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dakota

dakota

dakota Sentence Examples

  • South Dakota in 1889 had only 15,717 acres of irrigated land.

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  • In 1890 the mileage of South Dakota was 2610 m., in 1900, 2961 m., and in 1909, 3776 m.

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  • North Dakota and Manitoba.

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  • North Dakota and Manitoba.

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  • 26, Economic Resources of the Northern Black Hills, 1904), and of the South Dakota School of Mines (Bulletin No.

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  • He was chairman of the committee on territories, and took an active part in urging the admission as states of North Dakota, South Dakota, Washington, Idaho and Montana, which finally came into the Union during his presidency.

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  • Wortman and C. Earle, "Ancestors of the Tapir from the Lower Miocene of Dakota," Bull.

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  • 26, Economic Resources of the Northern Black Hills, 1904), and of the South Dakota School of Mines (Bulletin No.

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  • Wortman and C. Earle, "Ancestors of the Tapir from the Lower Miocene of Dakota," Bull.

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  • Holland, France, Switzerland, Spain, Italy, Sicily, Greece, Hungary, Silesia, Moravia, Westphalia, Brunswick, Hanover, Schleswig-Holstein, (German) Silesia, Poland, Kutais, Uralsk, Turkestan, Armenia, Syria, Arabia, Persia, Tunis, Egypt, West Africa, British Columbia, Alberta, Assiniboia, Athabasca, Manitoba, New Jersey, South Dakota, Washington, Montana, Oklahoma, Utah, Wyoming, Colorado, California, New Mexico, Arkansas, Texas, Louisiana, Mexico, Hayti, Trinidad, Colombia, Argentina [?], New Zealand.

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  • by South and North Dakota - the Red River (commonly called the Red River of the North) separating it from the latter state - on the N.

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  • Holland, France, Switzerland, Spain, Italy, Sicily, Greece, Hungary, Silesia, Moravia, Westphalia, Brunswick, Hanover, Schleswig-Holstein, (German) Silesia, Poland, Kutais, Uralsk, Turkestan, Armenia, Syria, Arabia, Persia, Tunis, Egypt, West Africa, British Columbia, Alberta, Assiniboia, Athabasca, Manitoba, New Jersey, South Dakota, Washington, Montana, Oklahoma, Utah, Wyoming, Colorado, California, New Mexico, Arkansas, Texas, Louisiana, Mexico, Hayti, Trinidad, Colombia, Argentina [?], New Zealand.

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  • That part which lies east of the mountains was included in the Louisiana Purchase of 1803 and became successively a part of Missouri Territory in 1812, of Nebraska Territory in 1854, of Dakota Territory in 1861 and of Idaho Territory in 1863; that which lies west of the mountains became successively a part of Oregon Territory in 1848, of Washington Territory in 1853 and of Idaho Territory in 1863.

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  • by North Dakota; E.

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  • The greater part of the James River Valley lies in the bed of the extinct Lake Dakota, which was once a very narrow body of water extending northward from about the latitude of the present town of Mitchell for a short distance into what is now North Dakota.

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  • by North Dakota; E.

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  • The climate of South Dakota is of a continental type.

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  • From Pennsylvania the sect spread chiefly westward, and, after various vicissitudes, caused by defections and divisions due to doctrinal differences, in 1908 were most numerous in Pennsylvania, Maryland, Virginia, Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Iowa, Missouri, Nebraska, Kansas and North Dakota.

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  • The rapid settling of the state drove its native fauna, which comprised buffalo, deer, moose, bear, lynx and wolves, in great numbers into the northern sections, westward into Dakota, or across the Canadian border.

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  • The territorial boundaries extended to the Missouri river, including a greater part of the present North and South Dakota.

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  • Little Crow and his followers kept up desultory raids from the Dakota country, during one of which in July 1863 he lost his life.

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  • Lead, South Dakota >>

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  • by the Missouri and Big Sioux rivers, which separate it from Nebraska and South Dakota.

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  • The derivation of Assiniboia is from two Ojibway words, assini meaning a stone, and the termination "to cook by roasting"; from these came a name first applied to a Dakota or Sioux tribe living on the Upper Red river; afterwards when this tribe separated from the Dakotas, its name was given to the branch of the Red river which the tribe visited, the river being known as the Assiniboine and the tribe as Assiniboin.

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  • by North Dakota and South Dakota; S.

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  • It flows first east-north-east and then nearly east until it passes into North Dakota.

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  • In 1884, partly because his political life seemed at least for the immediate present to be at an end, partly on account of the freedom and activity of out-of-door life, he bought two cattle ranches near Medora on the Little Missouri river in North Dakota, where he lived for two years, becoming intimately associated with the life and spirit of the western portion of the United States.

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  • His record in the Assembly was such that his party nominated him for the mayoralty of the city of New York when he was absent on his ranch in Dakota.

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  • 'SOUTH DAKOTA, one of the North Central states of the American Union, lying between 42° 28' and 45° 57' N.

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  • to its junction with the Big Sioux river separates South Dakota from Nebraska.

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  • The Big Sioux river rises in the Coteau des Prairies in the north-east and flows almost directly south for a distance of 300 m., in the lower part of its course forming the boundary between South Dakota and Iowa.

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  • To the west of this stream and almost parallel with it is the James or Dakota river, which rises in North Dakota and follows a general course southward until it joins the Missouri river near Yankton.

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  • The portion of South Dakota east of the Missouri river is dotted with numerous lakes, ranging from small ponds to bodies of water from Io to 15 m.

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  • Agriculture is the leading industry in South Dakota; in 1900 out of 137,156 persons engaged in occupations, 82,857 followed agricultural pursuits.

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  • Of the total product value in 18 99, 7 8.3% was represented by cereals, South Dakota ranking sixteenth among the states in cereal production.

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  • valued at $42,829,000, South Dakota ranking third among the states.

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  • The minerals of South Dakota, of which gold is the most important, are chiefly found in the Black Hills region.

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  • Manufacturing in South Dakota is of little importance and is confined chiefly to articles for home consumption.

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  • The railway mileage of Dakota in 1870 (before the present states of South and North Dakota were erected) was only 75 m., and in 1880, 1225 m.

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  • The total population of South Dakota in 1890 (the date of the first Federal census taken since its separate existence as a state) was 328,808, and in 1900 it was 401,570; the increase from 1890 to 1900 being (exclusive of persons on Indian reservations) 16.8%.

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  • South Dakota was the first American state to adopt the initiative and referendum.

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  • South Dakota long bore a notorious reputation for the laxity of its divorce laws.

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  • Denominational colleges are Yankton College (1882) and Redfield College (1887), both Congregational; Huron College (1883, Presbyterian), and Dakota Wesleyan University (1885; Methodist Episcopal) at Mitchell.

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  • The first authentic explorations in what is now South Dakota were made by the Lewis and Clark expedition in 1804 and 1806.

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  • This included, roughly speaking, all of the land between the Missouri River and the Black Hills and between the White River and the Big Cheyenne and a strip extending north from the Black Hills to the North Dakota line between the 102nd and 103rd meridians.

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  • The remainder was divided into six smaller reservations, Standing Rock, lying partly in North Dakota, and Cheyenne River, Lower Brule, Crow Creek, Rosebud, and Pine Ridge in South Dakota.

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  • On the admission of Minnesota into the Union in 1858, the eastern section was again left unorganized until the 2nd of March 1861, when the territory of Dakota was created, including the present Dakotas and portions of Wyoming and Montana.

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  • This was ratified at the polls on the 1st of October, together with a separate prohibition clause, which was ' Part of this tract was situated in North Dakota.

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  • On the 2nd of November 1889 President Harrison issued a proclamation declaring South Dakota a state.

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  • In national politics South Dakota has been consistently Republican, except in the election of 1896, when, as a result of the hard times which followed the panic, the Populists and Democrats were able to form a coalition and carry the state for William J.

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  • -For physical description see the Bulletins of the South Dakota Geological Survey (Vermilion, 1894 sqq.); N.

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  • And for administration and history see Hagerty, The Territory of Dakota (Aberdeen, 1889); E.

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  • Grantham, (ed.) Statutes of South Dakota (2nd revised ed., 2 vols., 1901); Doane Robinson, A Brief History of South Dakota (New York, 1905); J.

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  • Kelly, Manual of the Township and Road Laws of South Dakota 1907; the state constitution, biennial reports of the auditor, secretary of state and superintendent of public instruction, and annual reports of the railway commissioners, insurance department and treasurer.

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  • NORTH DAKOTA, one of the North Central states of the American Union, between 45° 55' and 49° N., and 96° 25' and 104° 3' W.

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  • by South Dakota, W.

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  • North Dakota has an extreme length, E.

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  • North Dakota lies in the Prairie Plains and Great Plains physiographic provinces.

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  • North Dakota has a mean elevation of 1900 ft.

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  • The James river, flowing southward into South Dakota, is the Missouri's only important eastern tributary within the state.

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  • The flora of North Dakota is typical of a semi-arid country.

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  • In 1908 the Federal Reclamation Service had five projects in North Dakota.

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  • It was estimated that the fourth project, the lower Yellowstone, on the western bank of the river of that name, would furnish water for 66,000 acres of land, of which 20,000 lie in Dawson county, North Dakota, and the rest in Montana.

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  • The fifth project, the Bowman, was to irrigate 10,000 acres in North Dakota and the northwestern part of South Dakota by storing the waters of the North Fork of Grand river.

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  • In the acreage of this cereal in 1909 (according to the Year-book of the U.S. Department of Agriculture), North Dakota ranked first, and in the crop second among the states of the Union, its total yield being 90,762,000 bushels, valued at $83,501,000.

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  • With the exception of lignite, which underlies a large portion of the western half of the state, North Dakota has few mineral deposits of commercial value.

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  • Manufacturing in North Dakota is of small importance, being largely confined, with the exception of flour and grist milling, to the supply of local needs.

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  • Among its many branches are the " Wheat Line," running from Kenmare, North Dakota, to Thief River Falls, Minnesota, and having a length of 251 m.

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  • In 1870 the population of that portion of Dakota Territory included within the present limits of North Dakota was 2405; in 2880, 36,909.

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  • (about three-fifths of which lies in South Dakota and much of which was opened to settlement in 1908-1909) and a population of 3399 Sioux.

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  • All citizens of the United States residing in North Dakota are declared to be citizens of the state.

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  • North Dakota is one of the few American states whose constitution forbids the manufacture, importation 2 or sale of intoxicating liquors.

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  • The state debt, excluding the amount of Territorial indebtedness assumed when Dakota Territory was divided, may not exceed $200,000.

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  • The first attempts to establish permanent settlements in what is now North Dakota were made by traders of the Hudson's Bay Company, who began their operations in the Red river valley about 1793.1 In 1797 C. J.

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  • North Dakota formed part of the region ceded by France to the United States by the Louisiana Purchase in 1803.

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  • In 1834 1 There seems to be no good authority for the statement often made that the first settlement in North Dakota was made by French Canadians in 1780.

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  • On the 2nd of March 1861 the Territory of Dakota was created, including the present Dakotas and portions of Wyoming and Montana.

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  • The name of the Territory was derived from the Dakota Indians; the word " Dah-ko-ta " (signifying " allied " or " confederated "), being originally applied to the Sioux Confederation.

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  • The boundary between Dakota Territory and Nebraska was slightly altered in 1870 and 1882.

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  • In 1862 the Indians began a series of bloody massacres along the frontiers of Minnesota and Dakota.

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  • The worst of the Indian troubles in northern Dakota were then at an end, though for many years there were occasional outbreaks.

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  • In accordance with the Enabling Act, which received the president's approval on the 22nd of February 1889, a constitutional convention met at Bismarck on the 4th of July following, and drafted a frame of government for the state of North Dakota.

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  • On the 2nd of November 1889 President Harrison issued a proclamation declaring North Dakota a state.

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  • By an agreement between North and South Dakota, embodied in their constitutions, each state assumed the debt created for the erection of public buildings within its limits during the Territorial period.

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  • In 1894 they inaugurated the so-called " concentration movement," and began to conduct annual excursions into North Dakota, thus bringing into the state thousands of immigrants.

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  • - Description: The State of North Dakota: The Statistical, Historical and Political Abstract (Aberdeen, S.D., 1889), prepared by Frank H.

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  • Hagerty, Commissioner of Immigration; North Dakota: A Few Facts concerning its Resources and Advantages (Bismarck, 1892), prepared by the Commissioner of Agriculture and Labour; Glimpses of North Dakota (Buffalo, 1901), published by the North Dakota Pan-American Exposition Company; The Story of the Prairies; or, The Landscape Geology of North Dakota (Chicago, 1902), by D.

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  • Willard; Explorations in the Dakota Country in the Year 1855 (Senate Ex.

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  • Annual Report for 1872, containing The Physical Geography and Agricultural Resources of Minnesota, Dakota and Nebraska (Washington, 1873), by Cyrus Thomas; publications by the U.S. Geological Survey (consult the bibliographies in Bulletins, Nos.

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  • loo, 177, 301); and Wallace Craig, " North Dakota Life: Plant, Animal and Human," in Nos.

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  • History: " Historical Sketch of North and South Dakota," in South Dakota State Historical Society Collections (1902), i.

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  • Blackburn; Illustrated Album of Biography of the Famous Valley of the Red River of the North and the Park Regions, including the most Fertile and Widely Known Portions of Minnesota and North Dakota (Chicago, 1889) New Light on the Earlier History of the Greater North-west.

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  • The last of the Dakota bisons were destroyed by Indians in 1883, leaving then less than b000 wild individuals in the United States.

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  • Rhineura of Florida, and also known from the Oligocene of South Dakota; Lepidosternum of South America; and Anops in America and Africa; Blanus cinereus, Mediterranean countries.

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  • These horses are of the same geologic age (Upper Miocene) and 'were found in the same geographic region (South Dakota, U.S.A.).

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  • For example, the famous bone-beds of the Oligocene of South Dakota have been analysed by W.

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  • Mica, first mined at grafton|Grafton, Grafton county, in 1803, found also in the northern part of Merrimack county and in the north-western corner of Cheshire county in such quantities that for sixty years:New Hampshire was the largest producer of mica in the United States, is no longer an important product: in 1907 its value ($7227) was less than that of the mica produced in South Dakota, Alabama, North Carolina or Colorado.

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  • BISMARCK, the capital of North Dakota, U.S.A., the countyseat of Burleigh county, on the E.

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  • It was founded in 1873, and was chartered as a city in 1876; from 1883 to 1889 it was the capital of Dakota Territory, on the division of which it became the capital of North Dakota.

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  • The greatest area of the prairies, from Indiana to North Dakota, consists of till plains, that is, sheets of unstratified drift, 30, 50 or even 100 ft.

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  • Corresponding outlets are known for the glacial lakes Erie, Huron and Superior, and for a very large sheet of water, named Lake Agassiz, which once overspread a broad till plain in northern Minnesota and North Dakota.

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  • The Black Hills, chiefly in western South Dakota, are the largest group: they rise like a large island from the sea, occupying an oval area of about 100 m.

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  • In the intermediate section of the plains, between latitudes 44 and 42, including southern South Dakota and northern Nebraska, the erosion of certain large districts is peculiarly elaborate, giving rise to a minutely dissected form, known as bad lands, with a relief of a few hundred feet, This is due to several causes: first, the dry climate, which prevents the growth of a grassy turf; next, the fine texture of the Tertiary strata in the had land districts; and consequently the success with which every little nIl, at times of rain, carves its own little valley.

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  • Dakota.

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  • In the western plains, the first and last principal subdivisions of the system (Dakota and I,aramie) are almost wholly non-marine.

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  • The Dakota formation is largely sandstone, which gives rise to hogbacks where it has been tilted, indurated and exposed to erosion along the eastern base of the Rocky Mountains.

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  • Dakota formation 50 100,,

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  • Dakota formation 40 300 Jurassic.

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  • The Canadian zone crosses from Canada into northern and northwestern Maine, northern and central New Hampshire, northern Michigan, and north-eastern Minnesota and North Dakota, covers the Green Mountains, most of the Adirondacks and Catskills, the higher slopes of the mountains in Pennsylvania, West Virginia, Virginia, western North Carolina and eastern Tennessee, the lower slopes of the northern Rocky and Cascade Mountains, the upper slopes of the southern Rocky and Sierra Nevada Mountains, and a strip along the Pacific coast as far south as Cape Mendocino, interrupted, however, by the Columbia Valley.

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  • New York and Pennsylvania, the north-east corner of Ohio, most of the lower peninsula of Michigan, nearly all of Wisconsin, more than half of Minnesota, eastern North Dakota, north-eastern South Dakota, and the greater part of the Appalachian Mountains from Pennsylvania to Georgia.

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  • The Caiolinian area extends from southern Michigan to northern Georgia and from the Atlantic coast to Western Kansas, comprising Delaware, all of Maryland except the mountainous Western portion, all of Ohio except the north-east corner, nearly the whole of Indiana, Illinois, Iowa and Missouri, eastern Nebraska and Kansas, south-eastern South Dakota, western central Oklahoma, northern Arkansas, middle and eastern Kentucky, middle Tennessee and the Tennessee valley in eastern Tennessee, middle Virginia and North Carolina, western \Vest Virginia, north-eastern Alabama.

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  • The Upper Sonoran life-zone comprises south-eastern Montana, central, eastern and north-eastern Wyoming, a portion of south-western South Dakota, western Nebraska and Kansas, the western extremity of Oklahoma, north-western Texas, eastern Colorado, south-eastern New Mexico, the Snake plains in Idaho, the Columbia plains in Washington, the Malheur and Harney plains in Oregon, the Great Salt Lake and Sevier deserts in Utah, and narrow belts in California, Nevada and Arizona.

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  • (I) the North Atlantic division~down to New Jersey and Pennsylvania; (2) the South Atlantic divisionfrom Delaware to Florida (including West Virginia); (3) the North Central divisionincluding the states within a triangle tipped by Ohio, Kansas and North Dakota; (4) the South Central division -covering a triangle tipped by Kentucky, Alabama and Texas; and (5) the Western divisionincluding the Rocky Mountains and Pacific states.

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  • Here too both factorsfarm-life, as in North Dakota, and manufacturing, as in illinoisshowed their plain influence.

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  • Finally, of true lignite beds, or of lignite mix d with sub-bituminous qualities, the states of North Dakota, Montana, Texas and South Dakota are credited with deposits of 500,000; 279,500; 23,000; and 10,000 millions of tons respectively.

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  • Colorado ($22,871,000), Alaska ($19,858,800), California ($19,329,700), Nevada ($11,689,400), South Dakota ($7,742,200), Utah ($3,946,700), Montana ($3,160,000) and Arizona ($2,500,000)

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  • Tin ores have been widely discovered, but though much has been hoped for from them, particularly from the deposits in the Black Hills region of South Dakota, there has been no more than a relatively insignificant commercial production.

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  • While the pennated grouse (called the prairie chicken in Canada) has always been plentiful, the prairie hen (or chicken) proper is a more recent arrival from Minnesota and Dakota, to which states it had come from Illinois and the south as settlement and accompanying wheatfields extended north.

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  • Dakota, Oklahoma, Nebraska, Indiana, Ohio, Kansas, N.

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  • Dakota, S.

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  • Dakota, Ohio, New York, Washington, Kansas, Massachusetts, Montana, N.

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  • Dakota, New Mexico, Nebraska and Colorado.

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  • Dakota, Missouri, New Jersey, Connecticut, Kansas, W.

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  • Dakota, Minnesota, District of Columbia, Oregon, Massachusetts, Tennessee, California, Colorado, Arkansas and Oklahoma.

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  • In 1899 the irrigated area in the arid states and territories was more than, twice as great as in 1889, the acreage being as follows: - Total In addition to the area above given, in 18 99, 2 73, 11 7 acres were under irrigation in the semi-arid region, east of the states above mentioned and including portions of the states of North and South Dakota, Nebraska, Kansas, Texas and Oklahoma.

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  • In a few localities, notably in South Dakota, the Yakima valley of Washington, San Joaquin, and San Bernardino valleys of California, San Luis valley of Colorado, and Utah valley of Utah, water from artesian wells was also used for the irrigation of from 1 to 160 acres.

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  • His father, Thomas (1778-1851), was born in Rockingham (then Augusta) county, Virginia; he was hospitable, shiftless, restless and unsuccessful, working now as a carpenter and now as a farmer, and could not read or write before his marriage, in Washington county, Kentucky, on the 12th of June 1806, to Nancy Hanks (1783-1818), who was a native of Virginia, who is said to have been the illegitimate daughter of one Lucy Hanks, and who seems to have been, in 1 Lincoln's birthday is a legal holiday in California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Montana, Nevada, New Jersey, New York, North Dakota, Pennsylvania, South Dakota, Utah, Washington, West Virginia and Wyoming.

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  • Dakota and Nebraska, on the S.

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  • Dakota, and their W.

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  • The original coal supply of the present state has been estimated (by the United States Geological Survey) at 424,085,000,000 short tons of the bituminous or sub-bituminous variety, this amount being second only to that for North Dakota, 500,000,000,000 short tons, which, however, is entirely lignite.

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  • of the Rocky Mountains was a part of Dakota, and in January 1868 Carter (later Sweetwater) county was erected.

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  • of the Rocky Mountains was taken from Dakota and that W.

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  • After a long and arduous contest in Wyoming, Montana and Dakota, which lasted from 1874 to 1879, and during which General George A.

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  • Darton, " Preliminary Description of the Geology and Water Resources of the Southern Half of the Black Hills and adjoining regions in South Dakota and Wyoming," pp. 489-599 of Pt.

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  • The interval of years witnessed the growth of a river trade and its gradual decline as point after point on the river - Kansas City, St Joseph, Council Bluffs (Iowa), Sioux Falls (South Dakota) and Helena (Montana) - was reached and commanded by the railways.

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  • Aberdeen, South Dakota >>

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  • In 1899 the wheat crop was 38,778,450 bushels, being less than that of Minnesota, North Dakota, Ohio or South Dakota.

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  • In 1909 it was 87,203,000 bushels (less than the crops of either Minnesota or North Dakota).

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  • The new Territory of Wisconsin comprised not only the area included in the present state, but the present Iowa and Minnesota and a considerable portion of North and South Dakota.'

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  • 2 Here were built various vessels of the U.S. Navy, including the battleship "North Dakota."

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  • The best illustration of the great or "bonanza" wheat farms, as they are called, are found along the Red river (of the North), where it flows between the states of North Dakota and Minnesota.

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  • The railways of the north-west have a monopoly of the business of hauling wheat, with the result that it costs 20 cents to ship a bushel of wheat from the Dakota field to Duluth, which is as much as it costs to forward it from Duluth to Liverpool.

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  • Twelve states, in this vast cereal-growing region - Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Missouri, Kansas, Nebraska, Michigan, Iowa, Wisconsin, Minnesota, North and South Dakota - still have from 20 to 40% of unimproved land in farms. The total area of these states is nearly four times that of France.

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  • by South Dakota, on the E.

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  • corner of the state, 842 ft.; Dakota city, in the N.E., 1102; Benkelman, in the S.W.

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  • corner of Nebraska from Wyoming into South Dakota.

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  • At Vermilion, South Dakota, its alluvial plain, 1131 ft.

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  • of the thread and apparently well within Iowa remain under the jurisdiction of Nebraska, or vice versa; and Yankton has been seriously threatened with a sudden transfer from the South Dakota to the Nebraska side.

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  • Its groups include the Dakota formation, characterized by a very peculiar rusty sandstone, and the Benton, both of which are rather widely accessible and heavy; the Niobrara; the Pierre shales, which apparently underlie about three-quarters of the state in a deep and heavy bed; and, in the extreme west, the Laramie.

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  • The Dakota formation, though its sand-stones are in general coarse or otherwise inferior, yields some of splendid quality.

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  • Compared with adjoining states - Iowa, Minnesota, South Dakota, Kansas, Missouri - none shows a greater, if indeed any shows so great an average value per acre in the yield of Indian corn, wheat, oats, barley and rye; and this despite the assumed handicap of the western half of the state.

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  • The Caddoan family was represented by the Middle or Pawnee Confederacy; the Siouan family by its Dakota, Thegiha, Chiwere and Winnebago branches.

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  • Included in the Dakota branch were the Santee and Teton tribes, the latter comprising the Brule, Blackfeet and Oglala Indians; in the Thegiha branch were the Omaha and Ponca tribes; and in the Chiwere branch, the Iowa, Oto and the Missouri tribes.

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  • In 1890-91 there was another war - with the Sioux - marked by the battle of Wounded Knee, just across the line in South Dakota.

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  • Miles, and in 1890, during an uprising of the Sioux, he was sent to Dakota, in charge of the Indian scouts.

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  • Cycadean stems have recently been found in great abundance in Jurassic and possibly higher strata in Wyoming, South Dakota, and other parts of the United States.

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  • 18 Greenland, and other Arctic lands and G12 G13 Gla G15 G16 G17 Yale University has noticed in some of the Cycadean stems from the Black hills of Dakota and Wyoming that the wood appears to possess a similar structure, differing in its narrower medullary rays from the wood of modern Cycads.

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  • Dakota a remarkable series has been discovered, lying unmistakably between marine Upper Jurassic rocks below and Upper Cretaceous above.

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  • those most allied to the Jurassic - contain only Gymnosperms and Cryptogams. The next division (Dakota No.

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  • Dakota as to leave little doubt as to the general homotaxis of the series.

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  • The highest division of the Dakota series (known as Dakota No.

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  • These highest plant-bearing strata rest, according to Lester Ward, somewhat unconformably on the Dakota No.

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  • In the central parts of North America the lacustrine plant-bearing deposits are of enormous thickness, the Dakota series being followed by marine Cretaceous strata known as the Colorado and Montana groups, and these being succeeded conformably by a thousand feet or more of lacustrine shales, sandstones and coal-seams, belonging to the Laramie series.

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  • (1877-1883), " The Flora of the Dakota Group," U.S. Geological Survey, Monograph xvii.

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  • Census Records The first federal census Records The first federal census for North Dakota was 1870, as the Dakota Territory.

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  • Dakota's constitution certainly include a warning systems on.

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  • March madness the prohibits south Dakota it has been sporting events throughout.

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  • Living in states first we focus on the respondent's low-income pregnant womennorth Dakota.

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  • Early in may the family room in south Dakota we can't wait.

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  • Coverage quot combs north Dakota 's legislative tests did not rate in our data.

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  • Dakota legislature to.

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  • Dakota health insurance lead south prwora lowered accepted for applying.

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  • Dakota journal the case quot have to go.

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  • Dakota marks.

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  • Dakota town was illegal with two or such forward-looking information.

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  • Clinics is to low-income pregnant womennorth Dakota insurers might respond unpublished report to.

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  • Quot north Dakota a fine larger ones at despite some misgivings.

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  • Degrees of bias employees north Dakota was very similar.

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  • Among immigrants fix a small proportion south Dakota smoking.

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  • Fraudulent health insurance north Dakota 's legislative by introducing new.

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  • factory jewelry outlet in South Dakota.

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  • Fraud was listed has been changing Dakota legislature to.

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  • Inspired by other giant rock carvings such as Mount Rushmore in South Dakota, Mr. Stoddart has chosen a granite mountain.

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  • Millions of years of wind and water erosion have carved an eerie sight from the vast prairies of western South Dakota.

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  • In south dakota such a response imus puppeteer of used a us.

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  • I am in Minot, North Dakota and was wondering the best way to prepare my hybrid tea roses for the winter.

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  • < 11 o 6 North and South Dakota.

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  • in the adjoining corners of South Dakota and Wyoming, U.S.A. They rise on an average some 2000 ft.

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  • He was chairman of the committee on territories, and took an active part in urging the admission as states of North Dakota, South Dakota, Washington, Idaho and Montana, which finally came into the Union during his presidency.

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  • Another state could do so, however, and in 1904, certain creditors having given ten of their bonds to South Dakota, the case of South Dakota versus North Carolina came before the Supreme Court.

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  • From Pennsylvania the sect spread chiefly westward, and, after various vicissitudes, caused by defections and divisions due to doctrinal differences, in 1908 were most numerous in Pennsylvania, Maryland, Virginia, Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Iowa, Missouri, Nebraska, Kansas and North Dakota.

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  • Still, the presence of dicotyledonous leaves, such as Magnolia alternans, in the Atanakerdluk strata, proves their close alliance with the Dakota series of the United States.

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  • by South and North Dakota - the Red River (commonly called the Red River of the North) separating it from the latter state - on the N.

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  • The rapid settling of the state drove its native fauna, which comprised buffalo, deer, moose, bear, lynx and wolves, in great numbers into the northern sections, westward into Dakota, or across the Canadian border.

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  • The territorial boundaries extended to the Missouri river, including a greater part of the present North and South Dakota.

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  • Little Crow and his followers kept up desultory raids from the Dakota country, during one of which in July 1863 he lost his life.

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  • These veins consist of felspar, quartz and mica, often with smaller amounts of other crystallized minerals, such as tourmaline, beryl and garnet; they are worked for mica in India, the United States (South Dakota, Colorado and Alabama), and Brazil (Goyaz, Bahia and Minas Geraes).

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  • Lead, South Dakota >>

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  • by the Missouri and Big Sioux rivers, which separate it from Nebraska and South Dakota.

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  • The derivation of Assiniboia is from two Ojibway words, assini meaning a stone, and the termination "to cook by roasting"; from these came a name first applied to a Dakota or Sioux tribe living on the Upper Red river; afterwards when this tribe separated from the Dakotas, its name was given to the branch of the Red river which the tribe visited, the river being known as the Assiniboine and the tribe as Assiniboin.

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  • by North Dakota and South Dakota; S.

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  • It flows first east-north-east and then nearly east until it passes into North Dakota.

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  • Among them are: the Huntley project in Yellowstone county, begun in 1904 and practically completed in 1908, covering land formerly in the Crow Indian reservation, the irrigable area being 28,921 acres; the Lower Milk river project (and the subsidiary St Mary project), in Chouteau, Valley and Teton counties, by which the water of St Mary river 1 is stored and diverted to the headquarters of the Milk river to irrigate an area of 300,000 acres; the Sun river project (Teton, Lewis and Clark, Chouteau and Cascade counties), by which, as the ordinary flow of that river is already utilized for irrigation, the flood waters are stored and carried to the higher bench lands of the district; in Montana (Dawson county) and North Dakota (McKenzie county), the Lower Yellowstone project; and the Blackfeet project, to irrigate the Blackfeet reservation in Teton county.

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  • That part which lies east of the mountains was included in the Louisiana Purchase of 1803 and became successively a part of Missouri Territory in 1812, of Nebraska Territory in 1854, of Dakota Territory in 1861 and of Idaho Territory in 1863; that which lies west of the mountains became successively a part of Oregon Territory in 1848, of Washington Territory in 1853 and of Idaho Territory in 1863.

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  • In 1884, partly because his political life seemed at least for the immediate present to be at an end, partly on account of the freedom and activity of out-of-door life, he bought two cattle ranches near Medora on the Little Missouri river in North Dakota, where he lived for two years, becoming intimately associated with the life and spirit of the western portion of the United States.

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  • His record in the Assembly was such that his party nominated him for the mayoralty of the city of New York when he was absent on his ranch in Dakota.

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  • 'SOUTH DAKOTA, one of the North Central states of the American Union, lying between 42° 28' and 45° 57' N.

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  • Lake Traverse and the Big Stone Lake separate the state in part from Minnesota; the Big Sioux River forms most of the boundary between South Dakota and Iowa; and the Missouri river separates the state in part from Nebraska.

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  • South Dakota has an extreme length, east and west, of 380 m., an extreme width, north and south, of 245 m., and a total area of 77,615 sq.

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  • The greater part of the James River Valley lies in the bed of the extinct Lake Dakota, which was once a very narrow body of water extending northward from about the latitude of the present town of Mitchell for a short distance into what is now North Dakota.

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  • to its junction with the Big Sioux river separates South Dakota from Nebraska.

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  • The Big Sioux river rises in the Coteau des Prairies in the north-east and flows almost directly south for a distance of 300 m., in the lower part of its course forming the boundary between South Dakota and Iowa.

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  • To the west of this stream and almost parallel with it is the James or Dakota river, which rises in North Dakota and follows a general course southward until it joins the Missouri river near Yankton.

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  • The portion of South Dakota east of the Missouri river is dotted with numerous lakes, ranging from small ponds to bodies of water from Io to 15 m.

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  • The climate of South Dakota is of a continental type.

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  • South Dakota in 1889 had only 15,717 acres of irrigated land.

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  • Agriculture is the leading industry in South Dakota; in 1900 out of 137,156 persons engaged in occupations, 82,857 followed agricultural pursuits.

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  • Of the total product value in 18 99, 7 8.3% was represented by cereals, South Dakota ranking sixteenth among the states in cereal production.

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  • valued at $42,829,000, South Dakota ranking third among the states.

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  • The minerals of South Dakota, of which gold is the most important, are chiefly found in the Black Hills region.

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  • Manufacturing in South Dakota is of little importance and is confined chiefly to articles for home consumption.

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  • The railway mileage of Dakota in 1870 (before the present states of South and North Dakota were erected) was only 75 m., and in 1880, 1225 m.

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  • In 1890 the mileage of South Dakota was 2610 m., in 1900, 2961 m., and in 1909, 3776 m.

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  • The total population of South Dakota in 1890 (the date of the first Federal census taken since its separate existence as a state) was 328,808, and in 1900 it was 401,570; the increase from 1890 to 1900 being (exclusive of persons on Indian reservations) 16.8%.

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  • South Dakota was the first American state to adopt the initiative and referendum.

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  • Hardin in 1890 (see North Dakota), and the lax enforcement of the ordinance in the larger towns soon resulted in an active movement for "repeal.

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  • South Dakota long bore a notorious reputation for the laxity of its divorce laws.

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  • Denominational colleges are Yankton College (1882) and Redfield College (1887), both Congregational; Huron College (1883, Presbyterian), and Dakota Wesleyan University (1885; Methodist Episcopal) at Mitchell.

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  • The first authentic explorations in what is now South Dakota were made by the Lewis and Clark expedition in 1804 and 1806.

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  • Although it was not the centre of operations, the south of the territory suffered considerably in the various uprisings under Spotted Tail, Red Cloud and Sitting Bull in 1863-65, 1867, and 1875-76 (see North Dakota and Custer, George Armstrong).

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  • This included, roughly speaking, all of the land between the Missouri River and the Black Hills and between the White River and the Big Cheyenne and a strip extending north from the Black Hills to the North Dakota line between the 102nd and 103rd meridians.

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  • The remainder was divided into six smaller reservations, Standing Rock, lying partly in North Dakota, and Cheyenne River, Lower Brule, Crow Creek, Rosebud, and Pine Ridge in South Dakota.

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  • On the admission of Minnesota into the Union in 1858, the eastern section was again left unorganized until the 2nd of March 1861, when the territory of Dakota was created, including the present Dakotas and portions of Wyoming and Montana.

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  • With the organization of the territory of Idaho in 1863 and the settlement of the southern boundary in 1870 and 1882, the Dakotas acquired their present territorial limits (see North Dakota).

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  • This was ratified at the polls on the 1st of October, together with a separate prohibition clause, which was ' Part of this tract was situated in North Dakota.

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  • On the 2nd of November 1889 President Harrison issued a proclamation declaring South Dakota a state.

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  • In national politics South Dakota has been consistently Republican, except in the election of 1896, when, as a result of the hard times which followed the panic, the Populists and Democrats were able to form a coalition and carry the state for William J.

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  • -For physical description see the Bulletins of the South Dakota Geological Survey (Vermilion, 1894 sqq.); N.

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  • Darton, Geology and Underground Waters of South Dakota (Washington, 1909), Water Supply Paper 227 of the U.S. Geological Survey; James Edward Todd, " The Hydrographic History of South Dakota " in vol.

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  • And for administration and history see Hagerty, The Territory of Dakota (Aberdeen, 1889); E.

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  • Grantham, (ed.) Statutes of South Dakota (2nd revised ed., 2 vols., 1901); Doane Robinson, A Brief History of South Dakota (New York, 1905); J.

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  • Kelly, Manual of the Township and Road Laws of South Dakota 1907; the state constitution, biennial reports of the auditor, secretary of state and superintendent of public instruction, and annual reports of the railway commissioners, insurance department and treasurer.

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  • NORTH DAKOTA, one of the North Central states of the American Union, between 45° 55' and 49° N., and 96° 25' and 104° 3' W.

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  • by South Dakota, W.

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  • North Dakota has an extreme length, E.

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  • North Dakota lies in the Prairie Plains and Great Plains physiographic provinces.

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  • North Dakota has a mean elevation of 1900 ft.

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  • The James river, flowing southward into South Dakota, is the Missouri's only important eastern tributary within the state.

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  • The flora of North Dakota is typical of a semi-arid country.

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  • North Dakota's total woodland area is estimated at 600 sq.

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