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deaf

deaf

deaf Sentence Examples

  • My attempt at lightening the situation fell on deaf ears.

  • He turned a deaf ear when they pressed for details.

  • Gladys must have thought most of the world was deaf as she was quite surprised when Dean politely scolded her.

  • Ryland's pleading fell on deaf ears.

  • She continued to take notes, as if Dean's scolding had fallen on deaf ears.

  • Utilizing the best of his detective training, he deduced she was as deaf as a turnip.

  • Is it like suddenly being blind or deaf or something?

  • The faith which he put in the Chinese made him turn a deaf ear to the warnings which he received of the threatening Boxer movement in 1900.

  • Biennial appropriations are made for the support of the deaf and dumb, the blind and imbecile children at various institutions in Massachusetts and Connecticut.

  • The hindrance, however, to the general development of trade which the act involved aroused at once loud complaints, tO which Cromwell turned a deaf ear, continuing to seize Dutch ships trading in forbidden goods.

  • Dunmore is the seat of the state oral school for the deaf.

  • Jehoash, it is said, turned away from Yahweh after the death of Jehoiada and gave heed to the Judaean nobles, " wrath came upon Judah and Jerusalem for their guilt," prophets were sent to bring them back but they turned a deaf ear.

  • Stigmatized as a traitor, scorned and even imprisoned, he had not ceased to utter his warnings to deaf ears, although Zedekiah himself was perhaps open to persuasion.

  • The state institution for the education of the deaf and dumb (1854) and the state institution for the blind (1848) are at Jackson.

  • An institute for the deaf and dumb and blind was opened at Raleigh in 1845, and another for the deaf and dumb at Morganton in 1894; by a law of 1907 every deaf child.

  • Laurent, to protect himself from the consequences of the substitution, replaced the wooden figure by a deaf mute, who was presently exchanged for the scrofulous child of the death certificate.

  • The deaf mute was also concealed in the Temple.

  • A child was in fact delivered to her agents, but he was a deaf mute.

  • Charitable institutions include a deaf and dumb asylum (1875-1886), the Metropolitan infirmary for children (1841), and the royal sea-bathing infirmary, established in 1791 and enlarged through the munificence of Sir Erasmus Wilson in 1882.

  • The town has two Evangelical and a Roman Catholic church, a gymnasium, a cadet academy and a deaf and dumb asylum.

  • The crowning complication in the effect of Der fliegende Hollander, Tannhauser and Lohengrin on the musical thought of the 10th century was that the unprecedented fusion of their musical with their dramatic contents revealed some of the meaning of serious music to ears that had been deaf to the classics.

  • The other public buildings of the town include the infirmary founded in 1837, the present buildings being erected in 1883, and subsequently enlarged; the sanatorium, the seamen's hospital, the South Wales Institute of Mining Engineers (which has a library) built in 1894, the exchange, an institute for the blind, a school for the deaf and dumb, and one of the two prisons for the county (the other being at Swansea).

  • He became deaf after the percussion from the loud crash.

  • The Michigan school for the deaf, established in 1854, and the Oak Grove hospital (private) for the treatment of mental and nervous diseases, are here.

  • Other institutions are the Royal hospital for sick children, the home for crippled children, the Royal maternity hospital, and the deaf and dumb asylum.

  • There are also many flourishing charities, including an excellent hospital and a school for the deaf and dumb.

  • Other institutions include higher elementary schools for pupils certified to be able to profit by higher instruction; and schools for blind, deaf and defective children.

  • There are numerous other hospitals both general and special, a foundling hospital dating from the 13th century (Santa Maria degli Innocenti), an institute for the blind, one for the deaf and dumb, &c. Most of the hospitals and other charitable institutions are endowed, but the endowments are supplemented by private contributions.

  • The schools include the Gymnasium (founded in 1592 by the Protestant community as a Latin school), the Realgymnasium (founded in 1830, for "modern" subjects and Latin), the Oberrealschule and Realschule (founded 1893, the latter wholly "modern"), two girls' high schools, a girls' middle-class school, a large number of popular schools, a mechanics' and polytechnic school, a school of mechanics, an industrial drawing school, a commercial school, and a school for the deaf and dumb.

  • In addition to the institutions under the board of charities and corrections there are two under the board of education, and supported wholly or in part by the state, the School for the Deaf (1877) and the Home and School for Dependent and Neglected Children (1885) at Providence.

  • He suggested the use of experimental tanks for testing the powers of ship models, invented an ear-trumpet for the deaf, improved the common house-stove of his native land, cured smoky chimneys, took a lively interest in machine-guns and even sketched a flying machine.

  • The city is the seat of the Academy of the Holy Names (opened in 1865 as St Peter's Academy), of the State Custodial Asylum for unteachable idiots, of the Central New York Institution for Deaf Mutes (1875), and of the Oneida County Home.

  • The charitable institutions include the county hospital, district asylum, a deaf and dumb home, the Kyle combination poorhouse, St John's refuge and industrial schools for boys and girls.

  • The institutions under its charge include a Soldiers' Orphans' Home at Davenport; a Soldiers' Home at Marshalltown; a College for the Blind at Vinton; a School for the Deaf at Council Bluffs; an Institution for Feeble-minded Children at Glenwood; an Industrial School for Boys at Eldora; an Industrial School for Girls at Mitchellville; and, at Oakdale, a Sanatorium for the Treatment of Tuberculosis.

  • The Horace Mann school in Boston, a public day school for the deaf, the New England industrial school for deaf mutes at Beverly and the Clarke school for the deaf at Northampton are maintained in part by the state.

  • Among the educational establishments are a gymnasium, and Realschule, the Sophienstift (a large school for girls of the better class, founded by the grand-duchess Sophia), the grand-ducal school of art, geographical institutes, a technical school, commercial school, music school, teachers' seminaries, and deaf and dumb and blind asylums. An English church was opened in 1899.

  • Its principal buildings are an old palace, formerly the residence of the bishops of Augsburg and now government offices, a royal gymnasium, a Latin school with a library of 75,000 volumes, seven churches (six Roman Catholic), two episcopal seminaries, a Capuchin monastery, a Franciscan convent and a deaf and dumb asylum.

  • The number of aliens, of the deaf and dumb and the blind were also gathered.

  • Eight private institutions for the care or the care and instruction of deaf mutes and one for the care of the blind are supported mainly by the state.

  • There are, moreover, industrial schools, orphanages and institutions for the deaf and dumb and blind.

  • He unexpectedly gained the accession of many Jews by race who were indifferent to the religious aspect of Judaism, but he quite failed to convince the leaders of Jewish thought, who from first to last remained (with such conspicuous exceptions as Nordau and Zangwill) deaf to his pleading.

  • Charities, £&c. - The state charitable and penal institutions consist of the Western Washington Hospital for the Insane at Fort Steilacoom, the Eastern Washington Hospital for the Insane at Medical Lake, the State School for the Deaf and the State School for the Blind at Vancouver, the State Institution for Feeble-minded near Medical Lake, the Washington Soldiers' Home and Soldiers' Colony at Orting, the Veterans' Home at Port Orchard, the State Penitentiary at Walla Walla, the State Reformatory at Monroe and the State Training School at Chehalis.

  • Persons who when young could hear the squeaks of bats may be quite deaf to them when older.

  • - Various devices have been successfully employed for making sounds of determinate loudness in order to test the hearing of partially deaf people.

  • These are a state prison at Deer Lodge, managed by contract; a reform school at Miles City, an industrial school at Butte, an orphans' home at Twin Bridges, the soldiers' home at Columbia Falls, a school for deaf and blind at Boulder, and an insane asylum at Warm Springs, managed by contract.

  • They called attention to the fact that the Germans in earlier days were deaf to such requests; they saw in them a " dismemberment of the country," and asserted that in the central public departments of Vienna, too, the Czechs did not occupy a number of official positions in proportion to their population.

  • Charitable Institutions, &c. - The state maintains a school for the blind at Gary, a school for deaf mutes at Sioux Falls, a tuberculosis sanatorium at Custer, a general hospital for the insane at Yankton, a school for the feeble-minded at Redfield, a soldiers' home at Hot Springs, a reform school at Plankinton, and a penitentiary at Sioux Falls.

  • At St Francis, adjoining the city on the south, is the seminary of St Francis of Sales (Roman Catholic), and St Joseph's institute for deaf mutes (Roman Catholic).

  • The Milwaukee public school system comprises four high schools, a high school of trades, and in addition to the ordinary grades, a kindergarten department and day schools for the blind and deaf.

  • To the advances of the French government he at first turned a deaf ear, but when the rapprochement between the two countries was effected with little or no co-operation on his part, he utilized it for restraining France and promoting Russian interests.

  • Educational facilities are also furnished by the state through university and school of mines at University, near Grand Forks, normal schools (opened in 1890) at Valley City and Mayville, an agricultural college and experiment station (1890) at Fargo, a normal and industrial school (opened in 1899) at Ellendale, a school for the deaf (1890) at Devils Lake, a scientific school (opened in 1903) at Wahpeton, and a school of forestry at Bottineau.

  • Other institutions of importance in Hartford are the American school for the deaf (formerly the American asylum for the deaf and dumb), founded in 1816 by Thomas H.

  • In the city are a public library, the Beverly hospital, the New England industrial school for deaf mutes (organized, 1876; incorporated, 1879), and the Beverly historical society (1891), which owns a large colonial house, in which there is a valuable historical collection.

  • But his eloquence offended the narrow and cramped particularism of those little democratic cities, deaf to the sentiment of the common interest.

  • Criminally neglected by the diet, which from sheer niggardliness turned a deaf ear to all his requests for reinforcements and for supplies and money to pay his soldiers, Chodkiewicz nevertheless more than held his own against the Swedes.

  • There are a deaf and dumb institution at Danville (1823), an institution for the blind at Louisville (1842), and an institution for the education of feeble-minded children at Frankfort (1860).

  • The state also makes annual appropriations for the care and education of blind and deaf and dumb persons in institutions outside of the state.

  • An institution for the maintenance and education of children born deaf and dumb is maintained at Claremont, near Glasnevin (1816).

  • Charitable institutions of a high character are also prominent, among which are the Hospicio, which includes an asylum for the aged, infirm, blind, deaf and dumb, foundlings and orphans, a primary school for both sexes, and a girls' training school, and the Hospital de San Miguel de Belen, which is a hospital, an insane asylum, and a school for little children.

  • To those who began to despair of success, and advised him to conclude peace on almost any terms so as to avoid greater disasters, he turned a deaf ear, and brought the campaign to a successful conclusion; but when his more headstrong advisers urged him to insist on terms which would probably have produced a conflict with Great Britain and Austria, he resolved, after some hesitation, to make the requisite concessions.

  • There are a number of charitable institutions devoted to the education of orphans, the blind and the deaf and dumb, which are admirably equipped and administered.

  • Amontons, who through disease was rendered almost completely deaf in early youth, died at Paris on the II th of October 1705.

  • There are also two naval academies, asylums for the deaf and dumb, and numerous charitable institutions.

  • More than eighty churches, many of them of architectural value, are found scattered over the city, while the General Hospital, Women's Home, Children's Home, Children's Aid Shelter and Deaf and Dumb Institute speak of the benevolence of the citizens.

  • Amongst other buildings are the episcopal palace, with a museum of Roman and medieval antiquities, several convents, and the principal deaf and dumb institute in the country.

  • Turning a deaf ear Rome.

  • Unfortunately all the warnings and admonitions of the pope fell on deaf ears, though he himself parted with his mitre and plate in order to equip a fleet against the Turks.

  • and Charles V., were deaf to his admonitions to make common cause against the Turks.

  • The city is the seat of a state asylum for the deaf, dumb and blind, of a printers' home for union men, which was endowed in 1892 by Anthony J.

  • He is described as "a very strong lusty man," of uncouth manners and appearance, not so deaf as he pretended, of reserved and temperate habits, not avaricious and a despiser of honours.

  • He published many scientific monographs, including a memoir on the formation of a deaf variety in the human race.

  • The government also maintains an institute for the deaf and dumb at Belleville and for the blind at Brantford.

  • There are several educational institutions, including a business college, a convent, and a government institute for the deaf and dumb.

  • Here also are the state normal and model schools (1855), the state library, housed in the capitol, the state school for deaf mutes, the state home for girls, one of the two state hospitals for the insane (opened in 1848), the state arsenal - the building being the old state prison - the state prison (1836), St Francis hospital (1874), Mercer hospital (1892), the William McKinley memorial hospital (1887), the city hospital, two children's day nurseries, the Friends' home, the Union industrial home (for destitute children), the Florence Crittenton home (1895), the indigent widows' and single women's home (1854), the Har Sinai charity society, the home for friendless children, and the society of St Vincent de Paul.

  • In modern times the word asylum has come to mean an institution providing shelter or refuge for any class of afflicted or destitute persons, such as the blind, deaf and dumb, &c., but more particularly the insane.

  • Council Bluffs is the seat of the Western Iowa Business College, and of the Iowa school for the deaf.

  • The others were the State Psychopathic Institute at Kankakee (established in 1907 as part of the insane service) for systematic study of mental and nervous diseases; one at Lincoln having charge of feebleminded children; two institutions for the blind - a school at Jacksonville and an industrial home at Marshall Boulevard and 19th Street, Chicago; a home for soldiers and sailors (Quincy), one for soldiers' orphans (Normal), and one for soldiers' widows (Wilmington); a school for the deaf (Jacksonville), and an eye and ear infirmary (Chicago).

  • The State Central Hospital for the Insane (opened in 1851), the State School for the deaf (established in 1839, opened in 1845, and the first charitable institution of the state) and the State School for the Blind (1849) are also in Jacksonville.

  • At Fulton are the Westminster College (Presbyterian, founded in 1853), the Synodical College for Young Women (Pres., founded in 1871), the William Woods College for Girls (Christian Church, 1890), and the Missouri 'school for the deaf (1851).

  • He marched at the head of 35,000 men into northern Italy, and from Rimini issued his famous proclamation in favour of Italian independence, which at the time fell on deaf ears (March 30th, 1815).

  • Besides the elementary schools there are at Manila the Philippine Normal School, the Philippine School of Arts and Trades, the Philippine School of Commerce and the school for the instruction of the deaf and blind, and in 1908 the Philippine legislature passed an act for the establishment of a university of the Philippines.

  • Also under state control are the home for care and training of feeble-minded children, at Eldridge, Sonoma county; the institution for the deaf and the blind at Berkeley, and the home of mechanical trades for the adult blind at Oakland.

  • Frederick is the seat of the Maryland school for the deaf and dumb and of the Woman's College of Frederick (1893; formerly the Frederick Female Seminary, opened in 1843), which in 1907-1908 had 212 students, 121 of whom were in the Conservatory of Music. Francis Scott Key and Roger Brooke Taney were buried here, and a beautiful monument erected to the memory of Key stands at the entrance to Mount Olivet cemetery.

  • Gallaudet); it was the first institution to give collegiate courses to the deaf, and it has received Congressional appropriations, though it is a private foundation.

  • For the care of the deaf and blind there is the Virginia School for Deaf and Blind (1839), at Staunton, and the Virginia School for Coloured Deaf and Blind Children (1908), at Newport News.

  • Each school for the deaf and blind is managed by a board of visitors appointed by the governor with the concurrence of the Senate.

  • The state board of education consists of the governor; the attorneygeneral; the superintendent of public instruction, who is ex officio its president; three experienced educators chosen quadrennially by the Senate from members of the faculties of the University of Virginia, the Virginia Military Institute, the Virginia Polytechnic Institute, the State Female Normal School at Farmville, the School for the Deaf and Blind, and the College of William and Mary; and two division superintendents, one from a county and one from a city, chosen biennially by the other members of the board.

  • Of charitable and reformatory institutions a soldiers' and sailors' home (1889) is maintained at Monte Vista, a school for the deaf and blind (1874) at Colorado Springs, an insane asylum (1879) at Pueblo, a home for dependent and neglected children (1895) at Denver, an industrial school for girls (1887) near Morrison, and for boys (1881) at Golden, a reformatory (1889) at Buena Vista, and a penitentiary (1868) at Canyon City.

  • It is attractively situated, has a fine public school system, including a high school, a manual training school, a domestic science department, and kindergarten and day schools for the deaf.

  • The state maintains an insane asylum at Las Vegas, a deaf and dumb asylum and penitentiary at Santa Fe, an institute for the blind at Almagordo, a reform school at El Rito and a miners' hospital at Raton.

  • The government also maintains schools for the blind and for the deaf and dumb.

  • They found him deaf to all arguments.

  • He is the author of many miscellaneous treatises on science, music, the art of teaching the deaf and dumb, &c. But his chief work, the labour of fully twenty years, is entitled Dell' origine, progressi, e stato attuale d'ogni Letteratura (7 vols., Parma, 1782-1799).

  • The benevolent institutions include the general hospital, founded in 1817, removed to the present site in 1867, extended by the addition of two wings in 1878 and of an eye department in 1890; a convalescent home for twenty patients from the hospital only (1903); the Royal Cambrian Institution for the Deaf and Dumb, established in 1847 at Aberystwyth, removed to Swansea in 1850, and several times enlarged, so as to have at present accommodation for ninety-eight pupils; the Swansea and South Wales Institution for the Blind, established in 1865 and now under the Board of Education; the Swansea and South Wales Nursing Institute (1873), providing a home for nurses in the intervals of their employment; a nursing institution (1902) for nursing the sick poor in their own homes, affiliated with the Queen's Jubilee Institute of London; the Sailors' Home (1864); a Sailors' Rest (1885); and a Mission to Seamen's Institute (1904).

  • Boise is the seat of the state school for the deaf and blind (1906), and just outside the city limits are the state soldiers' home and the state penitentiary.

  • The care of all defectives was let by contract to other states until 1906, when a state school for the deaf and blind was opened in Boise.

  • The state supports the Michigan Asylum for the Insane (opened 1859), at Kalamazoo; the Eastern Michigan Asylum for the Insane (opened 1878), at Pontiac; the Northern Michigan Asylum for the Insane (opened 1885), at Traverse City; the Michigan Asylum for the Dangerous and Criminal Insane (established 1885), at Ionia; the Upper Peninsula Hospital for the Insane, at Newberry; a Psychopathic Hospital (established 1907), at Ann Arbor; a State Sanatorium (established 1905), at Howell; the Michigan State Prison (established 1839), at Jackson; the Michigan Reformatory (established 1887), at Ionia; the State House of Correction and Branch Prison (established 1885), at Marquette; the Industrial School for Boys, at Lansing; the Industrial Home for Girls (established 1879), near Adrian; the State Public School (opened 1874), at Coldwater, a temporary home for dependent children until homes in families can be found for them; the School for the Deaf (established 1854), at Flint; the School for the Blind, at Lansing; an Employment Institution for the Blind (established 1903), at Saginaw; the Home for the Feeble Minded and Epileptic (established 1893), at Lapeer; and the Michigan Soldiers' Home (established 1885), at Grand Rapids.

  • Other institutions at Danville are Caldwell College for women (1860; Presbyterian), and the Kentucky state institution for deaf mutes (1823).

  • The state supports the following charitable and correctional institutions all under the inspection of a State Department of Charities and Correction (1905); hospitals for the insane at Trenton and Morris Plains; a training-school for feeble-minded children (partly supported by the state) and a home for feeble-minded women at Vineland; a sanatorium for tuberculous diseases at Glen Gardner; a village for epileptics, with a farm of 700 acres, near Skillman, Somerset county; a state home (reform school) for boys near Jamesburg, Middlesex county, and for girls in Ewing township, near Trenton; a state reformatory for criminals sixteen to thirty years of age, near Rahway; a state prison at Trenton; a home for disabled soldiers at Kearney,' Hudson county; a home for disabled soldiers, sailors and their wives at Vineland"; and a school for the deaf at Trenton.

  • Four miles south of the city, at Cedar Spring, is the South Carolina Institution for the Education of the Deaf and Blind, founded as a private institution in 1849 and taken over by the state in 1857.

  • Homer, he said, was dumb to him, while he was deaf to Homer; and he could only approach the Iliad in Boccaccio's rude Latin version.

  • The charitable institutions maintained by the state are: the military and naval orphan asylum at Bath, the Maine institution for the blind at Portland, the Maine school for the deaf (established in 1876, and taken over by the state in 1897) at Portland, the Maine insane hospital at Augusta, the Eastern Maine insane hospital at Bangor, and a school for the feeble-minded (established in 1907) at West Pownal, each of which is governed by trustees appointed by the governor and council, with the exception of a part of those of the orphan asylum, who are appointed by the corporation.

  • The Western Pennsylvania Institution for the instruction of the deaf and dumb (1876), in Edgewood Park, is in part maintained by the state.

  • There is a state school for the deaf and the blind (1884) at Ogden.

  • The patient is deaf, but complains of ringing in the ears, which may assume various forms, especially in musical people.

  • Among others may be mentioned hospitals for the sick, the aged, the infirm, the blind, the deaf, the dumb, the insane, and homes for widows, orphans, foundlings and sailors.

  • The letters become scarcer and scarcer with the decay of his faculties; at last, in 1740, comes one to his kind niece, Mrs Whiteway, of heartrending pathos: "I have been very miserable all night, and to-day extremely deaf and full of pain.

  • Charitable and Penal Institutions.-The charitable and penal institutions of the state include the penitentiary at Jefferson City, opened in 1836, which is self-supporting; a training school for boys at Boonville (opened 1889), an industrial home for girls at Chillicothe (established 1887), hospitals for the insane at Fulton (1847), St Joseph (opened 1874), Nevada (1887), and Farmington (1899); a school for the blind at St Louis (opened 1851); a school for the deaf at Fulton (opened 1851); a colony for the feeble-minded and epileptic at Marshall (established 1899); a state sanitorium, for consumptives, at Mount Vernon (established 1905, opened 1907); a Federal soldiers' home at St James, and a Confederate soldiers' home at Higginsville (both established 1897).

  • The city is the seat of a state hospital for the insane; of the Clarke School for the Deaf (1867, founded by John Clarke of Northampton); of Smith College, one of the foremost colleges for women in the country; of the Mary A.

  • The state supports the following charitable and correctional institutions: a soldiers' home (1894) at Roseburg and a school for deaf mutes (1870), an institute for the blind (1873), a reform school, an insane asylum and a penitentiary at Salem, the capital of the state.

  • These institutions (except the penitentiary, of which the governor of the state is an inspector) are governed each by a board of three trustees, the governor of the state and the secretary of state serving on all boards, and the third trustee being the state treasurer on the boards for the state insane asylum, the state reform school and the institute for the feeble-minded, and the superintendent of public instruction on the boards for the school for deaf mutes and the institute for the blind.

  • His eldest son Alessandro being deaf and dumb, the succession devolved on his second son Odoardo (1612-1646), who fought on the French side in the war against Spain.

  • A representative list includes: - the Charity Organization Society, the primary object of which is to organize the work of the others; the Baltimore Association for the Improvement of the Condition of the Poor, which seeks to discourage indiscriminate alms-giving; the Bay View asylum or city poorhouse; the Children's Aid Society; the Thomas Wilson Fuel-Saving Society, for furnishing coal at low rates; the Woman's Industrial Exchange, for assisting women in need to support themselves; Johns Hopkins hospital, noted for the excellence of its equipment especially for heating and ventilating; Saint Joseph's general hospital; hospital for the women of Maryland of Baltimore city; nursery and child's hospital; Baltimore eye, ear and throat charity hospital; Maryland hospital for the - insane; the Sheppard asylum, intended especially for the cure of the insane; the Sheppard and Enoch Pratt hospital; the Baltimore orphan asylum; Saint Vincent's infant asylum; the Thomas Wilson sanatorium for children, intended for children under three years of age, who are suffering from disease, during the warm summer months; the Free Summer Excursion Society, for affording a change of air to the indigent sick; home for the incurables; homes for the aged; homes for friendless children; institutions for the blind; and institutions for the deaf and dumb.

  • No person not of full age, imperfectly educated, stupid, blind, deaf, deformed or otherwise defective in mind or body, or for any reason whatsoever unfit to discharge the duties or unworthy to represent the manhood of the nation, could be king, even though he were the eldest son of the preceding king.

  • The state was one of the first to establish schools for the deaf and the blind.

  • Its Institution for the Education of the Deaf was established in 1844, and its Institution for the Education of the Blind in 1847, both being in Indianapolis.

  • The court was frivolous, vacillating, stone deaf and stone blind; the gentry were amiable, but distinctly bent to the very last on holding to their privileges, and they were wholly devoid both of the political experience that only comes of practical responsibility for public affairs, and of the political sagacity that only comes of political experience.

  • There are twenty-two day schools for the deaf.

  • of Oshkosh; a School for the Deaf (1852) at Delavan, Walworth county, in which the teaching is principally oral and which includes a high school; a School for the Blind (1849; taken over by the state in 1850) at Janesville; an Industrial School for Boys (opened in 1860, as a House of Refuge) at Waukesha, with a farm of 404 acres; the State Prison (1853) at Waupun; State Public School for Dependent and Neglected Children (1886) at Sparta, with a farm of 234 acres; Wisconsin Home for Feeble Minded (1896) at Chippewa Falls; Wisconsin State Reformatory (1898), near Green Bay; and Wisconsin State Tuberculosis Sanatorium (1907) at Wales, Waukesha county.

  • Eisenach has a school of forestry, a school of design, a classical school (Gymnasium) and Modern school (Realgymnasium), a deaf and dumb school, a teachers' seminary, a theatre and a Wagner museum.

  • The Plain was deaf to Robespierre's appeal.

  • The state has a hospital for the insane at Fort Supply, the Whitaker Orphans' Home at Pryor Creek, the Oklahoma School for the Blind at Fort Gibson and the Oklahoma School for the Deaf at Sulphur; and the legislature of 1908 appropriated money for the East Oklahoma Hospital for the Insane at Vinita, a School for the Feeble-Minded at Enid, a State Training School for Boys at Wynnewood and a State Reformatory (at Granite, Greer county) for first-time convicts between the ages of sixteen and twenty-five.

  • Poor Law.-The following table gives the numbers in receipt of indoor and outdoor relief (exclusive of persons in institutions for the blind, deaf and dumb, and for idiots and imbeciles) in the years 1902-1905, together with the total expenditure for relief of the poor: The average daily number in receipt of relief of all kinds (except outdoor relief) during the same years was as follows: 1902, 41,163; 1903, 43, 600; 1904, 43,7 21; 1905, 43,9 11.

  • There is an institution for the deaf, dumb and blind (1849, since 1857 a state institution) at Cedar Springs, and a state hospital for the insane, founded in 1821 at Columbia by Samuel Farrow (1760-1824) and opened in 1828.

  • He also had the management of the university library, was director of the institute for the deaf and dumb, and filled many educational and municipal offices.

  • South-west of these buildings, on the other side of the Johannisthal Park, are clustered the medical institutes and hospitals of the university - the infirmary, clinical and other hospitals, the physico-chemical institute, pathological institute, physiological institute, ophthalmic hospital, pharmacological institute, the schools of anatomy, the chemical laboratory, the zoological institute, the physicomineralogical institute, the botanical garden and also the veterinary schools, deaf and dumb asylum, agricultural college and astronomical observatory.

  • The state almost entirely supports the Connecticut school for imbeciles, at Lakeville; the American school for the deaf, in Hartford; the oral school for the deaf, 1 The constitution prescribes that " the privileges of an elector shall be forfeited by a conviction of bribery, forgery, perjury, duelling, fraudulent bankruptcy, theft or other offense for which an infamous punishment is inflicted," but this disability may in any case be removed by a two-thirds vote of each house of the general assembly.

  • Charities, &c. - The charitable and penal institutions of the state consist of the Central Hospital for the Insane near Nashville; the Eastern Hospital for the Insane near Knoxville; the Western Hospital for the Insane near Bolivar; the Tennessee School for the blind at Nashville; the Tennessee Deaf and Dumb School at Knoxville; the Confederate Soldiers' Home near Nashville, on the " Hermitage," the estate formerly belonging to Andrew Jackson; and the Penitentiary and the Tennessee Industrial School, both at Nashville; and in 1907 the legislature passed an Act for the establishment in Davidson county of the Tennessee Reformatory for boys.

  • The Schools for the Blind and the Deaf and Dumb are each managed by a board of trustees, vacancies in which are filled by the remaining trustees with the concurrence of the legislature.

  • Unsolved murders, robberies, burglaries and all matter of crimes occurred daily but Howie turned a deaf ear to expanded involvement.

  • My attempt at lightening the situation fell on deaf ears.

  • You deaf now, too?

  • He turned a deaf ear when they pressed for details.

  • Gladys must have thought most of the world was deaf as she was quite surprised when Dean politely scolded her.

  • Ryland's pleading fell on deaf ears.

  • She continued to take notes, as if Dean's scolding had fallen on deaf ears.

  • Utilizing the best of his detective training, he deduced she was as deaf as a turnip.

  • All her prayers had fallen on deaf ears — or as Alex had once said; God was answering.

  • Is it like suddenly being blind or deaf or something?

  • David Wise David Wise, Treasurer, was born severely deaf and has qualified as a chartered certified accountant.

  • He currently has no contact with deaf adults and sign in Zanzibar is not well developed.

  • alarm clock your deaf child chooses will depend on how heavy a sleeper they are.

  • Tone Deaf Amigos play an interesting breed of music having allsorts on stage including their dad's PC, well worth keeping an eye on.

  • A deaf lady visited her GP complaining of pain in her stomach and was given antacids as treatment.

  • bemoan the lack of articles - I won't, my pleas fall on deaf ears.

  • The hearing children of deaf parents often grow up bilingual too, learning a sign language at home.

  • brain-dead, deaf, Burberry wearing alien.

  • challenge discrimination against deaf people in the NHS.

  • chartered accountantise, Treasurer, was born severely deaf and has qualified as a chartered certified accountant.

  • Many deaf children use a loop system with their television.

  • Deaf and hearing classmates at the school get the British Sign Language qualification together.

  • The type of alarm clock your deaf child chooses will depend on how heavy a sleeper they are.

  • The signing environment With a substantial proportion of deaf staff, effective communication within the team was a key issue.

  • condense what is being said into notes for the deaf person to read on screen or in Braille.

  • One of the best confessors I ever met was almost totally deaf.

  • deaf ear ' with ' wielding a big stick ' .

  • All deaf children to have a positive deaf children to have a positive Deaf identity.

  • deaf pupils are boarders who live a long way away.

  • Wales have a strong Forum now, set up in 1995 by deaf people for deaf people for deaf people in their area.

  • deaf recipient.

  • deaf mutes under the care of the mission, some of whom are blind as well.

  • Were they born deaf, or did they become deaf?

  • And is it really true that you are going deaf?

  • For example, a bank should ask a profoundly deaf person what sort of communication support they prefer.

  • Some prelingually deaf people have English as a preferred language and rely on speechreading.

  • Recently, a very few congenitally deaf children have been implanted with an auditory brainstem implant in Europe.

  • Jordan has a hearing loss Jordan wears two hearing aids and is severely deaf.

  • Then, the partially deaf old fellow, with the speech defect, presumed as a result of private school sodomy.

  • With the totally deaf, you're on yer own.

  • deaf in the glue ear.

  • deaf from birth and have never heard a word spoken?

  • deaf since childhood, and owing to an allergy she is unable to wear hearing aids.

  • deaf since birth and his eyesight will deteriorate with time.

  • The ' sermons ' would fall on deaf ears.

  • fallen on deaf ears.

  • fire safety is essential, Deaf people should not have to go without a fire alarm.

  • None of the other professions currently requires those working with Deaf people to have fluent BSL skills.

  • Moreover, as a clinician who was born deaf she is the ideal go-between for the hearing and deaf worlds.

  • The new name is probably the worst-kept secret around and justifies us saying that the deaf community grapevine moves faster than Australian bushfire.

  • Parliament was deaf; the Press, with but few exception, was callous; the public conscience seemed hardened as a nether millstone.

  • hearing dogs for Deaf People - trains dogs to alert deaf people to specific sounds.

  • This functional illiteracy means that even the nuances of stories from basic tabloid newspapers are beyond the reach of many deaf adults.

  • likely impact of such development on the expectations we have of deaf children.

  • I simply do not believe that the experience of meeting someone who is deaf induces spontaneous lobotomy in the majority of the adult population.

  • Q - I became partially deaf as a result of the german measles at the age of eleven.

  • A deaf mute, being asked, " What is forgiveness?

  • Yes glad in office not on floor, too noisy, people go deaf, have to shout.

  • Deaf students fail in Britain's grossly overcrowded public sector classrooms.

  • Alarm clocks Alarm clocks often use a vibrating pad or flashing lights (or both) to wake up deaf children.

  • Your sponsorship is covering all areas of his training, together with his future with our deaf recipient.

  • Her other ongoing projects include research about deaf people's use of the internet and Somali refugee and asylum seeker children.

  • salutary to compare the attention paid to teaching BSL to deaf pupils with that paid to teaching English to hearing pupils.

  • Margaret also caught scarlet fever and although she survived it left her deaf (she recovered her hearing at fourteen ).

  • At the age of five Goodricke had contracted scarlet fever which left him totally deaf.

  • sensorineural hearing loss from a deaf family.

  • The day is open to deaf young people and their hearing siblings Full communication support will be provided.

  • Then, the partially deaf old fellow, with the speech defect, presumed as a result of private school sodomy.

  • Deaf Awareness week Why not teach your class finger spelling?

  • These English language subtitles can be very useful for deaf people who want to watch the DVD.

  • teletext subtitles does not greatly help: for many deaf people, their first language is sign language.

  • Deaf Identities review 34 Chris Payton tod, Lancashire encourages ToDs to include this volume on their bookshelves and university reading lists.

  • mobile videophones are on the horizon, where Deaf people will be able to communicate on the move in BSL.

  • There remains a great deal of work to be done to determine the characteristics of deaf wellness.

  • The faith which he put in the Chinese made him turn a deaf ear to the warnings which he received of the threatening Boxer movement in 1900.

  • Charities, &c. - The state charitable and penal institutions consist of the West Virginia Hospital for the Insane at Weston, the Second Hospital for the Insane at Spencer, three miners' hospitals - one at Welch, one at McKendree and one at Fairmont; the West Virginia Asylum for Incurables at Huntington, Schools for the Deaf and Blind at Romney, the West Virginia Penitentiary at Moundsville, the West Virginia Reform School at Grafton and the West Virginia Industrial Home for Girls near Salem.

  • Biennial appropriations are made for the support of the deaf and dumb, the blind and imbecile children at various institutions in Massachusetts and Connecticut.

  • The hindrance, however, to the general development of trade which the act involved aroused at once loud complaints, tO which Cromwell turned a deaf ear, continuing to seize Dutch ships trading in forbidden goods.

  • The indoor institutions are the more important in regard to endowment, and consist of hospitals for the infirm (a number of these are situated at the seaside); of hospitals for chronic and incurable diseases; of orphan asylums; of poorhouses and shelters for beggars; of infant asylums or institutes for the first education of children under six years of age; of lunatic asylums; of homes for the deaf and dumb; and of institutes for the blind.

  • Italy, who had made the integrity of the Ottoman empire a cardinal point of her Eastern policy, felt this change of the Mediterranean status quo the more severely inasmuch as, in order not to strain her relations with France, she had turned a deaf ear to Austrian, Russian and German advice to prepare to occupy Tunisia in agreement with Great Britain.

  • Among the state institutions in Columbus are the university (see below), the penitentiary, a state hospital for the insane, the state school for the blind, and the state institutions for the education of the deaf and dumb and for feeble-minded youth.

  • In or near the city are the Central Indiana Hospital for the Insane, the Indiana Institution for the Education of the Blind, the Indiana Institution for the Education of the Deaf, the Indiana Girls' School (included with the Women's prison until 1899, and under the same management as the prison from 1899 to 1903, when it became a separate institution, - it was removed to Clermont, to m.

  • Dunmore is the seat of the state oral school for the deaf.

  • and xiv.), and Judah in the time of Isaiah turned a deaf ear (Isa.

  • The deaf, dumb and blind are cared for at its expense in the California institution for these defectives.

  • Berkeley is the seat of the California state university (see California, University Of), opened in 1873; the inter-related Berkeley Bible Seminary (1896, Disciples of Christ); Pacific Theological Seminary (established in 1866 at Oakland, in 1901 at Berkeley, Congregational); Seminary of the Pacific Coast Baptist Theological Union, and Unitarian Theological School - all associated with the University of California; and the state institution for the deaf, dumb and blind.

  • Jehoash, it is said, turned away from Yahweh after the death of Jehoiada and gave heed to the Judaean nobles, " wrath came upon Judah and Jerusalem for their guilt," prophets were sent to bring them back but they turned a deaf ear.

  • Stigmatized as a traitor, scorned and even imprisoned, he had not ceased to utter his warnings to deaf ears, although Zedekiah himself was perhaps open to persuasion.

  • The state institution for the education of the deaf and dumb (1854) and the state institution for the blind (1848) are at Jackson.

  • An institute for the deaf and dumb and blind was opened at Raleigh in 1845, and another for the deaf and dumb at Morganton in 1894; by a law of 1907 every deaf child.

  • of sound mind must attend, between the ages of eight and fifteen, a school for the deaf at least five terms of nine months each; and by a law of 1908 every blind child (between seven and seventeen), if of sound mind and body, must attend some school for the blind for nine months of each year.

  • The Institute for the Colored Deaf, Dumb and Blind (1867) at Raleigh and the Eastern Insane Hospital (1880) near Goldsboro are the oldest institutions of the kind for negroes in the world; in connexion with the last there is an epileptic colony for negroes.

  • Laurent, to protect himself from the consequences of the substitution, replaced the wooden figure by a deaf mute, who was presently exchanged for the scrofulous child of the death certificate.

  • The deaf mute was also concealed in the Temple.

  • Richemont's tale that the woman Simon, who was genuinely attached to him, smuggled him out in a basket, is simple and more credible, and does not necessarily invalidate the story of the subsequent operations with the deaf mute and the scrofulous patient, Laurent in that case being deceived from the beginning, but it renders them extremely unlikely.

  • A child was in fact delivered to her agents, but he was a deaf mute.

  • from Cincinnati; Longview Hospital), Massillon, Toledo and Lima; a hospital for epileptics at Gallipolis, opened in 1893; institutions for feeble-minded, for the blind (opened 1839) and for the deaf (opened 1829) at Columbus; a state sanatorium for tuberculous patients at Mt.

  • Charitable institutions include a deaf and dumb asylum (1875-1886), the Metropolitan infirmary for children (1841), and the royal sea-bathing infirmary, established in 1791 and enlarged through the munificence of Sir Erasmus Wilson in 1882.

  • There are a school for the Blind, Deaf, and Dumb (1885) at St.

  • The town has two Evangelical and a Roman Catholic church, a gymnasium, a cadet academy and a deaf and dumb asylum.

  • The crowning complication in the effect of Der fliegende Hollander, Tannhauser and Lohengrin on the musical thought of the 10th century was that the unprecedented fusion of their musical with their dramatic contents revealed some of the meaning of serious music to ears that had been deaf to the classics.

  • These were at first purely symbolical, meaningless to any but a Christian eye, such as the Vine, the Good Shepherd, the Sheep, the Fisherman, the Fish, &c. Even the personages of ancient mythology were pressed into the service of early Christian art, and Orpheus, taming the wild beasts with his lyre, symbolized the peaceful sway of Christ; and Ulysses, deaf to the Siren's song, represented the Believer triumphing over the allurements of sensual pleasure.

  • The charitable institutions include two charity hospitals - at New Orleans (1832) and Shreveport; an Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat Hospital, a Hotel Dieu, the Touro Infirmary and a Home for Incurables, all at New Orleans; an Institute for the Deaf and Dumb (for whites - there is no state provision for negro deaf and dumb) and an Institute for the Blind, both at Baton Rouge; an Insane Hospital at Jackson and another at Pineville; and the Louisiana Retreat for the Insane at New Orleans.

  • Backus Law School (1892), the dental department (1892), Adelbert College (until 1882 the Western Reserve College, founded in 1826, at Hudson, Ohio), the College for Women (1888), and the Library school (1904); St Ignatius College (Roman Catholic, conducted by the Fathers of the Society of Jesus; incorporated 1890), which has an excellent meteorological observatory; St Mary's theological seminary (Roman Catholic); the Case School of Applied Science, founded in 1880 by Leonard Case (1820-1880), and opened in 1881; the Cleveland College of Physicians and Surgeons (founded in 1863; from 1869 until 1896 the medical department of the University of Wooster; since 1896 a part of Ohio Wesleyan University, Delaware, Ohio), the Cleveland Homeopathic Medical College, the Cleveland School of Pharmacy, the Cleveland Art School, and a school for the deaf, dumb and blind.

  • The other public buildings of the town include the infirmary founded in 1837, the present buildings being erected in 1883, and subsequently enlarged; the sanatorium, the seamen's hospital, the South Wales Institute of Mining Engineers (which has a library) built in 1894, the exchange, an institute for the blind, a school for the deaf and dumb, and one of the two prisons for the county (the other being at Swansea).

  • The charitable and correctional institutions of Minnesota have been since 1901 under the supervision of a State Board of Control consisting of three paid members appointed by the governor and serving for terms of six years; this board supplanted an unpaid Board of Corrections and Charities established in 1883, and the boards of managers of separate institutions (except the schools for the deaf and the blind at Faribault, and the state public school at Owatonna) and of groups of institutions were abolished.

  • The state institutions consist of state hospitals for the insane at St Peter (1866), at Rochester (1877), established originally as a state inebriate asylum under a law taxing liquor dealers for that purpose, which was subsequently held to be unconstitutional, at Fergus Falls (1887), at Anoka (1900) and at Hastings (1900); the state institute for defectives at Faribault, consisting of the schools for the deaf (1863), blind (1874) and feeble-minded (1879); the state public school for dependent and neglected children at Owatonna (1886); a sanatorium for consumptives at Walker; a hospital for indigent, crippled or deformed children (1907) at St Paul; the state training school for boys near Red Wing; a similar industrial school for girls (established separately in 1907) at Sauk Center; the state reformatory at St Cloud (1887), intermediate between the training school and the state prison, for first offenders between the ages of sixteen and thirty years, in which indeterminate sentences and a parole system are in operation; the state prison at Stillwater (1851), in which there is a parole system and a graded system of diminution of sentence for good conduct, and in which, up to 1895, prisoners were leased under contract (especially to the Minnesota Thresher Company), and since 1895 have been employed in the manufacture of shoes and of binding twine, and in providing for the needs of the prison population; and the state soldiers home occupying fifty-one acres adjoining Minnehaha Park in Minneapolis.

  • The Michigan school for the deaf, established in 1854, and the Oak Grove hospital (private) for the treatment of mental and nervous diseases, are here.

  • " 2 James Donaldson (1751-1830) was a printer who bequeathed nearly the whole of his large fortune for the purposes of a hospital for poor boys and girls, and the trustees have usually selected half of the children admitted from the ranks of the deaf and dumb.

  • Other institutions are the Royal hospital for sick children, the home for crippled children, the Royal maternity hospital, and the deaf and dumb asylum.

  • There are also many flourishing charities, including an excellent hospital and a school for the deaf and dumb.

  • Lamarck, Treviranus, Erasmus Dar win, Goethe, and Saint-Hilaire preached to deaf ears, for they advanced the theory that living beings had developed by a slow process of transmutation in successive generations from simpler ancestors, and in the beginning from simplest formless matter, without being able to demonstrate any existing mechanical causes by which such development must necessarily be brought about.

  • Fortunately Germany, which at the beginning of the century was delivered over to Brownism and vitalism and was deaf to Bichat, was rescued from this sort of barrenness by the brilliant experimental work of Claude Bernard and Pasteur in France - work which, as regards the attenuated virus, was a development of that of Edward Jenner, and indeed of Schwann, Robert Koch worthily following Pasteur with his work on the bacillus of anthrax and with his discovery of that of tuberculosis; and by the cellular doctrine and abundant labours in pathology of Virchow.

  • Other institutions include higher elementary schools for pupils certified to be able to profit by higher instruction; and schools for blind, deaf and defective children.

  • There are numerous other hospitals both general and special, a foundling hospital dating from the 13th century (Santa Maria degli Innocenti), an institute for the blind, one for the deaf and dumb, &c. Most of the hospitals and other charitable institutions are endowed, but the endowments are supplemented by private contributions.

  • The schools include the Gymnasium (founded in 1592 by the Protestant community as a Latin school), the Realgymnasium (founded in 1830, for "modern" subjects and Latin), the Oberrealschule and Realschule (founded 1893, the latter wholly "modern"), two girls' high schools, a girls' middle-class school, a large number of popular schools, a mechanics' and polytechnic school, a school of mechanics, an industrial drawing school, a commercial school, and a school for the deaf and dumb.

  • The case of Helen Keller is the most extraordinary ever known in the education of blind deaf-mutes (see Deaf And Dumb ad fin.), her acquirements including several languages and her general culture being exceptionally wide.

  • In addition to the institutions under the board of charities and corrections there are two under the board of education, and supported wholly or in part by the state, the School for the Deaf (1877) and the Home and School for Dependent and Neglected Children (1885) at Providence.

  • He suggested the use of experimental tanks for testing the powers of ship models, invented an ear-trumpet for the deaf, improved the common house-stove of his native land, cured smoky chimneys, took a lively interest in machine-guns and even sketched a flying machine.

  • The city is the seat of the Academy of the Holy Names (opened in 1865 as St Peter's Academy), of the State Custodial Asylum for unteachable idiots, of the Central New York Institution for Deaf Mutes (1875), and of the Oneida County Home.

  • The charitable institutions include the county hospital, district asylum, a deaf and dumb home, the Kyle combination poorhouse, St John's refuge and industrial schools for boys and girls.

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