Decimals sentence example

decimals
  • Again, in the use of decimals, it is unusual to give less than two figures.
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  • Thus 143 and 14 286 represent respectively and i ° ° to the same number of places of decimals, but the latter is obviously more exact than the former.
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  • Expression in L and decimals of LI is usually recommended, but it depends on circumstances whether some other method may not be simpler.
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  • Thus, if we go to two places of decimals, we have as the integral series the numbers 1, 2, 4, 8,.
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  • In this table, unlike Table IV., amplitudes are all expressed as decimals of the mean value of the potential gradient for the corresponding season.
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  • To add or subtract decimals, we must reduce them to the same denomination, i.e.
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  • If there is this tendency to adopt too as a basis instead of to, the teaching of decimals might sometimes be simplified by proceeding from percentages to percentages of percentages, i.e.
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  • Also most fractions cannot be expressed exactly as decimals; and this is also the case for surds and logarithms, as well as for the numbers expressing certain ratios which arise out of geometrical relations.
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  • We may take it to (say) 4 places of decimals; or we may suppose it to be taken to 1000 places.
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  • There was, however, no development in the direction of decimals in the modern sense, and the Arabs, by whom the Hindu notation of integers was brought to Europe, mainly used the sexagesimal division in the ' " "' notation.
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  • A better method is to ignore the positions of the decimal points, and multiply the numbers as if they were decimals between I and i o.
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  • Thus, to divide 8 5.9 by 3.14159 2 7 to two places of decimals, we in effect divide.
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  • In actual practice, however, decimals only represent approximations, and the process has to be modified (§ 111).
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  • They have no idea of decimals.
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  • He introduced the terms multinomial, trinomial, quadrinomial, &c., and considerably simplified the notation for decimals.
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  • Briggs's Logarithmorum chilias prima, which contains the first published table of decimal or common logarithms, is only a small octavo tract of sixteen pages, and gives the logarithms of numbers from unity to 1000 to 14 places of decimals.
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  • Briggs continued to labour assiduously at the calculation of logarithms, and in 1624 published his Arithmetica logarithmica, a folio work containing the logarithms of the numbers from to 20,000, and from 00,000 to ioo,000 (and in some copies to roi,000) to 14 places of decimals.
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  • There was thus left a gap between 20,000 and 90,000, which was filled up by Adrian Vlacq (or Ulaccus), who published at Gouda, in Holland, in 1628, a table containing the logarithms of the numbers from unity to 100,000 to ro places of decimals.
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  • The title of Gunter's book, which is very scarce, is Canon triangulorum, and it contains logarithmic sines and tangents for every minute of the quadrant to 7 places of decimals.
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  • Although the method is usually known by the names of Weddle and Hearn, it is really, in its essential features, due to Briggs, who gave in the Arithmetica logarithmica of 1624 a table of the logarithms of I + i r n up to r =9 to 15 places of decimals.
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  • Carry out column addition and subtraction of numbers involving decimals.
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  • The first sentence is an algorithm rule often employed by students to explain how to multiply decimals.
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  • These are infinite decimals in which the digits are uniformly distributed.
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  • Children can refine their calculations making use of their ability to order decimals.
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  • Multiply and divide decimals mentally by 10 or 100, and integers by 1000, and explain the effect.
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  • On p. 8, 10.502 is multiplied by 3.216, and the result found to be 33.77443 2; and on pp. 23 and 24 occur decimals not attached to integers, viz.
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  • Thus 143 and 14 286 represent respectively and i ° ° to the same number of places of decimals, but the latter is obviously more exact than the former.
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  • This lets you pick half, quarter and eighth of an inch thickness without having to convert fractions to decimals.
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  • Counting on fingers and toes, for example, helps children learn how to count, but more in-depth concepts such as decimals and fractions can be made easier through the use of games and tools.
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  • Board games: Educational Learning Games carries a large selection of games designed to teach children math facts, whether it's simple geometry through the use of puzzles, word problems or decimals.
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  • The logarithms to base io of the first twelve numbers to 7 places of decimals are log 1 =0.0000000 log 5 log 2 = 0.3010300 log 6 log 3 =0.477 121 3 log 7 log 4 =0.6020600 log 8 The meaning of these results is that The integral part of a logarithm is called the index or characteristic, and the fractional part the mantissa.
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  • The first logarithms to the base e were published by John Speidell in his New Logarithmes (London, 1619), which contains hYPerbolic log sines, tangents and secants for every minute of the quadrant to 5 places of decimals.
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  • Taking, for example, the number 1.087678, the object is to destroy the significant figure 8 in the second place of decimals; this is effected by multiplying the number by 1- 08, that is, by subtracting from the number eight times itself advanced two places, and we thus obtain 100066376.
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  • On the other hand, in writing decimals, the sequence (of negative powers) is from left to right.
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  • To multiply two decimals exactly, we multiply them as if the point were absent, and then insert it so that the number of figures after the point in the product shall be equal to the sum of the numbers of figures after the points in the original decimals.
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  • For instance, .143 represents correct to 3 places of decimals, since it differs from it by less than 0005.
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  • For elementary work the multiplicand may come immediately after the multiplier, as in D; the last figure of each partial product then comes immediately under the corre up to the multiplication of decimals and of approximate values of numbers, is to place the first figure of the multiplier under the first figure of the multiplicand, as in E; the first figure of each partial product will then come under the corresponding figure of the multiplier.
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  • This is the foundation of the use of recurring decimals; thus we can replace = s s = 1 o o /(' - 1 + 0 -)1 by .363636(=36/102 +36/ 104 +3 6 / 106), with an error (in defect) of only 36/(10 6.99).
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  • Briggs also used decimals, but in a form not quite so convenient as Napier.
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  • As an arithmetical calculator he was not only wonderfully expert, but he seems to have occasionally found a positive delight in working out to an enormous number of places of decimals the result of some irksome calculation.
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  • If, for instance, the values of a and b, correct to two places of decimals, are 3 58 and 1 34, then 2 24, as the value of a - b, is not necessarily correct to two places.
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  • The following are approximate values of the arm in decimals of a foot :
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