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dams

dams Sentence Examples

  • Were it not for these dams steamers might reach Mosul itself, at an elevation of 353 ft.

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  • Were it not for these dams steamers might reach Mosul itself, at an elevation of 353 ft.

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  • Hence in dams above Too ft.

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  • Two great dams on the river (one built by the Federal government) provide good water power.

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  • Throughout Great Britain there are still many reservoirs, with earthen dams, which cannot safely be filled; and others which, after remaining for years in this condition, have been repaired.

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  • A factory-owner, hearing what depth I had found, thought that it could not be true, for, judging from his acquaintance with dams, sand would not lie at so steep an angle.

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  • The regulation is effected by locks and movable dams, the latter so designed that in times of flood or frost they can be dropped flat on the bottom of the river.

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  • The wheels, called naoura, are of the most primitive construction, made of rough branches of trees, with palm leaf paddles, rude clay vessels being slung on the outer edge to catch the water, of which they raise a prodigious amount, only a comparatively small part of which, however, is poured into the aqueducts on top of the dams. These latter are exceedingly picturesque, often consisting of a series of well-built Gothic arches, and give a peculiar character to the scenery; but they are also great impediments to navigation.

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  • The improvement of the river, by the removal of snags and the construction of dams and locks in order to give it a navigable depth of to ft.

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  • The indiscriminate slaughter of fry, and the obstacles opposed by irrigation dams to breeding fish, are said to be causing a sensible diminution in the supply in certain rivers.

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  • high - almost wholly above the original ground level, which is said to be impermeable; but other dams of the same system, with core walls of less than ioo ft.

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  • high - almost wholly above the original ground level, which is said to be impermeable; but other dams of the same system, with core walls of less than ioo ft.

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  • It is lowest in November, and rocks, shallows, and the remains of old dams then render it almost unnavigable.

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  • Midhat caused many of the dams to be destroyed and for some years occasional steamers were run between Meskene and Hillah in flood time, from April to August.

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  • A new feature in diking was the construction of dams or sluices across the mouths of rivers, sometimes with important consequences for the villages situated on the spot.

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  • In its course through Mysore the channel is interrupted by twelve anicuts or dams for the purpose of irrigation.

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  • Masonry dams are, for the most part, merely retaining walls of exceptional size, in which the overturning pressure is water.

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  • Masonry dams are, for the most part, merely retaining walls of exceptional size, in which the overturning pressure is water.

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  • south of Mosul, at which point navigation is blocked by two ancient dams, erected, apparently, to control the river for the Assyrian city of Calah, the ruins of which are called Nimrud by the natives after these dams, which they conceive to be the work of that mythical hero.

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  • Great dams were also begun for irrigation purposes.

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  • "In places," writes Hearne, "which have been long frequented by beavers undisturbed, their dams, by frequent repairing, become a solid bank, capable of resisting a great force both of ice arid water; and as.

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  • Owing to the shrinkage of the soil in reclaimed lands, however, that is, lands which have been drained after fen or other reclamation, the sides of the polder are often higher than the middle, and it is necessary by means of small dams or sluices to make separate water-tight compartments (afpolderingen), each having its own unit of measurement.

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  • In the Mediterranean provinces of Spain there are some very remarkable irrigation dams. The great masonry dam of Alicante on the river Monegre, which dates from 1579, is situated in a narrow gorge, so that while 140 ft.

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  • In the jungles of Ceylon are to be found remains of gigantic irrigation dams, and on the neighbouring mainland of Southern India, throughout the provinces of Madras and Mysore, the country is covered with irrigation reservoirs, or, as they are locally termed, tanks.

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  • The casual traveller in southern India constantly remarks the ruins of old dams, and the impression is conveyed that at one time, before British rule prevailed, the irrigation of the country was much more perfect than it is now.

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  • When a river partakes of the nature of a torrent, dwindling to a paltry stream at one season and swelling into an enormous flood at another, it is impossible to construct a system of irrigation canals without very costly engineering works, sluices, dams, waste-weirs, &c., so as to give the engineer entire control of the water.

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  • The experiment was so far successful that, with incredible difficulty, the two vessels did actually reach Meskene, but the result of the expedition was to show that practically the river could not be used as a high-road of commerce, the continuous rapids and falls during the low season, caused mainly by the artificial obstructions of the irrigating dams, being insurmountable by ordinary steam power, and the aid of hundreds of hands being thus required to drag the vessels up the stream at those points by main force.

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  • The beds of these rivers, as well as that of the Danube, are continually changing, forming morasses and pools, and rendering the country near their banks marshy, Notwithstanding the work already done, such as canalizing and regulating the rivers, the erection of dams, &c., the problems of preventing inundations, and of reclaiming the marshes, have not yet been satisfactorily solved.

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  • Beavers are sociable animals, living in streams, where, so as to render the water of sufficient depth, they build dams of mud and of the stems and boughs of trees felled by their powerful incisor teeth.

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  • the formation of morainic dams, and in some cases the perhaps from the incidence of erratic upheaval of the land.

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  • In the north vast quantities of timber are floated down the great rivers, and the lesser streams are used as floating-ways by the provision of flumes and dams. The millowners either own forests, or lease the right of cutting, or buy the timber when cut, in the Crown or private forests.

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  • In 1871 the late Professor Rankine, F.R.S., whose remarkable perception of the practical fitness or unfitness of purely theoretical deductions gives his writings exceptional value, received from Major Tulloch, R.E., on behalf of the municipality of Bombay, a request to consider the subject generally, and with special reference to very high dams, such as have since been constructed in India.

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  • The Monongahela has been improved by locks and dams to Fairmont.

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  • It is irrigated by an elaborate system of dams, cuts and canals in connexion with the rivers Cauvery and Coleroon, and the soil is exceedingly productive.

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  • Seven years later the Bokharians razed the city to the ground, broke down the dams, and converted the district into a waste.

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  • - Map showing the Damietta and Rosetta dams on the Nile.

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  • Dams Any well-made earthen embankment of moderate height, and of such thickness and uniformity of construction as to ensure freedom from excessive percolation at any point, will in the course of time become almost impermeable to surface water standing against it; and when permeable rocks are covered with many feet of soil, the leakage through such soil from standing water newly placed above it generally diminishes rapidly, and in process of time often ceases entirely.

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  • or with the reservoir full, near the lower part of the outer face ac. The principles hitherto adopted in designing masonry dams, in which the moment of resistance depends upon the figure and weight of the masonry, involve certain assumptions, which, although not quite true, have proved useful and harmless, and are so convenient that they may be continued with due regard to the modifications which recent investigations have suggested.

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  • He investigated the problem by means of the general differential equations of static equilibrium for dams of triangular and rectangular form considered as isotropic elastic solids.

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  • I built dams of pebbles, made islands and lakes, and dug river-beds, all for fun, and never dreamed that I was learning a lesson.

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  • When it is found that the fibre separates readily from the woody shove " or core, the beets or small bundles are ready for removing from the dams. It is drained, and then spread, evenly and equally, over a grassy meadow to dry.

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  • Hence the extreme importance in high dams with clay cores of loading the clay well for some time before water pressure is brought against it.

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  • The highest dams of this class in the British islands impound water to a level of about IIo ft.

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  • For open pools and dams Schenck substitutes large wooden vats under cover, into which the flax is tightly packed in an upright position.

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  • floods must be provided with channels of sufficient size to carry them safely past the mine openings, and intercepting ditches should be excavated for this purpose, and dams and embankments constructed to divert the flood waters.

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  • Some of the corporations constructing works for the sale of water built structures of notable size, such, for example, as the Sweet-water and Hemet dams of southern California, the Bear river canal of Utah, and the Arizona canal, taking water from Salt river, Arizona.

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  • of canals, some carrying whole rivers, like the Truckee river in Nevada and the North Platte in Wyoming, and had erected 281 large structures, including the great dams in Nevada and the Minidoka dam (80 ft.

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  • The dams or ponds in which the operation is conducted are of variable size, and usually between 4 and 5 ft.

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  • The rippled stalks are tied in small bundles and packed, roots downwards, in the dams till they are quite full; over the top of the upper layer is placed a stratum of rushes and straw, or sods with the grassy side downwards, and above all stones of sufficient weight to keep the flax submerged.

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  • 5 Baladhuri, in his chapter on the floods of Mecca (pp. 53 seq.), says that `Omar built two dams.

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  • These researches led to a wide discussion of the sufficiency of the law of uniformly varying stress when applied to horizontal joints as a test of the stability of dams. Professor Karl Pearson showed that the results are dependent upon the assumption that the distribution of the vertical stresses on the base of the structure also followed the law of uniformly varying stress.

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  • The late Sir Benjamin Baker, F.R.S., suggested that the stresses might be measured by experiments with elastic models, and among others, experiments were carried out by Messrs Wilson and Gore a with indiarubber models of plane sections of dams (including the foundations) who applied forces to represent the gravity and water pressures in such a manner that the virtual density of the rubber was increased many times without interfering with the proper ratio between gravity and water pressure, and by this means the strains produced were of sufficient magnitude to be easily measured.

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  • As a matter of fact, the foundations of most dams are carried down in vertical trenches, the lower part only being in sound materials so that actual separation almost corresponding with the hypothetical On Some Disregarded Points in the Stability of Masonry Dams, Drapers' Company Research Memoir (London, 1904).

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  • In dams of moderate height above ground and considerable depth below ground there is, moreover, no reason why advantage should not be taken of the earth resistance due either to the downstream face of the trench against which the foundations are built, or to the materials excavated and properly embanked against that face above the ground level or to both.

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  • Both the Neuadd and the Fisher Tarn dams are largely dependent upon the support of earthen embankments with much economy and with perfectly satisfactory results.

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  • The only objection that can in any case be urged against most of the natural products is that a longer time is required for induration; but in the case of masonry dams sufficient time necessarily passes before any load, beyond that of the very gradually increasing masonry, is brought upon the structure.

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  • The actual construction of successful masonry dams has varied from the roughest rubble masonry to ashlar work.

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  • Any given yard of height measured during construction, or at any time after construction, will be less than a yard when additional weight has been placed upon it; hence the ends of such dams placed against rock surfaces must move with respect to those surfaces when the superincumbent load comes upon them.

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  • So far as the writer has been able to observe or ascertain, there are very few masonry dams in Europe or America which have not been cracked transversely in their higher parts.

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  • Its construction drew much attention to the subject of masonry dams in England - where the earthwork dam, with a wall of puddled clay, had hitherto been almost universal - and since its completion nine more masonry dams of smaller size have been completed.

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  • In connexion with the Elan and Claerwen works, in Mid-Wales, for the supply of Birmingham, six masonry dams were projected, three of which are completed, including the Caban Goch dam, 590 ft.

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  • In the Derwent Valley scheme, in connexion with the water supplies of Derby, Leicester, Nottingham and Sheffield, six more masonry dams have received parliamentary sanction.

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  • Two of these dams are now in course of construction, one of which, the Howden, will be 1080 ft.

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  • The recent investigations already referred to indicate the desirability of curving dams in plan in order to reduce the possibility of tension and infiltration of water at the upstream face.

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  • In New South Wales thirteen thin concrete dams, dependent upon horizontal curvature for their resistance to water pressure, have been constructed in narrow gorges at comparatively small cost to impound water for the use of villages.

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  • Something has been said of the failures of earthen dams. Many masonry dams have also failed, but, speaking generally, we know less of the causes which have led to such failures.

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  • The absence of one or bath, of these conditions has led to the failure of many dams.

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  • The Federal government undertook to deepen the channel by dredging and by making two dams and two locks between the Chicago, St Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha railway bridge in St Paul and the Washington Avenue bridge in Minneapolis - a distance of 11 .

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  • Of course there is a large interfusion of the blood of each of the trio through the dams of horses of the present day; indeed, it is impossible to find an English race-horse which does not combine the blood of all three.

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  • These exceptions are the Byerly Turk, who was " Captain Byerly's charger in Ireland in King William's wars (1689, &c.)," and a horse called Counsellor, bred by Mr Egerton in 1694, by Lord D'Arcy's Counsellor by Lord Lonsdale's Counsellor by the Shaftesbury Turk out of sister to Spanker - all the dams in Counsellor's pedigree tracing back to Eastern mares.

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  • In Herod's pedigree there are fully a dozen dams whose pedigree is unknown.

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  • In regard to mares it has very frequently turned out that animals which were brilliant public performers have been far less successful as dams than others which were comparatively valueless as runners.

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  • This record of height, with other particulars as to breeding, &c., serves to direct breeders in their choice of sires and dams. The standard of height established by the Hackney Horse Society was accepted and officially recognized by the Royal Agricultural Society in 1889, when the prize-list for the Windsor show contained pony classes for animals not exceeding 14 hands.

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  • This depression is occupied in great part by a series of lakes, some of these filling transversal breaches in the range, whilst others are remains of glacial reservoirs, bordered by morainic dams, extending as far as the eastern tableland and corresponding in these cases with transversal depressions which reach the Atlantic Ocean.

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  • Dams were built in several western states for conserving the water-supply in dry regions.

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  • capital-intensive projects like hydroelectric power dams have often been introduced without consultation of local people.

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  • Hydro-electric dams are built which have turbines in them.

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  • Kept dental dams in the glove box, grew the hair under your arms to a mousey fuzz.

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  • dams pedigree.

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  • Its Mosquitoes were intended to be the carriers of a variation of the Wallis bomb used by No.617 Squadron on the Ruhr dams.

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  • embankment dams Embankment dams are very low in height compared to their length.

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  • dams in betweenmoving and an arts.

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  • debris dams, features that are otherwise rare in the lowlands.

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  • downstream of the dams.

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  • embankment dams Embankment dams are very low in height compared to their length.

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  • Earlier dams had just been created by making earth embankments.

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  • Such dams, supplemented by simple barriers made of dirt, were used to collect floodwaters and promote deep wetting of the ground.

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  • Gravity dams are usually built on solid rock foundations.

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  • gravity dams Gravity dams are solid concrete dams where the base of the dam is thicker / wider than the top.

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  • hydroelectric dams are not clean, green friends of the climate.

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  • There is significant investment in dams in the region.

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  • mill dams on the River Frome were preventing the free flow of the river's water.

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  • The next leading price tag was 5,000gns for Lumbylaw Naïve a Lumbylaw Honkytonk daughter going back to Fieldhouse Earthman on her dams pedigree.

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  • Current projects/significant management activities: The Trust will be creating new wader scrapes and installing a series of dams this autumn.

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  • surrogate dams had to be imported from New Zealand.

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  • They cleared lands, built dams and drained swamps.

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  • He has booby trapped the dams on Iraq's two great rivers and he may have done the same to Iraq's oilfields.

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  • Here the river runs wild with no dams to slow her pace.

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  • The comparative scantiness of its sources, the steepness of its upper course and the rapid evaporation which takes place after the short rainy season would make the Senegal an insignificant stream for more than half the year; but natural dams cross the channel at intervals and the water accumulates behind them in deep reaches, which thus act as reservoirs.

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  • The Monongahela has been improved by locks and dams to Fairmont.

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  • south of Mosul, at which point navigation is blocked by two ancient dams, erected, apparently, to control the river for the Assyrian city of Calah, the ruins of which are called Nimrud by the natives after these dams, which they conceive to be the work of that mythical hero.

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  • The wheels, called naoura, are of the most primitive construction, made of rough branches of trees, with palm leaf paddles, rude clay vessels being slung on the outer edge to catch the water, of which they raise a prodigious amount, only a comparatively small part of which, however, is poured into the aqueducts on top of the dams. These latter are exceedingly picturesque, often consisting of a series of well-built Gothic arches, and give a peculiar character to the scenery; but they are also great impediments to navigation.

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  • It is lowest in November, and rocks, shallows, and the remains of old dams then render it almost unnavigable.

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  • The experiment was so far successful that, with incredible difficulty, the two vessels did actually reach Meskene, but the result of the expedition was to show that practically the river could not be used as a high-road of commerce, the continuous rapids and falls during the low season, caused mainly by the artificial obstructions of the irrigating dams, being insurmountable by ordinary steam power, and the aid of hundreds of hands being thus required to drag the vessels up the stream at those points by main force.

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  • Midhat caused many of the dams to be destroyed and for some years occasional steamers were run between Meskene and Hillah in flood time, from April to August.

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  • It is irrigated by an elaborate system of dams, cuts and canals in connexion with the rivers Cauvery and Coleroon, and the soil is exceedingly productive.

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  • Two great dams on the river (one built by the Federal government) provide good water power.

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  • The improvement of the river, by the removal of snags and the construction of dams and locks in order to give it a navigable depth of to ft.

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  • Seven years later the Bokharians razed the city to the ground, broke down the dams, and converted the district into a waste.

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  • The beds of these rivers, as well as that of the Danube, are continually changing, forming morasses and pools, and rendering the country near their banks marshy, Notwithstanding the work already done, such as canalizing and regulating the rivers, the erection of dams, &c., the problems of preventing inundations, and of reclaiming the marshes, have not yet been satisfactorily solved.

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  • The regulation is effected by locks and movable dams, the latter so designed that in times of flood or frost they can be dropped flat on the bottom of the river.

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  • floods must be provided with channels of sufficient size to carry them safely past the mine openings, and intercepting ditches should be excavated for this purpose, and dams and embankments constructed to divert the flood waters.

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  • The flood-water is controlled by a system of dams and channels constructed so as to utilize every drop, and the extent of cultivation is limited more by the supply of water available than by the amount of suitable soil.

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  • Beavers are sociable animals, living in streams, where, so as to render the water of sufficient depth, they build dams of mud and of the stems and boughs of trees felled by their powerful incisor teeth.

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  • "In places," writes Hearne, "which have been long frequented by beavers undisturbed, their dams, by frequent repairing, become a solid bank, capable of resisting a great force both of ice arid water; and as.

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  • In numerous depressions, some of which may have been the beds of lakes formed by beaver dams, the soil is deep and largely of vegetable formation.

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  • Dams on the Fox River furnish a good water-power.

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  • A great series of dams was therefore constructed (mapped and described in " Topography of Nineveh," J.R.A.S.

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  • By a series of locks and dams the Muskingum river has been made navigable for small vessels to the Ohio and above Zanesville to Dresden, where connexion is made with the Ohio Canal extending north to Cleveland.

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  • A new feature in diking was the construction of dams or sluices across the mouths of rivers, sometimes with important consequences for the villages situated on the spot.

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  • Owing to the shrinkage of the soil in reclaimed lands, however, that is, lands which have been drained after fen or other reclamation, the sides of the polder are often higher than the middle, and it is necessary by means of small dams or sluices to make separate water-tight compartments (afpolderingen), each having its own unit of measurement.

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  • In the Mediterranean provinces of Spain there are some very remarkable irrigation dams. The great masonry dam of Alicante on the river Monegre, which dates from 1579, is situated in a narrow gorge, so that while 140 ft.

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  • In the jungles of Ceylon are to be found remains of gigantic irrigation dams, and on the neighbouring mainland of Southern India, throughout the provinces of Madras and Mysore, the country is covered with irrigation reservoirs, or, as they are locally termed, tanks.

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  • The casual traveller in southern India constantly remarks the ruins of old dams, and the impression is conveyed that at one time, before British rule prevailed, the irrigation of the country was much more perfect than it is now.

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  • When a river partakes of the nature of a torrent, dwindling to a paltry stream at one season and swelling into an enormous flood at another, it is impossible to construct a system of irrigation canals without very costly engineering works, sluices, dams, waste-weirs, &c., so as to give the engineer entire control of the water.

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  • - Map showing the Damietta and Rosetta dams on the Nile.

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  • Some of the corporations constructing works for the sale of water built structures of notable size, such, for example, as the Sweet-water and Hemet dams of southern California, the Bear river canal of Utah, and the Arizona canal, taking water from Salt river, Arizona.

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  • of canals, some carrying whole rivers, like the Truckee river in Nevada and the North Platte in Wyoming, and had erected 281 large structures, including the great dams in Nevada and the Minidoka dam (80 ft.

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  • basins, dams andbarrages, the Nile flood is now utilized to a greater extent than ever before (see IRRIGATION: Egypt).

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  • The indiscriminate slaughter of fry, and the obstacles opposed by irrigation dams to breeding fish, are said to be causing a sensible diminution in the supply in certain rivers.

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  • The dams or ponds in which the operation is conducted are of variable size, and usually between 4 and 5 ft.

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  • The rippled stalks are tied in small bundles and packed, roots downwards, in the dams till they are quite full; over the top of the upper layer is placed a stratum of rushes and straw, or sods with the grassy side downwards, and above all stones of sufficient weight to keep the flax submerged.

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  • When it is found that the fibre separates readily from the woody shove " or core, the beets or small bundles are ready for removing from the dams. It is drained, and then spread, evenly and equally, over a grassy meadow to dry.

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  • For open pools and dams Schenck substitutes large wooden vats under cover, into which the flax is tightly packed in an upright position.

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  • the formation of morainic dams, and in some cases the perhaps from the incidence of erratic upheaval of the land.

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  • In the north vast quantities of timber are floated down the great rivers, and the lesser streams are used as floating-ways by the provision of flumes and dams. The millowners either own forests, or lease the right of cutting, or buy the timber when cut, in the Crown or private forests.

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  • In its course through Mysore the channel is interrupted by twelve anicuts or dams for the purpose of irrigation.

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  • Great dams were also begun for irrigation purposes.

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  • Timothy was grown in the northern, and alfalfa in the southern region as a forage crop. Even at this earliest period, irrigation, simple and individual, had begun in the southern section, the head waters of the few streams in this district being soon surrounded by farms. Co-operation and colonization followed, and more ditching was done, co-operative irrigation canals were constructed with some elaborate and large dams and head gates.

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  • Slack water navigation has been secured on the Allegheny by locks and dams (1890 and 1896 sqq.) at an expense up to July 1909 of $1,658,804; and up to that time $263,625 had been spent for open-channel work.

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  • by a private company which built seven locks and dams; this property was condemned and bought for $3,761,615 by the United States government in 1897, and, under the project of 18 99 for rebuilding three of the locks and enlarging another, and that of 1907 for a new lock and dam and for other improvements, $2,675,692 was spent up to July 1909.

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  • But as equally distinct markings occurred on two pure-bred Highland foals out of mares which had never seen a zebra, it was impossible to ascribe the stripes on the foals born after zebra hybrids to infection of their respective dams. Further, the subsequent foals afforded no evidence of infection, either in the mane, tail, hoofs or disposition.

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  • 5 Baladhuri, in his chapter on the floods of Mecca (pp. 53 seq.), says that `Omar built two dams.

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  • Hence, as the survival of the fittest, there are many artificial waters, with low dams consisting exclusively of earth - and sometimes very sandy earth - satisfactorily performing their functions with no visible leakage.

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  • Dams Any well-made earthen embankment of moderate height, and of such thickness and uniformity of construction as to ensure freedom from excessive percolation at any point, will in the course of time become almost impermeable to surface water standing against it; and when permeable rocks are covered with many feet of soil, the leakage through such soil from standing water newly placed above it generally diminishes rapidly, and in process of time often ceases entirely.

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  • Hence the extreme importance in high dams with clay cores of loading the clay well for some time before water pressure is brought against it.

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  • The highest dams of this class in the British islands impound water to a level of about IIo ft.

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  • On the other hand, the partial or total failure of smaller dams of this description, to retain the reservoir water, has been much more common in the past than is generally supposed.

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  • Throughout Great Britain there are still many reservoirs, with earthen dams, which cannot safely be filled; and others which, after remaining for years in this condition, have been repaired.

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  • For the sections of masonry dams actually used in practice, if designed on the condition that the centre of all vertical pressures when the reservoir is full shall be, as hereafter provided, at two-thirds the width of the base from the inner toe, the least sectional area for a density of 2 also has a vertical water face.

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  • or with the reservoir full, near the lower part of the outer face ac. The principles hitherto adopted in designing masonry dams, in which the moment of resistance depends upon the figure and weight of the masonry, involve certain assumptions, which, although not quite true, have proved useful and harmless, and are so convenient that they may be continued with due regard to the modifications which recent investigations have suggested.

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  • Hence in dams above Too ft.

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  • In 1871 the late Professor Rankine, F.R.S., whose remarkable perception of the practical fitness or unfitness of purely theoretical deductions gives his writings exceptional value, received from Major Tulloch, R.E., on behalf of the municipality of Bombay, a request to consider the subject generally, and with special reference to very high dams, such as have since been constructed in India.

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  • high - there are no practical examples of dams with logarithmically curved faces.

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  • After Rankine, a French engineer, Bouvier, gave the ratio of the maximum stress in a dam to the maximum vertical stress as 1 to the cosine squared of the angle between the vertical and the resultant which, in dams of the usual form, is about as 13 is to 9.

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  • He investigated the problem by means of the general differential equations of static equilibrium for dams of triangular and rectangular form considered as isotropic elastic solids.

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  • These researches led to a wide discussion of the sufficiency of the law of uniformly varying stress when applied to horizontal joints as a test of the stability of dams. Professor Karl Pearson showed that the results are dependent upon the assumption that the distribution of the vertical stresses on the base of the structure also followed the law of uniformly varying stress.

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  • The late Sir Benjamin Baker, F.R.S., suggested that the stresses might be measured by experiments with elastic models, and among others, experiments were carried out by Messrs Wilson and Gore a with indiarubber models of plane sections of dams (including the foundations) who applied forces to represent the gravity and water pressures in such a manner that the virtual density of the rubber was increased many times without interfering with the proper ratio between gravity and water pressure, and by this means the strains produced were of sufficient magnitude to be easily measured.

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  • As a matter of fact, the foundations of most dams are carried down in vertical trenches, the lower part only being in sound materials so that actual separation almost corresponding with the hypothetical On Some Disregarded Points in the Stability of Masonry Dams, Drapers' Company Research Memoir (London, 1904).

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  • In dams of moderate height above ground and considerable depth below ground there is, moreover, no reason why advantage should not be taken of the earth resistance due either to the downstream face of the trench against which the foundations are built, or to the materials excavated and properly embanked against that face above the ground level or to both.

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  • Both the Neuadd and the Fisher Tarn dams are largely dependent upon the support of earthen embankments with much economy and with perfectly satisfactory results.

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  • The only objection that can in any case be urged against most of the natural products is that a longer time is required for induration; but in the case of masonry dams sufficient time necessarily passes before any load, beyond that of the very gradually increasing masonry, is brought upon the structure.

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  • The actual construction of successful masonry dams has varied from the roughest rubble masonry to ashlar work.

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  • Any given yard of height measured during construction, or at any time after construction, will be less than a yard when additional weight has been placed upon it; hence the ends of such dams placed against rock surfaces must move with respect to those surfaces when the superincumbent load comes upon them.

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  • So far as the writer has been able to observe or ascertain, there are very few masonry dams in Europe or America which have not been cracked transversely in their higher parts.

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  • Its construction drew much attention to the subject of masonry dams in England - where the earthwork dam, with a wall of puddled clay, had hitherto been almost universal - and since its completion nine more masonry dams of smaller size have been completed.

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  • In connexion with the Elan and Claerwen works, in Mid-Wales, for the supply of Birmingham, six masonry dams were projected, three of which are completed, including the Caban Goch dam, 590 ft.

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  • In the Derwent Valley scheme, in connexion with the water supplies of Derby, Leicester, Nottingham and Sheffield, six more masonry dams have received parliamentary sanction.

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  • Two of these dams are now in course of construction, one of which, the Howden, will be 1080 ft.

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  • The recent investigations already referred to indicate the desirability of curving dams in plan in order to reduce the possibility of tension and infiltration of water at the upstream face.

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  • In New South Wales thirteen thin concrete dams, dependent upon horizontal curvature for their resistance to water pressure, have been constructed in narrow gorges at comparatively small cost to impound water for the use of villages.

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  • Something has been said of the failures of earthen dams. Many masonry dams have also failed, but, speaking generally, we know less of the causes which have led to such failures.

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  • The absence of one or bath, of these conditions has led to the failure of many dams.

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  • There are few lakes in the country except mountain tarns; but considerable morasses exist about the Upper Dneister, the Vistula and the San, while the ponds or dams in the Podolian valleys are estimated to cover an area of over 200 sq.

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  • The Federal government undertook to deepen the channel by dredging and by making two dams and two locks between the Chicago, St Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha railway bridge in St Paul and the Washington Avenue bridge in Minneapolis - a distance of 11 .

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  • Of course there is a large interfusion of the blood of each of the trio through the dams of horses of the present day; indeed, it is impossible to find an English race-horse which does not combine the blood of all three.

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  • These exceptions are the Byerly Turk, who was " Captain Byerly's charger in Ireland in King William's wars (1689, &c.)," and a horse called Counsellor, bred by Mr Egerton in 1694, by Lord D'Arcy's Counsellor by Lord Lonsdale's Counsellor by the Shaftesbury Turk out of sister to Spanker - all the dams in Counsellor's pedigree tracing back to Eastern mares.

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  • In Herod's pedigree there are fully a dozen dams whose pedigree is unknown.

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  • In regard to mares it has very frequently turned out that animals which were brilliant public performers have been far less successful as dams than others which were comparatively valueless as runners.

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  • This record of height, with other particulars as to breeding, &c., serves to direct breeders in their choice of sires and dams. The standard of height established by the Hackney Horse Society was accepted and officially recognized by the Royal Agricultural Society in 1889, when the prize-list for the Windsor show contained pony classes for animals not exceeding 14 hands.

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  • This depression is occupied in great part by a series of lakes, some of these filling transversal breaches in the range, whilst others are remains of glacial reservoirs, bordered by morainic dams, extending as far as the eastern tableland and corresponding in these cases with transversal depressions which reach the Atlantic Ocean.

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  • Dams were built in several western states for conserving the water-supply in dry regions.

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  • The remains of Langeron's and Dokhturov's mingled forces were crowding around the dams and banks of the ponds near the village of Augesd.

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  • Current projects/significant management activities: The Trust will be creating new wader scrapes and installing a series of dams this autumn.

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  • The network of dams and tunnels is one of the world 's biggest construction projects, and siphons water from Lesotho to South Africa.

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  • In effect, this meant that the surrogate dams had to be imported from New Zealand.

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  • They cleared lands, built dams and drained swamps.

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  • He has booby trapped the dams on Iraq 's two great rivers and he may have done the same to Iraq 's oilfields.

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  • Sasha was a wonderful bitch to own but was not the most fertile of dams nor was she an easy whelping bitch.

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  • Here the river runs wild with no dams to slow her pace.

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  • The use of fossil fuels, dams and other environmentally harmful methods of generating power grew exponentially during this century, but so did the science behind solar power.

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  • While this is generally considered a clean energy in that it doesn't pollute the environment, creating dams and other necessary structures to use the water can harm fish and wildlife as well as change the eco-system in the area.

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  • Hydropower relies on the building of dams which can change the eco-system, natural flow of water and even displace wildlife and entire communities of people.

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  • Preventing Erosion: Communities and industries have come up with solutions for reducing the amount of sediment in water by preventing soil erosion through building dams and planting trees.

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  • There is never a dull moment on a Mississippi cruise, as the waterway passes through swamps, glacial lakes, rapids and dams.

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  • Power Station, dams, power transformers or cell phone towers - Any place that creates power or sends out microwaves disrupts the natural movement of energy and creates shar (negative) chi.

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  • The flood-water is controlled by a system of dams and channels constructed so as to utilize every drop, and the extent of cultivation is limited more by the supply of water available than by the amount of suitable soil.

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  • Their houses are formed of the same materials as the dams, with little order or regularity of structure, and seldom contain more than four old, and six or eight young beavers.

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  • Dams on the Fox River furnish a good water-power.

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  • A great series of dams was therefore constructed (mapped and described in " Topography of Nineveh," J.R.A.S.

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  • By a series of locks and dams the Muskingum river has been made navigable for small vessels to the Ohio and above Zanesville to Dresden, where connexion is made with the Ohio Canal extending north to Cleveland.

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  • In 1890-1893 one of the largest dams in the world, an immense structure of granite masonry, 1200 ft.

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  • Timothy was grown in the northern, and alfalfa in the southern region as a forage crop. Even at this earliest period, irrigation, simple and individual, had begun in the southern section, the head waters of the few streams in this district being soon surrounded by farms. Co-operation and colonization followed, and more ditching was done, co-operative irrigation canals were constructed with some elaborate and large dams and head gates.

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  • Slack water navigation has been secured on the Allegheny by locks and dams (1890 and 1896 sqq.) at an expense up to July 1909 of $1,658,804; and up to that time $263,625 had been spent for open-channel work.

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  • by a private company which built seven locks and dams; this property was condemned and bought for $3,761,615 by the United States government in 1897, and, under the project of 18 99 for rebuilding three of the locks and enlarging another, and that of 1907 for a new lock and dam and for other improvements, $2,675,692 was spent up to July 1909.

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  • But as equally distinct markings occurred on two pure-bred Highland foals out of mares which had never seen a zebra, it was impossible to ascribe the stripes on the foals born after zebra hybrids to infection of their respective dams. Further, the subsequent foals afforded no evidence of infection, either in the mane, tail, hoofs or disposition.

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  • Hence, as the survival of the fittest, there are many artificial waters, with low dams consisting exclusively of earth - and sometimes very sandy earth - satisfactorily performing their functions with no visible leakage.

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  • The most important dams are those which close the outlets of existing valleys, but a dam may be wholly below ground, and according to the commoner method of construction in Great Britain, sufficient) im ermeable construc-  ?

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  • high - there are no practical examples of dams with logarithmically curved faces.

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  • After Rankine, a French engineer, Bouvier, gave the ratio of the maximum stress in a dam to the maximum vertical stress as 1 to the cosine squared of the angle between the vertical and the resultant which, in dams of the usual form, is about as 13 is to 9.

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  • Their houses are formed of the same materials as the dams, with little order or regularity of structure, and seldom contain more than four old, and six or eight young beavers.

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  • In 1890-1893 one of the largest dams in the world, an immense structure of granite masonry, 1200 ft.

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  • The most important dams are those which close the outlets of existing valleys, but a dam may be wholly below ground, and according to the commoner method of construction in Great Britain, sufficient) im ermeable construc-  ?

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  • On the other hand, the partial or total failure of smaller dams of this description, to retain the reservoir water, has been much more common in the past than is generally supposed.

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  • Asphalt, whether a natural product or artificially obtained, as, for example, in some chemical manufactures, is a most useful material if properly employed in connexion with reservoir dams. Under sudden impact it is brittle, and has a conchoidal fracture like glass; but under continued pressure it has the properties of a viscous fluid.

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  • Asphalt, whether a natural product or artificially obtained, as, for example, in some chemical manufactures, is a most useful material if properly employed in connexion with reservoir dams. Under sudden impact it is brittle, and has a conchoidal fracture like glass; but under continued pressure it has the properties of a viscous fluid.

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  • In numerous depressions, some of which may have been the beds of lakes formed by beaver dams, the soil is deep and largely of vegetable formation.

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