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debts

debts Sentence Examples

  • I owe you and I don't like having debts.

  • As much as he hated to admit it, Darkyn wasn't one to wait to claim debts owed him.

  • He'd thought to ask Darkyn about any debts owed but not about any future debts.

  • Both of them are at that level of not worrying about missing any meals but they're not big spenders—maybe five to ten mil bracket, give or take—no real debts.

  • I was joking about being afraid of assuming his debts.

  • Institutions possessing a special character are the monti frumentarii, public grain deposits, founded for the purpose of supplying peasant proprietors with seed corn, debts being paid in kind with interest after harvest.

  • The treaty of Tubingen is the name given in German history to an arrangement made in 1514 between Duke Ulrich and his subjects, by which the latter acquired various rights and privileges on condition of relieving the former of his debts.

  • The debts of the two nations resulted largely from this one cause.

  • Efforts to hasten this development have created some serious financial and industrial crises, and have burdened the country with heavy debts and taxes.

  • Both the departments and the communes have considerable public debts.

  • The federal government has no public debt, but each of the six states has contracted debts which aggregate £237,000,000, equal to about £58, 8s.

  • As to judgment debts, it is sufficient to say that, when by the judgment of a court of competent jurisdiction an order is made that a sum of money be paid by one of two parties to another, such a debt is not only enforceable by process of court, but it can be sued upon as if it were an ordinary debt.

  • There are also certain liabilities or debts which, for the convenience of the remedy, have been made to appear as though they sprang from contract, and are sometimes termed quasi-contracts.

  • Debts do not, as a general rule, carry interest, but such an obligation may arise either by agreement or by mercantile usage or by statute.

  • In the United States imprisonment for debt was universal under the common law, but it has been abolished in every state, except in certain cases, as where there is any suspicion of fraud or where the debtor has an intention of removing out of the state to avoid his debts.

  • The man was responsible for debts contracted by his wife, even before her marriage, as well as for his own; but he could use her as a mancipium.

  • Hence the Code allowed a proviso to be inserted in the marriage contract, that the wife should not be seized for her husband's pre-nuptial debts; but enacted that then he was not responsible for her pre-nuptial debts, and, in any case, that both together were responsible for all debts contracted after marriage..

  • The revenue was about 3,600,000; after deduction of taxes, interest on debts, expenses of management, &c., 2,080,000.

  • Between 1884 and 1902 no fewer than 220,61 6 sales were effected for failure to pay taxes, while, from 1886 to 1902, 79,208 expropriations were effected for other debts not due to the state.

  • In 1884 there were 20,422 sales, of which 35.28% were for debts of 4s.

  • or less, and 5195 for debts between 4s.

  • and 2; in 1902 there were 4857 sales, hut only 11~o1% for debts under 4s.

  • About 22% of them are for debts under 40, about 49%

  • 3~6,~384,i2o Debts to be transferred to the Grand Livre.

  • Perpetual debts (Modena, Sicily, Naples).

  • Debts separately inscribed in the Grand Livre 10,042,027

  • During the same period the assumption of the Venetian and Roman debts, losses on the issue of loans and the accumulation of annual deficits, had caused public indebtedness to rise from 92,000,000 to 328,000,000, no less than f 100,000,000 of the latter sum having been sacrificed in premiums and commissions to bankers and underwriters of loans.

  • were intended to protect the property of deceased persons, and also to secure the full payment of debts due therefrom to the crown.

  • Thus a nation which has to choose between bankruptcy and the repudiation of its debts is on the horns of a dilemma.

  • It remained in Mantegna's studio unsold at his death, and was disposed of to liquidate debts.

  • The homestead of a householder (with a family) who occupies it may be held exempt from sale for the collection of debts other than those for purchase-money, taxes, or improvements, or for the satisfaction of a judgment upon a forfeited recognizance or bail-bond, but a homestead so exempted is limited to $3000 in value and to 160 acres of land.

  • A considerable amount of personal property, including furniture, a small library, provisions, tools, agricultural implements, livestock and the proceeds of a life insurance policy, is also exempt from seizure for the satisfaction of debts.

  • However, there was a speedy reaction against the oppositon which had in no small measure been inspired by fear of a requirement that debts be paid in gold and silver.

  • A powerful but not disinterested ally was found in the king's uncle, Agesilaus, who hoped to rid himself of his debts without losing his vast estates.

  • Lysander as ephor proposed on behalf of Agis that all debts sbould be cancelled and that Laconia should be divided into 19,500 lots, of which 4500 should be given to Spartiates, whose number was to be recruited from the best of the perioeci and foreigners, and the remaining 15,000 to perioeci who could bear arms. The Agiad king Leonidas having prevailed on the council to reject this measure, though by a majority of only one, was deposed in favour of his son-in-law Cleombrotus, who assisted Agis in bearing down opposition by the threat of force.

  • The abolition of debts was carried into effect, but the land distribution was put off by Agesilaus on various pretexts.

  • The accumulation of debt upon it was prevented by the prohibition of interest, the release of debts every seventh year, and the reversion of the land to the proprietor, or his heirs, at each return of the year of jubilee.

  • In April 1294 the younger Bruce had permission to visit Ireland for a year and a half, and as a further mark of Edward's favour a respite of all debts owing by him to the exchequer.

  • There have now been recognized in the collections at Cairo, Florence, London, Paris and Bologna several Egyptian imitations of the Aegean style which can be set off against the many debts which the centres of Aegean culture owed to Egypt.

  • For every family in which there is a wife, a minor son, or an unmarried daughter, a homestead not exceeding $loon in value, or personal property not exceeding $500-in value, is exempt from sale for the satisfaction of debts.

  • exclusive of payments on funded and floating debts.

  • Now debts are discharged in the first instance by vouchers.

  • Thousands must have joined the Third Crusade in order to escape paying either their taxes or the interest on their debts; and the atmosphere of the gold-digger's camp (or of the cave of Adullam) must have begun more than ever to characterize the crusading armies.

  • The development of the art of war, and the growth of a systematic taxation, are two debts which medieval Europe also owed to the Crusades.

  • Parliament voted her £ 20,000 in 1660 for the payment of her debts, but Elizabeth did not receive the money, and on the 19th of May 1661 she left the Hague for England, in spite of the king's attempts to hinder her journey, receiving no official welcome on her arrival in London and being lodged at Lord Craven's house in Drury Lane.

  • Conscience Courts were local courts, established by acts of parliament in London and various provincial towns, for the recovery of small debts, usually sums under £5.

  • Wesley had at first to take charge of the contributions, but as they grew larger he appointed stewards to receive the money, to pay debts, and to relieve the needy.

  • All the thoughts, words and deeds of each are entered in the book of life as separate items - all the evil works, &c., as debts.

  • Both provinces and municipalities are forbidden by the constitution to contract debts without a coincident provision of permanent revenue for their settlement.

  • The debt of the Republic in April 1908 was $48,146,585, including twenty-seven millions which were assumed in 1902 for the payment of the army of independence, four for agriculture, and four for the payment of revolutionary debts, and $2,196,585, representing obligations assumed by the revolution's representative in the United States during the War of Independence.

  • By these Cuba was bound not to incur debts her current revenues will not bear; to continue the sanitary administration undertaken by the military government of intervention; to lease naval stations (since located at Bahia Honda and Guantanamo) to the United States; and finally, the right of the United States to intervene, if necessary, in the affairs of the island was explicitly affirmed in the provision, " That the government of Cuba consents that the United States may exercise the right to intervene for the protection of Cuban independence, the maintenance of a government adequate for the protection of life, property and individual liberty, and for discharging the obligations with respect to Cuba imposed by the treaty of Paris on the United States, now to be assumed and undertaken by the government of Cuba."

  • In 1859 the settlement of palace debts gave rise to the issue of 1,000,000 purses of new interior bonds (esham-i jedide) spread over a period of three years, repayable in twenty-four years, and bearing interest at 6%.

  • Delegations (havale) are granted on the provincial treasuries for one or two years in advance, sometimes for a series of years, in order to pay pressing debts too heavy to be met in a single payment.

  • The debts of the former are stated in the preface to the budget to be very large, and as payments are effected fresh creditors present themselves with undeniable vouchers in their hands, causing much embarrassment to the minister of finance: no figures, however, are given.

  • The Finance Bill provides that these debts are to be paid out of supplementary credits.

  • Now and then it has been dealt with piecemeal, when some particular class of creditors has become too pressing, but it is more than probable that the piece got rid of has been more or less rapidly replaced by fresh liabilities occasioned by budgetary deficits, or by the mere accumulation of interest on debts allowed to run on.

  • Laurent tells us that the present government having found it absolutely impossible to arrive at even an approximate estimate of this " occult debt," recourse was had, in order to fix it, to the creditors themselves, and a short act of parliament was passed declaring all debts prescribed which should not be claimed by a fixed date.

  • The figures were as follows: Ordinary expenditure, £ T 3 2, 997, 000; extraordinary expenditure, £T2,696,000; revenue £T26,015,000, leaving a deficit of £T9,678,000, which was brought up to over £T10,500,000 by special credits for the pension fund, the payment of debts incurred by Abdul-Hamid and indemnities to officials.

  • property, working plant, tools and fixtures, cannot he seized for payment of debts.

  • A homestead which is owned and occupied by a debtor as his dwelling place is exempt from seizure or sale for debts other than taxes, those secured by a mortgage on it, or those incurred for its improvement or repair, or for services performed by labourers or servants.

  • He retired into private life, heavily burdened with debts incurred during his tenure of office and narrowly escaping arrest even before he quitted Whitehall.

  • In 1888, a year before the republic was proclaimed, the internal and external national debts amounted to £74,000,000 sterling, with the currency at par.

  • In addition to the indebtedness of the national government, the individual states have also incurred funded debts of their own.

  • The aggregate of these debts in 1904 was £20,199,440, and the several loans made during the next two years, including those of the municipalities of Rio de Janeiro, Santos, Bahia and Manaos, add fully two and a half millions more to the total.

  • He refused to follow the financial policy of his party in 1862, and delivered a notable speech against the passage of the Legal Tender Act, which made a certain class of treasury notes receivable for all public and private debts.

  • His debts were enormous, and in 1675 he resolved to make over to his creditors all his income except twenty thousand livres, and, as he said, to "live for" them.

  • The paper notes already issued had been constituted by law legal tender for all debts, but in 1868 their power of actual purchase was only 30% compared with that of gold, and by 1870 it had fallen as low as 25%.

  • The financial situation in Venezuela was for a long time extremely complicated and discreditable, owing to defaults in the payment of public debts, complications arising from the guarantee of interest on railways and other public works, responsibility for damages to private property during civil wars and bad administration.

  • 52,925,521 54,718,163 51,874,694 A considerable part of the expenditure since 1903 consists of payments on account of foreign debts which Venezuela was compelled to satisfy.

  • of England repudiated the heavy debts contracted for his wars in France with the Florentine banking houses of Bardi and Peruzzi (1339), which eventually led to their failure and to that of many smaller firms, and shook Florentine credit all over the world; Philip VI.

  • He also took a leading part in the senate in securing the passage of laws for funding the national debt, assuming the state debts and establishing a United States bank.

  • With Therasia (now a sister, not a wife), while leading a life of rigid asceticism, he devoted the whole of his vast wealth to the entertainment of needy pilgrims, to payment of the debts of the insolvent, and to public works of utility or ornament; besides building basilicas at Fondi and Nola, he provided the latter place with a muchneeded aqueduct.

  • On the contrary, so great was his respect for both that, when there was a question of selling the Medici library to pay that family's debts, he saved the collection at the expense of the convent purse.

  • Under the Articles of Confederation it was principally Rhode Island that defeated the proposal to authorize Congress to levy an impost duty of 5% mainly as a means of meeting the debts of the Central government.

  • In 1774 Lord Holland had to find £140,000 to pay the gambling debts of his sons.

  • 13 introduced (as one of the tribunes) a bill proposing that all debts should be cancelled.

  • The constitution of 1876 forbids the borrowing of money except to supply casual deficiencies of revenue (amount limited to $200,000 at a time), repel invasion, suppress insurrection, defend the state in war, or pay existing debts.

  • Otherwise, the wife may control her property as if single, and neither is liable for what are clearly the debts of the other.

  • A homestead cannot be conveyed or encumbered without the consent of both husband and wife, if held by a married man; and a homestead, to the value of $500, is exempt from liability for debts postdating the purchase, unless for improvements on the property.

  • The state has no bonded debt, and the constitution forbids it to incur debts exceeding in the aggregate a quarter of a million dollars, except for warlike purposes or for some single work to which the people give their consent by vote; the constitution also forbids any county or municipal corporation from incurring an indebtedness exceeding 5% of the value of its taxable property.

  • A householder with a family may, by recording the proper declaration in a registry of deeds, hold exempt from attachment, levy on execution, and sale for the payment of debts thereafter contracted an estate of homestead, not exceeding $800 in value, in a farm or lot with buildings thereon which he lawfully possesses by lease or otherwise and occupies as his residence.

  • The net debts of towns and cities rose in the years1885-1908from $63,306,213 to $ 16 3,55 8, 3 2 5.

  • The count y debts in 1908 aggregated $6,076,867.

  • Encouraged by these and other conventions in order to obstruct the collection of debts and taxes, a mob prevented a session of the Court of Common Pleas and General Sessions of the Peace at Northampton on the 29th of August, and in September other mobs prevented the same court from sitting in Worcester, Middlesex and Berkshire counties.

  • The organization of cities and villages is provided by the legislature, which may restrict their powers of taxation and of contracting debts and may fix salaries.

  • In 1829 the Safety-Fund Act was passed, which required each bank thereafter chartered or rechartered to pay into the state treasury 3% of its capital stock other than that owned by the state, and from this fund the debts of insolvent banks were to be paid.

  • After deducting debts owing abroad the public and private wealth of the colony is calculated to be about £270,000,000.

  • The debts of the local bodies amount to about nine millions.

  • Crime was rarely punished, and debts were not recoverable.

  • But after a severe struggle the publishing house failed, leaving the author charged with its very heavy debts.

  • And in this last year, having paid off all the debts of his old firm, he returned to America.

  • A homestead to the value of $1000 which is owned and occupied by the head of a family is exempt from attachment or forced sale except for debts secured by mechanics', labourers', materialmen's or vendors' liens upon the premises.

  • He denounced the repudiation of state debts or the failure to pay interest on them.

  • The king's death-bed request to his brother, "Let not poor Nelly starve," was faithfully carried out by James II., who paid her debts from the Secret Service fund, provided her with other moneys, and settled on her an estate with reversion to the duke of St Albans.

  • 31 1918 the amounts of outstanding debts incurred abroad during the war were as follows: 2,696 millions of German Reichsmarks 42.9.

  • That servitude existed in many forms all over the archipelago, but among the most curious must be reckoned the pandelingschap or "pledgedom," which originated in Borneo, and according to which a man had the power to make his debtors his serfs until their debts were paid.

  • succeeded his aunt on the 5th of January 1762, he paid off all the debts that Catherine had contracted without inquiring what they were for.

  • residuum, a remainder, from residere, to remain), in law, that which remains of a testator's estate after all debts and legacies are discharged, and funeral, administration and other expenses paid.

  • In Maryland a wife holds her property as if single except that she can convey real estate only by a joint deed with her husband (this requirement being for the purpose of effecting a release of the husband's " dower interest "), neither husband nor wife is liable for the separate debts of the other, and on the death of either the rights of the survivor in the estate of the other are about equal.

  • There is no homestead exemption law and exemptions from levy for the satisfaction of debts extend only to $loo worth of property, besides wearing apparel and books and tools used by the debtor in his profession or trade, and to all money payable in the nature of insurance.

  • A constitutional provision makes each stockholder in a state bank liable to the amount of his share or shares for all the bank's debts and liabilities.

  • Scarcely had these amendments been carried when the serious financial straits brought on by debt incurred through the state's promotion of internal improvements gave rise to the demand for a reduction of governmental expenses and a limitation of the power of the General Assembly to contract debts.

  • Some difficulties had arisen between France and the dey of Algiers with reference to the debts contracted to Bacri and Busnach, two Algerine Jews who had supplied corn to the Frenchovernment under the Directory.

  • After nearly all the forty-six banks chartered by the legislature in 1818 had been wrecked in the financial panic of 1819, the legislature in 1820 passed a series of laws designed for the benefit of the debtor class, among them one making state bank notes a legal tender for all debts.

  • At Athens a low variety of the unit was adopted for the coinage, true to the object of Solon in depreciating debts; and the first coinage is of only 65.2, or scarcely within the range of the trade weights (28); this seems to have been felt, as, contrary to all other states, Athens slowly increased its coin weight up to 66.6, or but little under the trade average.

  • The homestead law of New Hampshire exempts from seizure for debt five hundred dollars' worth of any person's homestead except for the enforcement of a mortgage upon it, for the collection of debts incurred in making repairs or improvements, or for the collection of taxes.

  • On May 16th 1877, he was one of the "363" who voted want of confidence in the Broglie ministry (thus paying his debts), and he took considerable part in organizing the subsequent electoral campaign.

  • Since 1579 he had lived mainly at Barn Elms, Barnes, maintaining an adequate establishment; but his salary did not cover his expenses, he was burdened with his son-in-law Sir Philip Sidney's debts, and he obtained few of those perquisites which Elizabeth lavished on her favourites.

  • The corporation has neither control over the police nor any judicial duties, excepting as regards a court of conscience dealing with debts under 40s.

  • (Irish); while the lord mayor holds a court for debts over 40s., and for the settlement of cases between masters and servants.

  • The condition of the Indians on the plantations is often akin to slavery, owing to the system adopted by some planters of making payments in advance; for the Indians soon spend their earnings, and thus contract debts which can only be repaid by long service.

  • Each has its own documentary constitution; its legislature of two elective houses; its executive, consisting of a governor and other officials; its judiciary, whose decisions are final, except in cases involving Federal law; its system of local government and local taxation; its revenue, system of taxation, and debts; its body of private civil and criminal law and procedure; its rules of citizenship, which may admit persons to be voters in state and national elections under conditions differing from those prevailing in other states.

  • The greater part of the debt arises from the assumption of the debts of the provinces as they entered federation, expenditure on canals and assistance given to railways.

  • It does not include the debts incurred by certain provinces since federation, a matter which concerns themselves alone.

  • A bill went through both Houses of Congress providing that a silver dollar should be coined of the weight of 4122 grains, to be full legal tender for all debts and dues, public and private, except where otherwise expressly stipulated in the contract.

  • The constitution of 1901 prohibits the increase of the debt for any other purposes than the suppression of insurrection or resistance to invasion, and the assumption of corporate debts by cities and towns is also restricted.

  • In the Federal Congress (1789-1793) he favoured the assumption of the state debts, the establishment of a national bank and the adoption of a protective tariff policy.

  • Moreover in that country traders can demand interest on commercial, debts from the day on which the debts fall due.

  • John James Ruskin, a typical Scot, of remarkable energy, probity and foresight, built up a great business, paid off his father's debts, formed near London a most hospitable and cultured home, where he maintained his taste for literature and art, and lived and died, as his son proudly wrote upon his tomb, "an entirely honest merchant."

  • Under it the high contracting powers have agreed not to have recourse to armed force for the recovery of contractual debts claimed from the government of one country by the government of another country as due to its subjects.

  • Such is the modern " Acatalepsia," which arises from denying the evidence of the senses, and from citing the transfigured realism of Spencer instead of the original realism of Aristotle, about whom Balfour speaks as follows: " It would be difficult, perhaps impossible, to sum up our debts to Aristotle.

  • A second pamphlet on the war with America, the debts of Great Britain, and kindred topics followed in the spring of 1 777 ., His name thus became identified with the cause of American independence.

  • The Centenary of Methodism was celebrated in 1839 and £221,939 was raised as a thank-offering: £71,609 was devoted to the colleges at Didsbury and Richmond; £70,000 was given to the missionary society, which spent £30,000 on the site and building of a missionhouse in Bishopsgate Within; £38,000 was set apart for the removal of chapel debts, &c.

  • Debts amounting to £3,266,013 have been paid off since 1854.

  • To pay his gambling debts he accepted a gift of 200,000 francs from Louis Philippe, thus affording a ready handle to his enemies.

  • Like many other youthful profligates, he joined the conspiracy in the hope of getting his debts cancelled.

  • Sicily was to be conquered from the Hohenstaufen at the expense of England; and Henry pledged his credit to the papacy for enormous subsidies, although years of comparative inactivity had already overwhelmed him with debts.

  • in 1291 appointed John de Berwick custodian of the abbey so that he might pay their debts from the issues of their estates, allowing them enough for their maintenance, and Edward II.

  • On the great day of the feast there was a procession of the priests, the sacrificial assistants of every kind, the representatives of every part of the empire with their victims, of the cavalry, in short of the population of Attica and 1 So named from a note (1902) directed by Dr Don Louis Maria Drago, the Argentine minister of foreign affairs, to the Argentine diplomatic representative at Washington at the time of the difficulties of Venezuela incident to the collection of debts owed to foreigners by that country.

  • In 1748, however, the company broke up, and Lessing, who had allowed himself to become surety for some of the actors' debts, was obliged to leave Leipzig too, in order to escape their creditors.

  • For a time he was not unhappy, but the debts which he had contracted in Hamburg weighed heavily on him, and he missed the society of his friends; his health, too, which had hitherto been excellent, gradually gave way.

  • His great stroke as a collector was to acquire (by bequest, conditional on paying off certain debts) in 1701 the cabinet of William Courten, who had made collecting the business of his life.

  • His business declined; his debts increased; it was with difficulty that the daily expenses of his household were defrayed.

  • His debts to Oxford tradesmen were small indeed, yet larger than he could pay.

  • In order to defray the charges of her funeral, and to pay some debts which she had left, he wrote a little book in a single week, and sent off the sheets to the press without reading them over.

  • In the spring of 1833 the store's stock was sold to satisfy its creditors, and Lincoln assumed the firm's debts, which he did not fully pay off for fifteen years.

  • The extravagance of Frederick drained the resources of his state, but this was amply atoned for by the rigid economy of Frederick William I., who not only paid off the debts accumulated by his father, but amassed an enormous treasure.

  • Besides the debts of each state of the Dual Monarchy, there is a general debt, which is borne jointly by Austria and Hungary.

  • The Hungarians laid down the principle that they were in no way responsible for debts contracted during a time when they had been deprived of their constitutional liberties; they consented, however, to pay each year 291million gulden towards the interest.

  • These charges included the services of the Privileged and Unified debts, the tribute to Turkey and the interest on the Suez Canal shares held by Great Britain, but excluded the interest on the Daira and Domains loans, expected to be defrayed by the revenues from the estates on which those loans were secured.

  • It was agreed that there should be no conversion of the Guaranteed or Privileged debts before 1910 and no conversion of the Unified debt until 1912.

  • The reason for these mutinies was the attempt made by successive pashas to put a stop to the extortion called Tulbah, a forced payment exacted by the troops from the inhabitants of the country by the fiction of debts requiring to be discharged, which led to grievous ill-usage.

  • The fellah is thus deprived of his harvest and falls into arrears with his taxes, and is harassed and bastinadoed to force him to pay his debts.

  • David was now free to subdue John of the Isles, to repudiate all his own debts contracted before 1368, and to make preparations for a crusade.

  • By the influence of his countless creditors, who desired to be paid out of his estates, and in revenge for his seizure, on claims for debts, of the whole estates of clan Maclean (1674-1680), he was tried and was actually found guilty of treason.

  • A homestead owned and occupied by a householder having a family is exempt (to the amount of $loon) from liability for debts, except taxes upon, and purchase money for, the same.

  • With the latter may be compared presentday movements like the initiative and referendum, and not a few discussions of national debts.

  • The treaty, known in history as Jay's Treaty, provided that the north-western posts should be evacuated by the 1st of June 1796, that commissioners should be appointed to settle the north-east and the north-west boundaries, and that the British claims for British debts as well as the American claims for compensation for illegal seizures should be referred to commissioners.

  • In the Viginia House of Delegates, as in the Continental Congress, he opposed the further issue of paper money; and he tried to induce the legislature to repeal the law confiscating British debts, but he did not lose sight of the interests of the Confederacy.

  • Madison now opposed Hamilton's measures for the funding of the debt, the assumption of state debts, and the establishment of a National Bank, and on other questions he sided more and more with the opposition, gradually assuming its leadership in the House of Representatives and labouring to confine the powers of the national government within the narrowest possible limits; his most important argument against Hamilton's Bank was that the constitution did not provide for it explicitly, and could not properly be construed into permitting its creation.

  • Her son, spoiled by his mother and his step-father, became a wild young fellow, and added his debts to the heavy burden of Montpelier upon Madison.

  • Homesteads belonging to the head of a family and containing 80 to 160 acres (according to value) if in the country, or a lot of ¢ to one acre (according to value), if in town, village or city, are exempt from liability for debts, excepting liens for purchase money, improvements or taxes.

  • A homestead, entered upon record and limited to a value of $5000 if held by the head of a family and to a value of $loon if held by one not the head of a family, is exempt from liability for debts,except for a mortgage; a lien before it was claimed as a homestead is a lien afterward for improvements.

  • The first few days of his reign - when he paid his uncle's debts, administered justice in person, and proclaimed universal religious toleration - gave bright promise, but in the face of the lawless aristocracy and defiant governors of provinces he effected few subsequent reforms. The most important event of his reign was the invasion of Italy by the Lombards, who, entering in 568, under Alboin, in a few years made themselves masters of nearly the entire country.

  • In the sultan's service Ibn Batuta remained eight years; but his good fortune stimulated his natural extravagance, and his debts soon amounted to four or five times his salary.

  • Virginia and Maryland promised such a cession; President Washington was known to be in favour of a site on the Potomac, and in July 1790 Alexander Hamilton, in return for Thomas Jefferson's assistance in passing the bill for the assumption of the state war debts by the Federal government, helped Jefferson to pass a bill for establishing the capital on the Potomac, by which the president was authorized to select a site anywhere along the Potomac between the Eastern Branch (Anacostia) and the Conococheague river, a distance of about So m., and to appoint three commissioners who under his direction should make the necessary surveys and provide accommodations for the reception of Congress in r800.

  • His enterprises were unsuccessful; in 1761 he became insolvent, and the Society refused to be responsible for his debts.

  • The downfall of the town was accelerated by the illiberal policy of its patrician rulers; and the French Revolution reduced it to such a degree that in 1796 it offered itself and its territories to the king of Prussia on condition that he would pay its debts.

  • But the use of the system of credit, and the general establishment of constitutional government, have enabled the difficulty to be surmounted by the creation on a vast scale of national debts.

  • To national debts there has been added a great mass of municipal and local indebtedness, which seems likely to equal, or even exceed in magnitude the liabilities of the central governments.

  • He had obtained a grant of D1200 from the fines imposed on Catesby, one of the conspirators, but his debts were sufficient to swallow up this and much more.

  • Spinoza's effects were few and realized little more than was required for the payment of charges and outstanding debts.

  • Those who still kept their property nominally were in the position of Irish cottiers: they owed more than they could pay, and stone pillars erected on their land showed the amount of the debts and the names of the lenders.

  • In the first place, it is true that according to ancient practice he proclaimed a general seisachtheia, or shaking off of burdens: he cancelled all the debts made on the security of the land or the person of the debtor.

  • When the contract for the new loan was concluded, the liabilities of the Persian government for the balance of the 1892 loan (about 435,000), temporary loans from various banks, arrears of pays and salaries, and other debts, amounted to over 1,500,000, SO that not much margin was left.

  • It was estimated that 1,000,000 would be required to pay all debts, including the balance of the 1892 loan, and leave a surplus sufficient for carrying on the government until the shahs return.

  • Moreover, the Persian government, finding that the previous estimate of the money required for paying its debts was about 50%, below the mark, now asked for double the amount offered by the London capitalists, without, however, proportionately increasing the guarantee.

  • A law of the 9th of August 1902 provided for the conversion of certain gold debts into three series of consolidated debt, at reduced interest.

  • John of Gaunt called a council on the 16th of October to impeach Wykeham on articles which alleged misapplication of the revenues, oppressive fines on the leaders of the free companies, taking bribes for the release of the royal French prisoners, especially of the duke of Bourbon, who helped to make him bishop, failing to send relief to Ponthieu and making illegal profits by buying up crown debts cheap. He was condemned on one only, that of halving a fine of 80 paid by Sir John Grey of Rotherfield for licence to alienate lands, and tampering with the rolls of chancery to conceal the transaction.

  • Wykeham at once took an active part in the financial affairs of the new king, giving security for his debts and himself lending 500 marks, afterwards secured on the customs (Pat.

  • A homestead provision (1901) exempts from liability for debts (except mortgages or liens placed before the homestead claim) any homestead belonging to the head of a family, existing in one compact body and valued at not more than $2500; such a homestead a married man may not sell, lease or put a lien on without his wife's consent.

  • The city was to be fired, and those who opposed the revolution were to be slain; all debts were to be cancelled; and there was to be a proscription of all the wealthy citizens.

  • It is held by some historians that there was at the time on the part of many of the Roman nobles a determination to raise themselves to power, despite the opposition of the senate; others with "greater probability maintain that Catiline's object was simply the cancelling of the huge debts which he and his friends had accumulated.

  • His social reforms included a redistribution of land, the remission of debts, the restoration of the old system of training (6,ycoy17) and the admission of picked perioeci into the citizen body.

  • Under the revised constitution of 1908 the former classification of cities into four classes and the practice of granting special charters were abolished, and the legislature is required to provide by general laws for the incorporation of cities and villages; "such general laws shall limit their rate of taxation for municipal purposes and restrict their powers of borrowing money and contracting debts."

  • The legislature may not create any debt or liability " which shall, single or in the aggregate with any previous debts or liabilities, at any time exceed $10o,000," except for purposes of war, to repel invasion or to suppress insurrection, without specifying distinctly the purpose or object, providing for the payment of interest, and limiting the liability to thirty-five years; and the measure as thus passed must be ratified by popular vote.

  • The county council may, with the consent of the Local Government Board, borrow money on the security of the county fund or any of its revenues, for consolidating the debts of the county; purchasing land or buildings; any permanent work or other thing, the cost of which ought to be spread over a term 'of years; making advances in aid of the emigration or colonization of inhabitants of the county; and any purpose for which quarter sessions or the county council are authorized by any act to borrow.

  • Field & Co., and in 1853 had accumulated $250,000, paid off the debts of the Root company and retired from active business, leaving his name and $100,000 with the concern.

  • The other and probably the correct view is that any considerable sum of money paid to a child at that child's request is an advancement; thus payment of a son's debts of honour has been held to be an advancement.

  • They were free to leave their farms provided they were able to effect a settlement in regard to all outstanding rent arrears and debts.

  • She is entitled to the wages for her separate labour and that of her children, and is not liable for her husband's debts.

  • 2 In 1902 the bonded debts of counties and townships aggregated $8,066,878; that of towns and cities (mostly that of St Louis), $31,193,870.

  • One of his measures, by which New Granada became responsible for the half of the debts of the defunct republic of Colombia, gave serious offence to a large party, and he was consequently succeeded not, as he desired, by Jose Maria Obando, but by a member of the opposition, Jose Ignacio de Marquez.

  • On returning to London he found his congregation at the Tabernacle dispersed; and his circumstances were so depressed that he was obliged to sell his household furniture to pay his orphan-house debts.

  • These bodies have control of the local expenditures and tax levies, and without their consent the local administrative officers cannot contract debts.

  • Finding most of its valuable rates hypothecated to the meeting of old debts, the municipality of Palermo has embarked upon municipal ownership and trading in various directions.

  • A homestead of this size is exempt from levy for the debts of the intestate except in case of an incumbrance given by consent of both husband and wife, or of obligations for purchase money, or of liens for making improvements, and the homestead of a family cannot be alienated without the joint consent of husband and wife.

  • Peter of Savoy, another uncle, was perhaps the most shameless of all the beggars for the kings bounty; not only was he made earl of Richmond, but his debts were repeatedly paid and great sums were given him to help his continental adventures.

  • On several occasions when he endeavoured to commit parliaments to back his bills and endorse his policy, they refused to help him, and left him to face his debts as best he might.

  • Edward drifted on along the path to financial ruin till he actually went bankrupt in 1345, when he repudiated his debts, and ruined several great Italian banking houses, who had been unwise enough to continue lending him money to the last.

  • To pay his debts he was obliged to resort to heavy taxation in Aquitaine, which gave his discontented subjects in Poitou and the other outlying districts an excuse for the rebellion that they had been for some time meditating.

  • His debts increased daily, but payment was there none, for all the manors and posses- Condition sions that pertained to the crown he had given away, ~ountry.

  • His debts and dissipations were a great source of sorrow to his father, from whom he is known to have received at different times £14,000, the modern equivalent of which is much larger.

  • Pitt's debts were the result of a wasteful indifference to his private affairs.

  • In February 1785 he delivered one of the most famous of all his speeches, that on the nabob of Arcot's debts.

  • She was, however, restored to favour, granted a pension of 1 600 a year by James, and given io,000 crowns to pay her debts.

  • A homestead owned and occupied by any resident of the state and consisting of not more than 40 acres of agricultural land outside the limits of a city or village, or one-fourth of an acre within a city or village, together with the dwelling-house and other appurtenances, is exempt from liability for debts other than labourers', mechanics' and purchase-money liens, mortgages and taxes.

  • Up to this time his old debts still embarrassed him, but now his private and political fortunes changed together.

  • His decree of July 1861, suspending for two years all payments on public debts of every kind, led to the landing in Mexico of English, Spanish and French troops.

  • The extortions by which he sought to raise money for his extravagant pleasures excited a rising known as that of the arme Konrad (poor Conrad), not unlike the rebellion in England led by Wat Tyler; order was soon restored, and in 1514 by the treaty of Tubingen the people undertook to pay the duke's debts in return for various political privileges, which in effect laid the foundation of the constitutional liberties of the country.

  • The Assembly went on to declare that it placed the debts of the crown under the safeguard of the national honour and that all existing taxes, although illegal as having been imposed without the consent of the people, should continue to be paid until the day of dissolution.

  • Richard de la Pole joined Edmund abroad in 1504, and remained at Aix as surety for his elder brother's debts.

  • When the restoration took place, Camacho sat in the Cortes among the dynastic Liberals with Sagasta as leader, and became finance minister in 1881 at a critical moment when Spain had to convert, reduce, and consolidate her treasury and other debts with a view to resuming payment of coupons.

  • There are certain debts in England, Scotland and the United States which are said to be privileged - that is, such debts as the executor must first apply the personal estate of the deceased, in payment, for example, of funeral expenses or servants' wages.

  • In English law the term " preferred " rather than " privileged " is generally applied to such debts.

  • the issuing of licences, and regulates bonded debts.

  • A homestead in lands to the value of $t000, the products of the same, and personal property to the value of $500 which belong to the head of a family or to the husband and wife jointly are exempt from attachment, levy or sale except for taxes, purchase money or debts contracted in making improvements or repairs.

  • The exemption of the homestead continues for the benefit of the widow or for the children alone, whether minors or not, provided it is occupied by some of them, and it may be partitioned among the children regardless of debts.

  • He tried to import more method into the very unequal distribution of taxation, less brutality in collection, less confusion in the fiscal machine, and more uniformity in the matter of rights; while he diminished the debts of the much-involved towns by putting them through the bankruptcy court.

  • People brought up against her the debts and expenditure due to her belief in the inexhaustible resources of France; and hatred became definite when she was suspected of trying to imitate her mother Maria lheresa and play the part of ruler, since her husband neglected his duty.

  • proposed arrangements to consolidate the floating and treasury debts of the Peninsula in the shape of 70,000,000 of 4 ~, stock, redeemable in 40 years, and to reduce and consolidate the Id exterior and interior debts, then exceeding 480,000,000, in the form of 78,840,000 of exterior 4% debtexempt from taxation under an agreement to that effect with the council of foreign bondholders in London on the 28th of June 1882and 77,840,000 of perpetual interior 4%.

  • The colonial debts were not included in those plans.

  • The debts of Spain were further increased in 1891 by a consolidation of Io,ooo,000 of floating debt turned into 4% redeemable stock similar to that of 1882; and this did not prevent a fresh growth of floating debts out of annual deficits averaging two to three millions sterling during the last quarter of the 19th century.

  • The government of Spain having guaranteed the colonial debts of Cuba and of the Philippines, when those colonies were lost in 1898, Spain was further saddled with 46,210,000 of colonial consolidated debts, and with the expenses of the wars amounting, besides, to 63,257,000.

  • Consequently, the Spanish government had once more to attempt to make both ends meet by asking its creditors to assent to the suppression of all the amortization of imperial and colonial debts, and to a tax of 20% on the coupons of all the debts, whilst at the same time the Cortes were asked to authorize a consolidation and liquidation of the floating and war debts and an annual increase of 3,200,000 in already heavy taxation.

  • Under these modifications the Spanish debt at the close of the 19th century, exclusive of 44,000,ooo of treasury debt, consisted of 41,750,000 of exterior debt, still temporarily exempted from taxation on the condition of being held by foreigners, of 270,000,000 of 4% interior consols, and of 6o.ooo,ooo of new 5% consols, renlacing the war and floating debts.

  • From 1875 to 1881, when not too much engrossed in more pressing affairs, his governments turned their attention to the reorganization of the finances, the resumption of payment of part of the debt coupon, and the consolidation of the colonial and imperial floating debts.

  • They undertook to carry out a general conversion of the consolidated external and internal debts by a considerable reduction of capital and interest, to which the bondholders assented.

  • Unfortunately, Spain indulged in the illusion that America would perhaps respect her rights of sovereignty in the Philippine Islands, or pay a considerable sum for their cession and recognize the debts of Cuba and of the Philippines.

  • The American commission, presided over by secretary Day in Paris, absolutely refused to admit the Spanish contention that the United States or the new administration in Cuba and the Philippines should be saddled with several hundred million dollars of debts, contracted by the colonial treasuries, and guaranteed by Spain, almost entirely to maintain Spanish rule against the will of the Cubans and Filipinos.

  • The national debt, which consisted before the war of 234,866,500 of external Financial and internal consols ar,d redeemable debts, and and Political 24,2 50,000 of home floating debt, was increased Reoiganizaby 46,21o,ooo of Cuban and Philippine debts, which tion.

  • the Cortes had guaranteed, and by 6o,ooo,ooo of debts contracted at a high rate of interest, and with the national guarantee, to meet the expenses of the struggle with the colonies and of the war with the United States.

  • however, had succeeded in less than eighteen months in giving a decisive and vigorous impulse to the reorganization of the budget, of taxation and of the home and colonial debts.

  • The amortization of the home and colonial debts was suppressed, and the redeemable debts of both classes were converted into 4% internal consols.

  • The interest on all colonial debts ceased to be paid in gold, and was paid only in pesetas, like the rest of the internal debts, and like the external debt held by Spaniards.

  • A woman's rights to her property are not affected by marriage, except that it becomes liable for payment of debts contracted for necessaries to the family when a judgment against the husband for the payment of the same cannot be satisfied.

  • In 1789, with his debts paid up by his father, he was elected by the noblesse of Limoges a deputy to the States General.

  • But the lower orders were excited by reports that the Armenians, supported by the European powers, were plotting the overthrow of the sultan; and their cupidity was aroused by the prospect of wiping out their heavy debts to Armenian pedlars and merchants.

  • From 1779 onward we trace the idea of supporting government by the interest of the propertied classes; from 1781 onward the idea that a not-excessive public debt would be a blessing 4 in giving cohesiveness to the union: hence his device by which the federal government, assuming the war debts of the states, secured greater resources, based itself on a high ideal of nationalism, strengthened its hold on the individual citizen, and gained the support of property.

  • The relations between capital and labour are the subject of a series of statutes, which prohibit the employment of children under fourteen years of age in any mechanical, mercantile or manufacturing establishment, punish with fine or imprisonment any attempt by an employer to influence his employee's vote or to prevent him from joining a labour union, and in cases of insolvency give preference over general liabilities to debts of $100 or less for labour.

  • A homestead entered upon record and occupied by the owner is exempt to the extent of $loon in value from liability for debts.

  • - For the protection of the property rights of married women the code of Tennessee provides that the wife's real estate shall be exempt from her husband's debts; that the proceeds of her real or personal property shall not be paid to any other person except by her consent certified upon privy examination of her by the court or a commissioner appointed by the court; and that she may mortgage or convey her real estate without the concurrence of her husband provided she be privately examined regarding the matter by a chancellor, circuit judge, or the clerk of the county court.

  • A homestead of a head of a family to the value of $1000 is exempt from forced sale except for the collection of taxes, debts contracted for its purchase or in making improvements upon it, or fines for voting out of the election district, for carrying concealed weapons, or for giving away or selling intoxicating liquors on election days.

  • I owe you and I don't like having debts.

  • As much as he hated to admit it, Darkyn wasn't one to wait to claim debts owed him.

  • He'd thought to ask Darkyn about any debts owed but not about any future debts.

  • Immortal Code, Rule 302: Debts incurred by a deity shall not expire and shall be transferred to successors until settled.

  • Both of them are at that level of not worrying about missing any meals but they're not big spenders—maybe five to ten mil bracket, give or take—no real debts.

  • I was joking about being afraid of assuming his debts.

  • He was looking for antecedent recoveries, income payments and aging book debts or equity in the matrimonial home.

  • The deal will also absolve her of some $ 25 million in debts the estate currently owes.

  • I am, however, still paying off debts accrued during the marriage.

  • alimentary debts very rarely arose between husbands and wives.

  • amassed debts in the tens of thousands.

  • The average student starting this autumn could emerge with debts of £ 30,000 or more.

  • However, his buddy won't help him pay off his debts unless he coaches for a corporately sponsored youth baseball team.

  • brother-in-law's debts.

  • cancellationso provided for the cancelation of debts.

  • Countries agree to grow cash crops in order to pay off their crippling debts.

  • certain circumstances be made liable for the debts of the company of which he is a director.

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