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dances

dances Sentence Examples

  • There may be seen the native dances and break-neck horse-racesthe riders bareback - through the main street of the village.

  • A mock mass was begun, during which the lections were read cum farsia, obscene songs were sung and dances performed, cakes and sausages eaten at the altar, and cards and dice played upon it.

  • Europeans are considered indelicate in many ways by other races, and a remark of Peschel l is to the point: " Were a pious Mussulman of Ferghana to be present at our balls and see the bare shoulders of our wives and daughters, and the semi-embraces of our round dances, he would silently wonder at the long-suffering of Allah who had not long 1 The Races of Man.

  • It is reasonable, therefore, to conclude that ornament is a stimulus to sexual selection, and this conclusion is enforced by the fact that among many comparatively nude peoples clothing is assumed at certain dances which have as their confessed object the excitation of the passions of the opposite sex.

  • The trabea, which in historical times was worn by the consuls when opening the temple of Janus, by the equites at their yearly inspection and on some other occasions, and by the Salii at their ritual dances, and had (according to tradition) formed the original costume of the augurs and flamens (who afterwards adopted the toga praetexta), was apparently a toga smaller in size than the ordinary civil dress, decorated with scarlet stripes (trabes).

  • The numerous enactments of councils to ensure the proper care of church property, prohibiting the use of churches for secular purposes, for the storing of grain or valuables, for dances and merry-making, do not technically come under the head of legislation against sacrilege.

  • The people have to work on the chief's plantations and fisheries, and also work in parties for each other, breaking up new land, &c. This often ends in feasting and in dances (pilu pilu), which include allegorical representations of events or ideas.

  • It was with the aid of these youthful enthusiasts that Savonarola arranged the religious carnival of 1496, when the citizens gave their costliest possessions in alms to the poor, and tonsured monks, crowned with flowers, sang lauds and performed wild dances for the glory of God.

  • He who so produces them " dances out the word of the true philosophy," - a technical description of the profanation of the mysteries.

  • in a French text-book thus: " The layer, keeping his eye about a foot from the collimateur and working the elevating wheel, makes the hori z ontal line dance about the landscape until it dances on to the target; then working the traversing gear he does the same with the vertical line, then bringing his eye close, he brings the intersection on to the target."

  • In his joyous aspect Bes plays the harp or flute, dances, &c. He is figured on mirrors, ointment vases and other articles of the toilet.

  • 14, where David girt in (or with) a linen ephod dances before the ark at its entry into Jerusalem and incurs the unqualified contempt of his wife Michal, the daughter of Saul.

  • The rites performed were such as are found elsewhere - prayer, sacrifice, processions, dances, Brasseur de Bourbourg.

  • In the next month the god Xipe-totec, already mentioned, had his festival called the " flaying of men " from the human victims being flayed, after their hearts were torn out, for young men to dress in their skins and perform dances and sham fights.

  • The ordinary pleasures of festivals were mingled with all this, such as dances in beast-masks, sham fights and children's games, but the type of a religious function was a sickening butchery followed by a cannibal feast.

  • Solemn and gay dances were frequent, and a sport called the bird-dance excited the admiration of foreigners for the skill and daring with which groups of performers dressed as birds let themselves down by ropes wound round the top of a high mast, so as to fly whirled in circles far above the ground.

  • In Loango a prince's cap is put upon the head of a dead leopard, and dances are held in its honour.

  • Among the Hopi (Moqui) of Arizona the serpent figures largely in one of the dances.

  • Their confradias, or brotherhoods, each with its patron saint and male and female chiefs, exist largely to organize public festivals, and to purchase wooden masks, costumes and decorations for the dances and dramas in which the Indians delight.

  • Dances, especially the indecent hula, " danse du ventre," were favourite entertainments.

  • Their music, dances and.

  • It is an immense store-house of miscellaneous information, chiefly on matters connected with the table, but also containing remarks on music, songs, dances, games, courtesans.

  • The women of the peasants of Upper Egypt perform strange dances, &c., at funerals, which are regarded partly as relics of ancient Egyptian customs.

  • A most objectionable class of male dancers also exists, who imitate the dances of the Ghawazi, and dress in a kind of nondescript female attire.

  • the too sudden adoption of European clothing, rendering the body supersensitive to changes of temperature; lastly, the action of over-zealous missionaries in suppressing the dances, merrymaking and free joyous life of pagan times, and the preaching of a sombre type of Christianity, with deadening effects on the buoyant temperament of these children of Nature.

  • The haughty spirit of Eudoxia was inflamed by the report of a discourse commencing with the words - " Herodias is again furious; Herodias again dances; she once more demands the head of John "; and though the report was false, it sealed the doom of the archbishop. A new council was summoned, more numerous and more subservient to the wishes of Theophilus; and troops of barbarians were quartered in the city to overawe the people.

  • Children who touch or are touched by one of the many templesnakes are sequestered for a year and learn the songs and dances of the cult.

  • On the day of public procession - the last took place in 1857 or 1858 - naked priests and " wives" escorted the company with songs and dances; death was the penalty of those caught peering from their houses, and, apart from this, the natives feared loathsome diseases should they gaze upon the sacred scene.

  • Again, among the Moquis of America, where the snake-clan claim descent from a woman who gave birth to snakes, the reptiles are freely handled at the " snake dances " which are performed partly to secure the fertility of the soil.'

  • The festival of Mithras is the chief festival of the empire, at which the king drinks and is drunken, and dances the national dance (Ctes.

  • The native dances, slow but not ungraceful, and more restrained than those of Andalusia or the south of France, are obviously Moorish in origin, and depend for their main effects on the movement of the arms and body.

  • That evening the dancing-girls came to go through the Natch dances, then as now so common on festive occasions in many parts of India; but he paid them no attention, and gradually fell into an uneasy slumber.

  • Their religion has been described as a kind of demonworship, consisting of rude dances and shouts raised to scare away the evil spirits, whom they confound with their ancestors.

  • Similar figures were Artemis Coloene, worshipped at Lake Coloe near Sardis; Artemis Cordax, celebrated in wanton dances on Mount Sipylus; the Persian Artemis, identical with Anaitis Bendis, was a Thracian goddess of war and the chase, whose cult was introduced into Attica in the middle of the 5th century B.C. by Thracian metics.

  • Even the costume of the Croatian peasantry, to whom brilliant colours and intricate embroideries are always dear, proclaims their racial identity with the Serbs; their songs, dances and musical instruments, the chief part of their customs and folk-lore, their whole manner of life, so little changed by its closer contact with Western civilization, may be studied in Servia (q.v.) itself.

  • What was the origin of the tribal dances, or of this or that law of custom or etiquette?

  • Some arise naturally thus: Baiame, say, originated everything, therefore he originated the grotesque mummeries and dances of the mysteries.

  • The priestesses by whom she was served are depicted in early art as armed with the double-headed axe, and the dances they performed in her honour with shield and bow gave rise to the myths which saw in them.

  • Between dances, the young man took over again.

  • A comic afterpiece always followed the main play, and performances were often interspersed with songs and dances.

  • Looking over to the DJ booth this is confirmed as ET punches the air and dances manically to the tunes he selects.

  • The hotel has a ballroom, and there'll be two evening dances and a learning session.

  • bathes in the golden light and she dances to the music of the universe.

  • betrothal scene to be padded out with too many dances.

  • clog dancer who dances in the great Lancashire tradition.

  • conga dances could convince us that they were happy.

  • These include horse races, the killing of bears, athletic contests, special dances and theatrical performances.

  • She holds her skirt with her hand as she dances, with stately precision, after the manner of the grandes dames.

  • Some airmen went to dances with trainee teachers at their college, or there was the local dance hall at Marlborough.

  • debutante dances.

  • delirious dream - he dances with nymphs.

  • The dancers showed a high level of professionalism and excellent rhythm in a spectacle that ranged from modern type dances to classical flamenco.

  • Head to the main square, where locals, dressed in traditional Canarian costume, perform folk dances.

  • He had been collecting folk dances with their music (he made recordings very often either on tape or on film ).

  • Then it starts to follow the dances of foragers and to go out and forage for nectar and pollen itself.

  • Sri Lankans of various religions believe that certain ritual devil dances can cure the sick, appease angry gods, and ensure good harvests.

  • Louise dances beautifully around the stage, she is a very graceful mover; surely a legacy of her Arts Ed training.

  • hesitant to talk tonight about the Nantgarw dances.

  • lama dances of their lineage.

  • But, be warned, even long-standing dance enthusiasts look upon the Tango as one of the hardest dances to master.

  • animal magnetism that dances like iron filings at the North Pole.

  • marimba music and spectacle of masked dances a smiling, drunken horse rider bit the top off a beer bottle.

  • mart dances is not something we can make any decision on.

  • Etna, Etna, who dances better than I pirouetting above your fearsome maw bellowing a thousand meters below?

  • maypole dances, based on what they have learned.

  • mishaps from the cast as they muck up the dances and songs.

  • Google may be changing their index calculation method to allow for a continuous update (which will effectively end the roughly monthly dances ).

  • pained vocals accompany the dances as the performers use their whole being to deliver the tale.

  • Sometimes his dances are abstract, sometimes they have stories and his choice of music is often very percussive (is that a word?

  • But the town pipers supplemented their basic town piping income by giving recitals and playing at dances and weddings.

  • Then we went to a wedding and I played for dances in a marquee, you know polkas and things.

  • The first dances are very symmetrical within the spirit of Bach's mathematically precise manner.

  • rehearsest of the time was spent rehearsing the physically difficult ndayo dances.

  • salsa dances - whatever rocks your boat.

  • Began as a mobile DJ playing high school dances, sweet sixteens, then eventually my own parties.

  • solus altissimus ' are much more vigorous; the music fairly dances.

  • Chinese people do these dances for a similar reason to cleaning the house, to scare the evil sprits away.

  • Also ceilidhs, barn dances and all the usual other folk staples.

  • trudge many miles to play at these dances.

  • A taste of exotic Spanish culture twirls into Cambridge with the opportunity to learn this most popular and passionate of dances.

  • woolshed dances and our interpretation of " Green Door " was one to be reckoned with.

  • There may be seen the native dances and break-neck horse-racesthe riders bareback - through the main street of the village.

  • These two sections are connected by a "Monologue Recreatif," in which the author displays his general knowledge of popular songs, dances and tales, of astronomy, natural history and naval matters.

  • A mock mass was begun, during which the lections were read cum farsia, obscene songs were sung and dances performed, cakes and sausages eaten at the altar, and cards and dice played upon it.

  • In the southern were the Orchestra, where the Dionysiac dances took place, and the famous statues of Harmodius and Aristogeiton by Antenor which were carried away by Xerxes; also the Metroum, or temple of the Mother of the Gods,the Bouleuterium, or council-chamber of the Five Hundred, the Prytaneum, the hearth of the combined communities, where the guests of the state dined, the temple of the Dioscuri, and the Tholus, or Skias, a circular stone-domed building in which the Prytaneis were maintained at the public expense; in the northern were the Leocorium, where Hipparchus was slain, the QToa /3avtXtK?7, the famous aTOet 7roLKLAn, where Zeno taught, and other structures.

  • Pratinas was also the introducer of satyric dramas as a species of entertainment distinct from tragedy, in which the rustic merry-makings and the extravagant dances of the satyrs were retained.

  • Europeans are considered indelicate in many ways by other races, and a remark of Peschel l is to the point: " Were a pious Mussulman of Ferghana to be present at our balls and see the bare shoulders of our wives and daughters, and the semi-embraces of our round dances, he would silently wonder at the long-suffering of Allah who had not long 1 The Races of Man.

  • It is reasonable, therefore, to conclude that ornament is a stimulus to sexual selection, and this conclusion is enforced by the fact that among many comparatively nude peoples clothing is assumed at certain dances which have as their confessed object the excitation of the passions of the opposite sex.

  • The trabea, which in historical times was worn by the consuls when opening the temple of Janus, by the equites at their yearly inspection and on some other occasions, and by the Salii at their ritual dances, and had (according to tradition) formed the original costume of the augurs and flamens (who afterwards adopted the toga praetexta), was apparently a toga smaller in size than the ordinary civil dress, decorated with scarlet stripes (trabes).

  • The numerous enactments of councils to ensure the proper care of church property, prohibiting the use of churches for secular purposes, for the storing of grain or valuables, for dances and merry-making, do not technically come under the head of legislation against sacrilege.

  • The people have to work on the chief's plantations and fisheries, and also work in parties for each other, breaking up new land, &c. This often ends in feasting and in dances (pilu pilu), which include allegorical representations of events or ideas.

  • It was with the aid of these youthful enthusiasts that Savonarola arranged the religious carnival of 1496, when the citizens gave their costliest possessions in alms to the poor, and tonsured monks, crowned with flowers, sang lauds and performed wild dances for the glory of God.

  • He who so produces them " dances out the word of the true philosophy," - a technical description of the profanation of the mysteries.

  • In their war dances, which were only rehearsals, they disguised themselves as animals, and the pantomime was a mimic hunt.

  • in a French text-book thus: " The layer, keeping his eye about a foot from the collimateur and working the elevating wheel, makes the hori z ontal line dance about the landscape until it dances on to the target; then working the traversing gear he does the same with the vertical line, then bringing his eye close, he brings the intersection on to the target."

  • In his joyous aspect Bes plays the harp or flute, dances, &c. He is figured on mirrors, ointment vases and other articles of the toilet.

  • Permission was given for dancing, archery, leaping, vaulting and other harmless recreations, and of "having of May games, Whitsun ales and morris dances, and the setting up of May-poles and other sports therewith used, so as the same may be had in due and convenient time without impediment or neglect of divine service, and that women shall have leave to carry rushes to church for the decorating of it."

  • 14, where David girt in (or with) a linen ephod dances before the ark at its entry into Jerusalem and incurs the unqualified contempt of his wife Michal, the daughter of Saul.

  • The rites performed were such as are found elsewhere - prayer, sacrifice, processions, dances, Brasseur de Bourbourg.

  • In the next month the god Xipe-totec, already mentioned, had his festival called the " flaying of men " from the human victims being flayed, after their hearts were torn out, for young men to dress in their skins and perform dances and sham fights.

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