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davy

davy

davy Sentence Examples

  • Davy, from boracic acid.

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  • About the same time Davy showed that two pieces of ice could be melted by rubbing them together in a vacuum, although everything surrounding them was at a temperature below the freezing point.

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  • Though we may allow that the results obtained by Rumford and Davy demonstrate satisfactorily that heat is in some way due to motion, yet they do not tell us to what particular dynamical quantity heat corresponds.

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  • Davy on the decomposition of the solutions of salts by the voltaic current were turned to account in the water voltameter telegraph of Sdmmering and the modification of it proposed by Schweigger, and in a similar method proposed by Coxe, in which a solution of salts was substituted for water.

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  • This was the principle of the chemical telegraph proposed by Edward Davy in 1838 and of that proposed by Bain in 1846.

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  • Davy showed that they were oxides of various metals.

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  • Davy, Count Rumford, all concerned themselves with thermochemical investigations of such processes.

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  • The Board of Agriculture in 1803 had commissioned Sir Humphry Davy to deliver a course of lectures on the connexion of chemistry with vegetable physiology.

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  • By the market house is a statue of Sir Humphry Davy, who was born here in 1778.

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  • Rouelle, while in England Humphry Davy expounded the same idea in the experimental demonstrations which gave his lectures their brilliant charm.

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  • Berzelius's investigation of the action of the electric current on salts clearly demonstrated the invaluable assistance that electrolysis could render to the isolator of elements; and the adoption of this method by Sir Humphry Davy for the analysis of the hydrates of the metals of the alkalis and alkaline earths, and the results which he thus achieved, established its potency.

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  • In 1808 Davy isolated sodium and potassium; he then turned his attention to the preparation of metallic calcium, barium, strontium and magnesium.

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  • The discovery of boron by Gay Lussac and Davy in 1809 led Berzelius to investigate silica (silex).

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  • The chemical analogy of this substance to chlorine was quickly perceived, especially after its investigation by Davy and Gay Lussac. Cyanogen, a compound which in combination behaved very similarly to chlorine and iodine, was isolated in 1815 by Gay Lussac. This discovery of the first of the then-styled " compound radicals " exerted great influence on the prevailing views of chemical composition.

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  • Hydrochloric acid was carefully investigated at about this time by Davy, Faraday and Gay Lussac, its composition and the elementary nature of chlorine being thereby established.

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  • Serullas and Roscoe; Davy and Stadion investigated chlorine peroxide, formed by treating potassium chlorate with sulphuric acid.

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  • Davy also described and partially investigated the gas, named by him " euchlorine," obtained by heating potassium chlorate with hydrochloric acid; this gas has been more recently examined by Pebal.

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  • Both phosphoric and phosphorous acids became known, although imperfectly, towards the end of the 18th century; phosphorous acid was first obtained pure by Davy in 1812, while pure phosphorous oxide, the anhydride of phosphorous acid, remained unknown until T.

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  • Of other phosphorus compounds we may here notice Gengembre's discovery of phosphuretted hydrogen (phosphine) in 1783, the analogy of which to ammonia was first pointed out by Davy and supported at a later date by H.

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  • Of the halogen compounds of phosphorus, the trichloride was discovered by Gay Lussac and Thenard, while the pentachloride was obtained by Davy.

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  • The preparation of crystalline boron in 1856 by Wohler and Sainte Claire Deville showed that this element also existed in allotropic forms, amorphous boron having been obtained simultaneously and independently in 1809 by Gay Lussac and Davy.

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  • in 1800, and Rumford himself selected Sir Humphry Davy as scientific lecturer there.

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  • Nathorst explored the land between Franz Josef Fjord and Scoresby Fjord, where the large King Oscar Fjord, connecting Davy's Sound with Franz Joseph Fjord, was discovered.

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  • Franz Josef Fjord, with its branch King Oscar Fjord, communicating with Davy's Sound, forms a system of fjords on a similar scale.

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  • Jacques Davy Duperron >>

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  • In 1806 Sir Humphry Davy proved that the formation of acid and alkali when water was electrolysed was due to saline impurities in the water.

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  • He was knighted in 1897, and received the Royal (1875), Davy (1888), and Copley (1904) medals of the Royal Society, besides filling the offices of president of the Chemical Society and of the Institution of Electrical Engineers.

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  • He was elected interim president in June 1820, on the death of Sir Joseph Banks; but he did not care to enter into competition with Sir Humphry Davy, and the latter was elected president at the anniversary meeting in November 1820.

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  • C. Oersted (1777-1851) had shown that a magnetic needle is deflected by an electric current, he attempted, in the laboratory of the Royal Institution in the presence of Humphry Davy, to convert that deflection into a continuous rotation, and also to obtain the reciprocal effect of a current rotating round a magnet.

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  • He failed in both respects, and when Michael Faraday, who overheard a portion of his conversation with Davy on the subject, was subsequently more successful, he was inclined to assert the merit of priority, to which Faraday did not admit his claim.

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  • JACQUES DAVY DUPERRON (1556-1618), French cardinal, was born at St L6, in Normandy, on the 15th of November 1556.

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  • Here Jacques Davy received his education, being taught Latin and mathematics by his father, and learning Greek and Hebrew and the philosophy then in vogue.

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  • Davy, who in 1807 (Phil.

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  • In common with Gay Lussac and Davy, he held subterraneous thermic disturbances to be probably due to the contact of water with metals of the alkalis and alkaline earths.

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  • His experiments with Sir Humphrey Davy in endeavouring to fix the images of natural objects as seen in the camera were published in 1802 (Journ.

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  • Davy by electrolysing the moist hydroxide or chloride, and has been obtained by A.

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  • The existence of acids not containing oxygen was, in itself, sufficient to overthrow this idea, but, although Berthollet had shown, in 1789, that sulphuretted hydrogen (or hydrosulphuric acid) contained no oxygen, Lavoisier's theory held its own until the researches of Davy, Gay-Lussac and Thenard on hydrochloric acid and chlorine, and of Gay-Lussac on hydrocyanic acid, established beyond all cavil that oxygen was not essential to acidic properties.

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  • In later years Berzelius renounced the " oxygen acid " theory, but not before Davy, and, almost simultaneously, Dulong, had submitted that hydrogen and not oxygen was the acidifying principle.

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  • Opposition to the " hydrogen-acid " theory centred mainly about the hypothetical radicals which it postulated; moreover, the electrochemical theory of Berzelius exerted a stultifying influence on the correct views of Davy and Dulong.

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  • Borch, Oliver Drapper, John Davy, G.

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  • Davy in 1810.

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  • Edmund Davy first made acetylene in 1836 from a compound produced during the manufacture of potassium from potassium tartrate and charcoal, which under certain conditions yielded a black compound decomposed by water with considerable violence and the evolution of acetylene.

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  • This kept him absent from home for many years, during which letters were written to him by " little Davy," acquainting him with the doings at Lichfield.

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  • He was awarded the Longstaff medal of the Chemical Society in 1900, and the Davy medal of the Royal Society in 1904.

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  • CALCIUM [[[symbol]] Ca, atomic weight 40.0 (0= 16)], a metallic chemical element, so named by Sir Humphry Davy from its occurrence in chalk (Latin calx).

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  • This view was questioned in the 18th century, and in 1808 Sir Humphry Davy (Phil.

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  • Davy, inspired by his successful isolation of the metals sodium and potassium by the electrolysis of their hydrates, attempted to decompose a mixture of lime and mercuric oxide by the electric current; an amalgam of calcium was obtained, but the separation of the mercury was so difficult that even Davy himself was not sure as to whether he had obtained pure metallic calcium.

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  • Davy; but in the teeth of this statement we have Mayer's own words, "We might much rather assume the contrary - that in order to become heat motion must cease to be motion."

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  • For this work he was in 1889 awarded a Davy medal by the Royal Society, which ten years previously had bestowed upon him a Royal medal in recognition of his investigations in the coal-tar colours.

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  • He received the Davy medal from the Royal Society in 1904.

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  • Davy obtained it by electrolysing caustic soda.

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  • A broadside entitled Davy Dycars Dreame, a short and seemingly alliterative poem in the manner of Piers Plowman, brought him into trouble with the privy council, but he was dismissed with a reprimand.

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  • Carbonyl chloride (phosgene), COC1 2, was first obtained by John Davy (Phil.

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  • To Sir Humphry Davy belongs the merit of isolating this element from potash, which itself had previously been considered an element.

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  • Meyer, the Davy medal of the Royal Society, and in 1905 he received its Copley medal.

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  • See also Sir Clements Markham's Clavijo, in the Hakluyt Society's publications; White's edition of Davy's translation of the Institutes (1783); Stewart's translation of the Malfug,t; Malcolm's History of Persia; and Trans.

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  • Its recapture by Santa Anna, February-March 1836, was distinguished by the heroic defence of the mission (particularly the chapel of the Alamo) by Colonels William Barrett Travis, James Bowie and Davy Crockett, and 178 others against the attack of about 4000 Mexicans.

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  • In 1903 they were awarded the Davy medal of the Royal Society in recognition of this work, and in the same year the Nobel prize for physics was divided between them and Henri Becquerel.

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  • Black showed that the two substances were entirely different; and in 1808 Davy pointed out that it was the oxide of a metal, which, however, he was not able to isolate.

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  • In 1812 Mr Dance, a customer of his master, took him to hear four lectures by Sir Humphry Davy.

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  • Davy, enclosing these notes.

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  • He continued to work as a journeyman bookbinder till the 1st of March 1813, when he was appointed assistant in the laboratory of the Royal Institution of Great Britain on the recommendation of Davy, whom he accompanied on a tour through France, Italy and Switzerland from October 1813 to April 1815.

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  • Faraday's earliest chemical work was in the paths opened by Davy, to whom he acted as assistant.

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  • Davy to the laboratory of the Royal Institution to make an experiment.

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  • Sir Humphry Davy described him as a "very coarse experimenter," who "almost always found the results he required, trusting to his head rather than his hands."

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  • Thus he distrusted, and probably never fully accepted, Gay-Lussac's conclusions as to the combining volumes of gases; he held peculiar and quite unfounded views about chlorine, even after its elementary character had been settled by Davy; he persisted in using the atomic weights he himself had adopted, even when they had been superseded by the more accurate determinations of other chemists; and he always objected to the chemical notation devised by J.

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  • In 1810 he was asked by Davy to offer himself as a candidate for the fellowship of the Royal Society, but declined, possibly for pecuniary reasons; but in 1822 he was proposed without his knowledge, and on election paid the usual fee.

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  • Six years previously he had been made a corresponding member of the French Academy of Sciences, and in 1830 he was elected as one of its eight foreign associates in place of Davy.

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  • In 1808 Sir Humphry Davy, fresh from the electrolytic isolation of potassium and sodium, attempted to decompose alumina by heating it with potash in a platinum crucible and submitting the mixture to a current of electricity; in 1809, with a more powerful battery, he raised iron wire to a red heat in contact with alumina, and obtained distinct evidence of the production of an iron-aluminium alloy.

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  • In recognition of his brilliant experimental powers, and his numerous contributions to chemical science, he was awarded the Davy medal by the Royal Society in 1891.

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  • Experiments on the combustion of diamond were made by Smithson Tennant (1797) and Sir Humphry Davy (1816), with the object of proving that it is pure carbon; they showed that burnt in oxygen it yields exactly the same amount of carbon dioxide as that produced by burning the same weight of carbon.

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  • About this time Gay-Lussac's work, although he by no means entirely abandoned physical questions, became of a more chemical character; and in three instances it brought him into direct rivalry with Sir Humphry Davy.

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  • In the first case Davy's preparation of potassium and sodium by the electric current spurred on Gay-Lussac and his collaborator L.

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  • Thenard, who had no battery at their disposal, to search for a chemical method of obtaining those metals, and by the action of red-hot iron on fused potash - a method of which Davy admitted the advantages - they succeeded in 1808 in preparing potassium, going on to make a full study of its properties and to use it, as Davy also did, for the reduction of boron from boracic acid in 1809.

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  • Davy, on the other hand, could see no reason to suppose it contained oxygen, as they surmised, and ultimately they had to accept his view of its elementary character.

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  • Davy, passing through Paris on his way to Italy at the end of 1813, obtained a few fragments of iodine, which had been discovered by Bernard Courtois (1777-1838) in 1811, and after a brief examination by the aid of his limited portable laboratory perceived its analogy to chlorine and inferred it to be an element.

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  • He too saw its resemblance to chlorine, and was obliged to agree with Davy's opinion as to its simple nature, though not without some hesitation, due doubtless to his previous declaration about chlorine.

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  • Davy on his side seems to have felt that the French chemist was competing with him, not altogether fairly, in trying to appropriate the honour of discovering the character of the substance and of its compound, hydriodic acid.

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  • Davy showed definitely that it was an element, and gave it the name which it now bears.

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  • Davy in 1810 showed that it contained hydrogen and chlorine only, as up to that time it was considered to contain oxygen.

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  • Davy in 1815 by the action of concentrated sulphuric acid on potassium chlorate.

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  • Todd (1789-1840), Sir Humphry Davy (id.

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  • 1829), John Davy (id.

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  • Davy, and these, together with other eminent continental chemists, such as A.

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  • Davy, and improvements initiated by Wollaston and Robert Hare (1781-1858) of Philadelphia.

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  • In 1806 Davy communicated to the Royal Society of London a celebrated paper on some " Chemical Agencies of Electricity," and after providing himself at the Royal Institution of London with a battery of several hundred cells, he announced in 1807 his great discovery of the electrolytic decomposition of the alkalis, potash and soda, obtaining therefrom the metals potassium and sodium.

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  • In July 1808 Davy laid a request before the managers of the Royal Institution that they would set on foot a subscription for the purchase of a specially large voltaic battery; as a result he was provided with one of 2000 pairs of plates, and the first experiment performed with it was the production of the electric arc light between carbon poles.

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  • Davy followed up his initial work with a long and brilliant series of electrochemical investigations described for the most part in the Phil.

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  • De la Rive, Peter Barlow (1776-1862), William Ritchie (1 790-1837), William Sturgeon (1783-1850), and others; and Davy (Phil.

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  • Phys., 1820, 1 5, p. 94) and Davy (Annals of Philosophy, 1821) discovered independently the power of the electric current to magnetize 1 " Memoire sur la theorie mathematique des phenomenes electrodynamiques," Memoires de l'institut, 1820, 6; see also Ann.

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  • Ohm verified his law by the aid of thermo-electric piles as sources of electromotive force, and Davy, C. S.

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  • Davy and J.

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  • The general facts and laws of electrolysis were determined experimentally by Davy and Faraday and confirmed by the researches of J.

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  • In 1812 he was appointed professor of chemistry to the Apothecaries' Society, and delivered a course of lectures before the Board of Agriculture in place of Sir Humphry Davy, whom in the following year he succeeded in the chair of chemistry at the Royal Institution, London.

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  • Davy tried to electrolyse baryta, but was unsuccessful; later attempts were made by him using barium chloride in the presence of mercury.

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  • Davy on the application of machinery to the calculation and printing of mathematical tables, he discussed the principles of a calculating engine, to the construction of which he devoted many years of his life.

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  • The Royal Society of London awarded him the Davy medal in 1881 for his researches on indigo, the nature and composition of which he did more to elucidate than any other single chemist, and which he also succeeded in preparing artificially, though his methods were not found commercially practicable.

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  • SIR HUMPHRY DAVY, Bart.

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  • Here Davy, released from his indentures, was installed as superintendent towards the end of 1798.

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  • The gas itself was inhaled by Southey and Coleridge among other distinguished people, and promised to become fashionable, while further research yielded Davy material for his Researches, Chemical and Philosophical, chiefly concerning Nitrous Oxide, published in 1800, which secured his reputation as a chemist.

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  • According to his cousin, Edmund Davy,' then his laboratory assistant, he was so delighted with this achievement that he danced about the room in ecstasy.

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  • In it he disproved the idea advanced by Gay Lussac that potassium was a compound of hydrogen, not an element; but on the other hand he cast doubts on the elementary 1 Edmund Davy (1785-1857) became professor of chemistry at Cork Institution in 1813, and at the Royal Dublin Society in 1826.

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  • His son, Edmund William Davy (born in 1826), was appointed professor of medicine in the Royal College, Dublin, in 1870.

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  • Davy's reputation was now at its zenith.

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  • A large collection of the different models made by Davy in the course of his inquiries is in the possession of the Royal Institution.

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  • In 1826 Davy's health, which showed signs of failure in 1823, had so declined that he could with difficulty indulge in his favourite sports of fishing and shooting, and early in 1827, after a slight attack of paralysis, he was ordered abroad.

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  • On the 10th of February 1829 he suffered a second attack of paralysis which rendered his right side quite powerless, but under the care of his brother, Dr John Davy (1791-1868), he rallied sufficiently to be removed to Geneva, where he died on the 29th of May.

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  • Of a sanguine, somewhat irritable temperament, Davy displayed characteristic enthusiasm and energy in all his pursuits.

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  • As is shown by his verses and sometimes by his prose, his mind was highly imaginative; the poet Coleridge declared that if he "had not been the first chemist, he would have been the first poet 1 Davy's will directed that this service, after Lady Davy's death, should pass to his brother, Dr John Davy, on whose decease, if he had no heirs who could make use of it, it was to be melted and sold, the proceeds going to the Royal Society" to found a medal to be given annually for the most important discovery in chemistry anywhere made in Europe or Anglo-America."The silver produced £736, and the interest on that sum is expended on the Davy medal, which was awarded for the first time in 1877, to Bunsen and Kirchhoff for their discovery of spectrum analysis.

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  • Dr John Davy, Memoirs of Sir Humphry Davy (1836); Collected Works (with shorter memoir, 1839); Fragmentary Remains, Literary and Scientific (1858).

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  • Thorpe, Humphry Davy, Poet and Philosopher (1896).

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  • Some time later Davy, by heating phosphorous acid, obtained a phosphoretted hydrogen which was not spontaneously inflammable.

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  • Phosphorous acid, P(OH) 3, discovered by Davy in 1812, may be ' obtained by dissolving its anhydride, P 4 0 61 in cold water; by immersing sticks of phosphorus in a solution of copper sulphate contained in a well-closed flask, filtering from the copper sulphide and precipitating the sulphuric acid simultaneously formed by baryta water, and concentrating the solution in vacuo; or by passing chlorine into melted phosphorus covered with water, the first formed phosphorus trichloride being decomposed by the water into phosphorous and hydrochloric acids.

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  • Phosphorus pentachloride, PC15, discovered by Davy in 1810 and analysed by Dulong in 1816, is formed from chlorine and the trichloride.

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  • Nitrogen Compounds.-Phosphorus pentachloride combines directly with ammonia, and the compound when heated to redness loses ammonium chloride and hydrochloric acid and gives phospham, PN 2 H 4, a substance first described by Davy in 1811.

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  • See Percival, Description of Island of Ceylon (1805); Cordiner, Description of Ceylon (1807); John Davy, Ceylon and its Inhabitants (1821); Stirr, Ceylon and the Singhalese (1850); Sir Emerson Tennent, Ceylon (1859); J.

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  • His researches have been recognized by many scientific societies and institutions, the Royal Society awarding him the Davy medal in 1906.

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  • Davy, J.

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  • Davy Postle read a paper before the Royal Society of Victoria, suggesting the conveyance of meat on board ship in a frozen state by means of refrigerated air, and in 1869 he showed by experiment how it could be done; but his apparatus was not commercially developed.

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  • Davy actually used to run a free fanzine called ' Lets Get Crazy ' .

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  • This society secured the services of Sir Humphry Davy, who devised the wire gauze safety lamp.

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  • When they got done laughing, Davy says-- ' It won't hardly do, Charles William.

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  • Sir Humphry Davy Inventor of the eponymous miners safety lamp.

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  • I went to sleep feeling pretty smug, thinking I was some kind of Davy Crockett.

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  • tenement held by: John Davy £ 1 6s 8d; John Barbour £ 1 6s 8d.

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  • Davy, from boracic acid.

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  • About the same time Davy showed that two pieces of ice could be melted by rubbing them together in a vacuum, although everything surrounding them was at a temperature below the freezing point.

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  • Though we may allow that the results obtained by Rumford and Davy demonstrate satisfactorily that heat is in some way due to motion, yet they do not tell us to what particular dynamical quantity heat corresponds.

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  • Davy on the decomposition of the solutions of salts by the voltaic current were turned to account in the water voltameter telegraph of Sdmmering and the modification of it proposed by Schweigger, and in a similar method proposed by Coxe, in which a solution of salts was substituted for water.

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  • This was the principle of the chemical telegraph proposed by Edward Davy in 1838 and of that proposed by Bain in 1846.

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  • Davy showed that they were oxides of various metals.

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  • Davy, Count Rumford, all concerned themselves with thermochemical investigations of such processes.

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  • The Board of Agriculture in 1803 had commissioned Sir Humphry Davy to deliver a course of lectures on the connexion of chemistry with vegetable physiology.

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  • By the market house is a statue of Sir Humphry Davy, who was born here in 1778.

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  • Mendeleeff, the Davy medal in recognition of his work on the Periodic Law.

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  • Rouelle, while in England Humphry Davy expounded the same idea in the experimental demonstrations which gave his lectures their brilliant charm.

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  • Berzelius's investigation of the action of the electric current on salts clearly demonstrated the invaluable assistance that electrolysis could render to the isolator of elements; and the adoption of this method by Sir Humphry Davy for the analysis of the hydrates of the metals of the alkalis and alkaline earths, and the results which he thus achieved, established its potency.

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  • In 1808 Davy isolated sodium and potassium; he then turned his attention to the preparation of metallic calcium, barium, strontium and magnesium.

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  • The discovery of boron by Gay Lussac and Davy in 1809 led Berzelius to investigate silica (silex).

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  • The chemical analogy of this substance to chlorine was quickly perceived, especially after its investigation by Davy and Gay Lussac. Cyanogen, a compound which in combination behaved very similarly to chlorine and iodine, was isolated in 1815 by Gay Lussac. This discovery of the first of the then-styled " compound radicals " exerted great influence on the prevailing views of chemical composition.

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  • Hydrochloric acid was carefully investigated at about this time by Davy, Faraday and Gay Lussac, its composition and the elementary nature of chlorine being thereby established.

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  • Serullas and Roscoe; Davy and Stadion investigated chlorine peroxide, formed by treating potassium chlorate with sulphuric acid.

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  • Davy also described and partially investigated the gas, named by him " euchlorine," obtained by heating potassium chlorate with hydrochloric acid; this gas has been more recently examined by Pebal.

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  • The oxy-acids of iodine were investigated by Davy and H.

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  • Both phosphoric and phosphorous acids became known, although imperfectly, towards the end of the 18th century; phosphorous acid was first obtained pure by Davy in 1812, while pure phosphorous oxide, the anhydride of phosphorous acid, remained unknown until T.

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  • Of other phosphorus compounds we may here notice Gengembre's discovery of phosphuretted hydrogen (phosphine) in 1783, the analogy of which to ammonia was first pointed out by Davy and supported at a later date by H.

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  • Of the halogen compounds of phosphorus, the trichloride was discovered by Gay Lussac and Thenard, while the pentachloride was obtained by Davy.

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  • The preparation of crystalline boron in 1856 by Wohler and Sainte Claire Deville showed that this element also existed in allotropic forms, amorphous boron having been obtained simultaneously and independently in 1809 by Gay Lussac and Davy.

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  • in 1800, and Rumford himself selected Sir Humphry Davy as scientific lecturer there.

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  • Nathorst explored the land between Franz Josef Fjord and Scoresby Fjord, where the large King Oscar Fjord, connecting Davy's Sound with Franz Joseph Fjord, was discovered.

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  • Franz Josef Fjord, with its branch King Oscar Fjord, communicating with Davy's Sound, forms a system of fjords on a similar scale.

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  • Jacques Davy Duperron >>

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  • In 1806 Sir Humphry Davy proved that the formation of acid and alkali when water was electrolysed was due to saline impurities in the water.

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  • He was knighted in 1897, and received the Royal (1875), Davy (1888), and Copley (1904) medals of the Royal Society, besides filling the offices of president of the Chemical Society and of the Institution of Electrical Engineers.

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  • He was elected interim president in June 1820, on the death of Sir Joseph Banks; but he did not care to enter into competition with Sir Humphry Davy, and the latter was elected president at the anniversary meeting in November 1820.

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  • C. Oersted (1777-1851) had shown that a magnetic needle is deflected by an electric current, he attempted, in the laboratory of the Royal Institution in the presence of Humphry Davy, to convert that deflection into a continuous rotation, and also to obtain the reciprocal effect of a current rotating round a magnet.

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  • He failed in both respects, and when Michael Faraday, who overheard a portion of his conversation with Davy on the subject, was subsequently more successful, he was inclined to assert the merit of priority, to which Faraday did not admit his claim.

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  • JACQUES DAVY DUPERRON (1556-1618), French cardinal, was born at St L6, in Normandy, on the 15th of November 1556.

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  • Here Jacques Davy received his education, being taught Latin and mathematics by his father, and learning Greek and Hebrew and the philosophy then in vogue.

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  • Davy, who in 1807 (Phil.

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  • The isolation of the metals sodium and potassium by Sir Humphry Davy in 1807 by the electrolysis of the fused hydroxides was one of the earliest applications of the electric current to the extraction of metals.

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  • In common with Gay Lussac and Davy, he held subterraneous thermic disturbances to be probably due to the contact of water with metals of the alkalis and alkaline earths.

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  • His experiments with Sir Humphrey Davy in endeavouring to fix the images of natural objects as seen in the camera were published in 1802 (Journ.

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  • Davy by electrolysing the moist hydroxide or chloride, and has been obtained by A.

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  • The existence of acids not containing oxygen was, in itself, sufficient to overthrow this idea, but, although Berthollet had shown, in 1789, that sulphuretted hydrogen (or hydrosulphuric acid) contained no oxygen, Lavoisier's theory held its own until the researches of Davy, Gay-Lussac and Thenard on hydrochloric acid and chlorine, and of Gay-Lussac on hydrocyanic acid, established beyond all cavil that oxygen was not essential to acidic properties.

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  • In later years Berzelius renounced the " oxygen acid " theory, but not before Davy, and, almost simultaneously, Dulong, had submitted that hydrogen and not oxygen was the acidifying principle.

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  • Opposition to the " hydrogen-acid " theory centred mainly about the hypothetical radicals which it postulated; moreover, the electrochemical theory of Berzelius exerted a stultifying influence on the correct views of Davy and Dulong.

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  • Borch, Oliver Drapper, John Davy, G.

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  • Davy in 1810.

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  • Edmund Davy first made acetylene in 1836 from a compound produced during the manufacture of potassium from potassium tartrate and charcoal, which under certain conditions yielded a black compound decomposed by water with considerable violence and the evolution of acetylene.

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  • This kept him absent from home for many years, during which letters were written to him by " little Davy," acquainting him with the doings at Lichfield.

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  • He was awarded the Longstaff medal of the Chemical Society in 1900, and the Davy medal of the Royal Society in 1904.

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  • CALCIUM [[[symbol]] Ca, atomic weight 40.0 (0= 16)], a metallic chemical element, so named by Sir Humphry Davy from its occurrence in chalk (Latin calx).

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  • This view was questioned in the 18th century, and in 1808 Sir Humphry Davy (Phil.

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  • Davy, inspired by his successful isolation of the metals sodium and potassium by the electrolysis of their hydrates, attempted to decompose a mixture of lime and mercuric oxide by the electric current; an amalgam of calcium was obtained, but the separation of the mercury was so difficult that even Davy himself was not sure as to whether he had obtained pure metallic calcium.

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  • Davy; but in the teeth of this statement we have Mayer's own words, "We might much rather assume the contrary - that in order to become heat motion must cease to be motion."

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  • For this work he was in 1889 awarded a Davy medal by the Royal Society, which ten years previously had bestowed upon him a Royal medal in recognition of his investigations in the coal-tar colours.

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  • He received the Davy medal from the Royal Society in 1904.

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  • Davy) to 77 (Buchner)% of tannin (see 8 " Resherches pour servir a l'histoire des galles," Ann.

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  • Davy obtained it by electrolysing caustic soda.

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  • A broadside entitled Davy Dycars Dreame, a short and seemingly alliterative poem in the manner of Piers Plowman, brought him into trouble with the privy council, but he was dismissed with a reprimand.

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  • Carbonyl chloride (phosgene), COC1 2, was first obtained by John Davy (Phil.

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  • To Sir Humphry Davy belongs the merit of isolating this element from potash, which itself had previously been considered an element.

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  • Meyer, the Davy medal of the Royal Society, and in 1905 he received its Copley medal.

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  • See also Sir Clements Markham's Clavijo, in the Hakluyt Society's publications; White's edition of Davy's translation of the Institutes (1783); Stewart's translation of the Malfug,t; Malcolm's History of Persia; and Trans.

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  • Its recapture by Santa Anna, February-March 1836, was distinguished by the heroic defence of the mission (particularly the chapel of the Alamo) by Colonels William Barrett Travis, James Bowie and Davy Crockett, and 178 others against the attack of about 4000 Mexicans.

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  • In 1903 they were awarded the Davy medal of the Royal Society in recognition of this work, and in the same year the Nobel prize for physics was divided between them and Henri Becquerel.

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  • Black showed that the two substances were entirely different; and in 1808 Davy pointed out that it was the oxide of a metal, which, however, he was not able to isolate.

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  • In 1812 Mr Dance, a customer of his master, took him to hear four lectures by Sir Humphry Davy.

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  • Davy, enclosing these notes.

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  • He continued to work as a journeyman bookbinder till the 1st of March 1813, when he was appointed assistant in the laboratory of the Royal Institution of Great Britain on the recommendation of Davy, whom he accompanied on a tour through France, Italy and Switzerland from October 1813 to April 1815.

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  • Faraday's earliest chemical work was in the paths opened by Davy, to whom he acted as assistant.

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  • Davy to the laboratory of the Royal Institution to make an experiment.

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  • Sir Humphry Davy described him as a "very coarse experimenter," who "almost always found the results he required, trusting to his head rather than his hands."

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  • Thus he distrusted, and probably never fully accepted, Gay-Lussac's conclusions as to the combining volumes of gases; he held peculiar and quite unfounded views about chlorine, even after its elementary character had been settled by Davy; he persisted in using the atomic weights he himself had adopted, even when they had been superseded by the more accurate determinations of other chemists; and he always objected to the chemical notation devised by J.

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  • In 1810 he was asked by Davy to offer himself as a candidate for the fellowship of the Royal Society, but declined, possibly for pecuniary reasons; but in 1822 he was proposed without his knowledge, and on election paid the usual fee.

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  • Six years previously he had been made a corresponding member of the French Academy of Sciences, and in 1830 he was elected as one of its eight foreign associates in place of Davy.

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  • In 1808 Sir Humphry Davy, fresh from the electrolytic isolation of potassium and sodium, attempted to decompose alumina by heating it with potash in a platinum crucible and submitting the mixture to a current of electricity; in 1809, with a more powerful battery, he raised iron wire to a red heat in contact with alumina, and obtained distinct evidence of the production of an iron-aluminium alloy.

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  • In recognition of his brilliant experimental powers, and his numerous contributions to chemical science, he was awarded the Davy medal by the Royal Society in 1891.

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  • Experiments on the combustion of diamond were made by Smithson Tennant (1797) and Sir Humphry Davy (1816), with the object of proving that it is pure carbon; they showed that burnt in oxygen it yields exactly the same amount of carbon dioxide as that produced by burning the same weight of carbon.

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  • About this time Gay-Lussac's work, although he by no means entirely abandoned physical questions, became of a more chemical character; and in three instances it brought him into direct rivalry with Sir Humphry Davy.

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  • In the first case Davy's preparation of potassium and sodium by the electric current spurred on Gay-Lussac and his collaborator L.

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  • Thenard, who had no battery at their disposal, to search for a chemical method of obtaining those metals, and by the action of red-hot iron on fused potash - a method of which Davy admitted the advantages - they succeeded in 1808 in preparing potassium, going on to make a full study of its properties and to use it, as Davy also did, for the reduction of boron from boracic acid in 1809.

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  • Davy, on the other hand, could see no reason to suppose it contained oxygen, as they surmised, and ultimately they had to accept his view of its elementary character.

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  • Davy, passing through Paris on his way to Italy at the end of 1813, obtained a few fragments of iodine, which had been discovered by Bernard Courtois (1777-1838) in 1811, and after a brief examination by the aid of his limited portable laboratory perceived its analogy to chlorine and inferred it to be an element.

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  • He too saw its resemblance to chlorine, and was obliged to agree with Davy's opinion as to its simple nature, though not without some hesitation, due doubtless to his previous declaration about chlorine.

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  • Davy on his side seems to have felt that the French chemist was competing with him, not altogether fairly, in trying to appropriate the honour of discovering the character of the substance and of its compound, hydriodic acid.

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  • Davy showed definitely that it was an element, and gave it the name which it now bears.

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  • Davy in 1810 showed that it contained hydrogen and chlorine only, as up to that time it was considered to contain oxygen.

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  • Davy in 1815 by the action of concentrated sulphuric acid on potassium chlorate.

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  • Todd (1789-1840), Sir Humphry Davy (id.

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  • 1829), John Davy (id.

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  • Davy, and these, together with other eminent continental chemists, such as A.

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  • Davy, and improvements initiated by Wollaston and Robert Hare (1781-1858) of Philadelphia.

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  • In 1806 Davy communicated to the Royal Society of London a celebrated paper on some " Chemical Agencies of Electricity," and after providing himself at the Royal Institution of London with a battery of several hundred cells, he announced in 1807 his great discovery of the electrolytic decomposition of the alkalis, potash and soda, obtaining therefrom the metals potassium and sodium.

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  • In July 1808 Davy laid a request before the managers of the Royal Institution that they would set on foot a subscription for the purchase of a specially large voltaic battery; as a result he was provided with one of 2000 pairs of plates, and the first experiment performed with it was the production of the electric arc light between carbon poles.

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  • Davy followed up his initial work with a long and brilliant series of electrochemical investigations described for the most part in the Phil.

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  • De la Rive, Peter Barlow (1776-1862), William Ritchie (1 790-1837), William Sturgeon (1783-1850), and others; and Davy (Phil.

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  • Phys., 1820, 1 5, p. 94) and Davy (Annals of Philosophy, 1821) discovered independently the power of the electric current to magnetize 1 " Memoire sur la theorie mathematique des phenomenes electrodynamiques," Memoires de l'institut, 1820, 6; see also Ann.

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  • Ohm verified his law by the aid of thermo-electric piles as sources of electromotive force, and Davy, C. S.

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  • Foucault devoted attention to the invention of automatic apparatus for the production of Davy's electric arc (see Lighting: Electric), and these appliances in conjunction with magneto-electric machines were soon employed in lighthouse work.

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  • Davy and J.

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  • The general facts and laws of electrolysis were determined experimentally by Davy and Faraday and confirmed by the researches of J.

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  • In 1812 he was appointed professor of chemistry to the Apothecaries' Society, and delivered a course of lectures before the Board of Agriculture in place of Sir Humphry Davy, whom in the following year he succeeded in the chair of chemistry at the Royal Institution, London.

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  • Davy tried to electrolyse baryta, but was unsuccessful; later attempts were made by him using barium chloride in the presence of mercury.

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  • Davy on the application of machinery to the calculation and printing of mathematical tables, he discussed the principles of a calculating engine, to the construction of which he devoted many years of his life.

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  • The Royal Society of London awarded him the Davy medal in 1881 for his researches on indigo, the nature and composition of which he did more to elucidate than any other single chemist, and which he also succeeded in preparing artificially, though his methods were not found commercially practicable.

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  • SIR HUMPHRY DAVY, Bart.

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  • But when in 1794 his father, Robert Davy, died, leaving a widow and five children in embarrassed circumstances, he awoke to his responsibilities as the eldest son, and becoming apprentice to a surgeonapothecary at Penzance set to work on a systematic and remarkably wide course of self-instruction which he mapped out for himself in preparation for a career in medicine.

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  • Here Davy, released from his indentures, was installed as superintendent towards the end of 1798.

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  • The gas itself was inhaled by Southey and Coleridge among other distinguished people, and promised to become fashionable, while further research yielded Davy material for his Researches, Chemical and Philosophical, chiefly concerning Nitrous Oxide, published in 1800, which secured his reputation as a chemist.

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  • According to his cousin, Edmund Davy,' then his laboratory assistant, he was so delighted with this achievement that he danced about the room in ecstasy.

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  • In it he disproved the idea advanced by Gay Lussac that potassium was a compound of hydrogen, not an element; but on the other hand he cast doubts on the elementary 1 Edmund Davy (1785-1857) became professor of chemistry at Cork Institution in 1813, and at the Royal Dublin Society in 1826.

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  • His son, Edmund William Davy (born in 1826), was appointed professor of medicine in the Royal College, Dublin, in 1870.

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  • Davy's reputation was now at its zenith.

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  • A large collection of the different models made by Davy in the course of his inquiries is in the possession of the Royal Institution.

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  • In 1826 Davy's health, which showed signs of failure in 1823, had so declined that he could with difficulty indulge in his favourite sports of fishing and shooting, and early in 1827, after a slight attack of paralysis, he was ordered abroad.

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  • On the 10th of February 1829 he suffered a second attack of paralysis which rendered his right side quite powerless, but under the care of his brother, Dr John Davy (1791-1868), he rallied sufficiently to be removed to Geneva, where he died on the 29th of May.

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  • Of a sanguine, somewhat irritable temperament, Davy displayed characteristic enthusiasm and energy in all his pursuits.

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  • As is shown by his verses and sometimes by his prose, his mind was highly imaginative; the poet Coleridge declared that if he "had not been the first chemist, he would have been the first poet 1 Davy's will directed that this service, after Lady Davy's death, should pass to his brother, Dr John Davy, on whose decease, if he had no heirs who could make use of it, it was to be melted and sold, the proceeds going to the Royal Society" to found a medal to be given annually for the most important discovery in chemistry anywhere made in Europe or Anglo-America."The silver produced £736, and the interest on that sum is expended on the Davy medal, which was awarded for the first time in 1877, to Bunsen and Kirchhoff for their discovery of spectrum analysis.

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  • Paris, The Life of Sir Humphry Davy (1831), vol.

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  • Dr John Davy, Memoirs of Sir Humphry Davy (1836); Collected Works (with shorter memoir, 1839); Fragmentary Remains, Literary and Scientific (1858).

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  • Thorpe, Humphry Davy, Poet and Philosopher (1896).

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  • Some time later Davy, by heating phosphorous acid, obtained a phosphoretted hydrogen which was not spontaneously inflammable.

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  • Phosphorous acid, P(OH) 3, discovered by Davy in 1812, may be ' obtained by dissolving its anhydride, P 4 0 61 in cold water; by immersing sticks of phosphorus in a solution of copper sulphate contained in a well-closed flask, filtering from the copper sulphide and precipitating the sulphuric acid simultaneously formed by baryta water, and concentrating the solution in vacuo; or by passing chlorine into melted phosphorus covered with water, the first formed phosphorus trichloride being decomposed by the water into phosphorous and hydrochloric acids.

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  • Halogen Compounds.-Phosphorus trifluoride, PF 3, discovered by Davy, may be obtained mixed with the pentafluoride; by direct combination of its elements; from the tribromide and arsenic trifluoride (Maclvor); from the tribromide and zinc fluoride, and from dried copper phosphide and lead fluoride (H.

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  • Phosphorus pentachloride, PC15, discovered by Davy in 1810 and analysed by Dulong in 1816, is formed from chlorine and the trichloride.

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  • Nitrogen Compounds.-Phosphorus pentachloride combines directly with ammonia, and the compound when heated to redness loses ammonium chloride and hydrochloric acid and gives phospham, PN 2 H 4, a substance first described by Davy in 1811.

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  • See Percival, Description of Island of Ceylon (1805); Cordiner, Description of Ceylon (1807); John Davy, Ceylon and its Inhabitants (1821); Stirr, Ceylon and the Singhalese (1850); Sir Emerson Tennent, Ceylon (1859); J.

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  • His researches have been recognized by many scientific societies and institutions, the Royal Society awarding him the Davy medal in 1906.

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  • Davy, J.

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  • Davy Postle read a paper before the Royal Society of Victoria, suggesting the conveyance of meat on board ship in a frozen state by means of refrigerated air, and in 1869 he showed by experiment how it could be done; but his apparatus was not commercially developed.

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  • In a speech to the House of Representatives at this same time, Congressman Davy Crockett told the story of getting chewed out by a constituent for voting for a $20,000 emergency relief bill for the homeless in a city just wiped out by a fire.

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  • Sir Humphry Davy Inventor of the eponymous miners safety lamp.

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  • The vocal talent of the choir of Humphry Davy School serenaded shoppers at the Wharfside last week.

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  • I went to sleep feeling pretty smug, thinking I was some kind of Davy Crockett.

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  • From a tenement held by: John Davy £ 1 6s 8d; John Barbour £ 1 6s 8d.

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  • A cat called Davy, for instance might have started life as Daisy.

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  • There is no cell phone reception in Davy Jones' locker.

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  • Located in the piney woods of East Texas between the Davy Crockett National Forest and the Angelina National Forest, Angelina College offers two-year degrees to students in a wide variety of subjects.

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  • They also regularly offer a package where you get one day and night free when you book a specific number of days, and also 30% off offers for the Davy Crockett Ranch weekend stays.

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  • Davy Jones's Locker: Work with Davy Jones from Pirates of the Caribbean.

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  • Contrary to where the name suggests this winery might be, this San Antonio is not in Texas and Davy Crockett never set foot inside.

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  • John Wayne maybe, but not the coonskin-capped Davy.

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  • Chekov's hairstyle is remarkably similar to hair of singer Davy Jones.

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