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debauchery

debauchery

debauchery Sentence Examples

  • Her wealth made it certain that he would be the richest man in France, and he determined to play a part equal to that of his great-grandfather, the regent, whom he resembled in character and debauchery.

  • What followed in the second and third years of the Celman administration can only adequately be described as a debauchery of the national honour, of the national resources, of the rights of Argentines as citizens of the republic. Buenos Aires was still prostrate under the crushing blow of the misfortunes of 1880, and lacked strength and power of organization necessary to raise any effective protest against the proceedings of Celman and his friends when the true character of these proceedings was first understood.

  • The early death of his eldest son, Baltasar Carlos, was unquestionably due to debauchery encouraged by the gentlemen entrusted by the king with his education.

  • Froissart relates that he was burned to death through his bedclothes catching fire; Secousse says that he died in peace with many signs of contrition; another story says he died of leprosy; and a popular legend tells how he expired by a divine judgment through the burning of the clothes steeped in sulphur and spirits in which he had been wrapped as a cure for a loathsome disease caused by his debauchery.

  • He fought with success against the German tribes, but soon left the defence of the Upper Rhine to his legates and returned to Rome, where he abandoned himself to all kinds of debauchery and excess.

  • In the years of his reign he had entirely given himself over to debauchery.

  • Gilles de Laval, sire de Retz (1404-1440), the comrade-in-arms of Joan of Arc and marshal of France, gave himself over to the most revolting debauchery, and was strangled and burned at Nantes.

  • The Areois travelled about, devoting their whole time to feasting, dancing (the chief dance of the women being the grossly indecent Timorodeementionedby Captain Cook), and debauchery, varied by elaborate realistic stage presentments of the lives and loves of gods and legendary heroes.

  • After a three weeks' carnival of blood and debauchery Razin quitted Astrakhan with two hundred barges full of troops to establish the Cossack republic along the whole length of the Volga, as a preliminary step towards advancing against Moscow.

  • Treachery and debauchery filled the first years of the annals of the beautiful island.

  • He occupied part of his time in dabbling in literature, science and various trifling arts, but gave himself up chiefly to excess and debauchery.

  • Stevenson wrote: " The history of the ` Kaimiloa ' is a story of debauchery, mutiny and waste of government property."

  • Alexius III., sunk in debauchery, took no efficient measures to resist.

  • than his predecessors, being given to open debauchery and profligacy, an example followed by his amirs; and fresh discontent led to his being deposed by the Syrian amirs, when his brother ~?dfji was proclaimed sultan in his place (September 18th, 1346).

  • Owing to disturbances and misgovernment the population of Egypt and Syria is said to have shrunk to a third in his time, and he offended public sentiment not only by debauchery, but by having his image stamped on his coins.

  • The case was different when the Jews were dispersed through the new Greek kingdoms, and lived in cities like Jerusalem and Alexandria, centres of wealth and luxury, inhabited by mixed populations; this form of debauchery then became commoner and better organized.

  • Sobriety and hardiness characterize the bulk of the people, though the higher classes are too often stained with deep and degrading debauchery.

  • His health was the one subject to which he gave unremitting attention, and his fine constitution and devotion to all kinds of sport and physical exercise kept off the effects of uncontrolled debauchery for thirty years.

  • It was delivered on St Thomas's day (1609) before the feast of Christ's nativity, and in it he rebuked sharply "lusory lotts" and the "heathenish debauchery" of the students during the twelve days ensuing.

  • But the prevailing impression we carry away after reading him is that in all his early satires he was animated by a sincere and manly detestation of the tyranny and cruelty, the debauchery and luxury, the levity and effeminacy, the crimes and frauds, which we know from other sources were then rife in Rome, and that a more serene wisdom and a happier frame of mind were attained by him when old age had somewhat allayed the fierce rage which vexed his manhood.

  • At first unsuccessful, he finally defeated the reigning king Demetrius Soter in 150 B.C. Being now undisputed master of Syria, he abandoned himself to a life of debauchery.

  • But in the gambling and debauchery which followed, nothing was more common than that one-half of the conquerors should find themselves on the morrow in most pressing want; and while those who had retained or increased their share would willingly have gone home, the others clamoured for renewed attacks.

  • As among their kinsfolk the Tahitians, debauchery was systematized and infanticide an organized institution.

  • I know a little penance for our previous evening's debauchery may be in order, but the 12 hour hangover is completely unacceptable.

  • For all those of you yearning for a sordid account of drunken debauchery.

  • Their lives are full of violence, wild sex, and general debauchery as Bruno and Michael try to find happiness.

  • Well, I suppose you weren't in Connaught Halls last year then or else you would be used to such debauchery!

  • Gansa has a real feel to it: part wanton exchange student debauchery, part classy tapas bohemia.

  • This fabulously romantic gift box contains everything you need for a weekend of unadulterated debauchery.

  • Her wealth made it certain that he would be the richest man in France, and he determined to play a part equal to that of his great-grandfather, the regent, whom he resembled in character and debauchery.

  • All the vices - perfidy, avarice, debauchery, ambition, flattery - fought within him for the mastery.

  • What followed in the second and third years of the Celman administration can only adequately be described as a debauchery of the national honour, of the national resources, of the rights of Argentines as citizens of the republic. Buenos Aires was still prostrate under the crushing blow of the misfortunes of 1880, and lacked strength and power of organization necessary to raise any effective protest against the proceedings of Celman and his friends when the true character of these proceedings was first understood.

  • The early death of his eldest son, Baltasar Carlos, was unquestionably due to debauchery encouraged by the gentlemen entrusted by the king with his education.

  • Froissart relates that he was burned to death through his bedclothes catching fire; Secousse says that he died in peace with many signs of contrition; another story says he died of leprosy; and a popular legend tells how he expired by a divine judgment through the burning of the clothes steeped in sulphur and spirits in which he had been wrapped as a cure for a loathsome disease caused by his debauchery.

  • He fought with success against the German tribes, but soon left the defence of the Upper Rhine to his legates and returned to Rome, where he abandoned himself to all kinds of debauchery and excess.

  • In the years of his reign he had entirely given himself over to debauchery.

  • Gilles de Laval, sire de Retz (1404-1440), the comrade-in-arms of Joan of Arc and marshal of France, gave himself over to the most revolting debauchery, and was strangled and burned at Nantes.

  • The Areois travelled about, devoting their whole time to feasting, dancing (the chief dance of the women being the grossly indecent Timorodeementionedby Captain Cook), and debauchery, varied by elaborate realistic stage presentments of the lives and loves of gods and legendary heroes.

  • Buzurg Khan delivered himself up to indolence and debauchery, but Yakub Beg, with singular energy and perseverance, made himself master of Yangi Shahr, Yangi-Hissar, Yarkand and other towns, and eventually became sole master of the country, Buzurg Khan proving himself totally unfitted for the post of ruler.

  • After a three weeks' carnival of blood and debauchery Razin quitted Astrakhan with two hundred barges full of troops to establish the Cossack republic along the whole length of the Volga, as a preliminary step towards advancing against Moscow.

  • Treachery and debauchery filled the first years of the annals of the beautiful island.

  • He occupied part of his time in dabbling in literature, science and various trifling arts, but gave himself up chiefly to excess and debauchery.

  • Stevenson wrote: " The history of the ` Kaimiloa ' is a story of debauchery, mutiny and waste of government property."

  • Alexius III., sunk in debauchery, took no efficient measures to resist.

  • Debauchery of all kinds, and murder in all forms, were the daily matter of excitement or of jest to the brilliant circle which revolved around Queen Catherine de' Medici.

  • than his predecessors, being given to open debauchery and profligacy, an example followed by his amirs; and fresh discontent led to his being deposed by the Syrian amirs, when his brother ~?dfji was proclaimed sultan in his place (September 18th, 1346).

  • Owing to disturbances and misgovernment the population of Egypt and Syria is said to have shrunk to a third in his time, and he offended public sentiment not only by debauchery, but by having his image stamped on his coins.

  • The case was different when the Jews were dispersed through the new Greek kingdoms, and lived in cities like Jerusalem and Alexandria, centres of wealth and luxury, inhabited by mixed populations; this form of debauchery then became commoner and better organized.

  • Sobriety and hardiness characterize the bulk of the people, though the higher classes are too often stained with deep and degrading debauchery.

  • In spite of his debauchery, there is no doubt that he was a man of considerable education and no mean soldier, while Brutus, in a letter to his father (Epp. ad Brutum, ii.

  • His health was the one subject to which he gave unremitting attention, and his fine constitution and devotion to all kinds of sport and physical exercise kept off the effects of uncontrolled debauchery for thirty years.

  • How far the extraordinary corruption of private morals which has gained for the restoration period so unenviable a notoriety was owing to the king's own example of flagrant debauchery, how far to the natural reaction from an artificial Puritanism, is uncertain, but it is incontestable that Charles's cynical selfishness was the chief cause of the degradation of public life which marks his reign, and of the disgraceful and unscrupulous betrayal of the national interests which raised France to a threatening predominance and imperilled the very existence of Britain for generations.

  • It was delivered on St Thomas's day (1609) before the feast of Christ's nativity, and in it he rebuked sharply "lusory lotts" and the "heathenish debauchery" of the students during the twelve days ensuing.

  • But the prevailing impression we carry away after reading him is that in all his early satires he was animated by a sincere and manly detestation of the tyranny and cruelty, the debauchery and luxury, the levity and effeminacy, the crimes and frauds, which we know from other sources were then rife in Rome, and that a more serene wisdom and a happier frame of mind were attained by him when old age had somewhat allayed the fierce rage which vexed his manhood.

  • At first unsuccessful, he finally defeated the reigning king Demetrius Soter in 150 B.C. Being now undisputed master of Syria, he abandoned himself to a life of debauchery.

  • But in the gambling and debauchery which followed, nothing was more common than that one-half of the conquerors should find themselves on the morrow in most pressing want; and while those who had retained or increased their share would willingly have gone home, the others clamoured for renewed attacks.

  • As among their kinsfolk the Tahitians, debauchery was systematized and infanticide an organized institution.

  • It suits you so badly--all this debauchery, dissipation, and the rest of it!

  • I shall perish of my debauchery if Thou utterly desertest me!

  • They are armed against you by the same experience of debauchery; but to promise a maid to marry her... to deceive, to kidnap....

  • The habits of the military class are the absence of freedom, that is, discipline, idleness, ignorance, cruelty, debauchery, and drunkenness.

  • Another game in the vein of wacky Japan-antics, We Love Katamari is a game that actually surpassed the original (that's right, this is a sequel) in sheer lunacy and fruit-tastic debauchery.

  • Officials also hoped this would be a way to dissuade individuals from participating in ceremonies of debauchery, and celebrate with reverence instead.

  • Whether you have a Capricorn sun, or have it nestled on the first house cusp, certain characteristics, like frugality, depression, and even an occasional bout of debauchery, are bound to raise their heads from time to time.

  • The influence of old school tattoo flash on contemporary tattooists and aficionados dates back to times of war, debauchery, buxom temptresses and red-blooded men.

  • Of course, safety should always be a consideration when you're planning a night of drunken debauchery.

  • Fraternities, sororities and other groups on campus regularly throw wild college parties that usually include a lot of drinking, dancing and debauchery.

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