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david

david

david Sentence Examples

  • Would David do it?

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  • It was the same when I was young, David thought.

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  • I'm David Dean— but I guess you already know that.

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  • After a switchback, they crossed the bridge over a deep gorge, the location of Ouray's now-melted ice climbing park where David Dean had almost lost his life the prior winter.

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  • "David Dean," he said.

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  • David Dean was hanging patriotic bunting by dawn's early light when Cynthia finished setting out the usual assortment of pastries for the guests and joined her husband for the short walk to the Community Center.

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  • All these guys want to talk about is David Dean.

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  • David Dean whistled a patriotic tune as he strolled up town from the park.

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  • David's got a hairbrush.

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  • Tell the world to slow down, David.

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  • You're a shoe-in, David.

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  • Either Cynthia's presence relaxed her or she'd decided David Dean was not a combatant from the enemy camp.

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  • The women looked frightened, Faust actually ducked, and David Dean moved to the cover of a nearby boulder, pulling his wife along with him.

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  • Cynthia said, "Fitzgerald didn't even know he was going to run for sheriff until he became irritated at David."

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  • Dean was directed to spend all available weekend time on a door to door smiling and handshaking crusade, the first of many Fred had mapped out for his full-court press for making David Dean the sheriff of Ouray County, Colorado.

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  • David was knee deep in a can't-put-down-able James Lee Burke mystery, while Cynthia plodded through her zillion-page saga, a real flower-presser in Dean's mind.

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  • It was a shock for David Dean to see Fred O'Connor sitting on a wooden stool behind bars at the Ouray County jail.

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  • David Dean harbored serious doubts about leaving Lydia Larkin's apartment without either contacting the police or calling an ambulance—or maybe a lawyer.

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  • But as many times as David Dean considered picking up the telephone, it remained snuggled in its cradle unless Cynthia was answering it.

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  • Then he smiled, no doubt remembering past times with David Dean—times he regretted similar words.

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  • Just count your blessings he's out of the running and now you're a slam-dunk to become Sheriff David Dean.

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  • Fred O'Connor and David Dean kept close tabs on the New Jersey nuptials via telephone.

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  • Later, David Dean called Lydia—from bed after making love to his wife.

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  • Katie grabbed her purse and walked quickly down a pristine hall to a placard that read Officer David.

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  • Officer David said in tones as sweet as they were bitter toward her.

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  • "Officer David --" she began in earnest.

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  • She paused near the end and turned back to see both Officer David and the woman watching her with disapproving looks and crossed arms.

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  • Ms. Young, I'm David Kingsly, from Kingsly Enterprises.

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  • "David," he said with another smile that didn't reach his eyes.

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  • She suddenly felt foolish for believing David Kingsly.

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  • A man walked calmly through the crowd, strange red tattoos glowing all over his body, similar to the tattoos she'd seen on David Kingsly's neck when he invited her to the gala.

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  • David Dean asked as he sat down next to her.

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  • David Dean squeezed his wife's arm and bent over to kiss her.

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  • "David," Cynthia said, stretching out the name as she saw him masticating longer than was necessary for normal digestion.

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  • It wasn't designed to absorb perspiration and probably cost twice the price of a David Dean suit, at least the last time he'd purchased one.

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  • David Dean felt a momentary twinge of the here-we-go-agains that floated by on the wings of his wife's question.

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  • "David knows what he's talking about," Cynthia offered.

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  • A six-footer, like David Dean was a veritable giant from her reduced point of reference.

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  • Not a bad haul for what David called a pile of junk!

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  • She looked past David Dean to his wife.

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  • Most people wouldn't buy David Dean as an insecure guy.

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  • Don't be so insensitive, David.

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  • And what Cynthia Byrne might have become in a different century, under different circumstances, without a David Dean beside her.

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  • Me and David here will have the place running as smooth as a Shanghai subway.

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  • Yes, Shipton whispered the name Dean to Jake Weller, but perhaps he didn't mean David Dean!

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  • Dean itched to ask her how she was so sure it wasn't Mr. David Dean who dropped her hubby into space but she began to sob anew, making any further conversation impossible.

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  • By my read, all the police are doing is making a case against David Dean.

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  • "Vote for David Dean, ace detective," Weller said with a grin as he pulled himself from the chair.

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  • Might have Shipton faked the accident in some sick attempt to place the blame on David Dean whom he obviously despised?

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  • You can't keep blaming yourself for that, David.

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  • Detective David Dean sat in the Parkside Pennsylvania Police Headquarters with his feet in his lower desk drawer.

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  • David Dean was 38 years old and the only unmarried detective.

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  • Detective David Dean had been seeing Attorney Ethel Rosewater three or four times a month for more than two years.

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  • Atherton had managed to beat the rap, avoiding embarrassing notoriety, but he had despised David Dean from that day forward.

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  • Why David darling, you're jealous!

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  • David, sometimes you're so naive, it's incredible.

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  • The early morning fog blanketing eastern Pennsylvania was thicker than the frosting on grandma's cake, but no thicker than the early morning fog shrouding David Dean's sleep-deprived brain.

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  • He pointed at David.

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  • Our friend here, is Prince David of Dean, vacationing incognito.

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  • Get yourself a good woman, David.

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  • "Jonathan Winston, meet David Dean," Leland announced.

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  • I'm just checking on David Dean, latest mob burglary victim.

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  • Only David Dean had some difficulty "getting busy."

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  • He turned and brushed past them but his remark was a bright spot in David Dean's day.

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  • Now all of Parkside would know where David Dean shopped for his wardrobe.

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  • I can't see you any­more, David.

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  • David Dean would be making a trip to Colorado.

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  • The last thing David Dean had wanted to do was to climb back in his tired automobile and drive to Philadelphia in the middle of the night.

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  • Dean couldn't think of more than 20 names—Ethel Rosewater, Cynthia Byrne, David Dean, even Jeffrey Byrne, not to mention half of Arthur's gay friends and lovers and most of his ex-clients.

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  • "David from Pennsylvania" didn't have the same ring as he shook her hand and introduced himself as she remounted her bike.

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  • And yet he knew he couldn't turn his back on the quest—there were too many cop years and too much history in the make up of David Dean.

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  • But never, never, never in his entire life had David Dean felt less like crawling out of his sleeping bag and mounting his bicycle than on the misty Colorado morning of June fifteenth.

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  • I followed Jeffrey Byrne and you followed David Dean.

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  • I'm disappointed in you, David.

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  • "Listen to David," Fred said, standing over the two.

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  • He might start thinking if Cynthia Byrne's and David Dean's bodies show up.

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  • David and Cynthia Dean, now husband and wife, and owners of Bird Song, a bed and breakfast in Ouray, Colorado, were seated in the Tundra Room of the recently restored Beaumont Hotel.

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  • Horace Walpole, who gives an unfavourable picture of his private character, acknowledges that Stone possessed "abilities seldom to be matched"; and he had the distinction of being mentioned by David Hume as one of the only two men of mark who had perceived merit in that author's History of England on its first appearance.

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  • Frederick David Mocatta >>

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  • In the interval Chicheley found time to visit his diocese for the first time and be enthroned at St David's on the 11th of May 1411.

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  • Of this newest revelation Christus David was the mouthpiece, supervening on Christus Jesus.

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  • The " George " connoted a Berrichon as " David " does a Welshman.

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  • From certain indications in the latter and the evidence of some odd leaves discovered by David Laing, it has been concluded that there was an earlier Edinburgh edition, which has been ascribed to Thomas Davidson, printer, and dated c. 1540.

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  • David Livingstone >>

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  • CHRISTIAN DAVID GINSBURG (1831-), Hebrew scholar, was born at Warsaw on the 25th of December 1831.

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  • David Thomas Ansted >>

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  • might have experienced much difficulty in reducing it, had it not been for the pusillanimous conduct of David, the last emperor, who surrendered the place almost unconditionally.

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  • There is evidence of its vogue in Holland in the 17th century, for the painting by David Teniers (1610-1690), in the Scottish National Gallery at Edinburgh, is wrongly described as "Peasants playing at Skittles."

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  • The village was founded by David Dale (1739-1806) in 1785, with the support of Sir Richard Arkwright, inventor of the spinning-frame, who thought the spot might be made the Manchester of Scotland.

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  • service of the East India company and sailed for Fort St David; here he showed himself very industrious, made the acquaintance of Robert Clive and rose rapidly from one position to another.

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  • or by his successor David I.

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  • I I, 13), occupied Edom for six months and devastated it; it was garrisoned and permanently held by David (2 Sam.

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  • 2 The stem of David is superseded by the house of Zadok, the kingship has yielded to the priesthood, and the extinction of national hopes gives new importance to that strict organization of the hierarchy for which Ezekiel had prepared the way by his sentence of disfranchisement against the nonZadokite priests.

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  • The Burgher Synod in 1764 sent Thomas Clarke of Ballybay, Ireland, who settled at Salem, Washington county, New York, and in 1776 sent David Telfair, of Monteith, Scotland, who preached in Philadelphia; they united with the Associate Presbytery of Pennsylvania; in 1771 the Scotch Synod ordered the presbytery to annul its union with the Burghers, and although Dr Clarke of Salem remained in the Associate Presbytery, the Burgher ministers who immigrated later joined the Associate Reformed Church.

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  • His early education was cared for by his father and by the local rabbi, David Frankel.

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  • He was a younger son of David Murray, 5th Viscount Stormont (c. 1665-1731), the dignity having been granted in 1621 by James I.

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  • direct remainder to his nephew David Murray, 7th Viscount Stormont (1727-1796).

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  • C. Valckenaer (1715-1785), David Ruhnken (1723-1798), or his colleague J.

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  • 1152), a son of King David I., and became king of Scotland on the death of his brother, Malcolm IV., in December 1165, being crowned at Scone during the same month.

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  • The exact position of the Jebusite city is unknown; some authorities locate it on the western hill, now known as Zion; some on the eastern hill, afterwards occupied by the Temple and the city of David; while others consider it was a double settlement, one part being on the western, and the, other on the eastern hill, separated from one another by the Tyropoeon valley.

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  • The men of Judah and Benjamin did not succeed in getting full possession of the place, and the Jebusites still held it when David became king of Israel.

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  • Some years after his accession David succeeded after some difficulty in taking Jerusalem.

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  • He established his royal city on the eastern hill close to the site of the Jebusite Zion, while Jebus, the town on the western side of the Tyropoeon valley, became the civil city, of which Joab, David's leading general, was appointed governor.

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  • David surrounded the royal city with a wall and built a citadel, probably on the site of the Jebusite fort of Zion, while Joab fortified the western town.

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  • North of the city of David, the king, acting under divine guidance, chose a site for the Temple of Jehovah, which was erected with great magnificence by Solomon.

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  • Nebuchadrezzar placed in the city a garrison which appears to have been quartered on the western hill, while the eastern hill on which were the Temple and the city of David was left more or less desolate.

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  • Westward of this gate the wall followed the south side of the valley which joined the Tyropoeon from the west as far as the north-western corner of the city at the site of the present Jaffa Gate and the socalled tower of David.

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  • Nehemiah mentions a number of places on the eastern hill, including the tomb of David, the positions of which cannot with our present knowledge be fixed with any certainty.

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  • He doubled the area of the enclosure round the Temple, and there can be little doubt that a great part of the walls of the Haram area date from the time of Herod, while probably the tower of David, which still exists near the Jaffa Gate, is on the same foundation as one of the towers adjoining his palace.

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  • He put himself under the tuition of David Bogue of Gosport and carried away deep impressions from his academy.

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  • - Although the legal basis for the final stage is found in the legislation of the time of Moses (latter part of the second millennium B.C.), it is in reality scarcely earlier than the 5th century B.C., and the Jewish theory finds analogies when developments of the Levitical service are referred to David (I Chron.

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  • 24, 27 the lower figure is given on the authority of "the last words (or acts) of David."

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  • The sequel to this phase is placed in the reign of Solomon, when David's old priest Abiathar, sole survivor of the priests of Shiloh, is expelled to Anathoth (near Jerusalem), and Zadok becomes the first chief priest contemporary with the foundation of the first temple (1 Kings ii.

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  • 21) must have remained; but that it was small is shown by the fact that it was deemed a suitable place for David's ambassadors to retire to after the indignities put upon them by Hanun (2 Sam.

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  • David Carnegie in 1896-97.

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  • David Carnegie, which started in July 1896, and travelled north-easterly until it reached Alexander Spring; then turning northward, it traversed the country between Wells's track of 1896 and the South Australian border.

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  • He made his bastard son David bishop of Utrecht, and from 1456 onwards that see continued under Burgundian influence.

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  • David Robert Plunket Rathmore >>

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  • "SIR DAVID GILL (1843-1914), British astronomer, was born in Aberdeenshire June 12 18 4 3 and educated at the university of Aberdeen.

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  • See David Gill, Man and Astronomer, by George Forbes (1916).

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  • Sir David Ochterlony >>

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  • The Scottish philosophy of Thomas Reid and his successors believed that David Hume's scepticism was no more than the genuine outcome of Locke's sensationalist appeal to experience when ripened or forced on by the immaterialism of Bishop Berkeley - God and the soul alone; not God, world and soul.

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  • Scepticism, with which P. Bayle had played as a historian - he amused himself, too, with praising the Manichaean solution of the riddle of the universe - became a serious power in the history of philosophy with the advent of David Hume.

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  • We refer to David Hume.

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  • Near the tolbooth stands the market cross, a stone column with a unicorn on the top supporting the burgh arms. At the west end of High Street is a statue of David Macbeth Moir ("Delta," 1798-1851), Musselburgh's most famous son.

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  • In 1138 David of Scotland made it a centre of military operations, and it was ravaged by Wallace in 1296, by Bruce in 1312, and by David II.

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  • 1769, a celebration in honour of the poet was organized by David Garrick.

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  • (1802); Orpheo and Heurodis from the Auchinleck MS. in David Laing's Select Remains of the Ancient Popular Poetry of Scotland (new ed., 1885); and Kyng Orfew from the Ashmolean MS. in J.O.

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  • Modern collections of religious poetry sometimes bear the title of Psalms and Hymns, but these are always more or less directly connected with the actual Psalms of David.

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  • Sir David Brewster modified his apparatus by moving the object-box and closing the end of the tube by a lens of short focus which forms images of distant objects at the distance of distinct vision.

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  • ix., x.); where the champions of David fought those of Ish-bosheth (2 Sam.

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  • ISAAC ABRABANEL, called also Abravanel, Abarbanel (1437-1508), Jewish statesman, philosopher, theologian and commentator, was born at Lisbon of an ancient family which claimed descent from the royal house of David.

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  • His grandson David was also an author.

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  • In the first half of the 14th century lived the two translators Qalonymos ben David and Qalonymos ben Qalonymos, the latter of whom translated many works of Galen and Averroes, and various scientific treatises, besides writing original works, e.g.

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  • In Germany David Gans wrote on astronomy, and also the historical work Zemah David (Prag, 1592).

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  • In the East, David Conforte (d.

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  • between him and David (I Sam.

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  • 4), David took charge.

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  • See further David, Saul.

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  • Both Normans and English came to Scotland in crowds in the days of Margaret, Edgar and David, and Scottish national feeling sometimes rose up against them.

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  • The 5th book concludes with the death of King David I.

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  • More distinguished sympathizers are Edward Gibbon, who has the deistic spirit, and David Hume, the historian and philosophical sceptic, who has at least the letter of the deistic creed (Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion), and who uses Pascal's appeal to " faith " in a spirit of mockery (Essay on Miracles).

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  • With Christian David, a carpenter, at their head, they crossed the border into Saxony, settled down near Count Zinzendorf's estate at Berthelsdorf, and, with his permission, built the town of Herrnhut (17 22-1 7 27).

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  • Before long persecution broke out against Herrnhut; the count sent a band of emigrants to Georgia; and as these emigrants would require their own ministers, he had David Nitschmann consecrated a bishop by Jablonsky (1735).

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  • Dalyell in Scotish Poems of the Sixteenth Century (1801); and of the 1578 volume by David Laing in 1868.

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  • "Vedderburn's" Complainte of Scotlande (1549) has been variously assigned to Robert Wedderburn, to Sir David Lyndsay and to Sir James Inglis, who was chaplain of the Abbey of Cambuskenneth from about 1508 to 1550.

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  • Other passages are borrowings from Octavien de Saint Gelais and Sir David Lyndsay.

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  • in the days of Saul and David) it was the priest with the ephod or image of Yahweh who gave answers to those who consulted him.

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  • in the time of David and Solomon), but the application of this theory to the list of unclean foods in Deut.

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  • What `Ophrah became on a small scale in the days of Gideon, Jerusalem became on a larger scale in the days of David and his successors.

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  • 2 The narrative is of some value as it shows that while it was possible to appoint any one as a priest, since Micah, like David, appointed one of his own sons (xvii.

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  • Even as early as the time of David it would seem that Nathan assumed this more developed function as interpreter of Yahweh's righteous will to David.

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  • The strange contrast between the succession of dynasties and kings cut off by assassination in the northern kingdom, ending in the tragic overthrow of 721 B.C., and the persistent succession through three centuries of the seed of David on the throne of Jerusalem, as well as the marvellous escape of Jerusalem in 701 B.C. from the fate of Samaria, must have invested the seed of David in the eyes of all thoughtful observers with a mysterious and divine significance.

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  • Yahweh's servant David, whereas in the ideal scheme detailed in chap. xl.

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  • Ioo) clearly reveal the powerful revival of Messianic hopes of a national deliverer of the seed of David.

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  • In the neighbourhood are the ruins of Fort St David situated on the river Gadilam, which has been as stirring a history as any spot in the Presidency.

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  • In 1746 Fort St David became the British headquarters for the south of India, and Dupleix' attack was successfully repulsed.

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  • The great reflecting telescope at Dorpat was manufactured by him, and so great was the skill he attained in the making of lenses for achromatic telescopes that, in a letter to Sir David Brewster, he expressed his willingness to furnish an achromatic glass of 18 in.

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  • Chelsum returned to the attack in 1785 (A Reply to Mr Gibbon's Vindication), and Sir David Dalrymple (An Inquiry into the Secondary Causes, &c.) made his first appearance in the controversy in 1786.

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  • David Glasgow Farragut >>

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  • and David II.

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  • It was founded in 1150 by David I., and remained in the hands of the Cistercians till its suppression at the Reformation.

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  • David and his followers are found in the south of Hebron, and as they advanced northwards they encountered wondrous heroes between Gath and Jerusalem (2 Sam.

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  • History saw in David the head of a lengthy line of kings, the founder of the Judaean monarchy, the psalmist and the priest-king who inaugurated religious institutions now recognized to be of a distinctly later character.

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  • It is associated with the half-nomad clans in the south of Palestine, or with the wanderings of David and his own priest Abiathar; it is ultimately placed within the newly captured city.

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  • When the narratives describe the life of the young David at the court of the first king of the northern kingdom, when the scenes cover the district which he took with the sword, and when the brave Saul is represented in an unfavourable light, one must allow for the popular tendency to idealize great figures, and for the Judaean origin of the compilation.

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  • Yet again, Saul had been chosen by Yahweh to free his people from the Philistines; he had been rejected for his sins, and had suffered continuously from this enemy; Israel at his death was left in the unhappy state in which he had found it; it was the Judaean David, the faithful servant of Yahweh, who was now chosen to deliver Israel, and to the last the people gratefully remembered their debt.

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  • David, the conqueror, was followed by his son Solomon, famous for his wealth, wisdom and piety, above all for the magnificent Temple which he built at Jerusalem.

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  • But another side of the picture shows the domestic intrigues which darkened the last days of David.

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  • The accession of Solomon had not been without bloodshed, and Judah, together with David's old general Joab and his faithful priest Abiathar, were opposed to the son of a woman who had been the wife of a Hittite warrior.

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  • The Edomites, who had been almost extirpated by David in the valley of Salt, south of the Dead Sea, were now strong enough to seek revenge; and the powerful kingdom of Damascus, whose foundation is ascribed to this period, began to threaten Israel on the north and north-east.

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  • Although the rise of the Hebrew state, at an age when the great powers were quiescent and when such a people as the Philistines is known to have appeared upon the scene, is entirely intelligible, it is not improbable that legends of Saul and David, the heroic founders of the two kingdoms, have been put in a historical setting with the help of later historical tradition.

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  • Both Jehoash (of Judah) and his son Amaziah left behind them a great name; and the latter was comparable only to David (2 Kings xiv.

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  • Tradition, in fact, is concentrated upon the rise of the Judaean dynasty under David, but there are significant periods before the rise of both Jehoash and Uzziah upon which the historical records maintain a perplexing silence.

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  • The throne of David was then occupied by the young Ahaz, Jotham's son.

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  • It is part of the scheme which runs through the book of Kings, and its apparent object is to show that the Temple planned by David and founded by Solomon ultimately gained its true position as the only sanctuary of Yahweh to which his worshippers should repair.

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  • One fragmentary source alludes to a journey to the Midianite or Kenite father-in-law of Moses with the Ark (q.v.); another knows of its movements with David and the priest Abiathar (a name closely related to Jether or Jethro; cf.

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  • I 1-24); Caleb's overthrow of the Hebronite giants finds a parallel in David's conflicts before the capture of Jerusalem, and may be associated with the belief that these primitive giants once filled the land (Josh.

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  • 21 seq.; see § 7, and David; Samuel, Books Of).

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  • Whatever the predominant party might think of foreign marriages, the tradition of the half-Moabite origin of David serves, in the beautiful idyll of Ruth (q.v.), to suggest the debt which Judah and Jerusalem owed to one at least of its neighbours.

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  • The warfare which followed was like that which Saul and David waged against the Philistines.

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  • When he went on his last disastrous campaign, Hyrcanus led a Jewish contingent to join his army, partly perhaps a troop of mercenaries (for Hyrcanus was the first of the Jewish kings to hire mercenaries, with the treasure found in David's tomb).

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  • As God's servant, Pompey destroyed their rulers and every wise councillor: soon the righteous and sinless king of David's house shall reign over them and over all the nations (xvii.).

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  • Each procurator represented not David but Caesar.

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  • Early Christian writers assert that he proceeded to search out and to execute all descendants of David who might conceivably come forward as claimants of the vacant throne.

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  • The general hope of the nation was not necessarily bound up with the house of David, and its realization was not incompatible with the yoke of Rome.

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  • of Jamnia (Jabne Yebneh) had been raised to this dignity a century before, and, as members of the house of Hillel and thus descendants of David, the patriarchs enjoyed almost royal authority.

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  • Sir David Henderson >>

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  • According to him the word was first used on the 27th of December 1641 by a disbanded officer named David Hide, who during a riot is reported to have drawn his sword and said he would "cut the throat of those round-headed dogs that bawled against bishops."

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  • He issued Le Psautier de David (1525), and was appointed royal librarian at Blois (1526); his version of the Pentateuch appeared two years later.

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  • Tucker (1802-1859), the Democratic candidate, representing the repudiators and David O.

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  • David Holmes Democrat1817-1820George Poindexter..

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  • Benjamin Williams James Turner Nathaniel Alexander Benjamin Williams David Stone..

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  • The last exilarch of importance was David, son of Zakkai, whose contest with Seadiah had momentous consequences.

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  • DAVID (a Hebrew name meaning probably beloved 1), in the Bible, the son of Jesse, king of Judah and Israel, and founder of the royal Judaean dynasty at Jerusalem.

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  • - I Kings ii.), which are our principal source for the history of David, show how deep an impression the personality of the king, his character, his genius and the romantic story of his early years had left on the mind of the nation.

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  • This history, as we now have it, is extracted from various sources of unequal value, which are fitted together in a way which offers considerable difficulties to the critic. In the history of David's early adventures, for example, the narrative is not seldom disordered, and sometimes seems to repeat itself with puzzling variations of detail, which have led critics to the unanimous conclusion that the First Book of Samuel is drawn from at least two sources.

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  • It is indeed easy to understand that the romantic incidents of this period were much in the mouths of the people - to whom David was a popular hero - and in course of time were written down in various forms which were not combined into perfect harmony by later editors, who gave excerpts from several sources rather than a new and independent history.

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  • The parallel history of David in I Chron.

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  • A comparison of the two records, however, is especially important for its illustration of the later tendency to idealize the figure of David, and the historical critic has to bear in mind the possibility that this tendency had begun long before the Chronicler's time, and that it may be found in the relatively older records preserved in Samuel.

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  • 14-23, and the apocryphal Psalm of David, Ps.

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  • Characteristic of the omitted portions are the friendship which sprang up between Jonathan and David and the latter's appointment to a command in the army.

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  • 52), and David soon became both a popular hero and an object of jealousy to Saul.

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  • xviii., Saul's jealousy leaped at once to the conclusion that David's ambition would not stop short of the kingship. Such a suspicion would be intelligible if we could suppose that the king had heard something of the significant act of Samuel, which now stands at the head of the history of David in witness of that divine election and unction with the spirit of Yahweh on which his whole career hung (xvi.

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  • 4 According to this text Saul was simply possessed with such a personal dislike and dread of Conflicts with David as might easily occupy his disordered brain.

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  • In this charge David increased his reputation as a soldier and became a general favourite.

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  • David's good fortune did not desert him; he won his wife, and in this new advancement continued to grow in the popular favour, and to gain fresh laurels in the field.

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  • At this point it is necessary to look back on the proposed marriage of David with Saul's eldest daughter Merab (xviii.

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  • 8, the whole episode of Merab and David perhaps rests on a similar confusion of names.

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  • As the king's son-in-law, David was necessarily again at court.

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  • On at least one occasion the king's frenzy broke out in an attempt to murder David with his own hand.'

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  • At another time Saul actually gave commands to assassinate his son-in-law, but the breach was made up by Jonathan, whose chivalrous spirit had united him to David in a covenant of closest friendship (xix.

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  • The circumstances of the final outburst of Saul's hatred, which drove David into exile, are not easily disentangled.

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  • The older history repeatedly indicates that David's kingship was predicted by a divine oracle, but would hardly lead us to place the prediction so early (I Sam.

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  • David appears to be still at court, and Jonathan is even unaware that he is in any danger, whereas the preceding verses represent him as already a fugitive.

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  • It may also be doubted whether the narrative of David's escape from his own house by the aid of his wife Michal (xix.

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  • David's daring spirit might very well lead him to visit his wife even after his first flight.

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  • David was still at court in his usual position when he became certain that the king was aiming at his life.

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  • A plan was arranged by which Jonathan should draw from the king an expression of his feelings, and a tremendous explosion revealed that Saul regarded David as the rival of his dynasty, and Jonathan as little better than a fellow-conspirator.

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  • 40-42), which must be regarded as a later expansion, they parted and David fled.

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  • It was perhaps after this that David made a last attempt to find a place of refuge in the prophetic circle of Samuel at Ramah (xix.

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  • Deprived of the protection of religion as well as of justice, David tried his fortune among the Philistines at Gath.

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  • 26), which were glad to have on their frontiers a protector so valiant as David, even at the expense of the blackmail which he levied in return.

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  • 5) and by the priest Abiathar, the only survivor of a terrible massacre by which Saul took revenge for the favours which David had received at the sanctuary of Nob.

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  • Popular tradition, as though unwilling to let David escape from Saul, told of that king's continual pursuit of the outlaw, of the attempt of the men of Ziph (S.E.

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  • of Hebron) to betray him, of David's magnanimity displayed on two occasions, and of Jonathan's visit to console his bosom friend (xxiv.

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  • If this were an attempt to steer a middle course his true actions could not have been kept secret long, and as it is implied that the Philistines subsequently acquiesced in David's sovereignty in Hebron, it is not easy to see what interest they had in embroiling him with the men of Judah.

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  • David accompanied the army, as a matter of course.

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  • David now took the first great step to the throne.

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  • The embassy threw out a hint, - their lord was dead and David himself had been anointed king over Judah; but the relation between Jabesh-Gilead and Saul had been a close one, and it was not to be expected that its eyes would be turned upon the king of Judah when Saul's son was installed at the not distant Mahanaim.

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  • Ishbaal's party became weaker and weaker; and at length Abner quarrelled with his nominal master and offered the kingdom to David.

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  • Ishbaal lost hope, and after he had been foully assassinated by two of his own followers, all Israel sought David as king.

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  • The biblical narrative is admittedly not so constructed as to enable us to describe in chronological order the thirty-three years of David's reign over all Israel.

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  • It is possible that some of the incidents ascribed to this period properly belong to an earlier part of his life, and that tradition has idealized the life of David the king even as it has not failed to colour the history of David the outlaw and king of Hebron.

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  • The later views of the history of this period are represented in the book of Chronicles, where immediately after Saul's death David is anointed at Hebron king over all Israel (1 Chron.

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  • It is quite in harmony with this that the same source speaks of the Israelites who joined David at Ziklag (i Chron.

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  • It is questionable whether David could have become king over all Israel immediately after the death of Ishbaal.

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  • But David's position in the south of Judah is clear.

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  • These chapters bring him farther north, and they commence by depicting David as a man of Bethlehem, high in the court of Saul, the king's son-in-law, and a popular favourite with the people.

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  • But notwithstanding this, the relation is broken off, and years elapse before David gains hold upon the Hebrews of north Israel, the weakness of the union being proved by the ease with which it was subsequently broken after Solomon's death.

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  • If Jerusalem and its immediate neighbourhood were first conquered by David (2 Sam.

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  • The evidence has obviously some bearing upon the history of Saul, as also upon the intercourse between Judah and Benjamin which David's early history implies.

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  • It has been conjectured, therefore, that David's original home lay in the south.

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  • David's friendly relations with the Philistines find a parallel in Isaac's covenant with Abimelech.

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  • David owed his success to his troop of freebooters (i Sam.

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  • We hear of two great battles with the " Philistines " in the valley of Rephaim, near Jerusalem, at a time when David's base was Adullam (v.

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  • Elhanan of Bethlehem slew the giant Goliath of Gath, and David's own brother Shimei (or Shammah) overthrew a monster who could boast of twenty-four fingers and toes.

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  • In yet another incident the Philistines maintained a garrison in Bethlehem, and David expressed a wish for a drink from its well.

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  • Here, in the midst of a region which had been held by aliens, he fortified the " city of David " and garrisoned it with his men.

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  • For his wars a larger force than his early bodyguard was required, and the Chronicler gives an account of the way in which an army of nearly 300,000 was raised and held by David's thirty heroes (i Chron.

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  • It was under the care of the king of Moab that David placed his parents when he fled from Saul (i Sam.

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  • A more moderate idea of David's power has been found in Ps.

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  • Moab, Ammon and Edom would appear to have been merely tributary, whilst in the north among his allies David could number the king of Hamath.

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  • The king of Tyre, who recognized David's newly won position (v.

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  • 2 David destroyed two-thirds of the Moabites - presumably of their fighting men (2 Sam.

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  • " David," " Merom," " Zobah."

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  • The main problem is whether the account of David's rule has been exaggerated, or whether the attempt has been made to throw back to the time of the first king of all Israel later political conditions.

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  • So, after David had completed a series of conquests which made Palestine the greatest of the petty states of the age, troubles arose with the Israelites, who in times past had sought for him to be king (iii.

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  • There were men of stronger build than the weak Ishbaal and the crippled son of Jonathan, the survivors of Saul's house, and it is only to be expected that David's first care must have been to cement the union of the north and south.

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  • 8 This policy of leniency towards Israel is characteristic of David, and may well have become a popular theme in the tales of succeeding generations.

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  • Thus it was quite in keeping with the romantic attachment between David and Saul's son Jonathan that when he became king of Israel he took Jonathan's son Meribbaal under his care (ix.).

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  • This David recognized, and, summoning the injured clan, inquired what expiation could be made.

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  • The incident is a valuable picture of crude ideas of Yahweh, and, if nothing else were needed, it was sufficient to involve David in a feud with the Benjamites.

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  • 8 Here, too, we learn of the tardy burial of the bones of Saul and Jonathan which had remained in JabeshGilead since the battle of Gilboa; - the history of David's dealings with the family of Saul has been obscured.

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  • David's revolt.

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  • But the narrative loses its point unless David's kindness " for Jonathan's sake " comes at an early date soon after he became king, and although the youth is found at Lo-debar (east of the Jordan) under the protection of Machir, the independent fragment in ii.

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  • Bathsheba's influence added a new element of danger to the usual jealousies of the harem, and two of David's sons perished in vain attempts to claim the throne, which she appears to have viewed as the rightful inheritance of her own child.

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  • David's sons were estranged from one another, and acquired all the vices of Oriental princes.

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  • The surprise was complete, and David was compelled to evacuate Jerusalem, where he might have been crushed before he had time to rally his faithful subjects.

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  • The precedence claimed by Judah was challenged by the northern tribes even on the day of David's victorious return to his capital, and a rupture ensued, headed by Sheba, which but for the energy of Joab might have led to a second and more dangerous rebellion.

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  • The unruly clans which David knew how to control when he was at Ziklag or Hebron were doubtless ready to support the rebellious son.

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  • 8, it is significant that the scene of Absalom's exile lay to the south, that Ahithophel was a south Judaean, and that Amasa probably belonged to the Jezreel 2 with which David was connected through his wife Ahinoam.

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  • David's hurried flight, attended only by his bodyguard, indicates that his position was not a very strong one, and it is difficult to connect this with the fact that he had already waged the wars mentioned in 2 Sam.

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  • 27 makes Nahash himself David's ally, and accounts for David's eagerness to repay to Hanun, the son of Nahash, the kindness which he had received from the father (x.

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  • The Appendix ascribes to David a song of triumph and some exceedingly obscure " last words " (xxii.

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  • From this condition David raised the land to the highest state of prosperity and glory, and by his conquests made the united kingdom the most powerful state of the age.

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  • David was not only a great captain, he was a national hero in whom all the noblest elements of the Hebrew genius were combined.

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  • 3 Opinion will differ, however, as to the extent to which later ideals have influenced the narratives upon which the student of Hebrew history and religion is dependent, and how far the reigns of David and Solomon altered the face of Hebrew history.

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  • It cannot be doubted that the three types of David, represented by the books of Samuel, of Chronicles, and the superscriptions of the Psalms, are irreconcilable, and that they represent successive developments of the original traditions.

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  • This could not but have an influence on the current ideas concerning David.

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  • David's character must be judged partly in the light of the times in which he lived and partly in connexion with the great truths which he represents, truths whose value is not impaired should they prove to be the convictions of later ages.

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  • Accordingly, David is not to be condemned for failing to subdue the sensuality which is the chief stain on his character, but should rather be judged by his habitual recognition of a generous standard of conduct, by the undoubted purity and lofty justice of an administration which was never stained by selfish considerations or motives of personal rancour, 5 and finally by the calm 3 See Hebrew Religion, Messiah, Prophet.

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  • From the lust of conquest for its own sake David appears to have been wholly free.

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  • The generous elevation of David's character is seen most clearly in those parts of his life where an inferior nature would have been most at fault, - in his conduct towards Saul, in the blameless reputation of himself and his band of outlaws in the wilderness of Judah, in his repentance under the rebuke of Nathan and in his noble bearing on the revolt of Absalom.

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  • To the later generations David was pre-eminently the Psalmist and the founder of the Temple service.

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  • Nor can it be maintained that the elaborate ritual ascribed to David by the chronicler has any historical value.

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  • Alten Orients 2, p. 527), and though David's skill referred to in Amos vi.

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  • And although the Levitical organization, as ascribed to David, is manifestly post-exilic, it is at least certain that many of the Levitical families were of southern origin.

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  • It is in David's history that the clans of the south first attained prominence, and some of them are known to have been staunch upholders of a purer worship of Yahweh, or to have been associated with the introduction of religious institutions among the Israelites.

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  • 9 show that according to one view David delivered Israel (not Judah) from the Philistines.

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  • ated with Caleb, David and the Levites.

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  • 29 sqq.; see Kenites), and if Abiathar carried it before David (I Kings ii.

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  • It is possible, therefore, that one early account of David was that of an entrance into the land of Judah, and that round him have gathered traditions partly individual and partly tribal or national.

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  • - Robertson Smith's later views subsequent to 1877 (when he wrote the article on David for this Encyclopaedia) were expressed partly in the Old Test.

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  • (9th ed.); on David's character see especially his criticism of Renan, Eng.

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  • Mention may be made of Stahelin's Leben Davids (Basel, 1866), still valuable for the numerous parallels adduced from oriental history; Cheyne's Aids to Devout Study of Criticism (1892), a criticism of David's history in its bearing upon religion; Marcel Dieulafoy, David the King (1902), full, but not critical; H.

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  • " David "; Cheyne, Ency.

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  • " David "; and (on the romantic element in the narratives) Luther in Ed.

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  • David >>

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  • SIR DAVID BREWSTER (1781-1868), Scottish natural philosopher, was born on the 11th of December 1781 at Jedburgh, where his father, a teacher of high reputation, was rector of the grammar school.

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  • See The Home Life of Sir David Brewster, by his daughter Mrs Gordon.

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  • This was the native place of David's wife Abinoam (1 Sam.

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  • After the death of Margaret, the "maid of Norway," in 1290, Bruce's grandfather, the 6th Robert de Bruce, lord of Annandale, claimed the crown of Scotland as the son of Isabella, the second daughter of David, earl of Huntingdon, and greatgranddaughter of King David I.; but John de Baliol, grandson of Margaret, the eldest daughter of Earl David, was preferred by the commissioners of Edward I.

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  • Joanna, Edward's sister, was to be given in marriage to David, the infant son of Bruce, born subsequent to the settlement of 1318 and now recognized as heir to the crown, and the ceremony was celebrated at Berwick on the 12th of July 1328.

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  • 1327), daughter of Richard de Burgh, earl of Ulster, whom he had married about 1304, and who bore him late his only son, David, who succeeded him.

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  • In 1588 the leading persons of Pembrokeshire, with Bishop Anthony Rudd of St David's at their head, petitioned Queen Elizabeth to fortify the Haven against the projected Spanish invasion, upon which the block-houses of Dale and Nangle at either side of the mouth of the harbour were accordingly erected.

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  • It was introduced into Britain soon after its rediscovery by David Douglas in 1827, and has been widely planted, but does not flourish well where exposed to high winds or in too shallow soil.

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  • Cardinal David Beton, the head of the French and Catholic party and therefore Mary of Lorraine's friend and ally, produced a will of the late king in which the primacy in the regency was assigned to himself.

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  • to the Mongols in 1247; at the Tatar camp near Kars he met a certain David, who next year (1248) appeared at the court of King Louis IX.

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  • Andrew, who was now with St Louis, interpreted to the king David's message, a real or pretended offer of alliance from the Mongol general Ilchikdai (Ilchikadai), and a proposal of a joint attack upon the Islamic powers for the conquest of Syria.

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  • Of the shorter poems, besides the greeting to Pippin on his return from the campaign against the Avars (796), an epistle to David (Charlemagne) incidentally reveals a delightful picture of the poet living with his children in a house surrounded by pleasant gardens near the emperor's palace.

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  • David Thomson with a small company from Plymouth, England, in the spring or early summer of 1623 built and fortified a house at Little Harbor (now Odiorne's Point in the township of Rye) as a fishing and trading station.

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  • In 1607 David Waterhouse, lord of the manor of Halifax, obtained a grant of two markets there every week on Friday and Saturday and two fairs every year, each lasting three days, one beginning on the 24th of June, the other on the 11th of November.

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  • Later these fairs and markets were confirmed with the addition of an extra market on Thursday to Sir William Ayloffe, baronet, who had succeeded David Waterhouse as lord of the manor.

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  • See also David Walker Woods, John Witherspoon (New York, 1906); and M.

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  • The name of Llandilo implies the town's early foundation by St Teilo, the great Celtic missionary of the 6th century, the friend of St David and reputed founder of the see of Llandaff.

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  • Besides this great work he published in 1832 his Geschichte der Pflanzung and Leitung der christlichen Kirche, and in 1837 his Das Leben Jesu Christi, in seinem geschichtlichen Zusammenhang and seiner geschichtlichen Entwickelung, called forth by the famous Life of David Strauss.

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  • the territory of the ancient city of Damascus; it was brought into subjection for a short time under David.

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  • In the same year appeared Evanson's work entitled The Dissonance of the four generally received Evangelists, to which replies were published by Priestley and David Simpson (1793).

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  • David S.

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  • A somewhat wild Bedouin disposition, fostered by their surroundings, was retained by the Israelite in habitants of Gilead to a late period of their history, and seems to be to some extent discernible in what we read alike of Jephthah, of David's Gadites, and of the prophet Elijah.

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  • That the Israelites even applied the title of Baal to Yahweh himself is proved by the occurrence of such names as Jerubbaal (Gideon), Eshbaal (one of Saul's sons) and Beeliada (a son of David, 1 Chron.

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  • DAVID DUDLEY FIELD (1805-1894), American lawyer and law reformer, was born in Haddam, Connecticut, on the 13th of February 1805.

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  • He was the oldest of the four sons of the Rev. David Dudley Field (1781-1867), a well-known American clergyman and author.

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  • See also the Life of David Dudley Field (New York, 1898), by Rev. Henry Martyn Field.

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  • From 1843 to 1849 he was vice-principal of St David's College, Lampeter, and in 1854 was appointed Norrisian professor of divinity at Cambridge.

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  • 21), which we may identify with the memorable victory of David over the Philistines recorded in 2 Sam.

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  • Sir David Baird >>

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  • Thomson Paton; the county and municipal buildings; handsome public baths and gymnasium, presented to the town by Mr David Thomson; the accident hospital; the fever hospital; the museum of the Natural Science and Archaeological Society; the academy, the burgh school and a secondary school with the finest technical equipment in Scotland, given by Mr A.

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  • Hachures of a rude nature first made their appearance on David Vivier's map of the environs of Paris (1674), and on Cassini's Carte de la France.

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  • It was only the chronologists and historians of the church who, following Julius Africanus, made use of apocalyptic numbers in their calculations, while court theologians like Eusebius entertained the imperial table with discussions as to whether the dining-hall of the emperor - the second David and Solomon, the beloved of God - might not be the New Jerusalem of John's Apocalypse.

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  • DAVID I.

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  • On the death of Edgar, king of Scotland, in 1107, the territories of the Scottish crown were divided in accordance with the terms of his will between his two brothers, Alexander and David.

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  • Alexander, together with the crown, received Scotland north of the Forth and Clyde, David the southern district with the title of earl of Cumbria.

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  • in 1124 gave David possession of the whole.

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  • In 1127, in the character of an English baron, he swore fealty to Matilda as heiress to her father Henry I., and when the usurper Stephen ousted her in 1135 David vindicated her cause in arms and invaded England.

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  • But Stephen marched north with a great army, whereupon David made peace.

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  • After threatening an invasion in 1137, David marched into England in 1138, but sustained a crushing defeat on Cutton Moor in the engagement known as the battle of the Standard.

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  • David II of Scotland >>

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  • The early Friends definitely asserted that those who did not know quaking and trembling were strangers to the experience of Moses, David and other saints.

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  • In Aberdeen the Quakers took considerable hold, and were there joined by .some persons of influence and position, especially Alexander Jaffray, sometime provost of Aberdeen, and Colonel David Barclay of Ury and his son Robert, the author of the Apology.

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  • See eulogy by his friend Dr David Hosack (Essays, i., New York, 1824), with biographical details taken from a letter of Rush to President John Adams; also references in the works of Thacker, Gross and Bowditch on the history of medicine in America.

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  • His friend and biographer, David Welsh (1793-1845), superintended the publication of his text-book, the Physiology of the Human Mind, and his Lectures on the Philosophy of the Human Mind was published by his successors, John Stewart and the Rev. E.

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  • Hare assisted Thirlwall, afterwards bishop of St David's, in the translation of the 1st and 2nd volumes of Niebuhr's History of Rome (1828 and 1832), and published a Vindication of Niebuhr's History in 1829.

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  • In 1776 it was moved in the House of Commons by David Hartley, son of the author of Observations on Man, that " the slave trade was contrary to the laws of God and the rights of men "; but this motion - the first which was made on the subject - failed.

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  • In 1767 he was appointed to succeed Shakelton as principal painter to the king; and so fully employed was he on the royal portraits which the king was in the habit of presenting to ambassadors and colonial governors, that he was forced to take advantage of the services of a host of assistants - of whom David Martin and Philip Reinagle are the best known.

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  • The most common are the history of Jonah as a type of the Resurrection, the Fall, Noah receiving the dove with the olive branch, Abraham's sacrifice of Isaac, Moses taking off his shoes, David with the sling, Daniel in the lions' den, and the Three Children in the fiery furnace.

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  • The London Hibernian Society asked him to accompany Dr David Bogue, the Rev. Joseph Hughes, and Samuel Mills to Ireland in August 1807, to report on the state of Protestant religion in the country.

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  • HENRY DAVID THOREAU (1817-1862), American recluse, naturalist and writer, was born at Concord, Massachusetts, on the 12th of July 1817.

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  • The standard editions of his works are The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, Riverside edition (II vols., Boston, 18 941895), and Manuscript edition (12 vols., ibid., 1907).

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  • Sanborn, Henry David Thoreau (Boston, 1882), in the ` American Men of Letters Series "; H.

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  • Salt, Life of Henry David Thoreau (London, 1890); Some Unpublished Letters of H.

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  • In this respect it reached its height in the second half of the 18th century, and is specially associated with Colley Cibber, Samuel Johnson, Cumberland the dramatist, David Garrick, Samuel Richardson, Sir Joshua Reynolds, Beau Nash, Miss Chudleigh and Mrs Thrale.

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  • 75-77, so as to command the passage of the Taff, which was here crossed by the Via Maritima running from Gloucester to St David's.

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  • In 1846 he achieved high reputation by his Life of David Hume, based upon extensive and unused MS. material.

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  • Blantyre Works (pop. 1683) was the birthplace of David Livingstone (1813-1873) and his brother Charles (1821-1873), who as lads were both employed as piecers in a local cotton-mill.

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  • David Marston Clough Democrat-Populist1899-1901Republican1901-1905Samuel R.

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  • The British government notified to Sir John Moore that some io,000 men were to be sent to Corunna under Sir David Baird; that he, with 20,000, was to join him, and then both act in concert with the Spanish armies.

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  • After a remarkable period of obscurity, the ark enters suddenly into the history of David (2 Sam.

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  • Finally the king had it conveyed to the city of David, where a tent was prepared to shelter it.

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  • David Hume summed up his admiration for Douglas by saying that his friend possessed "the true theatric genius of Shakespeare and Otway, refined from the unhappy barbarism of the one and licentiousness of the other."

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  • David I.

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  • He also edited a monthly magazine, The Sword and Trowel; an elaborate exposition of the Psalms, in seven volumes, called The Treasury of David (1870-1885); and a book of sayings called John Ploughman's Talks; or, Plain Advice for Plain People (1869), a kind of religious Poor Richard.

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  • The bishops denounced sentence of excommunication against all transgressors, and soon after Howel himself went to Rome attended by the archbishop of St David's, the bishops of Bangor and St Asaph and thirteen other personages.

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  • The Bishop of St David's, the bishop was deprived for simony.

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  • This enabled David Hilbert to produce a very simple unsymbolic proof of the same theorem.

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  • See also David Hannay, Life of Marryat (1889).

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  • David Leslie, the best of the Scottish generals, was promptly despatched against Montrose to anticipate the invasion.

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  • After holding a chair in King's College, London, he was appointed vice-principal at St David's College, Lampeter (1862-1872).

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  • Had the internal contacts alone been used, which many astronomers would have considered the proper course, the result would have been 8.776" In 1877 Sir David Gill organized an expedition to the island of Ascension to observe the parallax of Mars with the heliometer.

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  • The failure of the method based on transits of Venus led to an international effort carried out on the initiative of Sir David Gill to measure the parallax by observations on those minor planets which approach nearest the earth.

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  • JOHANN DAVID MICHAELIS (1717-1791), German biblical scholar and teacher, a member of a family which had the chief part in maintaining that solid discipline in Hebrew and the cognate languages which distinguished the university of Halle in the period of Pietism.

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  • Michaelis had as fellow-worker his sister's son Christian Benedikt Michaelis (1680-1764), the father of Johann David, who was likewise influential as professor at Halle, and a sound scholar, especially in Syriac. J.

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  • Finally, as Justin's statements as to the birth of Jesus in a cave and Mary's descent from David show in all probability his acquaintance with the book, it may with good grounds be assigned to the first decade of the 2nd century.

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  • In 1555 Bishop Farrar of St David's was publicly burned for heresy under Queen Mary at the Market Cross, which was ruthlessly destroyed in 1846 to provide a site for General Nott's statue.

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  • With the rise of Llanelly the industrial importance of Carmarthen has tended to decline; but owing to its central position, its close connexion with the bishops of St David's and its historic past the town is still the chief focus of all social, political and ecclesiastical movements in the three counties of Cardigan, Pembroke and Carmarthen.

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  • On the attainder of the family after the Gowrie conspiracy in 1600, the land passed to Sir David Murray of the Tullibardine line, who became 1st viscount Stormont (1621) and was the ancestor of the earl of Mansfield, to whom the existing house belongs.

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  • Sir David completed in 1606 the palace which the earl of Gowrie had begun.

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  • The streets of Dunkirk are wide and well paved, the chief of them converging to the square named after Jean Bart (born at Dunkirk in 1651), whose statue by David d'Angers stands at its centre.

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  • David Dudley Field, of New York, subsequently enlarged this list, which has been continued under the title International Tribunals, by Dr W.

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  • As early as 729 - some authorities fix the date a hundred and fifty years before - the Culdees possessed a monastery at Dunkeld, which was converted into a cathedral by David I.

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  • Of the castle, the oldest building is St Margaret's chapel, believed to be the chapel where Queen Margaret, wife of Malcolm Canmore, worshipped, and belonging at latest to the reign of her youngest son, David I.

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  • Holyrood Palace was originally an abbey of canons regular of the rule of St Augustine, founded by David I.

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  • surveys the spot where Knox was buried; the reformer himself is in the quadrangle of New College: Sir David Brewster adorns the quadrangle of the university; Dr William Chambers is in Chambers Street, and Frederick, duke of York (1763-1827), and the 4th earl of Hopetoun are also commemorated.

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  • To the three named should be added the Calton burying-ground, with its Roman tomb of David Hume, and the obelisk raised in 1844 to the memory of Maurice Margarot, Thomas Muir (1765-1798), Thomas Fyshe Palmer (1747-1802), William Skirving and Joseph Gerrald (1765-1796), the political martyrs transported towards the end of the 18th century for advocating parliamentary reform.

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  • Alexander Carlyle, the famous divine (1 77 2-1805), whose Memorials of his Times still affords fascinating reading, ministered for fifty-five years in the parish church, in the graveyard of which lies David Macbeth Moir (1798-1851), who under the pen-name of " Delta " wrote Mansie Wauch, a masterpiece of Scots humour and pathos.

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  • Closely associated with the medical school, and separated from it by the Middle Meadow Walk, is the Royal Infirmary, designed by David Bryce, R.S.A.

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  • Fettes College, an imposing structure in a 16th-century semi-Gothic style, designed by David Bryce and called after its founder Sir William Fettes (1750-1836), is organized on the model of the great English public schools.

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  • The parish church of St Giles is believed to have been erected in the reign of Alexander I., about 1110, and the huge Norman keep of the castle, built by his younger brother, David I., continued to be known as David's Tower till its destruction in the siege of 1572.

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  • Soon after his accession to the Scottish throne David I.

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  • Hence, though the village of Canongate grew up beside the abbey of David I., and Edinburgh was a place of sufficient importance to be reckoned one of the four principal burghs as a judicatory for all commercial matters, nevertheless, even so late as 1450, when it became for the first time a walled town, it did not extend beyond the upper part of the ridge which slopes eastwards from the castle.

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  • He had been nominated bishop of St Asaph in 1536, translated to St David's in the same year, and to Bath and Wells in 1547.

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  • The registers at St David's make no mention of his consecration, but this counts for nothing.

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  • By special command of Raimund, archbishop of Toledo, the chief of these works were translated from the Arabic through the Castilian into Latin by the archdeacon Dominicus Gonzalvi with the aid of Johannes Avendeath (=ben David), a converted Jew, about 1150.

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  • It was mainly designed to combat a wild outbreak of Russophobia which, under the inspiration of David Urquhart, was at that time taking possession of the public mind.

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  • The chief representatives of the strictly " classical " school, which adopted the ancient Greek and Latin authors as its models, were David Baroti Szabo, Nicholas Revai, Joseph Rajnis and Benedict Virag.

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  • Fraknoi, Arpad Karolyi, David Angyal, Coloman Thaly, Geza Ballagi.

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  • At the present time excellent reproductions of Rowland's speculum gratings are on the market (Thorp, Ives, Wallace), prepared, after a suggestion of Sir David Brewster, by coating the original with a varnish, e.g.

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  • Some of the best of the varieties are: - Purple: David Rizzio, Sir Franklin, purpureus grandiflorus.

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  • David Abercromby >>

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  • 7 we find another title, namely " David."

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  • Hippolytus tells us that in his time most Christians said " the Psalms of David," and believed the whole book to be his; but this title and belief are both of Jewish origin, for in 2 Macc. ii.

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  • 13 Ta Tou Aavtt means the Psalter, and the title of the apocryphal " Psalter of Solomon " implies that the previously existing Psalter was ascribed to David.

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  • Jewish tradition does not make David the author of all the psalms; but as he was regarded as the founder and legislator of the Temple psalmody (1 Chron., ut supra; Ezra iii.

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  • 9b.), and appear to have been ascribed to David.

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  • Whatever may be the value of the titles to individual psalms, there can be no question that the tradition that the Psalter was collected by David is not historical; 1 Hippol., ed.

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  • The truth that underlies the tradition is that the collection is essentially the hymn-book of the second Temple,' and it was therefore ascribed to David, because it was assumed, as we see clearly from Chronicles, that the order of worship in the second temple was the same as in the first, and had David as its father: as Moses completed the law of Israel for all time before the people entered Canaan, so David completed the theory and contents of the Temple psalmody before the Temple itself was built.

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  • - xli.; all these are ascribed to David excepti., ii., x.

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  • (ascribed to David in LXX.); doxology, xli.

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  • to David (except lxvi., lxvii., lxxi.

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  • the last two bear David's name), lxxii.

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  • 18, 19 followed by the subscription " The prayers of David the son of Jesse are ended."

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  • of David, lxxxviii.

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  • (David), - LXX.

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  • to David; here the doxology is peculiar, " Blessed be Jehovah God of Israel from everlasting and to everlasting.

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  • are ascribed to David and cxxvii.

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  • varies considerably from the Hebrew as to the psalms to be ascribed to David; the book closes with a group of doxological psalms.

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  • But if we remove them we get a continuous body of Levitical Elohim psalms, or rather two collections, the first Korahitic and the second Asaphic, to which there have been added by way of appendix by a non-Elohistic editor a supplementary group of Korahite psalms and one psalm (certainly late) ascribed to David.

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  • 46 Asaph is taken to be a contemporary of David and chief of the singers of his time, and in r Chron.

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  • But here it becomes necessary to ask what is the precise meaning which we are to assign to the phrases, " to David," " to Asaph," " to the sons of Korah."

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  • 16), or, since the Chronicler ascribes to David the initiation of the Temple music, " in the oldest traditional mode."

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  • however, a confusion would easily arise between the composer of the tune and the author; and when once the idea had arisen that David was the author of psalms, it would be natural to endeavour to discover in the story of his life suitable occasions for their composition.

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  • The titles which ascribe four of the pilgrimage songs to David and one to Solomon are lacking in the true LXX., and inconsistent with the contents of the psalms. Better attested, because found in the LXX.

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  • xc. and that of David in Ps.

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  • The only possible question for the critic is whether the ascription of these psalms to David was due to the idea that he was the psalmist par excellence, to whom any poem of unknown origin was naturally ascribed, or whether we have in some at least of these titles an example of the habit so common in later Jewish literature of writing in the name of ancient worthies.

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  • We have still to consider the two great groups of psalms ascribed to David in books I.

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  • We have endeavoured to show that the ascription " to David " in these groups did not originally denote authorship by David, and that, notwithstanding the subscription of Ps.

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  • It is, however, probable that the title soon came to be understood of David's authorship, with the result that further notes were added indicating the situation in David's life to which the psalms appeared to be appropriate.

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  • xxxii., bears the title " of David," and in like manner the group Ps.

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  • Now that the ascription " to David " was understood of David's authorship before the time of the LXX.

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  • xviii., for example, but there is no evidence that in early times David was regarded as the author of any of the psalms. Even the Chronicler, though he regarded David as the great founder of the Temple music, does not quote any psalm as composed by him, and the Chronicler's omission of 2 Sam.

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  • It may fairly be contended therefore that the tradition that David is the author of the psalms which are assigned to him in books I.

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  • In any case the titles are manifestly the product of the same uncritical spirit as we have just been speaking of, for not only are many of the titles certainly wrong, but they are wrong in such a way as to prove that they date from an age to which David was merely the abstract psalmist and which had no idea whatever of the historical conditions of his age.

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  • Nothing can be further removed than this from any possible situation in the life of the David of the books of Samuel, and the case is still worse in the second Davidic collection, especially where we have in the titles definite notes as to the historical occasion on which the poems are supposed to have been written.

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  • to David when watched in his house by Saul, implies an absolute lack of the very elements of historical judgment.

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  • The synagogue collections, since they contained psalms which at this time were probably considered to be the work of David, were placed first, and the Temple collection added to them.

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  • A good deal is said about the musical services of the Levites in Chronicles, both in the account given of David's ordinances and in the descriptions of particular festival occasions.

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  • - (A) The oldest version, the LXX., follows a text generally closely corresponding to the Massoretic Hebrew, the main variations being in the titles and in the addition (lacking in some MSS.) of an apocryphal psalm ascribed to David when he fought with Goliath.

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  • This territory was claimed by the South African Republic, by Barolong and Batlapin Bechuanas, by Koranas, and also by David Arnot, on behalf of the Griqua captain, Nicholas Waterboer.

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  • Sir David Barbour, who had presided over a commission to inquire into the concessions granted by the late republic, presented a valuable report in June, and suggested a tax of io% on the profits of the gold mining industry, a suggestion carried out a year later (June 1902).

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  • In the beginning of the 8th century David of Beth Rabban, also a Nestorian monk, wrote, besides a geographical work, " a monastic history, called The Little Paradise, which is frequently cited by Thomas of Marga."

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  • David Dalhoff Neal >>

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  • The first complete edition was published by David Laing (2 vols., Edinburgh, 1834) with a supplement (Edinburgh, 1865).

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  • Smith, Antient Topography of London (1815); David Hughson [E.

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  • His Irenicum vere christianum is directed against David Pareus (1548-1622), professor primarius at Heidelberg, who in Irenicum sive de unione et synodo Evangelicorum (1614) had pleaded for a reconciliation of Lutheranism and Calvinism; his Calvinista aulopoliticus (1610) was written against the "damnable Calvinism" which was becoming prevalent in Holstein and Brandenburg.

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  • See also John Britton, Memoir of John Aubrey (1845); David Masson, in the British Quarterly Review, July 1856; Emile Montegut, Heures de lecture d'un critique (1891); and a catalogue of Aubrey's collections in The Life and Times of Anthony Wood..

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  • These curves attracted much attention and were discussed by John Bernoulli, Leibnitz, Huygens, David Gregory and others.

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  • SIR DAVID BAIRD (1757-1829), British general, was born at Newbyth in Aberdeenshire in December 1757.

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  • Commodore Sir Home Popham persuaded Sir David to lend him troops for an expedition against Buenos Aires; the successive failures of operations against this place involved the recall of Baird, though on his return home he was quickly re-employed as a divisional general in the Copenhagen expedition of 1807.

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  • Sir David married Miss Campbell-Preston, a Perthshire heiress, in r81o.

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  • See Theodore Hook's Life of Sir David Baird.

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  • In January 1757 he succeeded David Hume as librarian to the faculty of advocates, but soon relinquished this office on becoming tutor in the family of Lord Bute.

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  • Uriah, in the time of David).

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  • They protest against the Asmonaean house for usurping the throne of David, and laying violent hands on the high priesthood (xvii.

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  • The principal buildings are the parish church of St Thomas (restored 1874), the church of St David (r866), a Roman Catholic church, and Baptist, Calvinistic, Methodist, Congregational and Wesleyan chapels; the intermediate and technical schools (1895), Davies's endowed (elementary) school (1789), the Gwyn Hall (1888), the town hall, with corn exchange in the basement storey, and the market-house.

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  • In 1239 he was struck with paralysis and retired from the active work of government in favour of his son David.

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  • The most important was his De Origine ac Progressu schismatis Anglicani, which was continued after 1558 by Edward Rishton, and printed at Cologne in 1585; it has been often re-edited and translated, the best English edition being that by David Lewis (London, 1877).

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  • The historical interval that separated these two events is treated as naturally dividing itself into three great periods, - those of Moses, David and Ezra.

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  • As by rights the Messianic kingdom should follow immediately on the exile, it is probable that the prophet designs to hint in a guarded way that Zerubbabel, who in all other places is mentioned along with Joshua, is on the point of ascending the throne of his ancestor David.

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  • The great concern of the time and the chief practical theme of these chapters is the building of the temple; but its restoration is only the earnest of greater things to follow, viz., the glorious restoration of David's kingdom.

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  • The former prophecy is closely linked to the situation and wants of the community of Jerusalem in the second year of Darius I., and relates to the restoration of the temple and, perhaps, the elevation of Zerubbabel to the throne of David.

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  • It was in the stronghold ("cave" is a scribal error) of this town that David took refuge on two occasions (I Sam.

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  • JAMES DAVID FORBES (1809-1868), Scottish physicist, was the fourth son of Sir William Forbes, 7th baronet of Pitsligo, and was born at Edinburgh on the 10th of April 1809.

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  • A year later he was appointed professor of natural philosophy in Edinburgh University, in succession to Sir John Leslie and in competition with Sir David Brewster, and during his tenure of that office, which he did not give up till 1860, he not only proved himself an active and efficient teacher, but also did much to improve the internal conditions of the university.

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  • Next we find that Samuel's interest on behalf of the Israelite king is transferred to David, the founder of the Judaean dynasty, and it is his part to announce the rejection of Saul and Yahweh's new decision (xiii.

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  • 17), to anoint the young David, and, as head of a small community of prophets, to protect him from the hostility of Saul (xvi.

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  • Further, while on the one side the institution of the monarchy is subsequently regarded as hostile to the preeminence of Yahweh, Samuel's connexion with the history of David belongs to a relatively late stage in the history of the written traditions where events are viewed from a specifically Judaean aspect.

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  • See further David; Samuel, Books Of; Saul.

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  • 5); Yahweh's words are still good to them that walk uprightly; the glory of Israel is driven to take refuge in Adullam, l as in the days when David's band of broken men was the true hope of the nation, but there is no hint that it is banished from the land.

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  • A new David, like him whose exploits in the district of Micah's home were still in the mouths of the common people (?

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  • David Martin (1737-1798), the painter and engraver; 'Thomas Chalmers (1780-1847), the great divine; and John Goodsir (1814-1867), the anatomist, were natives of Anstruther.

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  • of Sir David Brewster, who had married the poet's second daughter) was destroyed.

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  • He was the son of a naval officer, and nephew of David Porter of the frigate "Essex."

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  • They had their own kings, who, they pretend, were descended from David, from the 10th century until 1800, when the royal race became extinct, and they then became subject to the Abyssinian kingdom of Tigre.

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  • The Gentleman's Magazine was continued by Cave's brother-in-law, David Henry, afterwards by John Nichols and his son.'

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  • He wrote David and His Throne (1855), Pen Pictures of the Bible (1855), Redeemer and Redeemed (1864), and Spiritual Manifestations (1879).

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  • DAVID RITTENHOUSE (1732-1796), American astronomer, was born at Germantown, Pennsylvania, on the 8th of April.

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  • The most beautiful of his few pictures of this kind was the "David musing on the Housetop" (1865).

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  • He returned to Paris before the end of the year, was well received by his family, and mixed in the cultivated circle which frequented the salon of his mother, among them Lebrun-Pindare, Lavoisier, Lesueur, Dorat, Parmy, and a little later the painter David.

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  • "Yah [well] is a father"), in the Bible, the son of Zeruiah, David's sister (I Chron.

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  • All three were renowned warriors and played a prominent part in David's history.

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  • 17), and Joab as warrior and statesman was directly respon sible for much of David's success.

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  • The hostility of the "sons of Zeruiah" towards the tribe of Benjamin is characteristically contrasted with David's own generosity towards Saul's fallen house.

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  • Abishai proposed to kill Saul when David surprised him asleep (i Sam.

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  • But David was resigned to the will of Yahweh and refused to entertain the suggestions.

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  • After Asahel met his death at the hands of Abner, Joab expostulated with David for not taking revenge upon the guilty one, and indeed the king might be considered bound in honour to take up his nephew's cause.

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  • But when Joab himself killed Abner David's imprecation against him and his brother Abishai showed that he dissociated himself from the act of vengeance, although it brought him nearer to the throne of all Israel (2 Sam.

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  • The two deeds are similar, and the impression left by them is expressed in David's last charges to Solomon (i Kings ii.).

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  • A certain animus against Joab's family thus seems to underlie some of the popular narratives of the life of David (q.v.).

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  • 22 f.), the stories of David and Amnon (2 Sam.

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  • sion of the Lomnitzer peak in the High Tatra was made by one David or Johann Frohlich in 1615.

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  • The fortress was an important bulwark against English invasion, and the town - which was created a royal burgh by David II.

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  • The Battle Of Dunbar was fought on the 3rd (13th) of September 1650 between the English army under Oliver Cromwell and the Scots under David Leslie, afterwards Lord Newark.

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  • Near the station are the ruins of the abbey of Cistercian nuns founded by David I.

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  • BATTLE OF THE STANDARD, a name given to the battle of the 22nd of August 1138 near Northallerton, in which the Scottish army under King David was defeated by the English levies of Yorkshire and the north Midlands, who arrayed themselves round a chariot carrying the consecrated banners of St Peter of York, St John of Beverley, St Wilfrid of Ripon and St Cuthbert of Durham.

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  • The following form which Seeberg gives as the creed of St Paul is an artificial combination of fragments of oral teaching, which naturally reappear in the teaching of St Peter, but finds no attestation in the later creeds of particular churches which would prove its claim to be their parent form: " The living God who created all things sent His Son Jesus Christ, born of the seed of David, who died for our sins according to the scriptures, and was buried, who was raised on the third day according to the scriptures, and appeared to Cephas and the XI I., who sat at the Der Katechismus der Urchristenheit, p. 85.

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  • "David was to be henceforth his Simonides, Pindar and Alcaeus, his Flaccus, Catullus and Severus."

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  • 7), the cause of his apprehension " on the ground that he was a descendant of David and a Christian " (Hegesippus ap. Eus.

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  • Mediterranean (sometimes called " Malta ") fever has been traced by Colonel David Bruce to a Micrococcus melitensis.

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  • Carlyle's memory recalled the Porteous Riots of 1736, and less remotely his friendship with Adam Smith, David Hume, and John Home, the dramatist, for witnessing the performance of whose tragedy Douglas He Was Censured In 1757.

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