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deer

deer

deer Sentence Examples

  • It was likely a deer trail.

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  • A deer watched them from the trees.

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  • I'll see if I can find a deer next time.

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  • The area he was watching was where she often saw deer in the early morning hours.

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  • Three species of deer are common.

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  • Leave the deer alone.

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  • By the time they reached the spot, the deer had vanished in the trees.

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  • I learned how the sun and the rain make to grow out of the ground every tree that is pleasant to the sight and good for food, how birds build their nests and live and thrive from land to land, how the squirrel, the deer, the lion and every other creature finds food and shelter.

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  • Even deer have killed people.

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  • Did you tell him about the deer yet?

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  • When she recognized the deer hock in her hand, she dropped it.

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  • That cat probably won't bother the adults as long as there are deer around, but it might go after the calf.

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  • Maybe the deer had died of natural causes.

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  • When she recognized the deer hock in her hand, she dropped it.

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  • He catches deer, drains them of blood, skins them, and I cook 'em up for dinner.

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  • The men gathered at the spot where she and Josh had seen the deer carcass and appeared to be discussing something.

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  • Leave the deer alone!

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  • The route Alex chose meandered through the gorge and then up a steep deer trail to the top of the mountain.

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  • Brush crackled near the edge of the forest and then a deer leaped into the open.

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  • It was a deer – or what was left of one, anyway.

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  • It's been a while since I had a good deer roast.

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  • The true home of this deer has never been ascertained, and probably never will be; all the few known specimens now living being kept in confinement - the great majority in the duke of Bedford's park at Woburn, Bedfordshire.

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  • There was a note affixed to the deer head, and she suspected it said the same thing as the other notes on animal heads she'd found around the house.

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  • I think the deer just died and animals were eating on it.

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  • There was a note affixed to the deer head, and she suspected it said the same thing as the other notes on animal heads she'd found around the house.

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  • Fortunately there had been no sign of slain deer or wild dogs.

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  • It was mostly used by deer, but she had been up it a number of times with her father.

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  • We passed close to the park and saw two deer... and what a splendid house!

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  • Dan ran ahead of them, Elise behind, and they flew down a deer path to a creek, then darted across rocks to the other bank.

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  • You figured Brutus killed the deer and you figured he'd shoot him.

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  • Multiple dirt deer trails moved away.

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  • The forest regions of Cochin-China harbour the tiger, panther, leopard, tiger-cat, ichneumon, wild boar, deer, buffalo, rhinoceros and elephant, as well as many varieties of monkeys and rats.

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  • In the mud was a deer track, and overlaying it, the paw print of a big cat — too big to be a bobcat.

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  • Five bonfires had sprung up, each one with a massive spit turning a large deer in its center.

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  • He went back to the deer trail and jogged through the forest to keep his body warm, making it to the castle in an hour.

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  • Anyway, you don't think he's killing deer or you'd do something about it yourself.

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  • Brady pushed her from his mind, focusing on the deer path leading away from the condo community into the forest.

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  • Surely if wild dogs had attacked the deer, they would have left tracks.

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  • It couldn't be deer season, so that meant the dog was chasing the deer for pleasure - or worse.

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  • The last time I saw the deer up here, I found a track big enough to belong to Brutus – only it didn't look like his tracks.

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  • The deer paused only a second when it saw her, and then bounded across the clearing, its white tail held erect.

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  • Megan reached inside the door and grabbed the broom as the deer disappeared into the forest again.

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  • Megan reached inside the door and grabbed the broom as the deer disappeared into the forest again.

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  • So far, deer and rabbits are easier for a few wolves to pull down than a healthy cow, but if the pack gets too big they may go after cattle.

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  • As she walked across the field, a deer came bounding out of the forest on the hill.

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  • As she walked across the field, a deer came bounding out of the forest on the hill.

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  • She pointed at the deer carcass.

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  • A little further ahead, they glimpsed a white flash of tail as a deer bounded crossed the trail no more than fifty feet ahead of them.

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  • One man still preserves the horns of the last deer that was killed in this vicinity, and another has told me the particulars of the hunt in which his uncle was engaged.

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  • In addition to the native deer, the Elk or buffalo could have eaten the grain.

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  • He didn't usually bark at the deer and Alex wouldn't like it if he started chasing them now.

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  • He didn't usually bark at the deer and Alex wouldn't like it if he started chasing them now.

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  • Deer are the mountain lion's natural prey.

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  • A gland and tuft are present on the skin of the outer side of the upper part of the hind cannon-bone; but, unlike American deer, there is no gland on the inner side of the hock.

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  • "Four deer paths," Brady said.

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  • I saw something move in the forest near the deer carcass.

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  • White tailed deer, as well as an abundance of smaller wildlife already frequented the ranch, so his North American Safari had its foundation.

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  • Why would he say he found the deer when you did?

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  • Why would he say he found the deer when you did?

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  • She got a large garbage bag out of the house and went back up to the deer carcass.

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  • He brought me a deer hock.

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  • She knows that her father shoots partridges and deer and other game.

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  • Damian turned in time to see the vamp Charlie struggling to drag a skinned deer carcass across the threshold.

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  • With our speed, we should be able to run down deer.

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  • With one misstep he knew she would run like a frightened deer.

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  • Kelli greeted one of the men with a kiss and a quick hug before going to the woman cutting chunks of meat off the deer.

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  • He stalked off into the forest, away from the castle and cliff.  Toby clambered through the brush and trees after him, the angel's footsteps loud where Rhyn's were silent.  Rhyn found a deer path and followed it until he reached a snowy meadow.  Crossing it, he continued to look for a place to stash the angel where the kid wouldn't freeze to death.  After another hour of walking, he found a small pocket in the roots of a massive tree.

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  • Her second thought was a deer.

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  • It looked like a deer.

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  • What would Alex do if he found out Brutus was killing deer?

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  • So you think Brutus is killing deer?

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  • What if Brutus is killing deer?

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  • Why would he suddenly start killing deer?

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  • So what did kill the deer?

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  • Actually, she only intended to ride along the forest line and see if there was any sign of deer.

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  • Crossing the creek and field to her house, she studied the hillside beyond for any sign of a deer.

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  • I'm afraid Brutus might be killing deer.

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  • He followed her and studied the deer.

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  • I thought maybe it was a deer.

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  • A few days before we were married, I found the remains of a deer.

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  • I thought Brutus might be killing deer.

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  • The fact was, she wasn't sure how he would react if he discovered Brutus was killing deer.

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  • They're like blind deer.

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  • 5 a curves somewhat forward and again divides at least once; while the hind prong is of great length undivided, and directed backwards in a manner found in no other deer.

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  • The chestnut covers considerable areas in Prigord, Limousin and Beam; resinotis trees (firs, pines, larches, &c.) form fine forests in the Vosges and The indigenous fauna include the bear, now very rare but still found in the Alps and Pyrenees, the wolf, harbouring chiefly in the Cvennes and Vosges, but in continually decreasing areas; the fox, marten, badger, weasel, otter, the beaver in the extreme south of the Rhne valley, and in the Alps the marmot; the red deer and roe deer are preserved in many of the forests, and the wild boar is found in several districts; the chamois and wild goat survive in the Pyrenees and Alps.

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  • The Asiatic elephant; the seladang, a bison of a larger type than the Indian gaur; two varieties of rhinoceros; the honey bear (bruang), the tapir, the sambhur (rusa); the speckled deer (kijang), three varieties of mouse-deer (napoh, plandok and kanchil); the gibbon (ungka or wawa'), the siamang, another species of anthropoid ape, the brok or coco-nut monkey, so called because it is trained by the Malays to gather the nuts from the coco-nut trees, the lotong, kra, and at least twenty other kinds of monkey; the binturong (arctictis binturong), the lemur; the Asiatic tiger, the black panther, the leopard, the large wild cat (harimau akar), several varieties of jungle cat; the wild boar, the wild dog; the flying squirrel,.

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  • The most common wild animals are deer, rabbits, squirrels, raccoons, skunks, woodchucks and muskrats.

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  • The valley between Incisa and Arezzo contains accumulations of fossil bones of the deer, elephant, rhinoceros, mastodon, hippopotamus, bear, tiger, and more.

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  • The tapir, fox, deer, wild cat, wild dog, carpincho or water hog and a few small rodents nearly complete the list of quadrupeds.

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  • It contains 30 islands, the largest of which is Inchmurrin, a deer park belonging to the duke of Montrose.

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  • Large animals, such as the black and the grizzly bear, and deer are found on the slopes of the Sierra Mountains, and antelope, deer and elk visit the northernmost valleys in the winter.

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  • Among the more common species of game are squirrels, opossums, musk-rats, rabbits, racoons, wild turkeys, ", partridges" (quail, or Bob White), geese, and ducks; deer, black bears, grey (or timber) wolves, black wolves and "wild cats" (lynx), once common, have become rare.

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  • The great order of Ungulata is represented by various forms of sheep, as many as ten or twelve wild species of Ovis being met with in the mountain chains of Asia; and more sparingly by several peculiar forms of antelope, such as the saiga (Saiga tatarica), and the Gazella gutturosa, or yellow sheep. Coming to the deer, we also meet with characteristic forms in northern Asia, especially those belonging to the typical genus Cervus.

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  • The musk deer (Moschus) is also quite restricted to northern Asia, and is one of its most peculiar types.

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  • Deer are likewise numerous, and the peculiar group of chevrotains (Tragulus) is characteristic of the Indian region.

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  • Deer do not extend into New Guinea, in which island the genus Sus appears to have its eastern limit.

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  • Many visitors are attracted by the fishing (especially for tarpon) and shooting in the vicinity, water-fowl being plentiful in the Bay, and deer, quail and wild turkeys being found in the vicinity inland.

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  • Of interest for sportsmen, as well as serving as prey for the carnivores, are red deer, goats (Capra pallasit and C. aegagrus), chamois, roebuck, moufflon (Ovis musimon), argali or Asiatic wild sheep (0.

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  • gmelini, and fallow deer (Capreolus pigargus) in northern Caucasus only.

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  • Bears, wolves, bison, deer, wild turkeys and wild pigeons were common in the primeval forests of Ohio, but they long ago disappeared.

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  • The wild animals found in the district comprise a few tigers, leopards and wild elephants, deer, wild pig, porcupines, jackals, foxes, hares, otters, &c. The green monkey is very common; porpoises abound in the large rivers.

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  • The first class includes the isabelline bear, badger, pole-cat, ermine, roe and fallow deer, wild ass, Syrian squirrel, pouched marmoset, gerbill and leopard.

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  • The Formosan fauna has been but partially ascertained; but at least three kinds of deer, wild boars, bears, goats, monkeys (probably Macacus speciosus), squirrels, and flying squirrels are fairly common, and panthers and wild cats are not unfrequent.

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  • Cattle and horses are bred and wild deer are still found.

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  • It has been used both for deer stalking and for coursing, and several varieties exist.

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  • The German boarhound is one of the largest races of dogs, originally used in Germany and Denmark for hunting boars or deer, but now employed chiefly as watchdogs.

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  • many small streams unite to form the Red Deer river, which flowing south-eastward joins the South Saskatchewan near W.

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  • The moose and red deer are found in the wooded regions, and the jumping deer and antelope on the prairies.

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  • r Z 1 / ?/.11 ' V o 1 J deer C ?

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  • Black bears, wolves and deer are not yet extinct, and more rarely a " wild cat " (lynx) or " panther " (puma) is seen in the swamps.

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  • Horses, asses, cows, deer, sheep, goats, swine, cats and dogs were introduced by the early Spaniards.

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  • Deer are not native, and are very rare; a few live in the swamps.

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  • The rapid settling of the state drove its native fauna, which comprised buffalo, deer, moose, bear, lynx and wolves, in great numbers into the northern sections, westward into Dakota, or across the Canadian border.

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  • Deer and moose are still found in the state.

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  • This piece, called in Irish the Faed Fiada or "Cry of the Deer," contains a number of remarkable grammatical forms, and the latest editors are of opinion that it may very well be genuine.

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  • Gold was first discovered within what is now Nevada City, on Deer Creek, in the summer of 1848, by James W.

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  • Squirrels, bears, foxes, arctic foxes, antelopes and especially deer in spring are the principal objects of the chase.

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  • The largest of these is the marsh deer (C. paludosus), which in size resembles its European congeners.

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  • Among the rodents there are hares, marmots, beavers, squirrels, rats and mice, the last in enormous swarms. Of the larger game the chamois and deer are specially noticeable.

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  • The more important wild animals are a large wild sheep (Ovis poli), foxes, wolves, jackals, bears, boars, deer and leopards; amongst birds, there are partridges, pheasants, ravens, jays, sparrows, larks, a famous breed of hawks, &c.

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  • There are also 2 species of deer, Cervus rufus and C. simplicornis.

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  • St James's Park was transformed from marshy land into a deer park, bowling green and tennis court by Henry VIII., extended and laid out as a pleasure garden by Charles II., and rearranged according to the designs of John Nash in 1827-1829.

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  • Even the vast forest of Middlesex, with its densely wooded thickets, its coverts of game, stags, fallow deer, boars and wild bulls is pressed into the description to give a contrast which shall enhance the beauty of the city itself.

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  • These tiny animals, commonly known as mousedeer, are in no wise nearly related to the true deer, but constitute by themselves a special section of artiodactyle ungulates known as Tragulina, for the characteristics of which see ARTIODACTYLA.

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  • A frieze of lions devouring ibexes and deer, and incised with great artistic skill, runs round the neck, while the eagle crest of Lagash adorns the globular part.

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  • In geographical distribution the Bovidae present a remarkable contrast to the deer tribe, or Cervidae.

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  • ==Fauna== The wild animals of Arabia are all of the desert-loving type: antelopes and gazelles are found in small numbers throughout the peninsula; the latter are similar to the chikara or ravine deer of India.

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  • The forested regions shelter the handsome Barbary red deer, which is peculiar to this region and the adjoining districts of Algeria.

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  • There are deer, called taruco (Cervus antisensis); the viscacha, a large rodent; a species of fox called atoc; and the puma (Felts concolor) and ucumari or black bear with a white muzzle, when driven by hunger, wander into the loftier regions.

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  • The liver-fluke (Distomum hepaticum) unlike most Trematodes flourishes in a wide range of hosts and infects man, horse, deer, oxen, sheep, pig, rabbit and kangaroo.

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  • This is one of the few deer in which there are glands neither on the hock nor on the skin covering the cannon-bone.

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  • These glands probably enable deer to ascertain the whereabouts of their fellows by the scent they leave on the ground and herbage.

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  • Sosens monkeys and badgers constitute the one possible exception, but the horses, oxen, deer, tigers, dogs, bears, foxes and even cats of the best Japanese artists were ill drawn and badly modelled.

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  • Of game, deer, wild boars, hares, snipe and partridges are fairly abundant, while the mountain streams yield trout of excellent quality.

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  • ROE-BUCK, the smallest of the British deer (a full-grown buck standing not more than 27 in.

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  • These deer take readily to the water, and they have been known to swim across lochs more than half a mile in breadth.

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  • Pigs and a hardy breed of ponies find a good living in the forest; and in spite of an act in 1851 providing for their extermination or removal, a few red deer still survive.

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  • The Deer Removal Act (1851) resulted in the almost total extinction of the forest deer.

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  • Leopards abound in the Hah valley; deer everywhere, some of them of a very large species.

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  • The musk deer is found in the snows, and the barking deer on every hill side.

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  • FALLOW-DEER (that is, DUN Deer, in contradistinction to the red deer, Cervus [Dama] dama), a medium-sized representative of the family Cervidae, characterized by its expanded or palmated antlers, which generally have no bez-tine, rather long tail (black above and white below), and a coat spotted with white in summer but uniformly coloured in winter.

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  • These deer are particularly fond of horsechestnuts, which the stags are said to endeavour to procure by striking at the branches with their antlers.

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  • Here may be mentioned the gigantic fossil deer commonly known as the Irish elk, which is perhaps a giant type of fallow-deer, and if so should be known as Cervus (Dama) giganteus.

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  • This deer inhabited Ireland, Great Britain, central and northern Europe, and western Asia in Pleistocene and prehistoric times; and must have stood 6 ft.

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  • Seven-tenths of a cubic metre of animal bones were found: deer, bear, wolf, raccoon, opossum, beaver, buffalo, elk, turkey, woodchuck, tortoise and hog; all contemporary with man's occupancy.

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  • B, Red deer (Cervus elaphus), R, Radius.

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  • The group at the present day is divided into Girafjidae (giraffe and okapi), Cervidae (deer), Antilocapridae (prongbuck), and Bovidae (oxen, sheep, goats, antelopes, &c.).

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  • The woods are well stocked with red and roe deer, wild boar, hares, rabbits, pheasants, woodcock and snipe.

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  • Originally great herds of bison roamed over the Texas plains, and deer, bears and wolves were numerous, especially in the forests.

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  • The bison and elk long ago disappeared, but black bear and deer are found in the unsettled part of the state.

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  • Subsequently the appearance in its vicinity of a white deer carrying a flower in its mouth was deemed so favourable an omen as to more than justify the change of its name to Luh or Deer city.

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  • excepting an occasional black bear or deer.

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  • Large tracts are still uncultivated; and the wild red deer and native Exmoor pony are characteristic of the district.

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  • (2) That there existed more than one self or soul or shade in any one of these personalities, and these shades had the power not only to go away, but to transform their bodily tenements at will; a bird, by raising its head, could become a man; the latter, by going on all fours, could become a deer.

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  • S.E., surrounded by its deer park, crossed from N.

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  • The true waterbuck (C. ellipsiprymnus), and the defassa or sing-sing (C. defassa), are the two largest species, equal in size to red deer, and grey or reddish in colour.

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  • Bears, leopards and musk deer are found on the higher mountains, deer on the lower ranges, and a few elephants and tigers on the slopes nearest to the plains.

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  • In the lowlands, tigers, rhinoceroses, deer and wild hogs are abundant.

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  • There are many deer in the Adirondacks.

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  • The native wild ducks are carefully preserved for sportsmen, in whose interests pheasants, red and fallow deer, and brown and rainbow trout have been very successfully acclimatized.

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  • Whiteand black-tailed deer and black bear inhabit the densest forests.

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  • Tungsten is found as wolframite in Stevens county near Deer Trail and Bissell, in Okanogan county near Loomis, in Whatcom county near the international boundary, and (with some scheelite) at Silver Hill, near Spokane.

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  • The island is visited periodically by a few Samoyedes; they formerly considered it sacred, and some of their sacrificial piles, consisting of drift-wood, deer's horns and the skulls of bears and deer, have been observed by travellers.

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  • Black-tailed mule deer are still favourite game for sportsmen.

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  • These are a state prison at Deer Lodge, managed by contract; a reform school at Miles City, an industrial school at Butte, an orphans' home at Twin Bridges, the soldiers' home at Columbia Falls, a school for deaf and blind at Boulder, and an insane asylum at Warm Springs, managed by contract.

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  • Clowes; The Rough Riders (1899); Oliver Cromwell (1901); the following works on hunting and natural history, Hunting Trips of a Ranchman (1886), Ranch Life and Hunting Trail (1888), The Wilderness Hunter (1893), Big Game Hunting in the Rockies and on the Plains (1899; a republication of Hinting Trips of a Ranchman and The Wilderness Hunter), The Deer Family (1902), with other authors, and African Game Trails (1910); and the essays, American Ideals (2 vols., 1897) and The Strenuous Life (1900); and State Papers and Addresses (1905) and African and European Addresses (1910).

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  • Game is fairly abundant; hares and partridges are found in the plains to the north-west, capercailzie in the neighbourhood of Tharandt and Schwarzenberg, and deer in the forests near Dresden.

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  • Other parks are Lake Park, also on the lake shore, at North Point, where stands the waterworks pumping station with its tall tower; Riverside and Kilbourn Parks, east and west respectively of the upper Milwaukee river, in the northern part of the city, Washington Park on the west side, containing a menagerie and a herd of deer; Sherman Park on the west side, and Kosciusko, Humboldt and Mitchell Parks on the south side.

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  • The islands are highly cultivated; deer and other game abound, and trout are plentiful in the mountain streams. A majority of the inhabitants are Christians.

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  • Bears, mountain lions (pumas), wild cats (lynx) and wolves haunt the more remote fastnesses of the mountains; foxes abound; deer are found in many districts and moose in the north.

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  • - Before the advent of the white man, herds of bison roamed the prairies, but these have disappeared,' and, with the exception of deer and bears, large game is to be found only in the Bad Lands.

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  • In 1864 Sully defeated the Sioux at the battle of Takaakwta, or Deer Woods, on the Knife river, and a few days later he again encountered them, and after a desperate struggle of three days administered a crushing defeat; the warriors abandoned their provisions and escaped into the Bad Lands.

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  • The goat antelope is found, and several varieties of deer.

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  • The Ardennes are the holiday ground of the Belgian people, and much of this region is still unknown except to the few persons who by a happy chance have discovered its remoter and hitherto well-guarded charms. There is still an immense quantity of wild game to be found in the Ardennes, including red and roe deer, wild boar, &c. The shooting is preserved either by the few great landed proprietors left in the country, or by the communes, who let the right of shooting to individuals.

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  • mile was the forest of Soignies with great numbers of stags, red and roe deer, that were hunted on horseback even under the ramparts of the town.

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  • It feeds chiefly on fruit and roots, but kills sheep, goats, deer, ponies and cattle, and sometimes devours carrion.

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  • It contains many fine buildings, designed on the most modern lines, but its special feature is a series of spacious enlosures for large herds of bison and deer.

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  • At one time London was able to supply many Continental gardens with giraffes, and Dublin and Antwerp have had great successes with lions, whilst antelopes, sheep and cattle, deer and equine animals are always to be found breeding in one collection or another.

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  • - In primitive times deer, ducks, turkeys, fish and oysters were especially numerous, and wolves, squirrels and crows were a source of annoyance to the early settlers.

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  • Deer, black bears and wild cats (lynx) are still found in some uncultivated sections.

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  • The first white settlers found great numbers of buffaloes, deer, elks, geese, ducks, turkeys and partridges, also many bears, panthers, lynx, wolves, foxes, beavers, otters, minks, musk-rats, rabbits, squirrels, raccoons, woodchucks, opossums and A I .° Longitude West 89 Greenwich C E Fayette, ?

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  • Of the larger game there remain only a few deer, bears and lynx in the mountain districts, and the numbers of small game and fish have been greatly reduced.

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  • The work of the Kew Observatory, at the Old Deer Park, Richmond, has also been placed under the direction of the N.P.L.

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  • It preys upon almost any animal it can overcome, such as antelopes, deer, sheep, goats, monkeys, peafowl, and has a special liking for dogs.

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  • labiatus), skunk (Mephitis, Spilogale and Conepatus), marten, several species of opossum (including a pigmy species of the Tres Marias islands), sloth, two species of ant-bear (Myrmecophaga tetradactylus and Cyclothurus didactylus), armadillo (Dasypus novemcinctus), a small arboreal porcupine (Synetheres mexicanus), the kinkajou (Cercoleptes caudivolvulus), three species of deer - the white-tailed Cariacus toltecus, the little black-faced brocket, Coassus rufinus, which is also found in Brazil, and the Sonora deer (Odocoileus couesi) - the Mexican bighorn (Ovis mexicanus) of Chihuahua, at least two species of hare (Lepus calotis and L.

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  • section of the state was originally a favourite hunting-ground of the Indians, for here in abundance were the moose, caribou, deer, wolf, bear, lynx, otter, beaver, fox, sable, mink, musk-rat, porcupine, wood-chuck, ruffed grouse and pigeon.

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  • These were rapidly reduced in number by the white man, the wild pigeons are extinct, and the moose, caribou, bear, wolf, lynx and beaver have become rare, but, under the protection of laws enacted during the latter part of the 19th century, deer and ruffed grouse are again quite plentiful.

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  • When hunting antelope (prongbuck) and deer the coyotes spread out their pack into a wide circle, endeavouring to surround their game and keep it running inside their ring until exhausted.

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  • There are extensive deer forests in Lewis-withHarris, Skye, Mull and Jura.

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  • It is the home of the Columbia black-tail deer, western raccoon, Oregon spotted skunk, Douglas red squirrel, Townsends chipmunk, tailless sewellel (Haplodcn rufus), peculiar species of pocket gophers and voles, Pacific coast forms of the great-horned, spotted, screech and pigmy owls, sooty grouse, Oregon ruffed grouse, Stellers jay, chestnutbacked chickadee and Pacific winter wren.

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  • The Virginia deer still ranges from Maine to the Gulf states and from the Atlantic coast to the Rocky Mountains.

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  • Unless by its mineral resources, of which scarcely anything is known, the barren grounds can never support a white population and have little to tempt even the Indian or Eskimo, who visit it occasionally in summer to hunt the deer in their migrations.

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  • The larger animals of Canada are the musk ox and the caribou of the barren lands, both having their habitat in the far north; the caribou of the woods, found in all the provinces except in Price Edward Island; the moose, with an equally wide range in the wooded country; the Virginia deer, in one or other of its varietal forms, common to all the southern parts; the black-tailed deer or mule deer and allied forms, on the western edge of the plains and in British Columbia; the pronghorn antelope on the plains, and a small remnant of the once plentiful bison found in northern Alberta and Mackenzie, now called " wood buffalo."

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  • Both sexes are devoid of antler appendage; but in this the musk-deer agrees with one genus of true deer (Hydrelaphus), and as in the latter, the upper canine teeth of the males are long and sabre-like, projecting below the chin, with the ends turned somewhat backwards.

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  • The known fauna comprise boars, bears, deer, swans, geese, pheasants and quail.

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  • In America, where the more typical kinds are known as white-footed, or deer, mice, the cricetines absolutely swarm, and include a host of genera, the majority of which are North American, although others are peculiar to Central and South America.

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  • There is good shooting (doves, quail, wild turkey and deer) in the vicinity; there are fine golf links and there is a large ranch for breeding and training polo ponies.

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  • The woods and mountains harbour large quantities of game, such as red deer, roedeer, wild boars and hares.

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  • Under the protection of a game commission which was created in 1895, of some game preserves which have been established by this commission, and of various laws affecting wild animals and birds, the numbers of Virginia deer, black bear, rabbits, ruffed grouse, quail and wild turkeys have increased until in some of the wilder sections they are quite plentiful, while the numbers of weasels, minks, lynx and foxes have been diminished.

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  • Here are to be found yak, wild asses (kyang), several varieties of deer, musk deer and Tibetan antelope (Pantholops); also wild sheep (the bharal of the Himalaya), Ovis hodgsoni and possibly Ovis poli, together with wild goats, bears (in large numbers in the north-eastern districts), leopards, otter, wolves, wild cats, foxes, marmots, squirrels, monkeys and wild dogs.

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  • The town and lands belonged of old to the Abbey of Deer, built in the 13th century by William Comyn, earl of Buchan; but when the abbey was erected into a temporal lordship in the family of Keith the superiority of the town passed to the earl marischal, with whom it continued till the forfeiture of the earldom in 1716.

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  • While discussing noses, he says that those with thick bulbous ends belong to persons who are insensitive, swinish; sharp-tipped belong to the irascible, those easily provoked, like dogs; rounded, large, obtuse noses to the magnanimous, the lion-like; slender hooked noses to the eagle-like, the noble but grasping; round-tipped retrousse noses to the luxurious, like barndoor fowl; noses with a very slight notch at the root belong to the impudent, the crow-like; while snub noses belong to persons of luxurious habits, whom he compares to deer; open nostrils are signs of passion, &c.

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  • With birds and mammals, however, there is no doubt that complete albino individuals do occur; and among species which, like the jackdaw, certain deer and rabbits, are normally deeply pigmented.

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  • The few mammals, such as deer, civet, Digs, shrews and monkeys, as wellas the birds and insects, resemble ordinary Malayan forms.

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  • phologie permiss on und Biologic Wilhelm deer Pilz Engelmann.

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  • The policy of the government which protects game, both in the park and in the surrounding national forests, has induced elk, deer, antelope, mountain-sheep, bears, porcupines, coyotes, squirrels, gophers and woodchucks to take shelter here.

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  • The forests are well stocked with game, deer, chamois (in the Alps), wild boars, capercailzie, grouse, pheasants, &c. being plentiful.

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  • The common Malay deer is widely distributed, Cervus muntjac less so.

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  • Roebuck and deer are found in a wild state in Gelderland and Overysel, foxes are plentiful in the dry wooded regions on the borders of the country, and hares and rabbits in the dunes and other sandy stretches.

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  • Deer, Chinese and East Indian.-Small, light, pelted skins, the majority of which are used for mats.

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  • Near Klampenborg is the Dyrehave (Deer park) or Skoven (the forest), a beautiful forest of beeches.

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  • The wooded hills are well stocked with deer, and a stray wolf occasionally finds its way from the forests of the Ardennes into those of the Hunsriick.

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  • Caymans, water-hogs (capinchos), several kinds of deer (Cervus paludosus the largest), ounces, opossums, armadillos, vampires, the American ostrich, the ibis, the jabiru, various species popularly called partridges, the pato real or royal duck, the Palamedea cornuta, parrots and parakeets, are among the more notable forms. Insect life is peculiarly abundant; the red stump-like ant-hills are a feature in every landscape, and bees used to be kept in all the mission villages.

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  • Red deer, wild swine and various other game are found in the forests.

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  • They were not payable of the following, except by custom: things of the substance of the earth, such as coals, minerals, turf and the like; things ferae naturae, such as fish, deer and the like; things tame, such as fowls, hounds or fish kept for pleasure or curiosity; barren land, until it is converted into arable or meadow land, and has been so for seven years; forest land, if in the hands of the king or his lessee, unless disafforested; a park which is disparked; or glebe land in the hands of the parson or vicar, which was mutually exempted from payment by the one to the other, but not if in the hands of the vicar's lessee.

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  • Of game there are the roe, stag, boar and hare; the fallow deer and the wild rabbit are less common.

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  • The larger quadrupeds are all extinct; even the red deer, formerly so abundant that in a single hunt in Jutland in 1593 no less than 1600 head of deer were killed, is now only to be met with in preserves.

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  • pecus, cattle), a term employed - in a more restricted sense - in place of the older title Ruminantia, to designate the group of ruminating artiodactyle ungulates represented by oxen, sheep, goats, antelopes, deer, giraffes, &c. The leading characteristics of the Pecora are given in some detail in the article Artiodactyla; but it is necessary to allude to a few of these here.

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  • In the Asiatic muntjac deer we find a pair of skin-covered horns, or " pedicles," corresponding to the paired horns of the giraffe, although welded to the skull.

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  • - Head of Siamese Deer (Cervus schomburgkii), showing antlers.

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  • I), the sambar and the red deer, becomes very large and more or less branched.

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  • Gadow is of opinion that the antlers of the deer, the hornlike protuberances on the skull of the giraffe, and the true horns of the prongbuck and other hollow-horned ruminants (Bovidae) are all different stages of evolution from a single common type: the antlers of the deer being the most primitive, and the horns of the Bovidae the most specialized.

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  • From the fact that the bony horn-core of the hollow-horned ruminants first develops as a separate ossification, as do the horns of the giraffe, while the pedicle of the antlers of the deer grow direct from the frontal bone, it has been proposed to place the hollow-horned ruminants (inclusive of the prongbuck) and the giraffes in one group and the deer in another.

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  • This arrangement has the disadvantage of separating the deer from the giraffes, to which they are evidently nearly related; but Dr Gadow's work brings them more into line.

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  • Whether he is right in regarding the hollow-horned ruminants as derived from the primitive deer may, however, be a matter of opinion.

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  • - Skull of Chinese Water-Deer, Hydrelaphus inermis (adult male), a Deer without Antlers, but with largely developed upper canine teeth.

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  • Remains of deer more or less nearly allied to species inhabiting the same districts are found over the greater part of the present habitat of the family.

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  • It is noteworthy, however, that certain Pliocene European deer (Anoglochis) appear to be closely allied to the modern American deer (Mazama).

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  • As we descend in the geological series the deer have simpler antlers, as in the European Miocene Dicrocerus; while in the Oligocene Amphitragulus, Dremotherium and Palaeomeryx, constituting the family Palaeomerycidae, antlers were absent, and the crowns of the molars so low that the whole depth of the hollows between the crescentic columns is completely visible.

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  • From North America have been obtained remains of certain ruminants which seem in some degree intermediate between deer and the prongbuck.

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  • From the presence of these well-marked antlers the skeleton would at first sight be set down as that of a small and primitive deer, conforming in regard to the structure of these appendages to the American type of the group. Mr W.

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  • Matthew shows, however, that the skeleton of Merycodus, as the extinct ruminant is called, differs markedly from that of all deer.

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  • The most noteworthy point of distinction is in the skull, in which the facial portion is sharply bent down on the posterior basal axis in the fashion characteristic of the hollow-horned ruminants (oxen, antelopes, &c.), and the American prongbuck, instead of running more or less nearly parallel to the same, as in deer.

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  • In the absence of any trace of the lower extremities of the metacarpal and metatarsal bones of the lateral toes the skeleton differs from the American deer, and resembles those hollow-horned ruminants in which these toes persist.

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  • Either we must regard Merycodus as a deer which parallels the antelopes and the prongbuck in every detail of skeletal structure, or else, like the prongbuck, an antelope separated from the main stock at a date sufficiently early to have permitted the development of a distinct type of cranial appendages, namely, antlers in place of true horns.

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  • But American extinct types appear to indicate signs of intimate relationship between antelopes, prongbuck and deer, and it may be necessary eventually to amend the current classification.

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  • Whatever be the ultimate verdict, the association of antlers - and these, be it noticed, conforming almost exactly with the forked type characteristic of American deer - with an antilopine type of skull, skeleton and teeth in Merycodus is a most interesting and unexpected feature.

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  • Upon an artificial island in the lake traces of lake-dwellings were discovered in 1869, together with the bones of red deer, wild boar and Bos longifrons.

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  • Bears, foxes, otters and sables are numerous, as also the reindeer in the north, and the musk deer, hares, squirrels, rats and mice everywhere.

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  • Reindeer, or caribou, constitute the genus Rangifer, and are large clumsily built deer, inhabiting the sub-Arctic and Arctic regions of both hemispheres.

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  • The lateral metacarpal bones are represented only by their lower extremities; the importance of this feature being noticed in the article Deer.

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  • 2.4.1 Orchards and Forests 2.4.2 Deer Forests and Game, &c. 2.4.3 Fisheries

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  • After 1841, however, the population in several Highland shires-in which the clearance of crofters to make way for deer was one of the most strongly-felt grievances among the Celtic part of the people-in the islands, and in some of the southern counties, diminished.

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  • Deer forests in 1900 covered 2,287,297 acres, an increase of 575,405 acres since 1883.

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  • The red deer is peculiar to the Highlands, but the fallow deer is not uncommon in the hill country of the south-western Lowlands.

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  • They returned to glens desolate of men, deserted, first, by the voluntary emigrations of the clans, and later by forced emigrations in the interests of sheep farms and deer forests.

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  • 10, 3) to have killed no fewer than forty head of game (boar, wild ass, deer) in one day.

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  • In Roman literature allusions to the pleasures of the chase (wild ass, boar, hare, fallow deer being specially mentioned as favourite game) are not wanting (Virg.

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  • deer was found that went away to Lord Petre's seat in Essex; only five got to the end of this 70 m.

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  • The mode of hunting with the Devon and Somerset hounds is briefly this: the whereabouts of a warrantable stag is communicated to the master by that important functionary the harbourer; two couple of steady hounds called tufters are then thrown into cover, and, having singled out a warrantable deer, follow him until he is forced to make for the open, when the body of the pack are laid on.

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  • In other parts of England staghound packs are devoted to the capture of the carted deer, a business which is more or less of a parody on the genuine sport, but is popular for the reason that whereas with foxhounds men may have a blank day, they are practically sure of a gallop when a deer is taken out in a cart to be enlarged before the hounds are laid on.

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  • Complaints are often raised about the cruelty of what is called tame stag hunting, and it became a special subject of criticism that a pack should still be kept at the Royal kennels at Ascot (it was abolished in 1901) and hunted by the Master of the Buckhounds; but it is the constant endeavour of all masters and hunt servants to prevent the infliction of any injury on the deer.

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  • Swamp deer, pheasants, and occasionally tigers are found in it.

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  • Elephants are numerous, and tigers, leopards, bears, bison and various kinds of deer abound in the forests.

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  • A small deer and, in southern Ecuador, the llama (Auchenia) with its allied species, the alpaca, guanaco and vicuna, represent the ruminants.

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  • Many of the original wild animals, such as the bison, bear, beaver, deer and lynx, have disappeared; wolves, foxes and mink are rare; but rabbits, squirrels and raccoons are still common.

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  • The mountains are a haunt of red deer.

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  • Birds and deer feed upon the haws, which are used in the preparation of a fermented and highly intoxicating liquor.

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  • Owing to the restricted period allowed for hunting, deer and small game are abundant, and the brooks, rivers, ponds and lakes are well stocked with trout and black bass.

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  • dorcas perhaps; Cervus Wallichii, the Indian barasingha, and probably some other Indian deer, in the north-eastern mountains.

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  • His favourite food appears to be deer, antelope and wild hog.

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  • The four-horned antelope (Tetracerus quadricornis) and the gazelle (Gazelles bennetti), the chinkara or " ravine deer " of sportsmen, are also found in India.

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  • The king of the deer tribe is the sdmbhar or jarau (Cervus unicolor), erroneously called " elk " by sportsmen.

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  • Next in size is the swamp deer or bara-singha, signifying " twelve points " (C. duvauceli), which is common in Lower Bengal and Assam.

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  • The chital or spotted deer (C. axis) is generally admitted to be the most beautiful inhabitant of the Indian jungles.

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  • Other species include the hog deer (C. porcinus), the barking deer or muntjac (Cervulus muntjac), and the chevrotain or mouse deer (Tragulus meminna).

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  • The musk deer (Moschus moschiferus) is confined to Tibet.

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  • The beautiful axis deer of Sulu has apparently been brought there by man.

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  • Red or brown deer occur in Basilan, Mindanao, Leyte, Samar and the Calamianes Islands.

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  • Deer are absent in Palawan, Tawi Tawi, Tablas, Romblon, Sibuyan and Siquijor.

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  • The wood of the aspen is very light and soft, though tough; it is employed by coopers, chiefly for pails and herring-casks; it is also made into butchers' trays, pack-saddles, and various articles for which its lightness recommends it; sabots are also made of it in France, and in medieval days it was valued for arrows, especially for those used in target practice; the bark is used for tanning in northern countries; cattle and deer browse greedily on the young shoots and abundant suckers.

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  • There are deer (at least five species), boars, bears, antelopes, beavers, otters, badgers, tiger-cats, marten, an inferior sable, striped squirrels, &c. Among birds there are black eagles, peregrines (largely used in hawking), and, specially protected by law, turkey bustards, three varieties of pheasants, swans, geese, common and spectacled teal, mallards, mandarin ducks white and pink ibis, cranes, storks, egrets, herons, curlews, pigeons, doves, nightjars, common and blue magpies, rooks, crows, orioles, halcyon and blue kingfishers, jays, nut-hatches, redstarts, snipe, grey shrikes, hawks, kites, &c. But, pending further observations, it is not possible to say which of the smaller birds actually breed in Korea and which only make it a halting-place in their annual migrations.

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  • White-tailed deer and especially black-tails are found on the high Sierra; the mule deer, too, although its habitat is now mainly east of the range, on the plateau, is also met with.

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  • A few red deer still occur in the wilder hilly district.

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  • The white-tailed Virginia deer inhabits the bottom lands and the mule deer the more open country.

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  • Other animals, more or less common, are the black-tailed deer, the jackrabbit, the badger, the skunk, the beaver, the moose and the weasel.

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  • Three or four species of deer are common, including the mouse-deer, or plandok, an animal of remarkable grace and beauty, about the size of a hare but considerably less heavy.

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  • The wild animals include bear, boar, chamois, fallow red and roe deer, gazelle, hyena, ibex, jackal, leopard, lynx, moufflon, panther, wild sheep and wolf.

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  • In the crannog of Lagore, county Meath, there were about 150 cartloads of bones, chiefly of oxen, deer, sheep and swine, the refuse of the food of the occupants.

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  • The Virginia deer is common in the bottomlands; a few beaver still frequent the remoter streams; in the higher portions are still a few black bears and pumas, besides the lynx, the Virginia varying hare, the woodchuck, the red and the fox squirrel and flying squirrels.

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  • Its prey is said to consist largely of gazelles, small deer, hares and peafowl and other birds.

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  • The caracal is easily tamed, and in some parts of India is trained to capture the smaller antelopes and deer and such birds as the crane and pelican.

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  • Rarest of all is the magnificent mountain sheep. Game is protected zealously, i not successfully, by the state, and it was officially estimated in 1898 that there were then probably 7000 elk, as many mountain sheep, 25,000 antelope and roo,000 deer within its borders (by far the greatest part in Routt and Rio Blanco counties).

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  • A tract of forest jungle, called the tarai, stretches along the extreme north of the district, and teems with large game, such as tigers, bears, deer, wild pigs, &c. The river Sarda or Gogra forms the eastern boundary of the district and is the principal stream.

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  • Bison no longer roam the plains, and the elk has been driven out; but among the larger mammals still to be found in certain districts are the deer, prong-horn (in small numbers), puma, coyote, timber wolf, lynx (Lynx rufus and Lynx Canadensis) and the black and grizzly bear.

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  • The red deer (Cervus elaphus) is now widely distributed as a wild animal over New Zealand, where also the fallow-deer (C. dama) and the Indian sambar (C. aristotelis or unicolor) have been introduced locally.

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  • The principal food of the tiger in India is cattle, deer, wild hog and pea-fowl, and occasionally human beings.

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  • The tigers of the Sundarbans (Ganges delta) continually swim from one island to the other to change their hunting-grounds for deer.

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  • As soon as they begin to require other food than her milk, she kills for them, teaching them to do so for themselves by practising on small animals, such as deer and young calves or pigs.

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  • broad, with mountains rising to the height of 900 ft., covered with valuable woods and abounding with deer and wild hogs.

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  • Goats, deer of various kinds, hares, and two or three species of antelope are found, as are monkeys in great variety.

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  • vicugna), huemul (Cervus chilensis), which appears on the Chilean escutcheon, and the pudu deer, a small and not very numerous species.

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  • The wild animals are tigers, elephants, rhinoceros, leopards and deer.

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  • But some were essentially indigenous, and he observed a singular character given to the fauna by the presence of certain Eastern forms, unknown in other parts of Persia, such as the tiger, a remarkable deer of the IndoMalayan group, allied to Cervus axis, and a pit viper (Halys).

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  • Among the wild animals are the lion, tiger, leopard, lynx, brown bear, hyena, hog, badger, porcupine, pole-cat, weasel, marten, wolf, jackal, fox, hare, wild ass, wild sheep, wild cat, mountaingoat, gazelle and deer.

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  • By preference the condor feeds on carrion, but it does not hesitate to attack sheep, goats and deer, and for this reason it is hunted down by the shepherds, who, it is said, train their dogs to look up and bark at the condors as they fly overhead.

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  • The Bandanese pay occasional visits to shoot bears and deer; there are numbers of wild goats and cattle; and among birds are mentioned cassowaries, cockatoos, birds of paradise, and the swallows that furnish edible nests.

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  • JURA (” deer island "), an island of the inner Hebrides, the fourth largest of the group, on the west coast of Argyllshire, Scotland.

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  • Jura derived its name from the red deer which once abounded on it.

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  • The majority are inhabitants of Australia and Tasmania, forming one of the most prominent and characteristic features of the fauna of these lands, and performing the part of the deer and antelopes of other parts of the world.

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  • Deer of several kinds are met with, but do not ascend very high on the hillsides, and belong exclusively to Indian forms. The musk deer keeps to the greater elevations.

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  • Deer and antelope are represented by various species.

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  • Deer readily eat them, and, after a preliminary steeping in lime-water, pigs also.

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  • The fallen leaves are relished by sheep and deer, and afford a good litter for flocks and herds.

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  • On the other hand, the recorded discovery of iron armour, Roman and British pottery and coins, together with the bones and horns of deer and other animals, is of little evidential value without a precise record of the circumstances in which they were found.

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  • The mammals include black bear, deer, lynx, porcupine, fox, squirrels, hares, rabbits, musk rats, minks, weasels, skunks and woodchucks.

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  • The red, or Virginia, deer and the grey fox are still found in circumscribed localities; and of the smaller mammals, the squirrel, chipmunk, rabbit, raccoon and opossum are still numerous.

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  • Both species equal in size the red deer.

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  • OLD DEER, a parish and village in the district of Buchan, Aberdeenshire, Scotland.

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  • The village lies on the Deer or South Ugie Water, 102 m.

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  • It had belonged to the monks of Deer and been in the possession of the University Library since 1715.

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  • It was edited by John Stuart (1813-1877) for the Spalding Club, by whom it was published in 1869 under the title of The Book of Deer.

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  • In 1218 William Comyn, earl of Buchan, founded the Abbey of St Mary of Deer, now in ruins, 4 m.

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  • The parish is rich in antiquities, but the most noted of them - the Stone of Deer, a sculptured block of syenite, which stood near the Abbey - was destroyed in 1854.

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  • The thriving village of NEW Deer (formerly called Auchriddie) lies about 7 m.

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  • The state has moose, caribou and deer, especially in the northern part.

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  • That representing two deer (fig.

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  • DEER (0.

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  • The leading characters of antlers are described under Pecora, but these structures may be defined somewhat more fully in the following passage from the present writer's Deer of all Lands:- " Antlers are supported on a pair of solid bony processes, or pedicles, arising from the frontal bones of the skull, of which they form an inseparable portion; and if in a fully adult deer these pedicles be sawn through, they will generally be found to consist of solid, ivory-like bone, devoid of perceptible channels for the passage of blood-vessels.

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  • The pedicles are always covered with skin well supplied with blood-vessels; and in young deer, or those in which the antlers have been comparatively recently shed, the covering of skin extends over their summits, when they appear as longer or shorter projections on the forehead, according to the species.

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  • This deposition of bony matter progresses very rapidly, and although in young deer and the adults of some species the resulting antler merely forms a simple spike, or a single fork, in full-grown individuals of the majority it assumes a more or less complexly branched structure.

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  • But the antlers of all deer by no means conform to this type; and in certain groups other names have to be adopted for the branches.

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  • "The antlers of young deer are in the form of simple spikes; and this form is retained in the South American brockets, although the simple antlers of these deer appear due to degeneration, and are not primitive types.

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  • Indeed, no living deer shows such primitive spikelike antlers in the adult, and it is doubtful whether such a type is displayed by any known extinct form, although many have a simple fork.

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  • In the deer of the sambar group, where the antlers never advance beyond a three-tined type, the shedding is frequently, if not invariably, very irregular; but in the majority at least of the species with complex antlers the replacement is annual, the new appendages attaining their full development immediately before the pairing-season.

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  • The existing members of the family are classified in the writer's Deer of all Lands as follows: A.

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  • True Deer, Genus Cervus.

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  • Pere David's Deer, Genus Elaphorus.

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  • American Deer, Genus Manama.

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  • The most distinctive feature of the deer of this group is, however, the patch of long erectile white hairs on the buttocks, which, although inconspicuous when the animals are quiescent, is expanded into a large chrysanthemum-like bunch when they start to run or are otherwise excited.

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  • The rusa, or Javan sambar, C. (R.) hippelaphus, is a lighter-coloured and smaller deer than the Indian sambar, with longer, slenderer and less rugged antlers.

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  • Typically from Java, this deer is also represented in the Moluccas and Timor, and has thus the most easterly range of the whole tribe.

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  • A black coat with white spots distinguishes the Philippine spotted deer, C. alf redi, which is about the size of a roe-buck; while other members of this group are the Calamianes deer of the Philippines (C. culionensis), the Bavian deer (C. kuhli) from a small island near Java, and the well-known Indian hog-deer or para (C. porcinus), all these three last being small, more or less uniformly coloured, and closely allied species.

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  • On the other hand, the larger and handsomer chital, or spotted deer (C. axis), stands apart by its white-spotted fawn-red coat and differently formed antlers.

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  • Finally, we have the thamin, or Eld's deer, C. (R.) eldi, ranging from Burma to Siam, and characterized by the continuous curve formed by the beam and the brow-tine of the antlers.

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  • For the small eastern deer, respectively known as muntjacs (Cervulus) and tufted muntjacs or tufted deer (Elaphodus), see Muntjac; while under Water-Deer will be found a notice of the Chinese representative of the genus Hydrela phus (or Hydropoles).

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  • The American deer include such New World species as are generically distinct from Old World types.

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  • One of the best known of these is the white-tailed deer Mazama (Dorcelaphus) americana, often known as the Virginian deer.

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  • As we proceed southwards from the northern United States, deer of the white-tailed type decrease steadily in size, till in Central America, Peru and Guiana they are represented by animals not larger that a roebuck.

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  • nemorivaga, are Central and South American deer of the size of roe-bucks or smaller, with simple spike-like antlers, tufted heads and the hair of the face radiating from two whorls on the forehead so that on the nose the direction is downwards.

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  • The smallest of all deer is the Chilian pudu (Padua pudu), a creature not much larger than a hare, with almost rudimentary antlers.

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  • For deer in general, see R.

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  • Lydekker, The Deer of all Lands (London, 1898, 1908).

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  • In the open country the mule deer, the pronghorn antelope and the coyote are found, and the bison formerly ranged over the north-eastern part of the state; the side-striped groundsquirrel, Townsend's spermophile, the desert pack-rat and the desert pack-rabbit inhabit the flat country.

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  • Numbers of sheep are bred on the island, and there are a few cattle and deer, besides goats and wild cats.

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  • Among wild animals, deer and bear are not uncommon.

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  • There are deer in the forests and on the open savannahs, the rabbit and squirrel are to be seen on the eastern slopes of the Andes, and partly amphibious rodents, the "capybara" (Hydrochoerus) and "guagua" (Coelogenys subniger), are very numerous along the wooded watercourses.

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  • Hogs and deer are both common wild animals, and of the latter there are three species, Cervus Eldi, Cervus hippelaphus and Cervus vaginalis.

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  • In the mountain forests of south-western Oregon bears, deer, elk, pumas, wolves and foxes are plentiful.

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  • Among the south-eastern plateaus antelope are found at all seasons, and deer and big-horn (mountain sheep), and occasionally a few elk, in the winter.

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  • The crumen or suborbital face-gland, which is so largely developed and probably performs the same office in some antelopes and deer, is present, although in a comparatively rudimentary form, in most species, but is absent in others.

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  • The fauna originally included buffalo, elk, deer, wolves, bear, lynx, beaver, otter, porcupine and puma, but civilization has driven them all out entirely.

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  • He was, like .most of his line, a keen sportsman, and, returning to Berkeley to find that a royal visit had made great slaughter among his deer, he showed his resentment by disparking Berkeley Park.

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  • Whorls of hair, as on the face of the horse and the South American deer known as brockets, occur where the different hair-slopes meet.

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  • Such are the white chrysanthemum-like patches on the rump of the Japanese deer and of the American prong-buck (Antilocapra), and the line of hairs situated in a groove on the loins of the African spring-buck.

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  • The white under-side of the tail of the rabbit and the yellow rump-patch of many deer are analogous.

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  • Some confirmation of this theory is afforded by the fact that whereas we can recognize ancestral deer in the Tertiaries of Europe we cannot point with certainty to the forerunners of the Bovidae.

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  • Tigers, panthers, deer, wild hogs and other wild animals abound in the forests, and during the rainy season many deaths occur from snake-bites.

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  • Deer were found in large numbers in all sections of the state, bear were common in the central and northern parts, bison were found in the south-west, wolves, lynx ("wild cats"), and foxes and other smaller animals particularly of fur-bearing varieties.

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  • Bear, deer and lynx are still to be found in the less settled forest regions of the N.

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  • The last bear was killed in the Harz in 1705, and the last lynx in 1817, and since that time the wolf too has become extinct; but deer, foxes, wild cats and badgers are still found in the forests.

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  • Their cry is peculiar, being something between the belling of a deer and the neigh of a horse.

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  • The tiger is met with only on the lower Amu-darya, except when it wanders to the alpine region in pursuit of the maral deer (Cervus maral).

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  • Antelopes, hares and occasionally the lynx, fox, deer, rats, vultures, crows, ravens, hawks, with lizards are other denizens of the borders of the deserts.

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  • She is accompanied often by a deer or a dog.

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  • Catching a single deer and belling it, he drives it through the wood; the other deer, whose instinct leads them to gather into herds for mutual protection against the mosquitoes, are attracted by the sound.

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  • The wealth of Uttar, "northmost of the northmen," whose narrative has been preserved by King Alfred, consisted mainly of six hundred of those "deer they call hrenas" and in tribute paid by the natives; and the Eigils saga tells how Brynjulf Bjargulfson had his right to collect contributions from the Finns (i.e.

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  • Fauna and Flora.-Of wild animals the most characteristic are the black bear, puma, prairie wolf, timber wolf, fox, deer, antelope, squirrel, rabbit and prairie dog.

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  • americana is said to associate with herds of deer (Cariacus campestris), and R.

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  • The forests abounded in game, the red deer and wild boar were common, whilst wolves ravaged the flocks.

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  • The principal animals and birds in South Carolina are deer, rabbits, squirrels, opossums, musk-rats, raccoons, minks, geese, ducks, wild turkeys, " partridge " (quail or bobwhite), woodcock and snipe.

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  • Fauna.-The animal kingdom embraces, besides the usual domestic animals (as horses, cattle, sheep, swine, goats, asses, &c.), wild boars, deer, wild goats, hares, &c.; also bears, wolves, lynxes, foxes, wild cats, jackals, otters, beavers, polecats, martens, weasels and the like.

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  • The fauna includes lions, leopards, several kinds of deer, monkeys, bush-cow and wild boar.

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  • The fauna also is well represented, but tigers which once were frequently seen are now very scarce; panther, hyena, jackal, wild boar, deer (Cervus maral) are common; pheasant, woodcock, ducks, teal, geese and various waterfowl abound; the fisheries are very productive and are leased to a Russian firm.

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  • MUNTJAC, the Indian name of a small deer typifying the genus Cervulus, all the members of which are indigenous to the southern and eastern parts of Asia and the adjacent islands, and are separated by marked characters from all their allies.

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  • For the distinctive features of the genus see Deer.

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  • As regards general characteristics, all muntjacs are small compared with the majority of deer, and have long bodies and rather short limbs and neck.

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  • the main stem or beam, after giving off a short brow-tine, inclining backwards and upwards, being unbranched and pointed, and when fully developed curving inwards and somewhat downwards at the tip. These small antlers are supported upon pedicles, or processes of the frontal bones, longer than in any other deer, the front edges of these being continued downwards as strong ridges passing along the sides of the face above the eyes.

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  • From this feature the name rib-faced deer has been suggested for the muntjac. The upper canine teeth of the males are large and sharp, projecting outside the mouth as tusks, and loosely implanted in their sockets.

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  • A popular name with Indian sportsmen is "barking deer," on account of the alarm-cry - a kind of short shrill bark, like that of a fox, but louder.

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  • The last-mentioned species, by its frontal tuft, small rounded ears, general brown coloration, and minute antlers, connects the typical muntjacs with the small tufted deer or tufted muntjacs of the genus Elaphodus of eastern China and Tibet.

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  • JACKSON, a city and the county-seat of Madison county, Tennessee, U.S.A., situated on the Forked Deer river, about 85 M.

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  • Before the advent of the white man Nebraska was full of wild mammals, the buffalo, elk, black and white tailed deer, antelope, bears, timber wolves, panthers (pumas), lynx, otter and mink being common.

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  • In addition to his achievements in black-letter bibliography he threw great light on ancient Celtic language and literature by the discovery, in 1857, of the Book of Deer, a manuscript copy of the Gospel in the Vulgate version, in which were inscribed old Gaelic charters.

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  • The cave-dweller who first collected the fat dripping off the deer on the roasting spit may well be looked upon as the first manufacturer of tallow.

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  • Deer are quite numerous in the forests of the east half of the state.

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  • The forests are well stocked with game, such as deer and wild boar, and the open country is well supplied with partridges.

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  • A little further ahead, they glimpsed a white flash of tail as a deer bounded crossed the trail no more than fifty feet ahead of them.

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  • By the time they reached the spot, the deer had vanished in the trees, though.

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  • A deer watched them from the trees.

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  • It was likely a deer trail.

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  • I'll see if I can find a deer next time.

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  • So far, deer and rabbits are easier for a few wolves to pull down than a healthy cow, but if the pack gets too big they may go after cattle.

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  • Damian turned in time to see the vamp Charlie struggling to drag a skinned deer carcass across the threshold.

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  • He catches deer, drains them of blood, skins them, and I cook 'em up for dinner.

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  • In addition to the native deer, the Elk or buffalo could have eaten the grain.

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  • Occasionally a deer would wander under the shelter and eat some of it, but the J-shaped feeders protected most of it.

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  • Multiple dirt deer trails moved away.

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  • She followed, expecting him to disappear into the trees at any point and reappear with a herd of deer clenched in his jaws.

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  • With our speed, we should be able to run down deer.

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  • And what if deer blood doesn't nourish us?

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  • With one misstep he knew she would run like a frightened deer.

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  • It's been a while since I had a good deer roast.

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  • Dan ran ahead of them, Elise behind, and they flew down a deer path to a creek, then darted across rocks to the other bank.

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  • Five bonfires had sprung up, each one with a massive spit turning a large deer in its center.

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  • Kelli greeted one of the men with a kiss and a quick hug before going to the woman cutting chunks of meat off the deer.

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  • "Four deer paths," Brady said.

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  • Brady pushed her from his mind, focusing on the deer path leading away from the condo community into the forest.

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  • He stalked off into the forest, away from the castle and cliff.  Toby clambered through the brush and trees after him, the angel's footsteps loud where Rhyn's were silent.  Rhyn found a deer path and followed it until he reached a snowy meadow.  Crossing it, he continued to look for a place to stash the angel where the kid wouldn't freeze to death.  After another hour of walking, he found a small pocket in the roots of a massive tree.

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  • He went back to the deer trail and jogged through the forest to keep his body warm, making it to the castle in an hour.

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  • The area he was watching was where she often saw deer in the early morning hours.

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  • Leave the deer alone.

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  • Her second thought was a deer.

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  • It looked like a deer.

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  • Surely if wild dogs had attacked the deer, they would have left tracks.

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  • What would Alex do if he found out Brutus was killing deer?

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  • She got a large garbage bag out of the house and went back up to the deer carcass.

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  • I looked around and found a deer carcass up by the tree line.

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  • So you think Brutus is killing deer?

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  • What if Brutus is killing deer?

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  • Why would he suddenly start killing deer?

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  • Anyway, you don't think he's killing deer or you'd do something about it yourself.

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  • So what did kill the deer?

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  • Fortunately there had been no sign of slain deer or wild dogs.

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  • Maybe the deer had died of natural causes.

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  • It was mostly used by deer, but she had been up it a number of times with her father.

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  • Did you tell him about the deer yet?

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  • I think the deer just died and animals were eating on it.

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  • Actually, she only intended to ride along the forest line and see if there was any sign of deer.

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  • Crossing the creek and field to her house, she studied the hillside beyond for any sign of a deer.

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  • Leave the deer alone!

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  • It was probably a deer, though.

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  • It was a deer – or what was left of one, anyway.

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  • She pointed at the deer carcass.

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  • I'm afraid Brutus might be killing deer.

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  • You figured Brutus killed the deer and you figured he'd shoot him.

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  • He followed her and studied the deer.

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  • The last time I saw the deer up here, I found a track big enough to belong to Brutus – only it didn't look like his tracks.

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  • The men gathered at the spot where she and Josh had seen the deer carcass and appeared to be discussing something.

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  • He brought me a deer hock.

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  • I saw something move in the forest near the deer carcass.

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  • I thought maybe it was a deer.

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  • A few days before we were married, I found the remains of a deer.

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  • I thought Brutus might be killing deer.

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  • The fact was, she wasn't sure how he would react if he discovered Brutus was killing deer.

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  • Deer are the mountain lion's natural prey.

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  • White tailed deer, as well as an abundance of smaller wildlife already frequented the ranch, so his North American Safari had its foundation.

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  • In the mud was a deer track, and overlaying it, the paw print of a big cat — too big to be a bobcat.

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  • That cat probably won't bother the adults as long as there are deer around, but it might go after the calf.

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  • One of the vamps had left her another deer head at the bottom.

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  • The route Alex chose meandered through the gorge and then up a steep deer trail to the top of the mountain.

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  • Even deer have killed people.

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  • Brush crackled near the edge of the forest and then a deer leaped into the open.

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  • The deer paused only a second when it saw her, and then bounded across the clearing, its white tail held erect.

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  • It couldn't be deer season, so that meant the dog was chasing the deer for pleasure - or worse.

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  • They're like blind deer.

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  • accelerate, accelerating down the fireroad, riders banging into each other and handlebars clashing like deer antlers in battle.

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  • Conclusions about daily life can be based only on such isolated finds as a piece of worked deer antler from the Thames at Hammersmith.

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  • Deer who live in forests have larger antlers than those who live on moor land.

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  • In wide open fields we saw a herd of deer some with huge antlers.

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  • antler growth in deer.

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  • A ditch about 2m deep was dug, with picks made of deer antlers.

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  • antlers of the deer.

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  • Dead and fallen aspen should be left undisturbed and protected from deer and rabbit grazing.

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  • banned deer hunting on its land, and the New Forest Buck Hunt folded.

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  • There are plenty of other animals too including sambar deer, leopard, crocodile, sloth bear and about 300 species of birds.

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  • There are plenty of other animals too including sambar deer, leopard, crocodile, sloth bear and about 300 species of birds.

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  • Hunting A stampeding herd of deer, driven by beaters are confronted by a line of bowmen.

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  • Spotted hyaenas, giant beaver, extinct big cats, extinct species of rhino, extinct giant deer and other deer.

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  • Locally quarried breccia is the predominant material, once quarried from the breccia outcrop on Loton deer park.

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  • brocket deer, which, although it saw us, was so relaxed it just carried on foraging!

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  • A high number of deer carcasses were found by the roadside on a busy stretch of road in a short space of time.

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  • Recent deer census work conducted by the Society indicates that deer are continuing to spread throughout Great Britain and numbers are increasing.

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  • CWD is similar to BSE and scrapie, but affects only cervids (deer and elk ).

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  • His experienced eye will also spot the hiding places of local wildlife including chamois, deer and playful marmots.

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  • An inspection in June had found the tripod disturbed and the guy ropes thoroughly chewed - probably by passing deer.

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  • Possible wildlife sightings include sambar, porcupine, palm civet, small Indian civet and barking deer.

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  • High water mark: deer grass clumps fifteen feet up birches in the Green Well of Scotland Gorge.

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  • Sporting clients from all over the world visit our beautiful country to stalk deer in the wild and remote corries in the Scottish glens.

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  • There are many other animals as well: the fish eating gharial crocodiles, buffaloes, sloth bear, hog deer and wild peacocks.

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  • culling of deer involves the selection of older or unhealthy animals which are shot humanely with a high velocity rifle.

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  • Samples were taken from all the deer culled within the Forest District.

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  • Allow for the creation of deer control areas at locations where specific problems in attaining deer culls have been identified.

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  • With your malady cured you'll live anew, nor will a deer be more active.

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  • By day they would hunt deer and rescue damsels in distress Then they would drink splendid wine to recover from the stress.

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  • declaratory order enforced on 3rd March and lasting between 3 & 4 weeks, banned the shooting of deer.

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  • deer culled within the Forest District.

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  • What are normal values from which hunted red deer readily recover?

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  • The main herds are of fallow deer which now probably number almost a thousand.

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  • God is multiplying in white-tailed deer behind the houses and crossing the roads.

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  • red deer on the open hill in Scotland are an important natural resource.

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  • In the wild, red deer are not found in any numbers in Wales or the Marches.

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  • Hundreds of thousands are used to retrieve game and to track wounded deer.

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  • The most conspicuous of which is the spotted deer.

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  • deer antler.

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  • The deer Commission's supporting team of deer stalkers carries out a regular program of deer population counts.

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  • deer herds is considerable.

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  • deer sedge and common heather are abundant.

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