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decompose

decompose

decompose Sentence Examples

  • It separates in the form of small rose-red crystals, which decompose on boiling with water.

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  • On heating, they decompose, forming basic tetrammine salts.

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  • They readily decompose on heating, and are easily hydrolysed by alkalies; they possess a somewhat more acid character than.

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  • Nitrous acid and chlorine readily decompose them with liberation of iodine; the same effect being produced when they are heated with concentrated sulphuric acid and manganese dioxide.

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  • One of the first discoveries made with it was its power to electrolyse or chemically decompose certain solutions.

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  • It crystallizes in needles which rapidly decompose when exposed to moist air.

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  • Since many substances decompose either at, or below, their boiling-points under ordinary atmospheric pressure, it is necessary to lower the boiling-point by reducing the pressure if it be desired to distil them.

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  • Strong or weak solutions of these substances also decompose it, producing some alkali nitrate and nitrite, the cellulose molecule being only partially restored, some quantity undergoing oxidation.

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  • It crystallizes in large transparent prisms, which melt on heating and decompose, leaving a residue of metaphosphoric acid, (HP03).

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  • All carbonates, except those of the alkali metals and of thallium, are insoluble in water; and the majority decompose when heated strongly, carbon dioxide being liberated and a residue of an oxide of the metal left.

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  • All carbonates, except those of the alkali metals and of thallium, are insoluble in water; and the majority decompose when heated strongly, carbon dioxide being liberated and a residue of an oxide of the metal left.

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  • This method is adopted for substances which decompose at their boiling-points under ordinary pressure, and, generally, when it is desirable to work at a lower temperature.

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  • Alkalis decompose it into picro-podophyllic acid and picro-podophyllin, minute traces of both of which occur in a free state in the rhizome.

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  • Alkalis decompose it into picro-podophyllic acid and picro-podophyllin, minute traces of both of which occur in a free state in the rhizome.

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  • The crystals so obtained are very unstable and decompose rapidly with evolution of carbon dioxide.

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  • When strongly heated they decompose, forming fatty acids, nitrogen peroxide and nitrogen.

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  • It may be liquefied, its critical temperature being -93, 5°, and the liquid boils at -153.6° C. It is not a supporter of combustion, unless the sustance introduced is at a sufficiently high temperature to decompose the gas, when combustion will continue at the expense of the liberated oxygen.

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  • At the age of nineteen he invented an electromagnetic engine, and in the course of examining its performance dissatisfaction with vague and arbitrary methods of specifying elec rical quantities caused him to adopt a convenient and scie tific unit, which he took to be the amount of electricity req ired to decompose nine grains of water in one hour.

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  • The dithionates are all soluble in water and when boiled with hydrochloric acid decompose with evolution of sulphur dioxide and formation of a sulphate.

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  • Baeyer, Ber., 1880, 13, p. 2258), crystallizes in needles which decompose when heated to 155-156° C. It is readily converted into indigo.

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  • Vegetable refuse of all kinds, when smother-burned in a similar way, becomes a valuable mechanical improver of the soil; but the preferable course is to decompose it in a heap with quicklime and layers of earth, converting it into leaf-mould.

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  • Gold forms three sulphides corresponding to the oxides; they readily decompose on heating.

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  • Practically any vessel may serve as a receiver - test tube, flask, beaker, &c. If noxious vapours come over, it is necessary to have an air-tight connexion between the condenser and receiver, and to pro vide the latter with an outlet tube leading to an absorption column or other contrivance in which the vapours are taken up. If the substances operated upon decompose when heated in air, as, for example, the zinc alkyls which inflame, the air within the apparatus is replaced by some inert gas, e.g.

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  • whether, when they cannot decompose, any state of electrical tension is present.

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  • When heated with CS 2 to 1 00° C. under pressure, it forms liquid nitrogen sulphide, N 2 S 5, a mobile red liquid which solidifies to an iodine-like mass of crystals which melt at Io-I I° C. Water, alkalis and acids decompose it into sulphur and ammonia (W.

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  • It crystallizes in small needles, which are readily soluble in water, and on heating, decompose at about 102° C., with liberation of nitrogen, chlorine and oxygen.

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  • It forms colourless crystals which are soluble in water and decompose on heating, with the formation of nitrogen.

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  • The essential part of the medicinal treatment of this condition is the administration of iodides, which are able to decompose the insoluble albuminates of lead which have become locked up in the tissues, rapidly causing their degeneration, and to cause the excretion of the poisonous metal by means of the intestine and the kidneys.

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  • This is possibly due to the accelerating action of the nitrous acid which is produc-ed in the direct action of the copper on the nitric acid and which, when a certain amount has been formed in the system, begins to decompose, thus 3HNO 2 = HN03+ 2N0+H 2 0 (V.

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  • It begins to decompose into gold and chlorine at 185°, the decomposition being complete at 230°; water decomposes it into gold and auric chloride.

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  • The want of chlorophyll restricts their mode of life - which is rarely aquatic - since they are therefore unable to decompose the carbon dioxide of the atmosphere, and renders them dependent on other plants or (rarely) animals for their carbonaceous food-materials.

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  • The want of chlorophyll restricts their mode of life - which is rarely aquatic - since they are therefore unable to decompose the carbon dioxide of the atmosphere, and renders them dependent on other plants or (rarely) animals for their carbonaceous food-materials.

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  • Davy, inspired by his successful isolation of the metals sodium and potassium by the electrolysis of their hydrates, attempted to decompose a mixture of lime and mercuric oxide by the electric current; an amalgam of calcium was obtained, but the separation of the mercury was so difficult that even Davy himself was not sure as to whether he had obtained pure metallic calcium.

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  • Davy, inspired by his successful isolation of the metals sodium and potassium by the electrolysis of their hydrates, attempted to decompose a mixture of lime and mercuric oxide by the electric current; an amalgam of calcium was obtained, but the separation of the mercury was so difficult that even Davy himself was not sure as to whether he had obtained pure metallic calcium.

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  • On fusion with caustic alkalis they decompose into their constituent aminothiophenol and acid.

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  • Iodine in alkaline solution converts pyrrol into iodol (tetra-iodopyrrol), crystallizing in yellowishbrown needles, which decompose on heating.

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  • Now dead animal substance and the excreta of animals decompose in the long run into carbonic acid, water and mineral salts, and so there is a continual destruction of animal substance both on the land and in the sea.

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  • These esters on hydrolysis yield the free acids, which readily decompose, with loss of carbon dioxide and formation of an aldehyde, R /Crri /Crri Oc< +�Cl � CH � [[Cooc H - O I ?Ch Cooc H 0c Ch�Cooh - Co +Chrr I Cho]].

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  • In 1808 Sir Humphry Davy, fresh from the electrolytic isolation of potassium and sodium, attempted to decompose alumina by heating it with potash in a platinum crucible and submitting the mixture to a current of electricity; in 1809, with a more powerful battery, he raised iron wire to a red heat in contact with alumina, and obtained distinct evidence of the production of an iron-aluminium alloy.

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  • In this method of preparation it is found that the secondary alcohols decompose more readily that the primary alcohols of the series, and when sulphuric acid is used, two phases are present in the reaction, the first being the building up of an intermediate sulphuric acid ester, which then decomposes into sulphuric acid and hydrocarbon: C2H 5 OH->C 2 H 5 HSO 4 ->C 2 H 4 +-H 2 SO 4.

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  • The substances which we at present term anhydrous acids (acid oxides) only become, for the most part, capable of forming salts with metallic oxides after the addition of water, or they are compounds which decompose these oxides at somewhat high temperatures."

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  • The alkali metals and alkaline earth metals decompose water at ordinary temperatures; magnesium begins to react above 70° C., and zinc at a dull red heat.

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  • The magnesite (a) serves for the generation of carbon dioxide which clears the tube of air before the compound (mixed with fine copper oxide (b)) is burned, and afterwards sweeps the liberated nitrogen into the receiving vessel (e), which contains a strong potash solution; c is coarse copper oxide; and d a reduced copper gauze spiral, heated in order to decompose any nitrogen oxides.

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  • Hofmann and Schotensack decompose a mixture of phenol (3 molecules) and sodium carbonate (4 mols.) with carbonyl chloride at 140-zoo° C. When 90% of the phenol has distilled over, the residue is dissolved and hydrochloric acid added, any phenol remaining is blown over in a current of steam, and the salicylic acid finally precipitated by hydrochloric acid.

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  • Those derived from monobasic acids, obtained by the action of acid chlorides or anhydrides on urea, decompose on heating and do not form salts.

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  • Alkaline hypobromites or hypochlorites or nitrous acid decompose urea into carbon dioxide and nitrogen.

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  • Dry guncotton heated in ammonia gas detonates at about 70°, and ammonium hydroxide solutions of all strengths slowly decompose it, yielding somewhat complex products.

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  • Acids decompose it into lead dioxide and monoxide, and the latter may or may not dissolve to form a salt; red lead may, therefore, be regarded as lead orthoplumbate, Pb2Pb04.

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  • of the two systems of three carbon atoms into a chain of six carbon atoms. But it is not only the formation of different isomers which is included in their constitution, but also the different ways in which they will decompose or give other products.

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  • They form yellow or bronze-coloured crystals, which decompose on boiling their aqueous solution.

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  • The salt must therefore be derived from an acid, chloroplatinic acid, H 2 PtC1 6, and have the formula Na 2 PtC1 6, the ions being Na and PtCls", for if it were a double salt it would decompose as a mixture of sodium chloride and platinum chloride and both metals would go to the cathode.

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  • Quinone-dioxime, HON: C 6 H 4: NOH, crystallizes in colourless or yellow needles, which decompose when heated to about 240° C. Potassium ferrocyanide in alkaline solution oxidizes it to dinitrosobenzene, whilst cold concentrated nitric acid oxidizes it to para-dinitrobenzene.

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  • Both it and the amide decompose water readily with formation of ammonia and caustic potash.

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  • Both it and the amide decompose water readily with formation of ammonia and caustic potash.

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  • The solution of sodium aluminate, containing aluminium oxide and sodium oxide in the molecular proportion of 6 to 1, is next agitated for thirty-six hours with a small quantity of hydrated alumina previously obtained, which causes the liquor to decompose, and some 70% of the aluminium hydroxide to be thrown down.

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  • Blagden (Ber.,1900,33,p.2544), who consider that three simultaneous reactions occur, namely, the formation of labile double salts which decompose in such a fashion that the radical attached to the copper atom wanders to the aromatic nucleus; a catalytic action, in which nitrogen is eliminated and the acid radical attaches itself to the aromatic nucleus; and finally, the formation of azo compounds.

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  • Molten copper absorbs carbon monoxide, hydrogen and sulphur dioxide; it also appears to decompose hydrocarbons (methane, ethane), absorbing the hydrogen and the carbon separating out.

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  • Dilute mineral acids decompose it with the formation of insoluble silver cyanide and hydrocyanic acid: KNC AgNC+HN03=HCN+ KNO 3 +AgNC. A boiling solution of potassium chloride with the double cyanide gives silver chloride and potassium cyanide.

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  • The cracking process practically consists in distilling the oils at a temperature higher than the normal boiling point of the constituents which it is desired to decompose.

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  • At Ioo° C. the crystals lose 6 of their molecules of water; the remaining molecule goes off at 250°, a temperature which lies close to that at which the salt begins to decompose.

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  • Before being used the turfy ingredients of composts should lie together in a heap only long enough for the roots of the herbage to die, not to decompose.

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  • On heating, it begins to decompose at 260-265° C. Barium chlorate, Ba(C103)2, is obtained by adding barium chloride to sodium chlorate solution; on concentration of the solution sodium chloride separates first, and then on further evaporation barium chlorate crystallizes out and can be purified by recrystallization.

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  • It crystallizes in monoclinic prisms of composition Ba(C10 3) 2 H 2 O, and begins to decompose on being heated to 250° C. Barium iodate, Ba(103)2, is obtained by the action of excess of iodic acid on hot caustic baryta solution or by adding sodium iodate to barium chloride solution.

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  • The food thus reaches the stomach in large lumps which cannot be readily digested, and either remain there till they decompose and give rise to irritation in the stomach itself, or pass on to the intestine, where digestion is likewise incomplete, and the food is ejected without the proper amount of nourishment having been extracted from it; while at the same time the products of its decomposition may have been absorbed and acted as poisons, giving rise to lassitude, discomfort, headache, or perhaps even to irritability and sleeplessness.

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  • He has also found that this action is reversible, for when the area of the surface of contact of the acid and mercury is made to increase, an electric current passes from the mercury to the acid, the amount of electricity which passes while the surface increases by one square centimetre being sufficient to decompose.

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  • These forms are termed by Fischer Metatrophic, because they require various kinds of organic materials obtained from the dead remains of other organisms or from the surfaces of their bodies, and can utilize and decompose them in various ways (Polytrophic) or, if monotrophic, are at least unable to work them up. The true parasites - obligate parasites of de Bary - are placed by Fischer in a third biological group, Paratrophic bacteria, to mark the importance of their mode of life in the interior of living organisms where they live and multiply in the blood, juices or tissues.

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  • The work of van Tieghem, van Senus, Fribes, Omeliansky and others has now shown that while certain anaerobic bacteria decompose the substance of the middle lamella - chiefly pectin compounds - and thus bring about the isolation of the cellulose fibres when, for instance, flax is steeped or " retted," they are unable to attack the cellulose itself.

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  • There exist in the mud of marshes, rivers and cloacae, &c., however, other anaerobic bacteria which decompose cellulose, probably hydrolysing it first and then splitting the products into carbon dioxide and marsh gas.

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  • It begins to decompose into silver and oxygen at 250°.

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  • His attempts to decompose "alum me, silica, zircone and glucine" were still less fortunate.

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  • The salts are unstable and readily decompose when heated.

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  • It burns when heated to about 200° C. Oxidizing agents decompose it with great violence.

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  • Water and the caustic alkalis readily decompose it with liberation of phosphine and the formation of iodides or hydriodic acid.

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  • By recrystallization from hot benzene, the a form is obtained in large prisms which melt at 157° C., and at their boiling-point decompose into hydrochloric acid and trichlorbenzene.

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  • Starting with a solid hydrocarbon of definite composition, it would be theoretically possible to decompose it entirely into carbon, hydrogen, ethylene and methane, and, by rapidly removing these from the heating zone before any secondary actions took place, to prevent formation of tar.

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  • Moreover, these secondary products cannot be successfully reduced, by further heating, to simpler hydrocarbons of any high illuminating value, and such bodies as naphthalene and anthracene have so great a stability that, when once formed, they resist any efforts again to decompose them by heat, short of the temperature which breaks them up into methane, carbon and hydrogen.

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  • decompose the liquid hydrocarbon in the presence of the diluents which are to mingle with it and act as its carrier, since, if this were done, a higher temperature could be employed and more of the heavier portions of the oil converted into gas, without at the same time breaking down the gaseous hydrocarbons too much.

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  • Air and moisture decompose it.

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  • By heating to the boiling point of naphthalene (218°) tertiary alcohols are decomposed, while heating to the boiling point of anthracene (360°) suffices to decompose secondary alcohols, the primary remaining unaffected.

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  • Chlorine, bromine and iodine decompose arsine readily, the action being most violent in the case of chlorine.

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  • many of these minerals decompose somewhat readily, yielding secondary minerals, which are comparatively soft and have a scaly character, with eminently perfect cleavages, which facilitate splitting into exceedingly thin plates.

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  • The metallic salts all crystallize in the anhydrous condition and decompose on heating, leaving a residue of the pure metal.

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  • As already described, ocean acidity may increase as phytoplankton (and increased marine organisms) decompose.

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  • decompose at lower temperatures may not give satisfactory EI spectra.

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  • decompose over time.

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  • decompose far too slowly to feed the crops: the system was bound to fail.

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  • Particularly in the summer birds rapidly decompose beyond the point where PM examinations are possible.

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  • Decomposition of metal hydroxides: The Group 1 Alkali Metal hydroxides do not readily decompose on heating ' up to red heat ' .

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  • decompose to give NO 2.

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  • decompose in the soil leading to residues of inorganic bromides.

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  • To prevent this, you heat the solution for some time to decompose the hydrogen peroxide into water and oxygen before adding the acid.

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  • Consider hiring a shredder for large chunky branches otherwise they'll take a very long time to decompose.

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  • The continuous wavelet transform is used to decompose the impulse response into the time-scale domain.

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  • It separates in the form of small rose-red crystals, which decompose on boiling with water.

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  • They form yellow or bronze-coloured crystals, which decompose on boiling their aqueous solution.

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  • On heating, they decompose, forming basic tetrammine salts.

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  • They readily decompose on heating, and are easily hydrolysed by alkalies; they possess a somewhat more acid character than.

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  • There is, in addition, a series of bacteria which decompose sulphureous compounds and utilize the element thus liberated in their protoplasm (see Bacteriology).

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  • The dithionates are all soluble in water and when boiled with hydrochloric acid decompose with evolution of sulphur dioxide and formation of a sulphate.

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  • Their quantitative experiments were, however, too rough to permit of accurate generalization; and although Lavoisier and Laplace stated the principle that the same amount of heat must be supplied to decompose a compound as would be produced on its formation, the statement was not based on exact experiment, and only received experimental confirmation much later.

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  • The cracking process practically consists in distilling the oils at a temperature higher than the normal boiling point of the constituents which it is desired to decompose.

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  • Baeyer, Ber., 1880, 13, p. 2258), crystallizes in needles which decompose when heated to 155-156° C. It is readily converted into indigo.

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  • The magnesite (a) serves for the generation of carbon dioxide which clears the tube of air before the compound (mixed with fine copper oxide (b)) is burned, and afterwards sweeps the liberated nitrogen into the receiving vessel (e), which contains a strong potash solution; c is coarse copper oxide; and d a reduced copper gauze spiral, heated in order to decompose any nitrogen oxides.

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  • Iodine in alkaline solution converts pyrrol into iodol (tetra-iodopyrrol), crystallizing in yellowishbrown needles, which decompose on heating.

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  • Hofmann and Schotensack decompose a mixture of phenol (3 molecules) and sodium carbonate (4 mols.) with carbonyl chloride at 140-zoo° C. When 90% of the phenol has distilled over, the residue is dissolved and hydrochloric acid added, any phenol remaining is blown over in a current of steam, and the salicylic acid finally precipitated by hydrochloric acid.

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  • It may be liquefied, its critical temperature being -93, 5°, and the liquid boils at -153.6° C. It is not a supporter of combustion, unless the sustance introduced is at a sufficiently high temperature to decompose the gas, when combustion will continue at the expense of the liberated oxygen.

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  • When heated with CS 2 to 1 00° C. under pressure, it forms liquid nitrogen sulphide, N 2 S 5, a mobile red liquid which solidifies to an iodine-like mass of crystals which melt at Io-I I° C. Water, alkalis and acids decompose it into sulphur and ammonia (W.

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  • Now dead animal substance and the excreta of animals decompose in the long run into carbonic acid, water and mineral salts, and so there is a continual destruction of animal substance both on the land and in the sea.

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  • On fusion with caustic alkalis they decompose into their constituent aminothiophenol and acid.

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  • The salt must therefore be derived from an acid, chloroplatinic acid, H 2 PtC1 6, and have the formula Na 2 PtC1 6, the ions being Na and PtCls", for if it were a double salt it would decompose as a mixture of sodium chloride and platinum chloride and both metals would go to the cathode.

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  • It crystallizes in rhombic prisms which are readily soluble in hot water, melt at 187° C. and decompose at about 240° C. It is readily hydrolysed by hot caustic alkalis to benzoic acid and glycocoll.

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  • If gradually heated it begins to vaporize and decompose at about 130°, and as a rule it detonates when heated slightly above this temperature, previously giving off some red fumes.

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  • It crystallizes in needles which decompose at "4° C. Silicon amide, Si(NH 2) 4, is obtained as a white amorphous unstable solid by the action of dry ammonia on silicon chloride at -50° C. (E.

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  • It crystallizes in needles which rapidly decompose when exposed to moist air.

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  • At Ioo° C. the crystals lose 6 of their molecules of water; the remaining molecule goes off at 250°, a temperature which lies close to that at which the salt begins to decompose.

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  • Since many substances decompose either at, or below, their boiling-points under ordinary atmospheric pressure, it is necessary to lower the boiling-point by reducing the pressure if it be desired to distil them.

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  • Practically any vessel may serve as a receiver - test tube, flask, beaker, &c. If noxious vapours come over, it is necessary to have an air-tight connexion between the condenser and receiver, and to pro vide the latter with an outlet tube leading to an absorption column or other contrivance in which the vapours are taken up. If the substances operated upon decompose when heated in air, as, for example, the zinc alkyls which inflame, the air within the apparatus is replaced by some inert gas, e.g.

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  • This method is adopted for substances which decompose at their boiling-points under ordinary pressure, and, generally, when it is desirable to work at a lower temperature.

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  • The substances which we at present term anhydrous acids (acid oxides) only become, for the most part, capable of forming salts with metallic oxides after the addition of water, or they are compounds which decompose these oxides at somewhat high temperatures."

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  • It begins to decompose into gold and chlorine at 185°, the decomposition being complete at 230°; water decomposes it into gold and auric chloride.

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  • The first process never extracts all the bismuth, as much as onethird being retained in the matte or speiss; the second is more satisfactory, since the extraction is more complete, and also allows the addition of reducing agents to decompose any admixed bismuth oxide or sulphide.

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  • The salts of bismuth are feebly antiseptic. Taken internally the subnitrate, coming into contact with water, tends to decompose, gradually liberating nitric acid, one of the most powerful antiseptics.

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  • The tellurides of the alkali metals immediately decompose on exposure to air, with liberation of tellurium.

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  • At the age of nineteen he invented an electromagnetic engine, and in the course of examining its performance dissatisfaction with vague and arbitrary methods of specifying elec rical quantities caused him to adopt a convenient and scie tific unit, which he took to be the amount of electricity req ired to decompose nine grains of water in one hour.

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  • 'iv"uµos, leavened, from Ev, in, and "i jn, leaven), a term, first suggested by Kiihne, for an unorganized ferment (see Fermentation), a group of substances, in the constitution of plants and animals, which decompose certain carbon compounds occurring in association with them.

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  • It crystallizes in small needles, which are readily soluble in water, and on heating, decompose at about 102° C., with liberation of nitrogen, chlorine and oxygen.

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  • It forms colourless crystals which are soluble in water and decompose on heating, with the formation of nitrogen.

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  • It crystallizes in large transparent prisms, which melt on heating and decompose, leaving a residue of metaphosphoric acid, (HP03).

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  • In this method of preparation it is found that the secondary alcohols decompose more readily that the primary alcohols of the series, and when sulphuric acid is used, two phases are present in the reaction, the first being the building up of an intermediate sulphuric acid ester, which then decomposes into sulphuric acid and hydrocarbon: C2H 5 OH->C 2 H 5 HSO 4 ->C 2 H 4 +-H 2 SO 4.

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  • Quinone-dioxime, HON: C 6 H 4: NOH, crystallizes in colourless or yellow needles, which decompose when heated to about 240° C. Potassium ferrocyanide in alkaline solution oxidizes it to dinitrosobenzene, whilst cold concentrated nitric acid oxidizes it to para-dinitrobenzene.

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  • Willstatter (Ber., 1904, 37, p. 4744), by dissolving pyrocatechin in absolute ether containing ignited sodium sulphate and then adding dry silver oxide, obtained the quinone in dark red crystalline plates which decompose between 60° and 70° C.

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  • Potassium bromide, KBr, may be obtained by dissolving bromine in potash, whereupon bromide and bromate are first formed, evaporating and igniting the product in order to decompose the bromate: 6KHO 3Br 2 =5KBr -}- KBrO 3 -}- 3H 2 0; 2KBrO 3 = 2KBr + 302 (cf.

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  • Nitrous acid and chlorine readily decompose them with liberation of iodine; the same effect being produced when they are heated with concentrated sulphuric acid and manganese dioxide.

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  • The essential part of the medicinal treatment of this condition is the administration of iodides, which are able to decompose the insoluble albuminates of lead which have become locked up in the tissues, rapidly causing their degeneration, and to cause the excretion of the poisonous metal by means of the intestine and the kidneys.

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  • Dilute mineral acids decompose it with the formation of insoluble silver cyanide and hydrocyanic acid: KNC AgNC+HN03=HCN+ KNO 3 +AgNC. A boiling solution of potassium chloride with the double cyanide gives silver chloride and potassium cyanide.

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  • Alder, English patent 1 353 (1900)]; in the latter case the chief reaction probably is: K 4 Fe(NC) 6 + K 2 CO 3 =4KNC, ',+ 2KOCN + CO + Fe more potassium ferrocyanide is occasionally added in small quantities, in order to decompose the cyanate formed; 2KOCN+2K4Fe(NC)6= ioKNC + 2FeO + 4C + 2N2; 2Fe0A+ 2C = 2C0 + 2Fe.

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  • whether, when they cannot decompose, any state of electrical tension is present.

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  • This is possibly due to the accelerating action of the nitrous acid which is produc-ed in the direct action of the copper on the nitric acid and which, when a certain amount has been formed in the system, begins to decompose, thus 3HNO 2 = HN03+ 2N0+H 2 0 (V.

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  • In 1808 Sir Humphry Davy, fresh from the electrolytic isolation of potassium and sodium, attempted to decompose alumina by heating it with potash in a platinum crucible and submitting the mixture to a current of electricity; in 1809, with a more powerful battery, he raised iron wire to a red heat in contact with alumina, and obtained distinct evidence of the production of an iron-aluminium alloy.

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  • The solution of sodium aluminate, containing aluminium oxide and sodium oxide in the molecular proportion of 6 to 1, is next agitated for thirty-six hours with a small quantity of hydrated alumina previously obtained, which causes the liquor to decompose, and some 70% of the aluminium hydroxide to be thrown down.

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  • Before being used the turfy ingredients of composts should lie together in a heap only long enough for the roots of the herbage to die, not to decompose.

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  • Vegetable refuse of all kinds, when smother-burned in a similar way, becomes a valuable mechanical improver of the soil; but the preferable course is to decompose it in a heap with quicklime and layers of earth, converting it into leaf-mould.

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  • Blagden (Ber.,1900,33,p.2544), who consider that three simultaneous reactions occur, namely, the formation of labile double salts which decompose in such a fashion that the radical attached to the copper atom wanders to the aromatic nucleus; a catalytic action, in which nitrogen is eliminated and the acid radical attaches itself to the aromatic nucleus; and finally, the formation of azo compounds.

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  • The alkali metals and alkaline earth metals decompose water at ordinary temperatures; magnesium begins to react above 70° C., and zinc at a dull red heat.

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  • of the two systems of three carbon atoms into a chain of six carbon atoms. But it is not only the formation of different isomers which is included in their constitution, but also the different ways in which they will decompose or give other products.

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  • The crystals so obtained are very unstable and decompose rapidly with evolution of carbon dioxide.

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  • Those derived from monobasic acids, obtained by the action of acid chlorides or anhydrides on urea, decompose on heating and do not form salts.

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  • Soc. Chem., 1879, 31, 146), crystallizes in prisms, which decompose on heating.

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  • One of the first discoveries made with it was its power to electrolyse or chemically decompose certain solutions.

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  • Molten copper absorbs carbon monoxide, hydrogen and sulphur dioxide; it also appears to decompose hydrocarbons (methane, ethane), absorbing the hydrogen and the carbon separating out.

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  • On heating, it begins to decompose at 260-265° C. Barium chlorate, Ba(C103)2, is obtained by adding barium chloride to sodium chlorate solution; on concentration of the solution sodium chloride separates first, and then on further evaporation barium chlorate crystallizes out and can be purified by recrystallization.

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  • It crystallizes in monoclinic prisms of composition Ba(C10 3) 2 H 2 O, and begins to decompose on being heated to 250° C. Barium iodate, Ba(103)2, is obtained by the action of excess of iodic acid on hot caustic baryta solution or by adding sodium iodate to barium chloride solution.

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  • The food thus reaches the stomach in large lumps which cannot be readily digested, and either remain there till they decompose and give rise to irritation in the stomach itself, or pass on to the intestine, where digestion is likewise incomplete, and the food is ejected without the proper amount of nourishment having been extracted from it; while at the same time the products of its decomposition may have been absorbed and acted as poisons, giving rise to lassitude, discomfort, headache, or perhaps even to irritability and sleeplessness.

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  • He has also found that this action is reversible, for when the area of the surface of contact of the acid and mercury is made to increase, an electric current passes from the mercury to the acid, the amount of electricity which passes while the surface increases by one square centimetre being sufficient to decompose.

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  • These forms are termed by Fischer Metatrophic, because they require various kinds of organic materials obtained from the dead remains of other organisms or from the surfaces of their bodies, and can utilize and decompose them in various ways (Polytrophic) or, if monotrophic, are at least unable to work them up. The true parasites - obligate parasites of de Bary - are placed by Fischer in a third biological group, Paratrophic bacteria, to mark the importance of their mode of life in the interior of living organisms where they live and multiply in the blood, juices or tissues.

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  • The work of van Tieghem, van Senus, Fribes, Omeliansky and others has now shown that while certain anaerobic bacteria decompose the substance of the middle lamella - chiefly pectin compounds - and thus bring about the isolation of the cellulose fibres when, for instance, flax is steeped or " retted," they are unable to attack the cellulose itself.

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  • There exist in the mud of marshes, rivers and cloacae, &c., however, other anaerobic bacteria which decompose cellulose, probably hydrolysing it first and then splitting the products into carbon dioxide and marsh gas.

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  • The enormous extension of surface also facilitates the absorption of energy from the environment, and, to take one case only, it is impossible to doubt that some source of radiant energy must be at the disposal of those prototrophic forms which decompose carbonates and assimilate carbonic acid in the dark and oxidize nitrogen in dry rocky regions where no organic materials are at their disposal, even could they utilize them.

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  • It begins to decompose into silver and oxygen at 250°.

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  • His attempts to decompose "alum me, silica, zircone and glucine" were still less fortunate.

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  • The salts are unstable and readily decompose when heated.

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  • It burns when heated to about 200° C. Oxidizing agents decompose it with great violence.

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  • Water and the caustic alkalis readily decompose it with liberation of phosphine and the formation of iodides or hydriodic acid.

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  • By recrystallization from hot benzene, the a form is obtained in large prisms which melt at 157° C., and at their boiling-point decompose into hydrochloric acid and trichlorbenzene.

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  • Starting with a solid hydrocarbon of definite composition, it would be theoretically possible to decompose it entirely into carbon, hydrogen, ethylene and methane, and, by rapidly removing these from the heating zone before any secondary actions took place, to prevent formation of tar.

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  • Moreover, these secondary products cannot be successfully reduced, by further heating, to simpler hydrocarbons of any high illuminating value, and such bodies as naphthalene and anthracene have so great a stability that, when once formed, they resist any efforts again to decompose them by heat, short of the temperature which breaks them up into methane, carbon and hydrogen.

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  • decompose the liquid hydrocarbon in the presence of the diluents which are to mingle with it and act as its carrier, since, if this were done, a higher temperature could be employed and more of the heavier portions of the oil converted into gas, without at the same time breaking down the gaseous hydrocarbons too much.

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  • By heating to the boiling point of naphthalene (218°) tertiary alcohols are decomposed, while heating to the boiling point of anthracene (360°) suffices to decompose secondary alcohols, the primary remaining unaffected.

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  • Chlorine, bromine and iodine decompose arsine readily, the action being most violent in the case of chlorine.

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  • many of these minerals decompose somewhat readily, yielding secondary minerals, which are comparatively soft and have a scaly character, with eminently perfect cleavages, which facilitate splitting into exceedingly thin plates.

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  • The metallic salts all crystallize in the anhydrous condition and decompose on heating, leaving a residue of the pure metal.

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  • Consider hiring a shredder for large chunky branches otherwise they'll take a very long time to decompose.

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  • The continuous wavelet transform is used to decompose the impulse response into the time-scale domain.

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  • A. Timber shingles can split, detach, decompose or suffer woodpecker attack.

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  • It's true, however, that disposable diapers don't decompose easily.

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  • Because disposable diapers can take several hundred years to decompose, many people are turning to cloth diapers.

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  • However, if these diapers are to decompose, they must be exposed to air and sun, and the plausibility of this is highly unrealistic.

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  • Composting occurs when decayed organic materials decompose to become water and enriched soil.

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  • In addition, the plastic in the cartridges could take one thousand years or more to decompose, so whatever you throw away is sure to be around for a long, long time.

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  • The down side of disposable salad containers, however, is the fact that they do not decompose.

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  • When these organic materials decompose in the anaerobic environment of a landfill, a significant amount of methane is released into the environment.

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  • It is simply a case of allowing organic matter, such as vegetable peelings, grass clippings, egg shells, coffee grounds and a wide variety of other items, to decompose.

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  • The larger the material, the longer it take to decompose.

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  • When they are packed in plastic bags they take many years to decompose.

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  • So not only do they not clog up landfills and animal habitats, they don't poison their surroundings as they decompose either.

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  • Since the bags take approximately three years to break down when exposed to the right combination of sunlight, moisture, oxygen and microbial activity they aren't going to begin to decompose right in your kitchen.

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  • If you are composting, then you will wish to have a bag that will decompose on you quickly.

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  • It takes over 100 years for traditional chip bags to decompose, and even then they don't fully biodegrade.

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  • Micro-organisms, which degrade other organic substances, will not decompose plastic.

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  • Make sure sprouts are dry before you place them in the fridge or they may decompose faster.

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  • Leaves and shredded wood mulches decompose fairly quickly and need to be replenished frequently.

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  • Items that readily decompose - leaves, grass, and vegetable scraps - are broken down by bacteria and other organisms to provide nutrients and structure to the soil.

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  • Be sure the bin that you make or buy has ventilation holes in the sides, so your pile gets the air it needs to decompose.

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  • A bin of oak leaves, for example, can take as much as three years to decompose completely.

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  • This helps it decompose quickly and with little odor.

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  • Worms and beneficial fungi help plant material to decompose.

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  • Left undisturbed, fallen leaves will gradually decompose and enrich the soil beneath.

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  • Shredded leaves can be used as mulch in flower beds, or they can be added to the compost pile, where they will decompose and can help nourish the flower or vegetable garden later on.

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  • Unlike conventional mulch, rubber mulch does not decompose readily into the soil.

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  • While the color of the rubber mulch can fade or change over time, it doesn't decompose.

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  • Mulch helps the soil retain moisture and stay warmer, which in turn encourages the kitchen waste you mixed with the soil to decompose.

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  • Biodegradable: A substance that will decompose into smaller biochemical or chemical components or parts.

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  • This will help them decompose more quickly than if you add them to the pile intact.

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  • If you add fresh clippings, you're likely to end up with an odor problem because they'll clump together and start to generate an odor before they begin to decompose.

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  • Since the bacteria that decompose your compost materials need to breathe oxygen, you want to make sure that they get plenty of it.

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  • Instead of being placed in a metal coffin or concrete tomb, people who choose this method of burial are placed in biodegradable containers, which will naturally decompose over time.

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  • Grave markers are usually made of materials that will eventually decompose, such as wooden crosses, or rocks that may be engraved.

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  • Just make sure that these items will not flame up as the candle burns down, and will not decompose over time inside the candle.

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  • Cork mats are apt to decompose quicker than rubber mats.

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  • In nature, molds decompose paper, wood and leaves.

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  • Inside the home, they can just as easily decompose drywall, carpets, books and other household items.

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  • Acids decompose it into lead dioxide and monoxide, and the latter may or may not dissolve to form a salt; red lead may, therefore, be regarded as lead orthoplumbate, Pb2Pb04.

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  • These esters on hydrolysis yield the free acids, which readily decompose, with loss of carbon dioxide and formation of an aldehyde, R /Crri /Crri Oc< +�Cl � CH � [[Cooc H - O I ?Ch Cooc H 0c Ch�Cooh - Co +Chrr I Cho]].

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  • When strongly heated they decompose, forming fatty acids, nitrogen peroxide and nitrogen.

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  • Strong or weak solutions of these substances also decompose it, producing some alkali nitrate and nitrite, the cellulose molecule being only partially restored, some quantity undergoing oxidation.

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  • Dry guncotton heated in ammonia gas detonates at about 70°, and ammonium hydroxide solutions of all strengths slowly decompose it, yielding somewhat complex products.

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  • Gold forms three sulphides corresponding to the oxides; they readily decompose on heating.

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  • Alkaline hypobromites or hypochlorites or nitrous acid decompose urea into carbon dioxide and nitrogen.

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  • Air and moisture decompose it.

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