution within and of patriotic defiance to the European powers without.

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  • The reform movement had originally no connexion with ecclesiastical politics; but that came later when the leaders turned their attention to the abuses prevalent among the clergy, to the conditions obtaining in the Church in defiance of the ecclesiastical law.

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  • His reactionary conservative temper was in complete harmony with the views of Bismarck and the emperor William, and with their powerful support he attempted, in defiance of modern democratic principles and even of the spirit of the constitution, to re-establish the old Prussian system of rigid discipline from above.

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  • The states of Holland, on the other hand, were determined to thwart any attempts for a renewal of war, and insisted, in defiance of the authority of the captaingeneral supported by the states-general, in virtue of their claim to be a sovereign province, in disbanding a large part of the regiments in their pay.

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  • It speaks of their defiance of their own constitution, expressly revived by Paul V., forbidding them to meddle in politics; of the great ruin to souls caused by their quarrels with local ordinaries and the other religious orders, their condescension to heathen usages in the East, and the disturbances, resulting in persecutions of the Church, which they had stirred up even in Catholic countries, so that several popes had been obliged to punish them.

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  • In 1910 the city had seven public parks (1120 acres), including Point Defiance, a thickly wooded park (about 640 acres), and, in the centre of the city, Wright Park, in which is the Seymour Conservatory.

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  • It is, however, part of the personal history of Abd-ar-rahman that when in 763 he was compelled to fight at the very gate of his capital with rebels acting on' behalf of the Abbasids, and had won a signal victory, he cut off the heads of the leaders, filled them with salt and camphor and sent them as a defiance to the eastern caliph.

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  • unnatural, seeing his defiance of the ordinary habits and standards of the world.

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  • He returned on the eve of the abolition of the Shogunate, and followed Enomoto (q.v.) when the latter, sailing with the Tokugawa fleet to Yezo, attempted to establish a republic there in defiance of the newly organized government of the emperor.

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  • Round the town lies a cluster of suburban villages, Polish Folwark, Russian Folwark, Zinkovtsui, Karvasarui, &c.; and on the opposite side of the river, accessible by a wooden bridge, stands the castle which long frowned defiance across the Dniester to Khotin in Bessarabia.

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  • (1700-1721), who espoused the losing Habsburg side in the War of the Spanish Succession, saw his nuncio excluded from the negotiations leading to the Peace of Utrecht, while the lay signatories disposed of Sicily in defiance of his alleged overlordship. Similarly Clement (1730-1740) looked on impotently when the sudden Bourbon conquest of Naples in the War of the Polish Succession set at nought his claims to feudal sovereignty, and established Tannucci as minister of justice, a position in which for forty-three years he regulated the relations of church and state after a method most repugnant to Rome.

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  • was not merely one of defiance towards supposed hostile forces within and without the Church; it was also strenuous in pushing on the R work of internal organization and reform.

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  • Here, on the 3rd of August 1795, General Wayne, the year after his victory over the Indians at Fallen Timbers, concluded with them the treaty of Greenville, the Indians agreeing to a cessation of hostilities and ceding to the United States a considerable portion of Ohio and a number of small tracts in Indiana, Illinois and Michigan (including the sites of Sandusky, Toledo, Defiance, Fort Wayne, Detroit, Mackinac, Peoria and Chicago), and the United States agreeing to pay to the Indians $20,000 worth of goods immediately and an annuity of goods, valued at $9500, for ever.

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  • It was in defiance of this right that Alva refused the claim of Counts Egmont and Horn to be tried by the knights of the Fleece in 1568.

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  • and his wife Mary of Lorraine, was born in December 1542, a few days before the death of her father, heart-broken by the disgrace of his arms at Solway Moss, where the disaffected nobles had declined to encounter an enemy of inferior force in the cause of a king whose systematic policy had been directed against the privileges of their order, and whose representative on the occasion was an unpopular favourite appointed general in defiance of their ill-will.

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  • The next or the twin-born impulse of her indomitable nature was, as usual in all times of danger, one of passionate and high-spirited defiance on discovering the seizure of her papers.

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  • The leading British ship, the "Defiance" (74), carrying the flag of Rear-Admiral Graves, anchored just south of the Trekroner.

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  • Although the institution of the popular courts by Solon had within it the germ of democratic supremacy, it is clear that the immediate result was small; thus, in the next decade anarchia was continuous and Damasias held the archonship for more than two years in defiance of the new constitution; the prolonged dissension in this matter shows that the office of archon still retained its supreme importance.

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  • When this occurs, every member of each troop. sounds a bold roar of defiance at the opposite parties; and when one roars, all roar together, and each seems to vie with his comrades in the intensity and power of his voice.

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  • And yet he, who was generally the haughtiest and most irritable of mankind, who was but too prompt to resent anything which looked like a slight on the part of a purse-proud bookseller, or of a noble and powerful patron, bore patiently from mendicants, who, but for his bounty, must have gone to the workhouse, insults more provoking than those for which he had knocked down Osborne and bidden defiance to Chesterfield.

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  • By way of political defiance the Democrats of Ohio nominated Vallandigham for governor on the 11th of June.

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  • Vallandigham had returned to his home in defiance of his banishment beyond military lines, and was leniently suffered to remain.

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  • Having secured his coronation at Rome in October 1209, Otto repudiated the many pledges he had made to Innocent and began to act in defiance of the papal wishes.

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  • He regretted the necessity for flouting public opinion, which he would have preferred to carry with him; in due course he would make his peace with Liberal sentiment, when success should have justified his defiance of it.

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  • This sufficed to provoke the defiance of the Danes, and on the 1st of February 1864 the Austrian and D h Prussian troops crossed the Eider.

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  • On the 21st of Ajril, the very day when the discussion of the Prussian proposals began in the diet, Austria, alarmed at a threatened attack by Garibaldi on Venetia, began to mobilize in defiance of an agreement just arrived at with Prussia.

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  • The proclamation of the new Joseph, emperor was a gage of defiance thrown down to Magyars 1848.

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  • The announcement of his determination caused the Opposition to rally against him, and when on the 18th of November the Liberal party adopted a " guillotine " motion by a show of hands in defiance of orthodox procedure, a section of the party seceded.

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  • In defiance of promises to the British government, orders were transmitted from Constantinople to Husain Pasha, the Turkish high admiral, to ensnare and put to death the principal beys.

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  • He cast out the spirit of negation, and henceforth the temper of his misery was changed to one, not of " whining," but of " indignation and grim fire-eyed defiance."

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  • In defiance of her commercial interests and of her popularity with the Moslem population of the Gulf, Great Britain set herself to suppress the trade, and executed a series of agreements with the chiefs of the Arabian littoral with this object.

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  • Again poetic justice is effected on the unfortunate hero who has chosen his own personal advancement in preference to his duty to the woman he loves; more pointedly than in Gotz is the moral enforced by Clavigo's worldly friend Carlos, that the ground of Clavigo's tragic end lies not so much in the defiance of a moral law as in the hero's vacillation and want of character.

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  • But Egmont depends for its interest almost solely on two characters, Egmont himself and Klarchen, Gretchen's counterpart; regarded as a drama, it demonstrates the futility of that defiance of convention and rules with which the Sturm and Drang set out.

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  • But now a commander had put an end to his defiance and had even returned his reproach unto him (Dan.

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  • In defiance of the law a gymnasium was set up under the shadow of the citadel.

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  • Few names or events stand out in the history of this period: perhaps the most interesting personality is that of the Druse prince Fakhr ud-Din (1595-1634), whose expulsion of the Arabs from the coast as far south as Acre and establishment of his own kingdom, in defiance of Ottoman authority - to say nothing of his dilettante cultivation of art, the result of a temporary sojourn in Italy - make him worth a passing notice.

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  • Unable to induce Burr to avow Federalist principles, influential Federalists, in defiance of the constitution, contemplated the desperate alternafive of preventing an election, and appointing an extra-constitutional (Federalist) president pro tern pore.

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  • However that may be, he soon repudiated this Danish princess, for whom he seems to have conceived an unconquerable aversion on the very morrow of his marriage to her, and in 1196, in defiance of the pope, who had refused to nullify his union with Ingeborg, married Agnes daughter of Bertold IV., duke of Meran.

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  • Wholesale and retail trade flourished all along the coast in defiance of prohibitory laws.

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  • Voices urged him to come to terms with Mehemet Ali, secure peace in Islam, and turn a united face of defiance against Europe; and for a while he harboured the idea.

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  • Thiers still maintained his warlike tone, and the king's speech prepared by him for the opening of the Chambers on the 28th of October was in effect a declaration of defiance to Europe.

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  • In 1899 it was found necessary to expel him, since his acts of aggression and defiance were no longer endurable.

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  • The polity of the new community, often founded in defiance of the home authorities, might either be a copy of that just left behind or be its direct political antithesis.

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  • Having been strongly fortified by Charles V., the city was in 1525 able to bid defiance to Francis I., who was so disastrously beaten in the vicinity, but two years later the French under Lautrec subjected it to a sack of seven days.

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  • The dragon hears Beowulf's shout of defiance, and rushes forth, breathing flames.

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  • When the Burgesses undertook in May 1769 to declare in vigorous resolutions that the right and power of taxation, direct and indirect, rested with the local assembly, the governor hastily dissolved them, but only to find the same men assembling in the Raleigh tavern in Williamsburg and issuing forth their resolutions in defiance of executive authority.

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  • With a few followers he escaped to Ireland, where his position as lordlieutenant was confirmed by an Irish parliament, and he ruled in full defiance of the English government.

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  • But the Slavophil movement, with its motto, " one law, one church, one tongue," acquired great influence in official circles, and its aim was, in defiance of the pledges of successive tsars, to subject Finland to Orthodoxy and autocracy.

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  • in Switzerland, in defiance of international right, taken to: Paris and on the 22nd of June tortured to death on a trumped-up charge of rape.

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  • His reign was marked by a troublesome war with the Paulician heretics, an inheritance from his predecessor; the death of their able chief Chrysochir led to the definite subjection of this little state, of which the chief stronghold was Tephrice on the upper Euphrates, and which the Saracens had helped to bid a long defiance to the government of Constantinople.

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  • These hostages, when restored in 150, swelled the ranks of the proletariate opposition, whose leaders, to cover their maladministration at home, precipitated a war by attacking Sparta in defiance of Rome.

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  • After the conquest of Peru by the Spaniards in the 16th century the natives were subjected to much tyranny and oppression, though it must in fairness be said that much of it was carried out in defiance of the efforts and the wishes of the Spanish home government, whose legislative efforts to protect the Indians from serfdom and ill-usage met with scant respect at the hands of the distant settlers and mine-owners, who bid defiance to the humane and protective regulations of the council of the Indies, and treated the unhappy natives little better than beasts of burden.

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  • Thereupon, in defiance of the archbishop, the abbe Baradere gave him the viaticum, while the rite of extreme unction was administered by the abbe Guillon, an opponent of the civil constitution, without consulting the archbishop or the parish cure.

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  • It was not a religious movement; and though, as a defiance of the accepted theology, its character was mainly theological, the deistical crusade belongs, not to the history of the church, or of dogma, but to the history of general culture.

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  • He is constantly admitting that on such and such an occasion he was terribly afraid; he confesses without the least shame that, when one of his followers suggested defiance of the Saracens and voluntary death, he (Joinville) paid not the least attention to him; nor does he attempt to gloss in any way his refusal to accompany St Louis on his unlucky second crusade, or his invincible conviction that it was better to be in mortal sin than to have the leprosy, or his decided preference for wine as little watered as might be, or any other weakness.

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  • Inside these walls the Bijapur kings bade defiance to all comers.

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  • His rival Athanaric seems to have tried to maintain his party for a while north of the Danube in defiance of the Huns; but he had presently to follow the example of the great mass of the nation.

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  • The coast of Alaska offers exceptional facilities for smuggling, and liquor has always been very plentiful; juries have steadily refused to convict offenders, and treasury officials have regularly collected revenue from saloons existing in defiance of law.

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  • He maintained an attitude of defiance and of "Roman resolution," smiled scornfully at his questioners, making no secret of his intentions, replied to the king, who asked why he would kill him, that the pope had excommunicated him, that "dangerous diseases require a desperate remedy," adding fiercely to the Scottish courtiers who surrounded him that "one of his objects was to blow back the Scots into Scotland."

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  • From the Hungarian and Russian sources, which are somewhat more precise, the date of the arrival of Dragosh, who is confused with the historical Bogdan Voda (1349-1365), appears to have been 1349, and his departure from Marmaros was carried out in defiance of his Hungarian suzerain.

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  • In defiance of treaties, however, the Porte continued to change the hospodars almost yearly and to exact extraordinary installation presents.

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  • On arrival, they found that the Transvaal Volksraad, in a spirit of defiance and even levity, had just passed a resolution offering four new seats in the Volksraad to the mining districts, and fifteen to exclusively burgher districts.

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  • Abbots more and more assumed almost episcopal state, and in defiance of the prohibition of early councils and the protests of St Bernard and others, adopted the episcopal insignia of mitre, ring, gloves and sandals.

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  • After a "reform" political campaign, the ousting in 1887 of a corrupt police judge by the mayor and city council, in defiance of an injunction of a federal court, led to a decision of the U.S. Supreme Court, favourable to the city authorities and important in questions of American municipal government.

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  • When, in defiance of this mandate, he came home and announced his intention of impeaching Somerset.

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  • A riot at Edinburgh in 1637 quickly led to national resistance, and when in November 1638 the general assembly at Glasgow set Charless orders at defiance, he was compelled to choose between tame submission and immediate war.

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  • On the one hand, however, he alienated even reasonable opponents by offering no guarantees that equality so gained would not be converted into superiority by the aid of his own military force and of the assistance of the French king; whilst on the other hand he relied, even more strongly than his father had done, on the technical legality which exalted the prerogative in defiance of the spirit of the law.

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  • Still the claim to rule had, at least from the time of Henry III., been derived from hereditary descent, and the interruption, however frequently it might occur, had been regarded as something abnormal, only to be applied where there was an absolute necessity to prevent the wielder of executive authority from setting at defiance the determined purpose of the nation.

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  • Nor did he see that the passion for equality, like every great passion, justified itself, and that the problem was, not how to obtain liberty in defiance of it, but how so to guide it as to obtain liberty by it and through it.

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  • The view which Disraeli thus propounded in defiance of his previous opinions was confirmed by the electors on the dissolution of parliament.

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  • Marie Tudor (1833),(1833), his next play, was hardly more daring in its Shakespearean defiance of historic fact, and hardly more triumphant in its Shakespearean loyalty to the everlasting truth of human character and passion.

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  • (1754-1816), a prince whose model was Frederick the Great, took part in the war against France in defiance of the wishes of his people, and when the French again invaded and devastated the country he retired to Erlangen, where he remained until after the conclusion of the peace of Luneville in 1801.

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  • Flamsteed denounced the production as surreptitious; he committed to the flames three hundred copies, of which he obtained possession through the favour of Sir Robert Walpole; and, in defiance of bodily infirmities, vigorously prosecuted his designs for the entire and adequate publication of the materials he continued to accumulate.

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  • The unreflective moral consciousness never finds it difficult to distinguish between a man's power of willing and all the forces of circumstance, heredity and the like, which combine to form the temptations to which he may yield or bid defiance; and such facts as " remorse " and " penitence " are a continual testimony to man's sense of freedom.

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  • Not twenty years after Luther's defiance of the pope, the startling thesis " that all that Aristotle taught was false " was prosperously maintained by the youthful Ramus before the university of Paris; and almost contemporaneously the group of remarkable thinkers in Italy who heralded the dawn of modern physical science - Cardanus, Telesio, Patrizzi, Campanella, Bruno - began to propound their Aristotelian theories of the constitution of the physical universe.

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  • The war began, like every feudal war of that day, with a solemn defiance, and it was soon characterized by terrible disasters.

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  • The accusation against him was that he had written in contravention of the decree of 1616, and in defiance of the command of the Holy Office communicated to him by Cardinal Bellarmin; and his defence consisted mainly in a disavowal of his opinions, and an appeal to his good intentions.

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  • The attitude of the Church was practically one of defiance.

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  • In defiance of a recent ordinance prohibiting provincial assemblies, he presided over the estates of Picardy and Artois, and then over those of Champagne.

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  • He incurred the wrath of that king, who, angered at some act of defiance, ordered the massacre of every Fula in his dominions.

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  • Some express defiance, others stoic acceptance of their fate.

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  • Like many Radicals, the leaders of the disturbances which broke out into open defiance and violence against authority, were probably well-intentioned men.

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  • She sets at defiance all ' military, ' all ' yeomanry cavalry.

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  • Defiance can also be a direct result of their feelings about divorce.

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  • Young children are easily frustrated and respond to internal and external conflicts with angry outbursts, defiance, or withdrawal.

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  • The warning signs at first might mimic normal adolescent angst like irritability, moodiness and defiance.

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  • Usually these tattoos were from a set of stereotypical symbols- courage, patriotism, and defiance of death-later referred to as "flash."

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  • Typically, leather jackets are associated with a cool, devil-may-care attitude - a bit of swagger and defiance don't hurt, either.

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  • It is when these acts increase, impulses cannot be controlled, or authority defiance becomes troublesome, that parents may need to seek professional help.

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  • Again poetic justice is effected on the unfortunate hero who has chosen his own personal advancement in preference to his duty to the woman he loves; more pointedly than in Gotz is the moral enforced by Clavigo's worldly friend Carlos, that the ground of Clavigo's tragic end lies not so much in the defiance of a moral law as in the hero's vacillation and want of character.

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  • Antisocial behaviors exist along a severity continuum and include repeated violations of social rules, defiance of authority and of the rights of others, deceitfulness, theft, and reckless disregard for self and others.

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  • Delinquent-A term applied to young people who behave in a manner in defiance of established social and ethical codes.

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  • They also are indicative of a psychology of self-mutilation, defiance, independence, and belonging, as for example in prison or gang cultures.

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  • Parent management training focuses on teaching parents specific and more effective techniques for handling the child's opposition and defiance.

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  • Unless Oscar is turning a cheek to the defiance of Hollywood logic, movie fanatics should expect to at least see a nomination because this film takes the effects of the show to a well-polished new level.

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