This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience. Learn more

declination

declination

declination Sentence Examples

  • I, 2 and 3), used to bolt the head of one of the screws, and the instrument was provided with a slipping piece, giving motion to the micrometer by screws acting on two slides, one in right ascension, the other in declination, so that " either of the, webs can be placed upon either component of a double star with ease and certainty (Mem.

  • 353), with which he measured the relative brightness of 2784 stars between the North Pole and about - so declination.

  • On the death of Argelander, which occurred on February r7th 1875, Schdnfeld was appointed to succeed him as director of the Bonn Observatory, and soon after his appointment he began his last and greatest piece of work, the extension, on Argelander's plan, of the survey of the heavens down to 23° of south declination.

  • These zone observations afforded 3 6 3,93 2 separate places of stars, and form the groundwork of the catalogue of 133,659 stars between 2° and 23° south declination, which was published in 1886 as the eighth volume of the Bonn observations.

  • Since the distance of a body from the observer cannot be observed directly, but only the right ascension and declination, calling these a and 6 we conceive ideal equations of the form a = f (a, b, c, e, f, g, t) and 5=0 (a, b, c, e, f, g, t), the symbols a, b,.

  • the word is found with its present meaning, the spring being considered as particularly the season of the year), a period of time, in particular, that of the four periods into which the year is divided by the changing of the temperature, rainfall, and growth and decay of vegetation due to the annual motion of the sun in declination.

  • Complete rotation of the head is obviously impossible because of the interference of the declination axis with the rods, and therefore, in some angles, objects cannot be measured in two positions of the circle.

  • Of these methods Bessel generally employed the first because of its simplicity, notwithstanding that it involved a resetting of the right ascension and declination of the axis of the tube with each reversal of the segments.

  • Bessel's practice was to unclamp in declination, lower and read off the head, and then restore the telescope to its former declination reading, the clockwork meanwhile following the stars in right ascension.

  • by Merz in 1839 on the model of Bessel's heliometer, submits the following suggestions for its improvement: 1 (I) to give automatically to the two segments simultaneous equal and opposite movement; 2 and (2) to make the tube of metal instead of wood; to attach the heliometer head firmly to this tube; to place the eye-piece permanently in the axis of the telescope; and to fix a strong cradle on the end of the declination axis, in which the tube, with the attached head and eye-piece, could rotate on its axis.

  • The brass tube, strengthened at the bearing points by strong truly turned collars, rotates in the cast iron cradle q attached to the declination axis.

  • k clamps the telescope in declination, n clamps it in right ascension, and the handles m and I provide slow motion in declination and right ascension respectively.

  • The circles for position angle and declination are read by micrometer-microscopes illuminated by the lamp L; the scales are illuminated by the lamp 1.

  • The tube V, on the contrary, is attached to the cradle, and merely forms a support for the finder Q, the handles at f and p, and the moving ring P. The latter gives quick motion in position angle; the handles at p clamp and give slow motion in position angle, those at f clamp and give slow motion in right ascension and declination.

  • a is the eye-piece, b the handle for moving the segments, c the micrometer microscope for reading the scales and scale micrometer, d the micrometer readers of the position and declination circles, e the handle for rotating the large wheel E which carries the screens.

  • 18 clamps and 19 gives slow motion in declination; 20 clamps and 21 gives slow motion in right ascension.

  • The microscopes adjoining 82 read the position and declination circles; for, by an ingenious arrangement of prisms and screens, the images of both circles can be read by each single microscope as shown in fig.

  • With the tables of the sun's declination then available, he could calculate his latitude by meridian altitudes of the sun taken with his astrolabe.

  • Becoming interested in terrestrial magnetism he made many observations of magnetic intensity and declination in various parts of Sweden, and was charged by the Stockholm Academy of Sciences with the task, not completed till shortly before his death, of working out the magnetic data obtained by the Swedish frigate "Eugenie" on her voyage round the world in 1851-1853.

  • With the first instrument of this kind, having objectives of 1 5 inch aperture, he measured the brightness of 4260 stars, including all stars down to the 6th magnitude between the North Pole and - 30° declination.

  • The instrument was then returned to Cambridge (U.S.A.), where the survey extended so as to include all stars of magnitude 7.5 down to - 40° declination, after which it was once more sent back to Arequipa.

  • solstitium, from sol, sun, and sistere, to stand still), in astronomy either of the two points at which the sun reaches its greatest declination north or south.

  • Flamsteed, from measurements made in 1689 and succeeding years with his mural quadrant, similarly concluded that the declination of the Pole Star was 40" less in July than in September.

  • This star was seen to possess an apparent motion similar to that which would be a consequence of the nutation of the earth's axis; but since its declination varied only one half as much as in the case of y Draconis, it was obvious that nutation did not supply the requisite solution.

  • Bradley had already perceived, in the case of the two stars previously scrutinized, that the apparent difference of declination from the maximum positions was nearly proportional to the sun's distance from the equinoctial points; and he realized the necessity for more observations before any generalization could be attempted.

  • His conclusions may be thus summarized: (r) only stars near the solstitial colure had their maximum north and south positions when the sun was near the equinoxes, (2) each star was at its maximum positions when it passed the zenith at six o'clock morning and evening (this he afterwards showed to be inaccurate, and found the greatest change in declination to be proportional to the latitude of the star), (3) the apparent motions of all stars at about the same time was in the same direction.

  • It remains to consider the measurement of the declination and the horizontal component, these two elements being generally measured with the same instrument, which is called a unifilar magnetometer.

  • The measurement of the declination involves two separate observations, namely, the determination of (a) the magnetic meridian and (b) the geographical meridian, the angle between the two being the declination.

  • - Unifilar Magnetometer, arranged to indicate declination.

  • When making a determination of declination a brass plummet having the same weight as the magnet is first suspended in its place, and the torsion of the fibre is taken out.

  • Hence in more recent patterns of magnetometer it is usual to do away with the transit mirror method of observing and either to use a separate theodolite to observe the azimuth of some distant object, which will then act as a fixed mark when making the declination observations, or to attach to the magnetometer an altitude telescope and circle for use when determining the geographical meridian.

  • The chief uncertainty in declination observations, at any rate at a fixed observatory, lies in the variable torsion of the silk suspension, as it is found that, although the fibre may be entirely freed from torsion before beginning the declination observations, yet at the conclusion of these observations a considerable amount of torsion may have appeared.

  • In the case of the Kew pattern unifilar the same magnet that is used for the declination is usually employed for determining H, and for the purposes of the vibration experiment it is mounted as for the observation of the magnetic meridian.

  • In order to obtain the declination a pivoted magnet is used to obtain the magnetic meridian, the geographical meridian being obtained by observations on the sun or stars.

  • meridian, called the magnetic variation or declination; amongst mariners this angle is known as the variation of the compass.

  • declination, which was practically finished by the end of 1878 and published in 1881.

  • declination to the equator, and collected the results in the Radclif f e Catalogue for 1890, which contains the places of 6424 stars.

  • This construction assumes that the sun describes daily a small circle about the pole of the celestial sphere, and ignores any diurnal variation in the declination.

  • In its simplest form the mounting of an equatorial telescope consists of an axis parallel to the earth's axis, called" the polar axis "; a second axis at right angles to the polar axis called" the declination axis "; and the telescope tube fixed at right angles to the declination axis.

  • to A A is the polar axis; the telescope is attached to the end of the declination axis; the latter rotates in bearings which are attached to the polar axis and concealed by the telescope itself.

  • The telescope is counterpoised by a weight attached to the opposite end of the declination axis.

  • Thus, when the declination axis is horizontal the telescope moves in the plane of the meridian by rotation on the declination axis only.

  • If we now attach to the polar axis a graduated circle D D, called the" hour circle,"of which the microscope or vernier R reads o h when the declination axis is horizontal, we can obviously read off the hour angle from the meridian of any star to which the telescope may be directed at the instant of observation.

  • Since the transit circle is preferable to the equatorial for such observations wherein great accuracy is required, the declination and hour circles of an equatorial are employed, not for the determination of the right ascensions and declinations of celestial objects, but for directing the telescope with ease and certainty to any object situated in an approximately known position, and which may or may not be visible to the naked eye, or to define approximately the position of an unknown object.

  • The declination axis rests on bearings attached to opposite sides of the polar axis.

  • The telescope is attached to one end of the declination axis, and counterpoised by a weight at the other end, as in fig.

  • (B) The polar axis is supported as in type A; the telescope is placed between the bearings of the declination axis and is mounted symmetrically with respect to the polar axis; no counterpoise is therefore requisite.

  • (C) The declination axis is mounted on the prolongation of the upper pivot of the polar axis; the telescope is placed at one end of the declination axis and counterpoised by a weight at the other end.

  • (D) The declination axis is mounted on a forked piece or other similar contrivance attached to a prolongation of the upper pivot of the polar axis; the telescope is mounted between the pivots of the declination axis.

  • Mountings of types A and B - that is, with a long polar axis supported at both ends - are often called the" English mounting,"and type C, in which the declination axis is placed on the extension of the upper pivot of the polar axis, is called the" German mounting,"from the first employment of type C by Fraunhofer.

  • Slow motion in declination can be cornmunicated by a screw acting on a long arm, which latter can be clamped at pleasure to the polar axis.

  • The peculiar form of the tube is eminently suited for rigid preservation of the relative parallelism of the axes of the two telescopes, so that,;i the image of a certain selected star is retained on the intersection of two wires of the micrometer, by means of the driving clock, aided by small corrections given by the observer in right ascension and declination (required on account of irregularity in the clock movement, error in astronomical adjustment of the polar axis, or changes in the star's apparent place produced by refraction), the image of a star will continue on the same spot of the photographic film during the whole time of exposure.

  • The declination circle is most inconvenient of access, and slow motion in declination can only be effected when the instrument is clamped by a long and inconvenient handle; so that, practically, clamping in declination was not employed.

  • The driving circle was greatly increased in diameter and placed at the upper end of the polar axis, and both the polar and declination axes were made much stronger in proportion to the mass of the instrument they were designed to carry.

  • It is not a little curious that the obvious improvement of trans ferring the declination axis as well as the declination-clamp to the telescope end of the declination axis was so long delayed; we can explain the delay only by the desire to retain the declination circle as a part of the counterpoise.

  • We believe the first important equatorials in which the declination was read from the eye-end were the 15-in.

  • Prism i is in the axis of the declination circle and always reflects rays along?

  • A slight rotatory motion of the telescope E on its axis enables the vernier of the declination circle to be read through prism 1.

  • The mode of relieving the friction of the declination axis is similar to that employed in the Melbourne telescope and in the account of the Vienna telescope published by Grubb.

  • The declination circle reads from the eye-end, and four handles for clamping and slow motion in right ascension and declination are situated near the observer's hands.

  • The lamp near the eye-end illuminates the field or the wires at pleasure, as well as the position circle of the micrometer and the declination circle; a separate lamp illuminates the hour circle.

  • An excellent feature is the short distance between the eye-piece and the declination axis, so that 1 In the bent telescope refracting prisms are employed at the corners to change the direction of the rays.

  • The Repsolds find it unnecessary to relieve the friction of the declination axis.

  • This framework is provided with guides on which the platform, whilst preserving its horizontality, is V the observer has to follow the eye-end in a comparatively small circle; another good point is the flattening of the cast-iron centrepiece of the tube so that the flange of the declination axis is attached as near to the axis of the telescope tube as is consistent with free passage of the cone of rays from the object-glass.

  • 15), the attachment to the flange of the declination axis is placed as close as it can be to the axis of the tube without interfering with rays converging from the object-glass to any point in the field of view.

  • - Dr Engelmann's piece and the declination circle by another (looking up the per forated polar axis), and where he can also set the telescope to any hour angle by one wheel, or to any declination by a second, with the greatest ease.

  • The observer at the eye-end can also read off the hour and declination circles and communicate quick or slow motions, to the telescope both in right ascension and declination by conveniently Pulkovo, placed handles.

  • The eye end presents an refractor appearance too complicated to be figured here; it has a micrometer and its illumination for the position circle, a micrometer head, and a bright or dark field, clamps in right ascension and declination and quick and slow motion in the same, a finder, microscopes for reading the hour and declination circles, an illuminated dial showing sidereal time and driven by an electric current from the sidereal clock, and counter weights which can be removed when a spectroscope or other heavy appliance is added.

  • arranged, and are all necessary for the quick and easy working raised and lowered nearly in an arc of a circle of which the point of intersection of the polar and declination axes is the centre.

  • Other water engines, similarly connected, with keys at the observer's hands, rotate the dome and perform the quick motions in right ascension and declination.

  • The declination axis is here represented by what are practically the trunnions or pivots of the tube, resting in bearings which are supported by the arms of a very massive cast-iron fork bolted to the upper end of the polar axis.

  • The telescope is moved in right ascension and declination by electric motors controlled from positions convenient for the observer.

  • They then meet a small plane mirror supported at the point of intersection of the polar and declination axes, whence they are reflected down through the hollow polar axis as shown in fig.

  • An hour circle attached to E P and a declination circle attached to the box containing the mirror N, both of which can be read or set from E, complete the essentials of the instrument.

  • The declination axis passes through the two opposite sides of the central box.

  • He is provided with quick and slow motions in right ascension and declination, which can be operated from the eye-end, and he can work in a closed and comfortably heated room.

  • Therefore, to observe stars of a different declination it will be necessary either to shift the direction of the fixed telescope, keeping its axis still pointed to the coelostat mirror, or to employ a second mirror to reflect the rays from the coelostat mirror along the axis of a fixed telescope.

  • Besides these complications there is another drawback to the use of the coelostat for general astronomical work, viz., the obliquity of the angle of reflection, which can never be less than that of the declination of the star, and may be greater to any extent.

  • A pair of stars of known declination are selected such that their zenith distances, when on the meridian, are nearly equal and opposite, and whose right ascensions differ by five or ten minutes of time.

  • The value of "one revolution of the screw in seconds of arc" can be determined either by observing at transit the difference of zenith distance of two stars of known declination in terms of the micrometer screw, the instrument remaining at rest between their transits; or by measuring at known instants in terms of the screw, the change of zenith distance of a standard star of small polar distance near the time of its greatest elongation.

  • Burnham's General Catalogue of Double Stars (1907) contains 13,655 pairs north of declination - 31°.

  • There is for example some evidence that the declination of the solar apex is really increased when the motion is referred to fainter stars.

  • Setting A for the right ascension, D for the declination of the apex, these are: L.

  • Proctor found that between Aldebaran and the Pleiades most of the stars have a motion positive in right ascension and negative in declination, a phenomenon which he designated " star-drift."

  • with too low a declination.

  • This appears to be the explanation of Stumpe's and Porter's results; they both divided their proper motions into groups according to their numerical amount, and found that the declination of the solar apex progressively increased as the size of the motions used diminished.

  • Kobold, using a peculiar and ingenious method, found for it a declination - 3°, which disagrees very badly with all other determinations; but it is a peculiarity of Kobold's method that it gives the line of symmetry of motion, which joins the apex and antapex, without indicating which end is the apex.

  • A magnetograph is an instrument for continuously recording the values of the magnetic elements, the three universally chosen being the declination, the horizontal component and the vertical component.

  • The changes in declination are obtained by means of a magnet which is suspended by a long fibre and carries a mirror, immediately below which a fixed mirror is attached to the base of the instrument.

  • The light reflected from the fixed mirror traces a straight line on the paper, serving as a base line from which the variations in declination are measured.

  • As the declination changes the spot of light reflected from the magnet mirror moves parallel to the axis of the recording drum, and hence the distance between the line traced by this spot and the base line gives, for any instant, on an arbitrary scale the difference between the declination and a constant angle, namely, the declination corresponding to the base line.

  • The value of this constant angle is obtained by comparing the record with the value for the declination as measured with a magnetometer.

  • per hour, so that the more rapid variations of the declination can be followed.

  • fir Instrumentenkunde, 1907, 2 7, 145.) The method of recording the variations in H is exactly the same as that adopted in the case of the declination, and the sensitiveness generally adopted is such that I mm.

  • 00005 C.G.S., the time scale being the same as that employed in the case of the declination.

  • The magnet is so weighted that its axis is approximately horizontal, and any change in the inclination of the axis is observed by means of an attached mirror, a second mirror fixed to the stand serving to give a base line for the records, which are obtained in the same way as in the case of the declination.

  • Cady, Terrestrial Magnetism, 1904, 9, 69, describing a declination magnetograph in which the record is obtained by means of a pen acting on a moving strip of paper, so that the curve can be consulted at all times to see whether a disturbance is in progress.

  • It is the idea of tension or tonicity as the essential attribute of body, in contradistinction to passive inert matter, which is distinctively Stoic. The Epicureans leave unexplained the primary constitution and first movements of their atoms or elemental solids; chance or declination may account for them.

  • His first memoir on the theory of magnetism, Intensitas vis magneticae terrestris ad mensuram absolutam revocata, was published in 1833, and he shortly afterwards proceeded, in conjunction with Wilhelm Weber, to invent new apparatus for observing the earth's magnetism and its changes; the instruments devised by them were the declination instrument and the bifilar magnetometer.

  • The sun's proper motion among the stars has been sought in the past as the assumption that the universe of stars showed as a whole no definite displacement of its parts, and, on this assumption, different methods of reduction which attributed apparent relative displacement of parts to real relative displacement of the sun agreed fairly well in concluding that the " apex of the sun's way " was directed to a point in right ascension 275°, declination 37° (F.

  • There is reason to believe that Gunter was the first to discover (in 1622 or 1625) that the magnetic needle does not retain the same declination in the same place at all times.

  • Latitudinal Co-ordinate; Declination or Polar Distance.

  • The unceasing diurnal motion of the image of any heavenly body relative to the cross threads of a telescope makes a direct accurate measure of any co-ordinate except the declination almost impossible.

  • They were provided with large graduated circles adapted for measurements of declination and right ascension, and prove the Chinese to have anticipated by at least three centuries some of Tycho Brahe's most important inventions.

  • in diameter; he substituted equatorial for zodiacal armillae, thus definitively establishing the system of measurements in right ascension and declination; and improved the graduation of circular arcs by adopting the method of " transversals."

  • DECLINATION (from Lat.

  • In 1596 at London the angle of declination was 11° E.

  • The angle is gradually diminishing and the declination will in time again be o°, when it will slowly increase in an easterly direction, the north magnetic pole oscillating slowly around the North Pole.

  • Regular daily changes of declination also occur.

  • (See Terrestrial magnetism.) In astronomy the declination is the angular distance, as seen from the earth, of a heavenly body from the celestial equator, thus corresponding with terrestrial latitude.

  • Sort by Sort output list by distance from search center (in arcminutes ), increasing right ascension or declination, or stellar magnitude.

  • The declination, or deviation between the magnetic pole and the rotation pole, should theoretically be a simple, mathematically calculable figure.

  • declination given by the Ordnance Survey on their 1:50,000 Loch Assynt sheet.

  • Up to this time, Venus has had a superior declination to the Sun.

  • The number 13.50 happens to be the magnetic declination for this area.

  • We are currently enjoying this planet close to its maximum northern declination at a time when the ring system is wide open.

  • Also every month, the Moon will reach its minimum declination at 18º north or south.

  • Indeed this is also true of the signs of the zodiac which have higher declination.

  • declination diagram is a part of the information in the lower margin on most larger maps.

  • declination degrees marked on the dial.

  • declination lines on the dial plate.

  • All of the objects in the Messier Catalog are north of -35 degrees declination.

  • This error caused an offset in the source declination up to 1 arcmin.

  • Next we must know the sun's declination at the time of our observation.

  • declination in the default equinox (given to the nearest arcsecond in the original catalog ).

  • declination in degrees, equinox 1950.

  • declination of the sun for the first day of each month.

  • declination of the object in the selected equinox.

  • declination of the star in the selected equinox, i.e., the optical position.

  • declination of the radio source in the selected equinox.

  • declination of the target in the default equinox.

  • declination of the galaxy, in the selected equinox.

  • Dec The declination of the object in the selected equinox.

  • Dec The declination of the target in the default equinox.

  • What is its true declination, after correcting for geocentric parallax?

  • precessed declination of the object in degrees, arcminutes and arcseconds for the epoch of observation.

  • Sort by Sort output list by distance from search center (in arcminutes ), increasing right ascension or declination, or stellar magnitude.

  • Gilded Hornton stone with declination lines crossing the hour lines to mark the summer solstice and equinoxes.

  • I, 2 and 3), used to bolt the head of one of the screws, and the instrument was provided with a slipping piece, giving motion to the micrometer by screws acting on two slides, one in right ascension, the other in declination, so that " either of the, webs can be placed upon either component of a double star with ease and certainty (Mem.

  • In measuring differences of declination, where the stars are brought up by the diurnal motion, this precaution cannot be adopted, because it is necessary always to bisect the preceding star with the fixed web.

  • The velocity of rotation of the micrometer-screw could therefore be varied for stars of different declination by varying the distance from the apex at which the revolving disk presses upon the revolving cone.

  • 353), with which he measured the relative brightness of 2784 stars between the North Pole and about - so declination.

  • When the great scheme of an international survey of the heavens was projected, the zone between 25° and 31° north declination was allotted to him, and at the time of his death some progress had been made in recording its included stars.

  • On the death of Argelander, which occurred on February r7th 1875, Schdnfeld was appointed to succeed him as director of the Bonn Observatory, and soon after his appointment he began his last and greatest piece of work, the extension, on Argelander's plan, of the survey of the heavens down to 23° of south declination.

  • These zone observations afforded 3 6 3,93 2 separate places of stars, and form the groundwork of the catalogue of 133,659 stars between 2° and 23° south declination, which was published in 1886 as the eighth volume of the Bonn observations.

  • Since the distance of a body from the observer cannot be observed directly, but only the right ascension and declination, calling these a and 6 we conceive ideal equations of the form a = f (a, b, c, e, f, g, t) and 5=0 (a, b, c, e, f, g, t), the symbols a, b,.

  • the word is found with its present meaning, the spring being considered as particularly the season of the year), a period of time, in particular, that of the four periods into which the year is divided by the changing of the temperature, rainfall, and growth and decay of vegetation due to the annual motion of the sun in declination.

  • Complete rotation of the head is obviously impossible because of the interference of the declination axis with the rods, and therefore, in some angles, objects cannot be measured in two positions of the circle.

  • Of these methods Bessel generally employed the first because of its simplicity, notwithstanding that it involved a resetting of the right ascension and declination of the axis of the tube with each reversal of the segments.

  • Bessel's practice was to unclamp in declination, lower and read off the head, and then restore the telescope to its former declination reading, the clockwork meanwhile following the stars in right ascension.

  • by Merz in 1839 on the model of Bessel's heliometer, submits the following suggestions for its improvement: 1 (I) to give automatically to the two segments simultaneous equal and opposite movement; 2 and (2) to make the tube of metal instead of wood; to attach the heliometer head firmly to this tube; to place the eye-piece permanently in the axis of the telescope; and to fix a strong cradle on the end of the declination axis, in which the tube, with the attached head and eye-piece, could rotate on its axis.

  • The makers availed themselves of Bessel's suggestion to make the segments move in cylindrical slides, and of Struve's to have the head attached to a brass tube; the eye-piece is set permanently in the axis, and the whole rotates in a cradle attached to the declination axis.

  • The brass tube, strengthened at the bearing points by strong truly turned collars, rotates in the cast iron cradle q attached to the declination axis.

  • k clamps the telescope in declination, n clamps it in right ascension, and the handles m and I provide slow motion in declination and right ascension respectively.

  • It differed only from the three Russian instruments in having a mounting by the Cookes in which the declination circle reads from the eye-end.5 This instrument was afterwards most generously lent by Lord Lindsay to Gill for his expedition to Ascension in 1877.6 These four Repsold heliometers proved to be excellent instruments, 5 For a detailed description of this instrument see Dunecht Publications, vol.

  • The circles for position angle and declination are read by micrometer-microscopes illuminated by the lamp L; the scales are illuminated by the lamp 1.

  • The tube V, on the contrary, is attached to the cradle, and merely forms a support for the finder Q, the handles at f and p, and the moving ring P. The latter gives quick motion in position angle; the handles at p clamp and give slow motion in position angle, those at f clamp and give slow motion in right ascension and declination.

  • a is the eye-piece, b the handle for moving the segments, c the micrometer microscope for reading the scales and scale micrometer, d the micrometer readers of the position and declination circles, e the handle for rotating the large wheel E which carries the screens.

  • 18 clamps and 19 gives slow motion in declination; 20 clamps and 21 gives slow motion in right ascension.

  • The microscopes adjoining 82 read the position and declination circles; for, by an ingenious arrangement of prisms and screens, the images of both circles can be read by each single microscope as shown in fig.

  • With the tables of the sun's declination then available, he could calculate his latitude by meridian altitudes of the sun taken with his astrolabe.

  • Becoming interested in terrestrial magnetism he made many observations of magnetic intensity and declination in various parts of Sweden, and was charged by the Stockholm Academy of Sciences with the task, not completed till shortly before his death, of working out the magnetic data obtained by the Swedish frigate "Eugenie" on her voyage round the world in 1851-1853.

  • With the first instrument of this kind, having objectives of 1 5 inch aperture, he measured the brightness of 4260 stars, including all stars down to the 6th magnitude between the North Pole and - 30° declination.

  • The instrument was then returned to Cambridge (U.S.A.), where the survey extended so as to include all stars of magnitude 7.5 down to - 40° declination, after which it was once more sent back to Arequipa.

  • solstitium, from sol, sun, and sistere, to stand still), in astronomy either of the two points at which the sun reaches its greatest declination north or south.

  • Flamsteed, from measurements made in 1689 and succeeding years with his mural quadrant, similarly concluded that the declination of the Pole Star was 40" less in July than in September.

  • This star was seen to possess an apparent motion similar to that which would be a consequence of the nutation of the earth's axis; but since its declination varied only one half as much as in the case of y Draconis, it was obvious that nutation did not supply the requisite solution.

  • Bradley had already perceived, in the case of the two stars previously scrutinized, that the apparent difference of declination from the maximum positions was nearly proportional to the sun's distance from the equinoctial points; and he realized the necessity for more observations before any generalization could be attempted.

  • His conclusions may be thus summarized: (r) only stars near the solstitial colure had their maximum north and south positions when the sun was near the equinoxes, (2) each star was at its maximum positions when it passed the zenith at six o'clock morning and evening (this he afterwards showed to be inaccurate, and found the greatest change in declination to be proportional to the latitude of the star), (3) the apparent motions of all stars at about the same time was in the same direction.

  • The elements which are actually measured when determining the value of the earth's field are usually the declination, the dip and the horizontal component (see Terrestrial magnetism).

  • It remains to consider the measurement of the declination and the horizontal component, these two elements being generally measured with the same instrument, which is called a unifilar magnetometer.

  • The measurement of the declination involves two separate observations, namely, the determination of (a) the magnetic meridian and (b) the geographical meridian, the angle between the two being the declination.

  • - Unifilar Magnetometer, arranged to indicate declination.

  • When making a determination of declination a brass plummet having the same weight as the magnet is first suspended in its place, and the torsion of the fibre is taken out.

  • Hence in more recent patterns of magnetometer it is usual to do away with the transit mirror method of observing and either to use a separate theodolite to observe the azimuth of some distant object, which will then act as a fixed mark when making the declination observations, or to attach to the magnetometer an altitude telescope and circle for use when determining the geographical meridian.

  • The chief uncertainty in declination observations, at any rate at a fixed observatory, lies in the variable torsion of the silk suspension, as it is found that, although the fibre may be entirely freed from torsion before beginning the declination observations, yet at the conclusion of these observations a considerable amount of torsion may have appeared.

  • In the case of the Kew pattern unifilar the same magnet that is used for the declination is usually employed for determining H, and for the purposes of the vibration experiment it is mounted as for the observation of the magnetic meridian.

  • In order to obtain the declination a pivoted magnet is used to obtain the magnetic meridian, the geographical meridian being obtained by observations on the sun or stars.

  • meridian, called the magnetic variation or declination; amongst mariners this angle is known as the variation of the compass.

  • declination, which was practically finished by the end of 1878 and published in 1881.

  • declination to the equator, and collected the results in the Radclif f e Catalogue for 1890, which contains the places of 6424 stars.

  • This construction assumes that the sun describes daily a small circle about the pole of the celestial sphere, and ignores any diurnal variation in the declination.

  • The arc Cs is graduated, and is set so that the angle COD equals the complement of the sun's declination.

  • In its simplest form the mounting of an equatorial telescope consists of an axis parallel to the earth's axis, called" the polar axis "; a second axis at right angles to the polar axis called" the declination axis "; and the telescope tube fixed at right angles to the declination axis.

  • to A A is the polar axis; the telescope is attached to the end of the declination axis; the latter rotates in bearings which are attached to the polar axis and concealed by the telescope itself.

  • The telescope is counterpoised by a weight attached to the opposite end of the declination axis.

  • Thus, when the declination axis is horizontal the telescope moves in the plane of the meridian by rotation on the declination axis only.

  • Now, if a graduated circle B B is attached to the declination axis, together with the necessary verniers or microscopes V V for reading it (see Transit Circle), so arranged that when the telescope is turned on the declination axis till its optical axis is parallel to A A the vernier reads 0° and when at right angles to A A 90°, then we can employ the readings of 2 Herschel, Phil.

  • If we now attach to the polar axis a graduated circle D D, called the" hour circle,"of which the microscope or vernier R reads o h when the declination axis is horizontal, we can obviously read off the hour angle from the meridian of any star to which the telescope may be directed at the instant of observation.

  • Since the transit circle is preferable to the equatorial for such observations wherein great accuracy is required, the declination and hour circles of an equatorial are employed, not for the determination of the right ascensions and declinations of celestial objects, but for directing the telescope with ease and certainty to any object situated in an approximately known position, and which may or may not be visible to the naked eye, or to define approximately the position of an unknown object.

  • The declination axis rests on bearings attached to opposite sides of the polar axis.

  • The telescope is attached to one end of the declination axis, and counterpoised by a weight at the other end, as in fig.

  • (B) The polar axis is supported as in type A; the telescope is placed between the bearings of the declination axis and is mounted symmetrically with respect to the polar axis; no counterpoise is therefore requisite.

  • (C) The declination axis is mounted on the prolongation of the upper pivot of the polar axis; the telescope is placed at one end of the declination axis and counterpoised by a weight at the other end.

  • (D) The declination axis is mounted on a forked piece or other similar contrivance attached to a prolongation of the upper pivot of the polar axis; the telescope is mounted between the pivots of the declination axis.

  • Mountings of types A and B - that is, with a long polar axis supported at both ends - are often called the" English mounting,"and type C, in which the declination axis is placed on the extension of the upper pivot of the polar axis, is called the" German mounting,"from the first employment of type C by Fraunhofer.

  • Slow motion in declination can be cornmunicated by a screw acting on a long arm, which latter can be clamped at pleasure to the polar axis.

  • The peculiar form of the tube is eminently suited for rigid preservation of the relative parallelism of the axes of the two telescopes, so that,;i the image of a certain selected star is retained on the intersection of two wires of the micrometer, by means of the driving clock, aided by small corrections given by the observer in right ascension and declination (required on account of irregularity in the clock movement, error in astronomical adjustment of the polar axis, or changes in the star's apparent place produced by refraction), the image of a star will continue on the same spot of the photographic film during the whole time of exposure.

  • The declination circle is most inconvenient of access, and slow motion in declination can only be effected when the instrument is clamped by a long and inconvenient handle; so that, practically, clamping in declination was not employed.

  • The driving circle was greatly increased in diameter and placed at the upper end of the polar axis, and both the polar and declination axes were made much stronger in proportion to the mass of the instrument they were designed to carry.

  • It is not a little curious that the obvious improvement of trans ferring the declination axis as well as the declination-clamp to the telescope end of the declination axis was so long delayed; we can explain the delay only by the desire to retain the declination circle as a part of the counterpoise.

  • We believe the first important equatorials in which the declination was read from the eye-end were the 15-in.

  • Prism i is in the axis of the declination circle and always reflects rays along?

  • A slight rotatory motion of the telescope E on its axis enables the vernier of the declination circle to be read through prism 1.

  • The mode of relieving the friction of the declination axis is similar to that employed in the Melbourne telescope and in the account of the Vienna telescope published by Grubb.

  • The declination circle reads from the eye-end, and four handles for clamping and slow motion in right ascension and declination are situated near the observer's hands.

  • The lamp near the eye-end illuminates the field or the wires at pleasure, as well as the position circle of the micrometer and the declination circle; a separate lamp illuminates the hour circle.

  • An excellent feature is the short distance between the eye-piece and the declination axis, so that 1 In the bent telescope refracting prisms are employed at the corners to change the direction of the rays.

  • The Repsolds find it unnecessary to relieve the friction of the declination axis.

  • This framework is provided with guides on which the platform, whilst preserving its horizontality, is V the observer has to follow the eye-end in a comparatively small circle; another good point is the flattening of the cast-iron centrepiece of the tube so that the flange of the declination axis is attached as near to the axis of the telescope tube as is consistent with free passage of the cone of rays from the object-glass.

  • 15), the attachment to the flange of the declination axis is placed as close as it can be to the axis of the tube without interfering with rays converging from the object-glass to any point in the field of view.

  • - Dr Engelmann's piece and the declination circle by another (looking up the per forated polar axis), and where he can also set the telescope to any hour angle by one wheel, or to any declination by a second, with the greatest ease.

  • The observer at the eye-end can also read off the hour and declination circles and communicate quick or slow motions, to the telescope both in right ascension and declination by conveniently Pulkovo, placed handles.

  • The eye end presents an refractor appearance too complicated to be figured here; it has a micrometer and its illumination for the position circle, a micrometer head, and a bright or dark field, clamps in right ascension and declination and quick and slow motion in the same, a finder, microscopes for reading the hour and declination circles, an illuminated dial showing sidereal time and driven by an electric current from the sidereal clock, and counter weights which can be removed when a spectroscope or other heavy appliance is added.

  • arranged, and are all necessary for the quick and easy working raised and lowered nearly in an arc of a circle of which the point of intersection of the polar and declination axes is the centre.

  • Other water engines, similarly connected, with keys at the observer's hands, rotate the dome and perform the quick motions in right ascension and declination.

  • The declination axis is here represented by what are practically the trunnions or pivots of the tube, resting in bearings which are supported by the arms of a very massive cast-iron fork bolted to the upper end of the polar axis.

  • The telescope is moved in right ascension and declination by electric motors controlled from positions convenient for the observer.

  • They then meet a small plane mirror supported at the point of intersection of the polar and declination axes, whence they are reflected down through the hollow polar axis as shown in fig.

  • A second mirror N, placed at 45° to the optical axis of the object-glass, reflects rays from a star at the pole; but by rotating the box which contains this mirror on the axis of its supporting tube T a star of any declination can be observed, and by combining this motion with rotation of the polar axis the astronomer seated at E is able to view any object whatever in the visible heavens, except circumpolar stars near lower transit.

  • An hour circle attached to E P and a declination circle attached to the box containing the mirror N, both of which can be read or set from E, complete the essentials of the instrument.

  • The declination axis passes through the two opposite sides of the central box.

  • Upon an axis concentric with the declination axis is carried a plane mirror, which is geared so as always to bisect the angle between the polar axis and the optical axis of the telescope.

  • He is provided with quick and slow motions in right ascension and declination, which can be operated from the eye-end, and he can work in a closed and comfortably heated room.

  • Therefore, to observe stars of a different declination it will be necessary either to shift the direction of the fixed telescope, keeping its axis still pointed to the coelostat mirror, or to employ a second mirror to reflect the rays from the coelostat mirror along the axis of a fixed telescope.

  • Besides these complications there is another drawback to the use of the coelostat for general astronomical work, viz., the obliquity of the angle of reflection, which can never be less than that of the declination of the star, and may be greater to any extent.

  • A pair of stars of known declination are selected such that their zenith distances, when on the meridian, are nearly equal and opposite, and whose right ascensions differ by five or ten minutes of time.

  • The value of "one revolution of the screw in seconds of arc" can be determined either by observing at transit the difference of zenith distance of two stars of known declination in terms of the micrometer screw, the instrument remaining at rest between their transits; or by measuring at known instants in terms of the screw, the change of zenith distance of a standard star of small polar distance near the time of its greatest elongation.

  • Burnham's General Catalogue of Double Stars (1907) contains 13,655 pairs north of declination - 31°.

  • There is for example some evidence that the declination of the solar apex is really increased when the motion is referred to fainter stars.

  • Setting A for the right ascension, D for the declination of the apex, these are: L.

  • Proctor found that between Aldebaran and the Pleiades most of the stars have a motion positive in right ascension and negative in declination, a phenomenon which he designated " star-drift."

  • with too low a declination.

  • This appears to be the explanation of Stumpe's and Porter's results; they both divided their proper motions into groups according to their numerical amount, and found that the declination of the solar apex progressively increased as the size of the motions used diminished.

  • Kobold, using a peculiar and ingenious method, found for it a declination - 3°, which disagrees very badly with all other determinations; but it is a peculiarity of Kobold's method that it gives the line of symmetry of motion, which joins the apex and antapex, without indicating which end is the apex.

  • MAGNETOGRAPH, an instrument for continuously recording the values of the magnetic elements, the three universally chosen being the declination, the horizontal component and the vertical component (see Terrestrial Magnetism).

  • The changes in declination are obtained by means of a magnet which is suspended by a long fibre and carries a mirror, immediately below which a fixed mirror is attached to the base of the instrument.

  • The light reflected from the fixed mirror traces a straight line on the paper, serving as a base line from which the variations in declination are measured.

  • As the declination changes the spot of light reflected from the magnet mirror moves parallel to the axis of the recording drum, and hence the distance between the line traced by this spot and the base line gives, for any instant, on an arbitrary scale the difference between the declination and a constant angle, namely, the declination corresponding to the base line.

  • The value of this constant angle is obtained by comparing the record with the value for the declination as measured with a magnetometer.

  • per hour, so that the more rapid variations of the declination can be followed.

  • fir Instrumentenkunde, 1907, 2 7, 145.) The method of recording the variations in H is exactly the same as that adopted in the case of the declination, and the sensitiveness generally adopted is such that I mm.

  • 00005 C.G.S., the time scale being the same as that employed in the case of the declination.

  • The magnet is so weighted that its axis is approximately horizontal, and any change in the inclination of the axis is observed by means of an attached mirror, a second mirror fixed to the stand serving to give a base line for the records, which are obtained in the same way as in the case of the declination.

  • Cady, Terrestrial Magnetism, 1904, 9, 69, describing a declination magnetograph in which the record is obtained by means of a pen acting on a moving strip of paper, so that the curve can be consulted at all times to see whether a disturbance is in progress.

  • It is the idea of tension or tonicity as the essential attribute of body, in contradistinction to passive inert matter, which is distinctively Stoic. The Epicureans leave unexplained the primary constitution and first movements of their atoms or elemental solids; chance or declination may account for them.

  • His first memoir on the theory of magnetism, Intensitas vis magneticae terrestris ad mensuram absolutam revocata, was published in 1833, and he shortly afterwards proceeded, in conjunction with Wilhelm Weber, to invent new apparatus for observing the earth's magnetism and its changes; the instruments devised by them were the declination instrument and the bifilar magnetometer.

  • The sun's proper motion among the stars has been sought in the past as the assumption that the universe of stars showed as a whole no definite displacement of its parts, and, on this assumption, different methods of reduction which attributed apparent relative displacement of parts to real relative displacement of the sun agreed fairly well in concluding that the " apex of the sun's way " was directed to a point in right ascension 275°, declination 37° (F.

  • There is reason to believe that Gunter was the first to discover (in 1622 or 1625) that the magnetic needle does not retain the same declination in the same place at all times.

  • Latitudinal Co-ordinate; Declination or Polar Distance.

Browse other sentences examples →