Data sentence example

data
  • You have some access to data bases that could be helpful.
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  • The machine will figure this out as it collects more data and incorporates more variables, and then experiments on people to see which combinations of factors work the best.
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  • I can't pull the data off.
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  • More and more data will be passively collected.
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  • Would you be able to access national data bases?
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  • She rifled through the data of each one.
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  • Even today, the scientific method involves experimentation that almost always necessitates some amount of data collection.
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  • Successes will come, encouraging more data collection and more people to participate.
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  • In the past, a scientist began with a surmise or hunch and began gathering data to prove or disprove it.
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  • Our ability to process data, move information, and make things small will progress to a point where they will not be gating factors ever again.
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  • More data will come online, from satellite images to sensor readings.
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  • It is quite possible that the characters of the nematocysts might afford data as useful to the systematist in this group as do the spicules of sponges, for instance.
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  • The amount of data stored is so vast that even if we put a number on it, it would be beyond our comprehension.
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  • And as with ignorance, we may already have much of the data we need to find solutions.
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  • I'm checking it out; I have access to that data base, but I bet the plate is stolen.
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  • Before considering observational data, it is expedient to mention various sources of uncertainty.
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  • Then along came the web, and you had data plus knowledge.
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  • He presented abstract concepts with empirical data.
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  • Any time you can move data collection from humans to computers, you get vast improvements in efficiency.
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  • In comparing these data allowance must be made for the fact that danger from lightning is much greater out of doors than in.
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  • There are no data for estimating Measures.
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  • The vapourpressure equations are seldom known with sufficient accuracy, and the ionization data are incomplete.
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  • But the agreement is very good so far as the data extend, and the theory is really simpler than Raoult's law, because many different degrees of hydration are known, and the assumption a = i (all monohydrates), which is tacitly involved in Raoult's law, is in reality inconsistent with other chemical relations of the substances concerned.
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  • These formulae are important on account of the labour and ingenuity expended in devising the most suitable types, and also as a convenient means of recording the experimental data.
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  • Taking for ice and water the following numerical data, L = 674.7, 6 74.7, L 1 =595.2, L r = 79.5, R = o 11 03 cal./deg., po = 4.61 mm., s-S = 519 cal./deg., and assuming the specific heat of ice to be equal to that of steam at constant pressure (which is sufficiently approximate, since the term involving the difference of the specific heats is very small), we obtain the following numerical formulae, by substitution in (23), Ice..
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  • The most uncertain data are the variation of the specific heat of the liquid and the value of the small quantity b in the formula (13).
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  • There are given the following data:
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  • Our office received thousands of Internet generated reports from around the world, listing a myriad of up to date economic data.
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  • I described how to transfer certain data and she asked if she could help.
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  • The analysis of the consolidated data was set for a later date.
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  • Dr. Stone returned to the UK in January 2001 to begin data analysis.
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  • A few seconds of extra latency on the data network will likely go unnoticed; but, on the voice network it can cause anarchy!
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  • The FHA was also circumspect about the calls for more data sharing between lenders.
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  • Sources of the data were cited individually in the article.
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  • With rich data, grounded theorists can more readily discern what participants mean and how they define their experiences.
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  • I think to the extent the data is not identifiable to a person and is only used to make suggestions to others, people will participate.
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  • Think about notable astronomers of centuries past, who collected their own data through years of careful observation.
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  • Any time you can move data storage from brains to hard drives, you get vast improvements in efficiency.
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  • Any time you can move data processing from intellects to CPUs, you get vast improvements in efficiency.
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  • More and more data about each customer will be available.
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  • What will change is the amount of data that will be recorded, the speed of the processors, and the cost of storage and computation.
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  • In some twentieth-century science fiction visions of the future, humans created friendly robot sidekicks with data storage capacity and computational speed the human brain lacked.
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  • Every other metric is still climbing: data throughput, mobile phone usage, messages sent, websites created, amount of information online, data transfer speed, and CPU speed.
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  • Brady waited impatiently as his friend manipulated the data.
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  • I got nada, even in historical data.
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  • Also it requires a long series of years to give thoroughly representative results for any element, and few stations possess more than a year or two's dissipation data.
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  • Notwithstanding the proximity of the two countries, there is not much parallelism between the data.
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  • His own observation, and the reports of Mersenne, furnished his data.
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  • Strictly, however, it is contrasted with "perception," and implies the mental reconstruction and combination of sensegiven data.
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  • Our data are nowhere so full as for India; where they are comparatively abundant they refer either to a civilized or semicivilized people, or to an area, like West Africa, where the influence of Islam has introduced a disturbing element.
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  • Hess (18 4 o) were the first who systematically investigated thermochemical effects in solution, and arrived at conclusions from their experimental data which still possess validity.
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  • It is to these two investigators and their pupils that most of our exact thermochemical data are due.
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  • Except for technological purposes, thermochemical data are not referred to unit quantity of matter, but to chemical quantities - i.e.
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  • Since heats of formation afford such convenient data for calculation on the above method, they have been ascertained for as many compounds as possible.
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  • With these perplexing data the position of Judah is inextricably involved.
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  • Hebrew religious institutions can be understood from the biblical evidence studied in the light of comparative religion; and without going afield to Babylonia, Assyria or Egypt, valuable data are furnished by the cults of Phoenicia, Syria and Arabia, and these in turn can be illustrated from excavation and from modern custom.
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  • Only from an exhaustive comparison of controlling data can the scattered hints be collected and classified.
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  • The large sacs which have been termed vagina are suggestive of the large coelomic spermathecae in Eudrilids, a comparison which needs, however, embryological data, not at present forthcoming, for its justification.
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  • Though the state papers of Venice have suffered from fire and the series begins comparatively late, yet their fullness and the world-wide sweep of Venetian interests render this collection an inexhaustible storehouse of data for students.
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  • The insufficiency of this argument, however, is shown by the data for arsenious and antimonious oxides, and also for the polymorphs of calcium carbonate, the more symmetrical polymorphs having a lower density.
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  • But there are no authentic data before the 9th century concerning his history.
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  • The following data may be considered: Climate (A) allows, in what is a great ranching district, cattle and horses to run at large through the whole winter.
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  • Without resorting to this exaggeration, Mommsen can speak with perfect truth of the " enormous space occupied by the burial vaults of Christian Rome, not surpassed even by the cloacae or sewers of Republican Rome," but the data are too vague to warrant any attempt to define their dimensions.
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  • Also: Leandro Garcia y Gragitena, Guia del empleado de hacienda (Havana, 1860), with very valuable historical data; Carlos de Sedano y Cruzat, Cuba desde 18 5 0 a 1873.
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  • The evolution of mathematical thought in the invention of the data of analysis has thus been completely traced in outline.
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  • The figures obtainable with respect to shipping are approximate, the statistical data not being altogether complete.
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  • Meanwhile the mathematical mind, with its craving for accurate data on which to found its plans (the most difficult of all to obtain under the conditions of warfare), had been searching for expedients which might serve him to better purpose, and in 1805 he had recourse to the cavalry screen in the hope of such results.
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  • The empirical data on which the hydrodynamical investigations are based are: (I) observed velocities and directions of oceanic currents and drifts; (2) salinity; (3) density; (4) temperature of the sea water in situ; (5) oceanic soundings.
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  • Climatological Atlas of the Russian Empire, by the Physical Observatory (St Petersburg, 1900), gives data and observations covering the period 1849-1899.
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  • Apart altogether from the facts that this investigation is still in its infancy and that the conditions of experiment are insufficiently understood, its ultimate success is rendered highly problematical by the essential fact that real scientific results can be achieved only by data recorded in connexion with a perfectly nortnal subject; a conscious or interested subject introduces variable factors which are probably incalculable.
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  • Of these thirteen sections, the first contains a simple description of the more prominent phenomena, without mathematical symbols or numerical data.
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  • All the data required for standardizing the galvanometer can in this way be determined with accuracy.
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  • From data contained in Joule's paper it may be calculated that the strongest external field Ho produced by his coil was about 126 C.G.S.
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  • Honda, measured the changes of length of various metals shaped in the form of ovoids instead of cylindrical rods, and determined the magnetization curves for the same specimens; a higher degree of accuracy was thus attained, and satisfactory data were provided for testing theories.
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  • The largest of the Amazon forest trees are the massaranduba (Mimusops data), called the cow-tree because of its milky sap, the samadma (Eriodendron samauma) or silk-cotton tree, the pdu d'arco (Tecoma speciosa), pdu d'alho (Catraeva tapia), bacori (Symphonea coccinea), sapucaia (Lecythis ollaria), and castanheira or brazil-nut tree (Bertholletia excelsa).
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  • The claim of reason has been recognized to manipulate the data of faith, at first blindly and immediately received, and to weld them into a system such as will satisfy its own needs.
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  • This is also shown by the data relating to the percentage of members of other Hungarian races speaking this language.
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  • Delambre from the data there supplied marked the profit derived from the investigation by practical astronomy.
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  • It will be admitted by philological students that the exegetical data supplied by (at any rate) Isa.
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  • We cannot know things-in-themselves: they exist for us only in our cognition of them, through the medium of sense-given data.
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  • The practical bearings of a science, it will be granted, are simply, as it were, the summation of its facts, with the legitimate conclusions from them, the natural application of the data ascertained, and have not necessarily any direct relationship to its pursuit.
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  • Where the deposit is a regular one and the mineral is of fairly uniform richness, the taking of a few samples from widely separated parts of the mine will often furnish sufficient data to determine the value of the deposit.
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  • This variety of opinion is due to the fact that the data available for settling the chronology often conflict with one another, or are capable of more than one interpretation.
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  • In addition to the Kings' List, other important chronological data consist of references in the classical authorities to the chronological system of Berossus; chronological references to earlier kings occurring in the later native inscriptions, such as Nabonidus's estimate of the period of Khammurabi (or Hammuribi); synchronisms, also furnished by the inscriptions, between kings of Babylon and of Assyria; and the early Babylonian date-lists.
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  • Others have attempted to reconcile the conflicting data by emendations of the figures and other ingenious devices.
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  • The first group, comprising the second to the sixth names, obtains its results by selecting the data on which it relies and ignoring others.
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  • The second group, comprising the next four names, attempts to reconcile the conflicting data by emending the figures.
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  • Having first fixed the date of the close of Dynasty III., they employed the figures of the Kings' List unemended for defining the earlier periods, and did not attempt to reconcile their results with other conflicting data.
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  • A second group of systems may be said to consist of those proposed by Lehmann-Haupt, Marquart, Peiser, and Rost, for these writers attempted to get over the discrepancies in the data by emending some of the figures furnished by the inscriptions.
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  • The balance of opinion was in favour of those of the first group of writers, who avoided emendations of the figures and were content to follow the Kings' List and to ignore its apparent discrepancies with other chronological data; but it is now admitted that the general principle underlying the third group of theories was actually nearer the truth.
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  • The publication of fresh chronological material in 1906 and 1907 placed a new complexion on the problems at issue, and enabled us to correct several preconceptions, and to reconcile or explain the apparently conflicting data.
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  • New data have also been discovered bearing upon the period before the rise of Babylon.
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  • There is, therefore, no absolute knowledge, for every man has different perceptions, and, further, arranges and groups his data in methods peculiar to himself; so that the sum total is a quantity with a purely subjective validity.
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  • For the mapping of the whole vast interior, except in rare cases, no data exist beyond the itineraries of explorers, travelling as a rule under conditions which precluded the use of even the simplest surveying instruments.
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  • Huber's journal, published after his death from his original notes, contains a mass of topographical and archaeological detail of the greatest scientific value: his routes and observations form, in fact, the first and only scientific data for the construction of the map of northern Arabia.
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  • His attention was directed to the question of the flow of glaciers in 1840 when he met Louis Agassiz at the Glasgow meeting of the British Association, and in subsequent years he made several visits to Switzerland and also to Norway for the purpose of obtaining accurate data.
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  • So late as the 16th century, Bossuet delivered a panegyric upon her, and it was the action of Dom Deforis, the Benedictine editor of his works, in criticizing the accuracy of the data on which this was based, that first discredited the legend.
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  • The following table affords data for comparing the climatesof Peking, Shanghai, Hakodate, Tokyo and San Francisco:
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  • The problem was not solved, but the inadequate solutions were excluded, and the data to be considered in any adequate solution were affirmed.
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  • There are no reliable data as to the population of Yedo during the shogunate.
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  • The meagre data given by ancient writers are collected by Busolt and Marshall.
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  • It has now become obvious that the data afforded by the Hebrew writings should never have been regarded as sufficiently accurate for the purpose of exact historical computations: that, in short, no historian working along modern scientific lines could well have made the mistake of supposing that the genealogical lists of the Pentateuch afforded an adequate chronology of world-history.
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  • A fresh volume of evidence required to be gathered, and a new controversy to be waged, before the old data for the creation of man could be abandoned.
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  • Indian literature supplies few data for the period, and the available information has been collected chiefly from notices in Chinese annals, from inscriptions found in India, and above all from coins.
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  • The pipette having been carefully dried, the process is repeated with pure alcohol or with proof spirits, and the strength of any admixture of water and spirits is determined from the corresponding number of drops, but the formula generally given is not based upon sound data.
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  • In order to arrive at the date here implied, we can begin the reckoning from Julius Caesar or Augustus, we can include or exclude Galba, Otho and Vitellius, and, finally, when we have drawn our conclusions from these data, there remains the possibility that the book was after all not written under the sixth emperor, but was really a vaticinium ex eventu.
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  • Before entering on the chief data which help towards the determination of this question, we shall first state the author's standpoint.
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  • This council was nominated by the governments of Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, Russia, Germany, Great Britain, Holland and Belgium, with headquarters in Copenhagen and a central laboratory at Christiania, and its aim was to furnish data for the improvement of the fisheries of the North Sea and surrounding waters.
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  • In the course, of investigating this special problem great improvements were made in the methods of observing in the deep sea, and also in the representation and discussion of the data obtained, and a powerful stimulus was given to the study of oceanography in all the countries of Europe.
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  • Our knowledge of the Pacific in this respect is still very imperfect, but it appears to be less salt than the other oceans at depths below 800 fathoms, as on the surface, the salinity at considerable depths being 34.6 to 34.7 in the Western part of the ocean, and about 34.4 to 34.5 in the eastern, so that, although the data are by no means satisfactory, it is impossible to assign a mass-salinity of more than 34.7 per mille for the whole body of Pacific water.
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  • His method of estimating the relative lunar and solar distances is geometrically correct, though the instrumental means at his command rendered his data erroneous.
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  • The new method abbreviates the time, since an electric current can tally almost simultaneously the data, the tallying of which by hand would be separated by appreciable intervals.
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  • Data of this kind, which are by other means inaccessible to the astronomer, are obviously indispensable to any adequate conception of the stellar system as a whole or in its parts.
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  • It might, therefore, be described as that branch of mathematics which deals with formulae for calculating the numerical measurements of curved lengths, areas and volumes, in terms of numerical data which determine these measurements.
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  • Mensuration, then, is mainly concerned with quadratureformulae and cubature formulae, and, to a not very clearly defined extent, with the methods of obtaining such formulae; a quadrature-formula being a formula for calculating the numerical representation of an area, and a cubature-formula being a formula for calculating the numerical representation of a volume, in terms, in each case, of the numerical representations of particular data which determine the area or the volume.
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  • The numerical result obtained by applying a formula to particular data will generally not be exact.
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  • For this reason, formulae which will only give approximate results are usually classed together as rules, whether the inaccuracy lies (as in the case of Huygens's rule) in the formula itself, or (as in the case of Simpson's rule) in its application to the data.
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  • If the data for any of these figures are other than those given above, trigonometrical ratios will usually be involved.
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  • This would involve p and q; but, for our purposes, the data are the sides pa+q and pb+q and the base b - a, and the expression of the integral in terms of these data would require certain eliminations.
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  • The province of mensuration is to express the final result of such an elimination in terms of the data, without the necessity of going through the intermediate processes.
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  • The data are then either the bounding ordinates uo, ui, ...
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  • The data are usually the breadths H and K and either (i) the edges of the minor briquettes, viz.
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  • In some cases the data for a trapezette or a briquette are not only certain ordinates within or on the boundary of the figure, but also others forming the continuation of the series outside the figure.
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  • The result of treating this area as if it were the ordinate of a trapezette leads to special formulae, when the data are of the kind mentioned in § 44.
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  • If m = 4, and the data are ul, u2, Us, U4, we have area = h (7 u o + 3 2u 2 -112/42 + 3 2u 3 + 7u4).
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  • There are two classes of cases, according as m is even or odd; it will be convenient to consider them first for those cases in which the data are the bounding ordinates of the strips.
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  • The general principle is that the numerical data from which a particular result is to be deduced are in general not exact, but are given only to a certain degree of accuracy.
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  • The relation between the inaccuracy of the data and the additional inaccuracy due to substitution of another figure is similar to the relation between the inaccuracies in mensuration of a figure which is supposed to be of a given form (§ 20).
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  • The data are the same in both cases.
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  • In the case of a trapezette, for instance, the data are the magnitudes of certain ordinates; the problem of interpolation is to determine the values of intermediate ordinates, while that of mensuration is to determine the area of the figure of which these are the ordinates.
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  • In the case of mathematical functions certain conditions of continuity are satisfied, and the extent to which the value given by any particular formula differs from the true value may be estimated within certain limits; the main inaccuracy, in favourable cases, being due to the fact that the numerical data are not absolutely exact.
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  • In the case of statistical data there is the further difficulty that there is no real continuity, since we are concerned with a finite number of individuals.
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  • It is only necessary to consider the trapezette and the briquette, since the cases which occur in practice can be reduced to one or other of these forms. In each case the data are the values of certain equidistant ordinates, as described in §§ 43-45.
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  • The terms quadratureformula and cubature-formula are sometimes restricted to formulae for expressing the area of a trapezette, or the volume of a briquette, in terms of such data.
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  • If the data are uo, u 1,.
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  • If the data are u;, U I, ...
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  • This means that, if the minor trapezette consists of k strips, v will be of degree k or k - I in x, according as the data are the bounding ordinates or the mid-ordinates.
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  • Suppose, for instance, that m=6, and that we consider the trapezette as a whole; the data being the bounding ordinates.
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  • There is, however, a certain set of cases, occurring in statistics, in which the data are not a series of ordinates, but the areas A I, A I,.
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  • The formulae of § 82 can be extended to the case of a briquette whose top has close contact with the base all along its boundary; the data being the volumes of the minor briquettes formed by the planes x =x0, x = x i,
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  • If the data of the briquette are, as in § 86, the volumes of the minor briquettes, but the condition as to close contact is not satisfied, we have y "`x P u dx dy = K + L + R - X111010-0,0 f xo yo i'?
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  • When the sequence of differences is not such as to enable any of the foregoing methods to be applied, it is sometimes possible to amplify the data by measurement of intermediate ordinates, and then apply a suitable method to the amplified series.
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  • From the data thus obtained an isobaric map and a report are prepared for each day; and weather warnings are telegraphed to any part of the coast when necessary.
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  • Computation from modern data shows that 235 lunations are 6939 days, 16.5 hours; and 19 solar years, 6939 days, 14.5 hours.
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  • Hence the formula is more useful in the form w = (w i +w2)1 2 / (Kd -1 2) = (wl +w 2)lr/ (K -lr) where k= (wl+w2-1-w3)lr/w3 is to be deduced from the data of some bridge previously designed with the same working stresses.
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  • From the first he appreciated the importance of accurate measurement, and all through his life the attainment of exact quantitative data was one of his chief considerations.
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  • It is not possible from the available data to fix the exact date of any of these topes, but it may be stated that the smaller topes are probably of different dates both before and after Asoka, and that it is very possible that the largest was one of three which we are told was erected by Asoka himself.
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  • The data afforded by Eudoxus, however, are far too vague to serve as the basis of any chronological conclusion.
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  • For the collection of data he necessarily relied upon the labours of a corps of assistants, and the publications named represent, properly speaking, an encyclopaedia rather than a unified history; but as a storehouse of material their value is great and is likely to be enduring.
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  • But our experimental data are not confined to free space.
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  • As every attempt to rationalize nature implies a certain process of criticism and interpretation to which the data of sense are subjected, and in which they are, as it were, transcended, the antithesis of reason and sense is formulated early in the history of speculation.
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  • We possess no certain historical data relating to Poland till the end of the 10th century.
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  • He further induced the government to print his observations annually, thereby securing the prompt dissemination of a large mass of data inestimable from their continuity and accuracy.
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  • But no formula has yet been invented, derived on theoretical principles from the physical data, which will assign by calculation a definite magnitude to 3.
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  • Statistical data (lists of names, genealogies, and precise chronological notes) are a conspicuous feature in it.
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  • The main objection to this presentation, as also to that of the rationalists, is that it is very largely based not upon the historical data, but upon a pre-determined theory.
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  • On the balance of evidence the only year which can possibly reconcile all the data appears to be A.D.
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  • Becoming interested in terrestrial magnetism he made many observations of magnetic intensity and declination in various parts of Sweden, and was charged by the Stockholm Academy of Sciences with the task, not completed till shortly before his death, of working out the magnetic data obtained by the Swedish frigate "Eugenie" on her voyage round the world in 1851-1853.
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  • The values here given are from some Persian buildings (25), which indicate 21.4, or slightly less; Oppert's value, on less certain data, is 21.52.
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  • There is great uncertainty as to the exact values of all ancient standards of volume -- the only precise data being those resulting from the theories of volumes derived from the cubes of feet and cubits.
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  • In this theory there can strictly be no "causation"; one thing is observed to succeed another, but observations cannot assert that it is "caused" by that thing; it is post hoc, but not propter hoc. The idea of necessary connexion is a purely mental idea, an a priori conception, in which observation of empirical data takes no part; empiricism in ethics likewise does away with the idea of the absolute authority of the moral law as conceived by the intuitionalists.
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  • He therefore concluded that all we know from the data of psychological idealism is impressions or sensations, ideas, and associations of ideas, making us believe without proof in substances and causes, together with " a certain unknown, inexplicable something as the cause of our preceptions."
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  • The noumenal idealists of Germany assumed, like all psychological idealists, the unproved hypothesis that there is no sense of body, but there is a sense of sensations; and they usually accepted Kant's point, that to get from such sensations to knowledge there is a synthesis contributing mental elements beyond the mental data of sense.
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  • They saw also the logic of Kant's deduction, that all we can know from such mental data and mental categories must also be mental.
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  • But they disagreed with Kant, and agreed with Fichte about things in themselves or noumena, and contended that the mental things we know are not mere phenomena of sense, but noumena, precisely because noumena are as mental as phenomena, and therefore can be known from similar data: this was the central point of their noumenal idealism.
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  • Phenomenal Idealism In Germany Phenomenal idealism is the metaphysics which deduces that, as we begin by perceiving nothing but mental phenomena of sense, so all we know at last from these data is also phenomena of sense, actual or possible.
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  • Lange thus transmuted inconsistent Kantism into a consistent Neo-Kantism, consisting of these reformed positions: (1) we start with sensations in a priori forms; (2) all things known from these data are mental phenomena of experience; (3) everything beyond is idea, without any corresponding reality being knowable.
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  • Its consistency, as deduced by Lange, was to reduce all use of reason, speculative and practical, to its logical use of proceeding from the assumed mental data of outer and inner sense, arranged a priori, to mental phenomena of experience, beyond which we can conceive ideas but postulate nothing.
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  • He accepts the Kantian positions that unity of consciousness combines sensations by a priori synthesis, and that therefore all that natural science knows about matter moving in space is merely phenomena of outer sense; and he agrees with Kant that from these data we could not infer things in themselves by reason.
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  • He supposes that the conscious content is partly a posteriori, or consisting of given data of sense, and partly a priori, or consisting of categories of understanding, which, being valid for all objects, are contributed by the common consciousness.
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  • He allows, in fact, no a priori forms except categories of the understanding, and these he reduces, considering that the most important are identity with difference and causality, which in his view are necessary to the judgments that the various data which make up a total impression (Gesammteindruck, Totaleindruck) are each different from the others, together identical with the total impression, and causally connected in relations of necessary sequence and coexistence.
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  • At the same time, true: to the hypothesis of " immanence," he rigidly confines these categories to the given data, and altogether avoids the inconsistent tendency of Kant to transfer causality from a necessary relation between phenomena to a neces-' sary relation between phenomena and things in themselves as their causes.
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  • If knowledge is experience of ideas distinguished by inner will of apperception into subject and object in inseparable connexion, if the starting-point is ideas, if judgment is analysis of an aggregate idea, if inference is a mediate reference of the members of an aggregate of ideas to one another, then, as Wundt says, all we can know, and all reason can logically infer from such data, is in our ideas, and consciousness without an object of idea is an abstraction; so that reason, in transcending experience, can show the necessity of ideas and " ideals," but infer no corresponding reality beyond, whether in nature, or in Man, or in God.
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  • When we combine his view of Nature under the first head that whatever is inferred in the natural sciences is ideas, with his view of knowledge under the second head that knowledge is experience, and experience, individual or universal, is of duality of subject and object in the unity of experience, it follows that all we could know from the data would be one experience of the race, one subject consisting of individual subjects, and in Nature single objects in the unity of this universal experience; and beyond we should be able to form conceptions dependent on the perceptions of individual experience in the unity of universal experience: that is all.
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  • There can be no doubt that Mach, Schuppe and Wundt drew the right phenomenalistic conclusions from such phenomenalistic data.
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  • Here you would expect him to stop, as the German Neo-Kantism of Lange stops, with the consistent conclusion that all we know of Nature from such data is these complexes of sensation-elements, or phenomena in the Kantian meaning.
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  • Whatever its origin may be, it could not, any more than a Kantian category of cause, justify us in concluding anything more than a relation of perceptions as conditions of one another, seeing that they were supposed to be the whole data, and matter itself to be " sensation-elements."
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  • On this assumption of a sense of sensations, but not of causality, he deduces that we could not from such data infer any particular kind of cause, or a bodily cause, e.g.
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  • Apart from his sophistical defence of Spanish colonial policy, Acosta deserves high praise as an acute and diligent observer whose numerous new and valuable data are set forth in a vivid style.
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  • But he was by no means a practical geographer, and the record of his travels loses greatly in value from the want of precise scientific data.
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  • From the imperfect and conflicting data which are alone available one positive result can be gathered, viz.
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  • Following the first chart of lines of equal variation compiled by Edmund Halley in 1700, charts of similar type have been published from time to time embodying recent observations and corrected for the secular change, thus providing seamen with values of the variation accurate to about 30' of arc. Possessing these data, it is easy to ascertain by observation the effects of the iron in a ship in disturbing the compass, and it will be found for the most part in every vessel that the needle is deflected from the magnetic meridian by a horizontal angle called the deviation of the compass; in some directions of the ship's head adding to the known variation of the place, in other directions subtracting from it.
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  • When data of this character have been obtained the compass deviations may be mechanically corrected to within i° - always adhering to the principal that "like cures like."
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  • A little knowledge about its sources above these points was given by the savages to de la Fuente in 1759 and to Mendoza in 1764, and we are also indebted to Humboldt for some vague data.
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  • It should be noticed that the verification was begun without any data as to the masses of the celestial bodies, these being selected and adjusted to fit the observations.
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  • We have, however, good reasons for regarding it as not absolutely perfect, and there are some astronomical data the tendency of which is to confirm this view.
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  • The slowly accumulating data have not yet made it possible to determine precisely the probably varying relations of these various names.
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  • The distinguishing feature of these explorations, led by Russian officers, is their high scientific value and the contributions they have offered to the botany, natural history, geology and meteorology of the regions under investigation in addition to the actual geographical data attained.
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  • Now the velocities u and v of the opposite ions under unit potential gradient, and therefore U and V under unit force, are known from electrical data.
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  • A priori concepts there are, but if they are to lead to the amplification of knowledge, they must be brought into relation with empirical data.
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  • The uncertainty of sensible data applies equally to the conclusions of reason, and therefore man must be content with probability which is sufficient as a practical guide.
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  • He registered and classified almost every known language, and from these data worked out a system of ethnology.
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  • This work, which contained only the first six and the eleventh and twelfth books, and to which in its English version he added the Data in 1762, was for long the standard text of Euclid in England.
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  • Hayden (1829-1887) made a large collection of specimens and photographs, and with these data, together with the reports of this and the Washburn-Doane expedition, Congress was induced to reserve the area from settlement, which was done by an act approved the 1st of March 1872.
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  • Harnack has tabulated the results which our scanty data allow us to reach in his Expansion of Christianity.
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  • An opportunity, however, presented itself: being required to work out from data supplied to him the "defilement" of a proposed fortress (an operation then only performed by a long arithmetical process), Monge, substituting for this a geometrical method, obtained the result so quickly that the commandant at first refused to receive it - the time necessary for the work had not been taken; but upon examination the value of the discovery was recognized, and the method was adopted.
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  • The most important are :- Euclid's Elements; Euclid's Data; Optical Lectures, read in the public school of Cambridge; Thirteen Geometrical Lectures; The Works of Archimedes, the Four Books of Apollonius's Conic Sections, and Theodosius's Spherics, explained in a New Method; A Lecture, in which Archimedes' Theorems of the Sphere and Cylinder are investigated and briefly demonstrated; Mathematical Lectures, read in the public schools of the university of Cambridge.
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  • In illustration of the very different estimates that have been made, however, may be mentioned that of De Bary in 1872 of 150,000 species, and that of Cooke in 1895 of 40,000, and Massee in 1899 of over 50,000 species, the fact being that no sufficient data are as yet to hand for any accurate census.
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  • Ideas are secondary in nature, copies of data supplied we know not whence.
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  • For a complete treatment of this portion of the theory of knowledge, there require to be taken into consideration at least the following points: (a) the exact nature and significance of the space and time relations in our experience, (b) the mode in which the primary data, facts or principles, of mathematical cognition are obtained, (c) the nature, extent and certainty of such data, in themselves and with reference to the concrete material of experience, (d) the principle of inference from the data, however obtained.
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  • The rough appearances of physical facts, their outlines, surfaces and so on, are the data of observation, and only by a method of approximation do we gradually come near to such propositions as are laid down in pure geometry.
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  • He definitely repudiates a view often ascribed to him, and certainly advanced by many later empiricists, that the data of geometry are hypothetical.
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  • The identical relation between the ideas of space and time and the impressions corresponding to them apparently leads him to regard judgments of continuous and discrete quantity as standing on the same footing, while the ideal character of the data gives a certain colour to his inexact statements regarding the extent and truth of the judgments founded on them.
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  • Any exactitude attaching to the conclusions of geometrical reasoning arises from the comparative simplicity of the data for the primary judgments.
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  • Upon the nature of the reasoning by which in mathematical science we pass from data to conclusions, Hume gives no explicit statement.
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  • Owing to the completeness of the recorded data, and the great experimental skill with which the research was conducted, the results are probably among the most valuable hitherto available.
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  • There exist absolutely no data, and it is doubtful whether such can ever be gathered, for forming trustworthy estimates.
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  • The statistics given are taken as far as possible from official returns, and where such are unavailable they have been carefully compiled from reliable data.
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  • It has been needful to cite so much of the evidence proving that our Homilies and Recognitions are both recensions of a common basis, at first known as the Circuits of Peter and later by titles connecting it rather with Clement, its ostensible author, because it affords data also for the historical problems touching (a) the contents and origin of the primary Clementine work, and (b) the conditions under which our extant recensions of it arose.
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  • In the southern hemisphere there is comparatively little inhabited land in high latitudes and observational data are few; thus little is known as to how the frequency varies with latitude and longitude.
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  • Paulsen (6) as observed by Kleinschmidt in the winters of 1865 to 1882, supplemented by Lovering's data for summer.
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  • The Scandinavian data, from the wealth of observations, are probably the most representative, and even in the most northern district of Scandinavia the smallness of the excess of the frequencies in December and January over those in March and October suggests that some influence tending to create maxima at the equinoxes has largely counterbalanced the influence of sunlight and twilight in reducing the frequency at these seasons.
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  • Lovering's general formula suggests that the 4-month term is really less important than the 3-month term, but he gives no data for the latter at individual stations.
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  • The method of counting frequencies was fairly alike, at least in the case of A and B, but in comparing the different stations the data should be regarded as relative rather than absolute.
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  • The Jan Mayen data refer really to Göttingen mean time, but this was only twenty-three minutes late on local time.
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  • Zeitschrift for 1902, p. 1 95; the more recent data are from his quarterly lists.
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  • The auroral data are from Table E of Tromholt's catalogue (5), with certain modifications.
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  • In Tromholt's yearly data the year commences with July.
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  • This being inconvenient for comparison with sun-spots, use was made of his monthly values to obtain corresponding data for years commencing with January.
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  • The Tromholt-Schroeter data for Scandinavia as a whole commenced with 1761; the figures for earlier years were obtained by multiplying the data for Sweden by 1.356, the factor being derived by comparing the figures for Sweden alone and for the whole of Scandinavia from July 1761 to June 1783.
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  • Wolfer's frequencies with data obtained by other observers for areas of sun-spots, and his figures show unquestionably that the unit in one or other set of data must have varied appreciably from time to time.
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  • Rubenson (14), from whom Tromholt derives his data for Sweden, seems to accept this view, assigning the apparent increase in auroral frequency since 1860 to the institution by the state of meteorological stations in 1859, and to the increased interest taken in the subject since 1865 by the university of Upsala.
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  • Paulsen also gives data from two other stations in Greenland, viz.
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  • Birkeland (19), who has made a special study of magnetic disturbances in the Arctic, proceeding on the hypothesis that they arise from electric currents in the atmosphere, and who has thence attempted to deduce the position and intensity of these currents, asserts that whilst in the case of many storms the data were insufficient, when it was possible to fix the position of the mean line of flow of the hypothetical current relatively to an auroral arc, he invariably found the directions coincident or nearly so.
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  • The following data for the apparent angular width of arcs were obtained at Cape Thorsden, the arcs being grouped according to the height of the lower edge above the horizon.
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  • Capital data are possibly waiting there under ground - the Kabul valley for instance is almost virgin soil for the archaeologist - and any conclusion we can arrive at is merely provisional.
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  • The bulk of Greek historical literature having perished, and in the absence of both archaeological data from Iran, we can only speculate on the inner life of these Greek cities under a strange sky.
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  • The history of these Greek dynasties is for us almost a blank, and for estimating the amount and quality of Hellenism in Bactria during the 180 years or so of Macedonian and Greek rule, we are reduced to building hypotheses upon the scantiest data.
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  • But in such an undertaking one is always apt to take subjective assumptions or mere fancies for established data.
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  • A scrap of annals has been found extending from the earliest times to the Vth Dynasty, as well as a very fragmentary list of kings reaching nearly to the end of the Middle Kingdom, to help out the scattered data of the other monuments.
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  • In temples of Ptolemaic and Roman age the full series is figured presenting their tribute to the god, and this series approximately agrees with the scattered data of early monuments.
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  • There remain the astronomical data.
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  • With certain of these it stands associated most closely, namely, with the vestibular, representing the sense organs which furnish data for appreciation of positions and movements of the head, and with the channels, conveying centripetal impressions from the apparatus of skeletal movement.
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  • As an historian his style was terse and brilliant, his spirit philosophical, and his data singularly accurate.
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  • Ove Malling (1746-1829) was an untiring collector of historical data, which he annotated in a lively style.
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  • Logical analysis, after assuming that truth is independent and not of our making, has to confess that all logical operations involve an apparently arbitrary interference with their data (Bradley).
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  • The former based his opinion largely on historical evidence, and the latter trusted principally to geological data.
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  • But a good deal of work is still required before the harvest of historical data contained in these texts shall have been made acceptable to students of philosophy and sociology.
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  • These are full of important historical data on the social, as well as the religious, life of India during the periods of which they treat.
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  • His Statistique Internationale des grandes villes and Bulletin annuel des finances des grandes villes give valuable comparative data.
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  • The official estimate (La Republique de l'Equateur et sa participation al'Exposition Universelle de 1900) gives the data for the provinces and their capitals, which are shown on the next page.
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  • The chronological scrupulosity of the earlier writer has made no impression on his follower; he has either wholly omitted or inaccurately repeated the chronological data.
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  • The dates of the various parts of the book must be determined by the character of the contents, there being no decisive external data.
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  • The order of the categories is in the main outlines fixed; but in the minor details much depends upon the philosopher, who has to fill in the gaps between ideas, with little guidance from the data of experience, and to assign to the stages of development names which occasionally deal hardly with language.
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  • The most important data bearing upon the first great period are given elsewhere in this work, and it is proposed to offer here a more general survey.5 To the prehistoric ages belong the palaeolithic and neolithic flints, from the distribution of which an attempt might be made to give a synthetic sketch of early Palestinian man.6 A burial cave at Gezer has revealed the existence of a race of slight build and stature, muscular, with elongated crania, and thick and heavy skull-bones.
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  • The external evidence does not point to any intervening hiatus, and the archaeological data from the excavations do not reveal any dislocation of earlier conditions; earlier forms have simply developed and the evolution is a progressive one.
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  • Pentateuchal law is relatively unprogressive, it is marked by a characteristic simplicity, and by a spirit of reform, and the persisting primitive social conditions implied do not harmonize with other internal and external data.
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  • The scanty political data in the annalistic notices of the north kingdom are supplemented by more detailed narratives of a few years leading up to the rise of the last dynasty, that of Jehu.
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  • He, therefore, abandoned the purely intellectual sphere and proposed an inquiry into the data given by the senses, from which he held that all true knowledge really comes.
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  • He further held that all knowledge is sensation ("non ratione sed sensu") and that intelligence is, therefore, an agglomeration of isolated data, given by the senses.
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  • Strabo follows up the topographical data with a few brief historical statements - "OaKot €t ov Kai raur'v Kai 111v e0-js no,u?rniav.
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  • The Caraballos Occidentales range is very complex; the central ridge is in some parts a rolling plateau, but it rises in Mt Data to 7364 ft., and numerous lofty spurs project from it.
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  • Especial importance attaches to the unexpected discovery by Whitehead of a new and peculiar mammalian fauna, inhabiting a small plateau on the top of Mt Data, in north Luzon, at an altitude of more than 7000 ft.
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  • The Method of Mixture consists in imparting the quantity of heat to be measured to a known mass of water, or some other standard substance, contained in a vessel or calorimeter of known thermal capacity, and in observing the rise of temperature produced, from which data the quantity of heat may be found as explained in all elementary text-books.
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  • The gas current is simultaneously observed by a suitable meter, which, with subsidiary corrections for pressure, temperature, &c., gives the necessary data for deducing calorific value.
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  • The First Experiments Of Any Value Were Those Of Regnault In 1847 On The Specific Heat Of Water Between 110° C. And 192° C. They Were Conducted On A Very Large Scale By The Method Of Mixture, But Showed Discrepancies Of The Order Of 0.5%, And The Calculated Results In Many Cases Do Not Agree With The Data.
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  • In the table are collected the parallaxes and other data of all stars for which the most probable value of the parallax exceeds 0.20".
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  • Although his data were the proper motions of only seven stars, he indicated a point near X Herculis not very far from that found by modern researches.
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  • When Erigena starts with such propositions, it is clearly impossible to understand his position and work if we insist on regarding him as a scholastic, accepting the dogmas of the church as ultimate data, and endeavouring only to present them in due order and defend them by argument.
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  • Among the dialecticians, Socrates had used inductive arguments to obtain definitions as data of deductive arguments against his opponents, and Plato had insisted on the processes of ascending to and descending from an unconditional principle by the power of giving and receiving argument.
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  • The ministration to memory, aided by registering and arranging the data, of observation and experiment in tables of instances of agreement, difference and concomitant variations.
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  • Conceptual logicians were, indeed, from the first aware that sense supplies the data, and that judgment and therefore inference contains belief that things are or are not.
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  • Lastly, the science of inference is not indeed the science of sensation, memory and experience, but at the same time it is the science of using those mental operations as data of inference; and, if logic does not show how analogical and inductive inferences directly, and deductive inferences indirectly, arise from experience, it becomes a science of mere thinking without knowledge.
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  • Judgment is consciousness of the identity or difference and of the causal relations of the given; naming the actual combinations of the data, but also requiring a priori categories of the understanding, the notions of identity, difference and causality, as principles of thought or laws, to combine the plurality of the given into a unity (Schuppe).
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  • So far as it depends on memory, an inferential judgment presupposes memorial ideas in its data; and so far as it infers universal classes and laws, it produces general ideas.
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  • Fortunately, we have more profound evidences, and at least three evidences in all: the linguistic expression of belief in the proposition; the consciousness of what we mentally believe; and the analysis of reasoning, which shows what we must believe, and have believed, as data for inference.
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  • What they really are in the inferences proposed by Wundt is not premises for syllogism, but data for induction parading as syllogism.
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  • According to both, again, the hypothesis of a law with which the process starts contains more than is present in the particular data: according to Jevons, it is the hypothesis of a law of a cause from which induction deduces particular effects; and according to Sigwart, it is a hypothesis of the ground from which the particular data necessarily follow according to universal laws.
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  • It would be unjustifiable to assume from the inadequate data available that the Spanish people retains the vitality which characterized it from 1797 to 5857.
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  • From these data the following outline of his life can be reconstructed.
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  • The surface level of the lake varies with the season, and recent observations taken on behalf of the Palestine Exploration Fund seem to show that there are probably cyclical variations also (ultimately dependent on the rainfall), the nature and periodicity of which there are as yet no sufficient data to determine.
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  • The remains of the plants of former periods, which have come down to us in the fossilized state, are almost always fragmentary, and often imperfectly preserved; but their investigation is of the utmost importance to the botanist, as affording the only direct evidence of the past history of vegetable organisms. Since the publication of the Origin of Species the general acceptance of the doctrine of evolution has given a vastly increased significance to palaeontological data.
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  • The few and incomplete data which we at present possess as to Palaeozoic Fungi do not as yet justify any inferences as to the evolution of these plants.
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  • Hence palaeobotanists have found it necessary to adopt a purely :artificial system of classification, based on form and venation of the frond, in the absence of adequate data for a more natural, grouping.
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  • On the other hand, a study of the plant-life of past ages tends to the conviction that too much stress may be laid on the imperfection of the geological record as a factor in the interpretation of palaeontological data.
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  • Until excavation gives us more definite data we can only infer from its position on one of the 1 So Appian, Syr.
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  • Trustworthy data for determining its nature are lacking.
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  • So far as the elements necessarily involved in conscious experience are concerned, these may be enumerated briefly thus: - given data of sense, inner or outer; the forms of perception, i.e.
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  • The modes under which it is possible for such given difference to become portion of the conscious experience of the ego, the modes under which the isolated data can be synthetically combined so as to form a cognizable whole, make up the form of cognition, and upon this form rests the possibility of any a priori or rational knowledge.
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  • The consideration of the several elements which in combination make up the fact of cognition, or perception, as it may be called, contains little or nothing bearing on the origin and nature of the given data of sense, inner or outer.
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  • The data of sense are mere stimuli, not partial or confused representations.
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  • On the origin of the data of sense, Kant's remarks are few and little satisfactory.
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  • Data of sense-affection do not contain in themselves synthetic combination.
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  • Space and time, the two essential conditions of senseperception, are not data given by things, but universal forms of intellect into which all data of sense must be received.
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  • The unity of apperception, then, as Kant calls it, is only possible in relation to synthetic unity of experience itself, and the forms of this synthetic unity, the categories, are, therefore, on the one hand, necessary as forms in which self-consciousness is realized, and, on the other hand, restricted in their application and validity to the data of given sense, or the particular element of experience.
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  • Reference of representations to the unity of the object, synthetic unity of apperception, and subsumption of data of sense under the categories, are thus three sides or aspects of the one fundamental fact.
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  • Kant has certainly brought together selfconsciousness, the system of the categories and data of sense.
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  • He does endeavour to show, but with small success, how the junction of category and data of sense is brought about, for according to his scheme these stood, to a certain extent at least, apart from and independent of one another.
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  • But data of sense had at least one universal aspect, their aspect as the particular of the general forms, space and time.
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  • Perception or real cognition is thus conceived as a complex fact, involving data of sense and pure perceptive forms, determined by the category and realized through productive imagination in the schema.
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  • The mathematical principles are the abstract expression of the necessary mode in which data of sense are determined by the category in the form of intuitions or representations of objects; the dynamical are the abstract expression of the modes in which the existence of objects of intuition is determined.
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  • For as data of sense are only possible objects when received in the forms of space and time, and as space and time are only cognized when determined in definite fashion by the understanding through the schema of number (quantity) or degree (quality), all intuitions are extensive quantities and contain a real element, that of sense, which has degree.
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  • But experience is for us the combination of data of sense in the forms of productive imagination, forms determined by the pure intellectual notions, and accordingly experience is possible for us only as in modes corresponding to the notions.
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  • But to assert that cognition is limited and its matter contingent is to form the idea of an intelligence for whom cognition would not be limited and for whom the data of intuition would not be given, contingent facts, but necessarily produced along with the pure categories.
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  • The phenomena of organic production furnish data for a special kind of judgment, which, however, involves or rests upon a quite general principle, that of the contingency of the particular element in nature and its subjectively necessary adaptation to our faculty of cognition.
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  • I also want access to data bases that might help such as Motor Vehicle registrations, crime records, outstanding warrants; that sort of thing.
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  • He gave me a pile of special account data that he said would grease the skids on any requisitions I submitted, no questions asked.
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  • We were provided with wide range of data bases allowing us to better describe various vehicles.
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  • We usually attempted four cases a day and with more accurate data, our success percentage improved.
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  • It was an egregious example of data mining.
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  • There is no data to accept or refute this hypothesis.
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  • He will infer conclusions from secondary data.
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  • The conclusion was inferred from gravity data.
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  • The authoring paradigm has become declarative in nature, describing the data rather than the processes involved in document links.
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  • It was not possible to define a clear response curve of PD excretion to purine absorption from that data set.
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  • Each Subtle Collection class offers a unique data structure abstraction.
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  • Importance of geographical location and local habitat features for species abundance: analyzes using Breeding Bird Survey data.
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  • In the case of SMR data there are good reasons to restrict access to them.
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  • Any data raised within this website is treated in strict accordance with the data protection laws of the United Kingdom.
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  • However, academics are concerned that the data are not yet sufficiently accurate to make value-added comparisons.
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  • The short descriptions of Work Programs shown here only reflect the drilling component and not, for instance, seismic data acquisition.
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  • The majority of data are from trials using recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA ), also known as alteplase.
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  • A user can save data to it via a wireless 802.11g adapter.
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  • A further release of data, which contains additional derived variables, will be made available at a later date.
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  • Some systems using ISDN2 provide the facility for using additional B channels to allow faster data transfer rates.
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  • To enforce adherence to business rules, we absolutely do not want to provide direct access to the data services to ASP code.
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  • The data shall finally be statistically evaluated with the goal to quantitatively distinguish between traffic and wood burning aerosols.
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  • All locations are linked by ADSL broadband enabling cost affective, real time communication and sharing of data between the concessions and head office.
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  • Conventional programming languages only provide facilities for exact matching, a more adaptive approach is required in order to support data aggregation.
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  • That is the conclusion of an analysis of household survey data from Nepal, a largely agrarian society with a sparse road network.
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  • In the algebraic theory of data, continuous data types are modeled by topological algebras.
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  • The encoding and decoding algorithms are simple, but the encoded data are consistently only about 33 percent larger than the uncoded data.
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  • The alignment keyword specifies the storage alignment required for the data type.
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  • Disadvantages of multireference alignment: A very large data set is needed.
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  • For example, UK approval of genetically altered soya was based solely on safety data collected by Monsanto who produce the product.
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  • In addition, the Edge 305 incorporates a barometric altimeter for extremely accurate elevation and vertical profile data.
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  • Magellan synthetic aperture radar data is combined with radar altimetry to develop a three-dimensional map of the surface.
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  • The results are being compared with recent highly accurate satellite altimetry data of the Southern Ocean.
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  • The analysis of data herein represents an amalgam of data sources.
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  • The data is also now amalgamated with the Library's online catalog.
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  • Airwave also makes it possible to deliver a wide range of highly resilient and secure data services to front-line ambulances.
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  • A State Street Bank and Trust Company, WM Company provide financial services including risk analytics, market data services and fund.. .
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  • Predictive analytics takes the body of data collected and manipulates it using sophisticated algorithms to provide dynamic suggestions for tactical action.
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  • Equifax also provides data analytics teams who will assist us to develop our DPA compliant customer acquisition strategies.
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  • Most did not provide quantitative data so the reports remain anecdotal.
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  • This review incorporates new data on morphological diversity in galls from several large assemblages of Cretaceous and early Tertiary angiosperm leaves.
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  • Motion capture is the richest source of data on human motion for computer animation.
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  • To achieve good performance from lazy implementations, it proved necessary to apply strictness annotations to certain commonly-used data structures.
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  • They give rise to narrow vertical bands of clearly anomalous wind data in the quick-look plots.
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  • Where reports are required for statistical purposes the data must be rendered anonymous.
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  • To provide a sustained impetus toward the wider use of field data in teaching and learning anthropology by working with a group of institutions.
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  • Conclusions: Our data suggest that randomized controlled trials of anti-TNF antibody in severe AH are warranted.
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  • These data suggest a role for specific micronutrient antioxidants in selected cohorts of men.
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  • The Append option in the File menu is used to append option in the File menu is used to append additional data sets to the current data set.
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  • Whenever a log file is opened, it is always opened in append mode, so existing data is never truncated.
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  • A: The source apportionment was carried out in 2005 using the most recent full set of annual data, that is 2004.
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  • Members were informed of the details of manufacturer, data holders, pesticide approval holders and companies holding licenses for human medicines.
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  • There is no concrete data as to when Samuil created an autonomous Macedonian archbishopric.
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  • The client/server architecture gives organizations the opportunity to deploy specialized servers which are optimized for handling specific data management problems.
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  • In addition, it also helps to minimize offset errors and MRU lever arm effects on the bathymetry data.
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  • The output bad-pixel flag is set to indicate no bad values in the data and variance arrays.
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