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date-palm

date-palm

date-palm Sentence Examples

  • The orange, date-palm and eucalyptus have been acclimatized on the coast of Provence and the Riviera.

  • With the date palm it is believed to have furnished the rafters for the buildings of Nineveh.

  • Wheat and the date palm seem to have been indigenous, and the latter is still one of the chief poductions of the country, but in later years rice has taken the place of wheat as the staff of life.

  • "The first part of Persis which lies along the Persian Gulf is hot, sandy and barren and only the date palm thrives there.

  • The date palm is a beautiful tree, growing to a height of from 60 to 80 ft., and its stem, which is strongly marked with old leaf-scars, terminates in a crown of graceful shining pinnate leaves.

  • All parts of the date palm yield valuable economic products.

  • Date sugar is a valuable commercial product of the East Indies, obtained from the sap or toddy of Phoenix sylvestris, the toddy palm, a tree so closely allied to the date palm that it has been supposed to be the parent stock of all the cultivated varieties.

  • The uses of the other parts and products of this tree are the same as those of the date palm products.

  • Among fruit trees the vine, apricot, peach, apple, quince, fig and banana are cultivated in the highlands, and in the lower country the date palm flourishes, particularly throughout the central zone of Arabia, in Hejaz, Nejd and El Hasa, where it is the prime article of food.

  • In these two regions the date palm is never met with growing naturally wild.

  • The present writer believes that the date palm was really indigenous to this district of the Jerid, as it is to countries of similar description in southern Morocco, southern Algeria, parts of the Tripolitaine, Egypt, Mesopotamia, southern Persia and north-western India; but that north of the latitude of the Jerid the date did not grow naturally in Mauretania, just as it was foreign to all parts of Europe, in which, as in true North Africa, its presence is due to the hand of man.

  • The date palm grows wild, as has been already related, in Jerba.

  • In the central region the olive is largely cultivated, in the south the date-palm.

  • In the Saharan oases the characteristic tree is the date palm - " the king of the desert."

  • Another analogy is furnished by the winged genii represented as fertilizing the sacred tree - the date-palm (Tylor); here the body is human, though the face is sometimes that of an eagle.

  • Tamar, the date-palm) and the old Canaanite elements (Zerah =indigena) by the younger Israelite invaders (Perez="branch").

  • All kinds of trees grow well, from the date palm to the oak; and there are over 200,000 wild olives in the country.

  • Thus 401vt came to mean a " date-palm "; but the date-palm is not in the least characteristic of Phoenicia, and can hardly grow there; 401vt in this sense has no connexion with the original meaning of Phoenician.

  • Here and there one sees a solitary sifsaf tree, or a small plantation of poplars or white mulberries, which trees, with the date-palm, constitute the only timber of the country.

  • Among other trees and shrubs may be mentioned the sumach, the date-palm, the plantain, various bamboos, cycads and the dwarf-palm, the last of which grows in some parts of Sicily more profusely than anywhere else, and in the desolate region in the south-west yields almost the only vegetable product of importance.

  • The most important tree is the date-palm, which grows all over Egypt and in the oases.

  • Here grow, among the introduced plants, the coffee tree, the date-palm, the sugar-cane, the banana, the orange tree, the American agave and two species of cactus; and among indigenous plants, the dragon tree on the north-west of Teneriffe.

  • Sugar is manufactured both from the sugar-cane and from the bastard date-palm, but the total production is inadequate to the local demand.

  • the coco-nut palm, an importation, but a tree which has been so extensively planted during the last hundred years that it is extremely plentiful; the palmiste (Palma dactylifera latifolia), the latanier (Corypha umbraculifera) and the date-palm.

  • angustifolia, leaves of the date palm (Phoenix sylvestris), of the dwarf palm (Chamaerops Ritchiana), of the Palmyra palm (Borassus flabelliformis), of the coco-nut palm (Cocos nucifera)andof the screw pine (Pandanus odoratissimus), the munja or munj grass (Saccharum Munja) and allied grasses, and the mat grasses Cyperus textilis and C. Pangorei, from the last of which the well-known Palghat mats of the Madras Presidency are made.

  • The date-palm has also been introduced into the southern provinces of the desert region.

  • The date-palm thrives well as far north as Tabbas in latitude 33 36 and at an altitude of 2000 ft.

  • The date palm fruits well; figs grow luxuriantly, though requiring much irrigation; almonds do well if protected from spring frosts; seaisland cotton grows in the finest grades, but is not of commercial importance.

  • Characteristic of the Sahara is the date-palm, which flourishes where other vegetation can scarcely maintain existence, while in the semi-desert regions the acacia (whence is obtained gum-arabic) is abundant.

  • The Greek word is also used for a date-palm, a musical instrument like a guitar, and the colour purple-red or crimson.

  • Besides the date-palm the dwarf-palm grows spontaneously in some parts of the south, but it nowhere makes up a large element of the vegetation.

  • The date-palm is cultivated along the Nile valley below Khartum, especially on the west bank in the Dongola mudiria and in the neighbouring oases.

  • Pieces of date palm leaf have been found on the bones but are not convincing evidence for wrapping.

  • smut disease is now affecting individual date palm trees in the north, central and south areas of Qatar.

  • The orange, date-palm and eucalyptus have been acclimatized on the coast of Provence and the Riviera.

  • With the date palm it is believed to have furnished the rafters for the buildings of Nineveh.

  • Wheat and the date palm seem to have been indigenous, and the latter is still one of the chief poductions of the country, but in later years rice has taken the place of wheat as the staff of life.

  • "The first part of Persis which lies along the Persian Gulf is hot, sandy and barren and only the date palm thrives there.

  • Trees are rare, and almost restricted to Pistacia, Celtis and Dodonaea, with poplars, and the date palm.

  • On the lowest levels the southern forms, the Ficus sycomorus and the date-palm, appear, and increase in the direction of Egypt (see Lebanon and Palestine).

  • The date palm is a beautiful tree, growing to a height of from 60 to 80 ft., and its stem, which is strongly marked with old leaf-scars, terminates in a crown of graceful shining pinnate leaves.

  • All parts of the date palm yield valuable economic products.

  • Date sugar is a valuable commercial product of the East Indies, obtained from the sap or toddy of Phoenix sylvestris, the toddy palm, a tree so closely allied to the date palm that it has been supposed to be the parent stock of all the cultivated varieties.

  • The uses of the other parts and products of this tree are the same as those of the date palm products.

  • Among fruit trees the vine, apricot, peach, apple, quince, fig and banana are cultivated in the highlands, and in the lower country the date palm flourishes, particularly throughout the central zone of Arabia, in Hejaz, Nejd and El Hasa, where it is the prime article of food.

  • In these two regions the date palm is never met with growing naturally wild.

  • The present writer believes that the date palm was really indigenous to this district of the Jerid, as it is to countries of similar description in southern Morocco, southern Algeria, parts of the Tripolitaine, Egypt, Mesopotamia, southern Persia and north-western India; but that north of the latitude of the Jerid the date did not grow naturally in Mauretania, just as it was foreign to all parts of Europe, in which, as in true North Africa, its presence is due to the hand of man.

  • The date palm grows wild, as has been already related, in Jerba.

  • In the central region the olive is largely cultivated, in the south the date-palm.

  • In the Saharan oases the characteristic tree is the date palm - " the king of the desert."

  • Another analogy is furnished by the winged genii represented as fertilizing the sacred tree - the date-palm (Tylor); here the body is human, though the face is sometimes that of an eagle.

  • Tamar, the date-palm) and the old Canaanite elements (Zerah =indigena) by the younger Israelite invaders (Perez="branch").

  • All kinds of trees grow well, from the date palm to the oak; and there are over 200,000 wild olives in the country.

  • Thus 401vt came to mean a " date-palm "; but the date-palm is not in the least characteristic of Phoenicia, and can hardly grow there; 401vt in this sense has no connexion with the original meaning of Phoenician.

  • Here and there one sees a solitary sifsaf tree, or a small plantation of poplars or white mulberries, which trees, with the date-palm, constitute the only timber of the country.

  • Among other trees and shrubs may be mentioned the sumach, the date-palm, the plantain, various bamboos, cycads and the dwarf-palm, the last of which grows in some parts of Sicily more profusely than anywhere else, and in the desolate region in the south-west yields almost the only vegetable product of importance.

  • The most important tree is the date-palm, which grows all over Egypt and in the oases.

  • Here grow, among the introduced plants, the coffee tree, the date-palm, the sugar-cane, the banana, the orange tree, the American agave and two species of cactus; and among indigenous plants, the dragon tree on the north-west of Teneriffe.

  • Sugar is manufactured both from the sugar-cane and from the bastard date-palm, but the total production is inadequate to the local demand.

  • the coco-nut palm, an importation, but a tree which has been so extensively planted during the last hundred years that it is extremely plentiful; the palmiste (Palma dactylifera latifolia), the latanier (Corypha umbraculifera) and the date-palm.

  • angustifolia, leaves of the date palm (Phoenix sylvestris), of the dwarf palm (Chamaerops Ritchiana), of the Palmyra palm (Borassus flabelliformis), of the coco-nut palm (Cocos nucifera)andof the screw pine (Pandanus odoratissimus), the munja or munj grass (Saccharum Munja) and allied grasses, and the mat grasses Cyperus textilis and C. Pangorei, from the last of which the well-known Palghat mats of the Madras Presidency are made.

  • The date-palm has also been introduced into the southern provinces of the desert region.

  • The date-palm thrives well as far north as Tabbas in latitude 33 36 and at an altitude of 2000 ft.

  • The date palm fruits well; figs grow luxuriantly, though requiring much irrigation; almonds do well if protected from spring frosts; seaisland cotton grows in the finest grades, but is not of commercial importance.

  • Characteristic of the Sahara is the date-palm, which flourishes where other vegetation can scarcely maintain existence, while in the semi-desert regions the acacia (whence is obtained gum-arabic) is abundant.

  • The Greek word is also used for a date-palm, a musical instrument like a guitar, and the colour purple-red or crimson.

  • Besides the date-palm the dwarf-palm grows spontaneously in some parts of the south, but it nowhere makes up a large element of the vegetation.

  • The date-palm is cultivated along the Nile valley below Khartum, especially on the west bank in the Dongola mudiria and in the neighbouring oases.

  • False smut disease is now affecting individual date palm trees in the north, central and south areas of Qatar.

  • The ancient Egyptians brought green date palm leaves into their homes to symbolize life's triumph over death.

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