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dacia

dacia

dacia Sentence Examples

  • It was intended that Russia should take what remained of the northern coast of the Black Sea, Austria should annex the Turkish provinces contiguous to her territory, the Danubian principalities and Bessarabia should be formed into an independent kingdom called Dacia, the Turks should be expelled from Europe, the Byzantine empire should be resuscitated, and the grand-duke Constantine, second son of the Russian heir-apparent, should be placed on the throne of the Palaeologi.

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  • At the root of the work lies a theory, whencesoever derived, which identified the Goths with the Scythians, whose country Darius Hystaspes invaded, and with the Getae of Dacia, whom Trajan conquered.

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  • He defeated the Chatti, annexed the district of the Taunus, and established the Limes as a line of defence; but he suffered defeats at the hands of the Quadi, Sarmatae and ' Marcomanni; in Dacia he received a severe check, and was obliged to purchase peace (90) from Decebalus by the payment of a large sum of money and by guaranteeing a yearly tribute - the first instance in Roman history.

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  • From Antioch Hadrian set out for Dacia to punish the Roxolani, who, incensed by a reduction of the tribute hitherto paid them, had invaded the Danubian provinces.

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  • An arrangement was patched up, and while Hadrian was still in Dacia he received news of a conspiracy against his life.

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  • 275, when Dacia was lost to the empire, and the invasions of the northern peoples resulted in the destruction of temples along a great stretch of frontier, the natural stronghold of the cult.

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  • The creed of Niceta of Remesiana in Dacia proves that c. A.D.

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  • It was impossible for a soldier like Trajan to endure the conditions accepted by Domitian; but the conquest of Dacia had become one of the most formidable tasks that had ever confronted the empire.

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  • The frontier of Dacia was successfully defended against the Scythians and Sarmatians, and a tract of territory reconquered in north Britain.

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  • After the abandonment of Dacia to the barbarians by Aurelian (270-275) and the transference of its inhabitants to the south of the Danube, the central portion of Moesia took the name of Dacia Aureliani (again divided into Dacia ripensis and interior).

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  • Here, under the general name of Sarmatae, they were a perpetual trouble to the Roman province of Dacia.

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  • These movements began in the east, where we find the Goths ravaging Dacia, Moesia and the coast regions as early as the 3rd century.

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  • In the following century the Vandals settled in Pannonia (western Hungary), while the Goths occupied Dacia, which had now been given up by the Romans, and subsequently took possession also of large territories to the south of the lower Danube.

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  • Transylvania formed part of the Roman province of Dacia.

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  • The nomad Vlachs or Tzintzars of these countries call themselves Arumani or "Romans"; they are a remnant of the native Latinized population which received an increase from the immigration of Daco-Roman refugees, who fled southwards during the 3rd century, after the abandonment of Dacia by Aurelian.

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  • Athanaric next attempted to establish himself in the territory between the Pruth and the Danube, and with this object set about heightening the old Roman wall which Trajan had erected in north-eastern Dacia; before his fortifications, however, were complete, the Huns were again upon him, and without a battle he was forced to retreat to the Danube.

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  • One horde settled under Roman protection in Little Scythia (the Dobrudzha), others in Dacia Ripensis (on the confines of Servia and Bulgaria) or on the southern borders of Pannonia.

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  • DACIA, in ancient geography, the land of the Daci, a large district of central Europe, bounded on the N.

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  • A kingdom of Dacia was in existence at least as early as the beginning of the 2nd century B.C. under a king Oroles.

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  • In 129, under Hadrian, Dacia was divided into Dacia Superior and Inferior, the former comprising Transylvania, the latter Little Walachia, with procurators, probably both under the same praetorian legate (according to Brandis, the procurator of Dacia inferior was independent, but see A.

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  • Under Gallienus (256), the Goths crossed the Carpathians and drove the Romans from Dacia, with the exception of a few fortified places between the Temes and the Danube.

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  • No details of the event are recorded, and the chief argument in support of the statement in Ruf (i) us Festus that "under the Emperor Gallienus Dacia was lost" is the sudden cessation of Roman inscriptions and coins in the country after 256.

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  • Aurelian (270-275) withdrew the troops altogether and settled the Roman colonists on the south of the Danube, in Moesia, where he created the province Dacia Aureliani.

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  • This was subsequently divided into Dacia Ripensis on the Danube, with capital Ratiaria (Arcar in Bosnia), and Dacia Mediterranea, with capital Sardica (Sofia, the capital of Bulgaria), the latter again being subdivided into Dardania and Dacia Mediterranea.

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  • 44; on the boundaries of the Roman province of Dacia, see T.

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  • In the time of Aurelian they invaded Pannonia, and during the reign of Probus we find them fighting in Dacia.

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  • Aurelian is said to have won a victory over them, but the province of Dacia had to be given up. In the time of Constantine the Great Thrace and Moesia were again plundered by the Goths, A.D.

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  • In the 2nd century it was occupied by the Getae, a Thracian tribe, whom the Roman emperor Trajan conquered in 106; he then incorporated the region in the province of Dacia.

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  • Oltenitza is the ancient Constantiola, which was the seat of the first bishopric established in Dacia.

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  • Among the mountains, gold was perhaps worked under Trajan, who first appointed a Procurator Metallorurn, or overseer of mines, for Dacia; certainly in the 14th century, when immigrant Saxon miners established a considerable trade with Ragusa, in Dalmatia.

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  • high, carved in low relief with scenes representing Trajan's conquest of Dacia.

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  • For information upon this period, and upon the subsequent centuries of Roman or Byzantine rule, see Dacia.

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  • Dacia.

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  • Not only had Michael succeeded in rolling back for a time the tide of Turkish conquest, but for the first and last time in modern history he united what once had been Trajan's Dacia, in its widest extent, and with it the whole Ruman race north of the Danube, under a single sceptre.

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  • Xenopol, Istoria Rominilor din Dacia Traiana (Jassy, 1888-93, 6 vols.

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  • It represents the original rustic Latin of the Roman provincials in Moesia and Dacia, as modified by centuries of alien rule.

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  • Unfortunately his writings, with a few exceptions, are still in MS. He is the author of the first history of the Rumanians in Dacia written according to the standards of Western science.

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  • Cogalniceanu published various reviews, some of a political, others of a more literary character, such as the Dacia literar y (1840) and Archiva romdneasca (1845-46); he has also the great merit of having published for the first time a collection of the Moldavian chronicles.

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  • Handing over the reins of government to his mother, he set out in 213 for Raetia, where he carried on war against the Alamanni; in 214 he attacked the Goths in Dacia, whence he proceeded by way of Thrace to Asia Minor, and in 215 crossed to Alexandria.

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  • He drove the Vandals out of Dacia, compelled the allegiance of the neighbouring tribes of West Goths, procured the submission of the Herules, of many Slav and Finnish tribes, and even of the Esthonians on the shores of the Gulf of Bothnia.

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  • He drove them out of Moesia across the Danube, where he left them in possession of Dacia, which he did not think himself able to retain; the name was transf erred to Moesia, which was then called Dacia Aureliani.

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  • The chronology, however, of Aurelian's reign is very confused, and the abandonment of Dacia is placed by some authorities towards its close.

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  • GETAE, an ancient people of Thracian origin, closely akin to the Daci (see Dacia).

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  • From this time the Getae seem to have been usually called Daci; for their further history see Dacia.

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  • It was intended that Russia should take what remained of the northern coast of the Black Sea, Austria should annex the Turkish provinces contiguous to her territory, the Danubian principalities and Bessarabia should be formed into an independent kingdom called Dacia, the Turks should be expelled from Europe, the Byzantine empire should be resuscitated, and the grand-duke Constantine, second son of the Russian heir-apparent, should be placed on the throne of the Palaeologi.

    0
    0
  • At the root of the work lies a theory, whencesoever derived, which identified the Goths with the Scythians, whose country Darius Hystaspes invaded, and with the Getae of Dacia, whom Trajan conquered.

    0
    0
  • He defeated the Chatti, annexed the district of the Taunus, and established the Limes as a line of defence; but he suffered defeats at the hands of the Quadi, Sarmatae and ' Marcomanni; in Dacia he received a severe check, and was obliged to purchase peace (90) from Decebalus by the payment of a large sum of money and by guaranteeing a yearly tribute - the first instance in Roman history.

    0
    0
  • From Antioch Hadrian set out for Dacia to punish the Roxolani, who, incensed by a reduction of the tribute hitherto paid them, had invaded the Danubian provinces.

    0
    0
  • An arrangement was patched up, and while Hadrian was still in Dacia he received news of a conspiracy against his life.

    0
    0
  • 275, when Dacia was lost to the empire, and the invasions of the northern peoples resulted in the destruction of temples along a great stretch of frontier, the natural stronghold of the cult.

    0
    0
  • The creed of Niceta of Remesiana in Dacia proves that c. A.D.

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    0
  • It was impossible for a soldier like Trajan to endure the conditions accepted by Domitian; but the conquest of Dacia had become one of the most formidable tasks that had ever confronted the empire.

    0
    0
  • The frontier of Dacia was successfully defended against the Scythians and Sarmatians, and a tract of territory reconquered in north Britain.

    0
    0
  • After the abandonment of Dacia to the barbarians by Aurelian (270-275) and the transference of its inhabitants to the south of the Danube, the central portion of Moesia took the name of Dacia Aureliani (again divided into Dacia ripensis and interior).

    0
    0
  • Here, under the general name of Sarmatae, they were a perpetual trouble to the Roman province of Dacia.

    0
    0
  • These movements began in the east, where we find the Goths ravaging Dacia, Moesia and the coast regions as early as the 3rd century.

    0
    0
  • In the following century the Vandals settled in Pannonia (western Hungary), while the Goths occupied Dacia, which had now been given up by the Romans, and subsequently took possession also of large territories to the south of the lower Danube.

    0
    0
  • Transylvania formed part of the Roman province of Dacia.

    0
    0
  • The nomad Vlachs or Tzintzars of these countries call themselves Arumani or "Romans"; they are a remnant of the native Latinized population which received an increase from the immigration of Daco-Roman refugees, who fled southwards during the 3rd century, after the abandonment of Dacia by Aurelian.

    0
    0
  • Athanaric next attempted to establish himself in the territory between the Pruth and the Danube, and with this object set about heightening the old Roman wall which Trajan had erected in north-eastern Dacia; before his fortifications, however, were complete, the Huns were again upon him, and without a battle he was forced to retreat to the Danube.

    0
    0
  • One horde settled under Roman protection in Little Scythia (the Dobrudzha), others in Dacia Ripensis (on the confines of Servia and Bulgaria) or on the southern borders of Pannonia.

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    0
  • DACIA, in ancient geography, the land of the Daci, a large district of central Europe, bounded on the N.

    0
    0
  • A kingdom of Dacia was in existence at least as early as the beginning of the 2nd century B.C. under a king Oroles.

    0
    0
  • In 129, under Hadrian, Dacia was divided into Dacia Superior and Inferior, the former comprising Transylvania, the latter Little Walachia, with procurators, probably both under the same praetorian legate (according to Brandis, the procurator of Dacia inferior was independent, but see A.

    0
    0
  • Under Gallienus (256), the Goths crossed the Carpathians and drove the Romans from Dacia, with the exception of a few fortified places between the Temes and the Danube.

    0
    0
  • No details of the event are recorded, and the chief argument in support of the statement in Ruf (i) us Festus that "under the Emperor Gallienus Dacia was lost" is the sudden cessation of Roman inscriptions and coins in the country after 256.

    0
    0
  • Aurelian (270-275) withdrew the troops altogether and settled the Roman colonists on the south of the Danube, in Moesia, where he created the province Dacia Aureliani.

    0
    0
  • This was subsequently divided into Dacia Ripensis on the Danube, with capital Ratiaria (Arcar in Bosnia), and Dacia Mediterranea, with capital Sardica (Sofia, the capital of Bulgaria), the latter again being subdivided into Dardania and Dacia Mediterranea.

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  • 44; on the boundaries of the Roman province of Dacia, see T.

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    0
  • In the time of Aurelian they invaded Pannonia, and during the reign of Probus we find them fighting in Dacia.

    0
    0
  • Aurelian is said to have won a victory over them, but the province of Dacia had to be given up. In the time of Constantine the Great Thrace and Moesia were again plundered by the Goths, A.D.

    0
    0
  • In the 2nd century it was occupied by the Getae, a Thracian tribe, whom the Roman emperor Trajan conquered in 106; he then incorporated the region in the province of Dacia.

    0
    0
  • Oltenitza is the ancient Constantiola, which was the seat of the first bishopric established in Dacia.

    0
    0
  • Among the mountains, gold was perhaps worked under Trajan, who first appointed a Procurator Metallorurn, or overseer of mines, for Dacia; certainly in the 14th century, when immigrant Saxon miners established a considerable trade with Ragusa, in Dalmatia.

    0
    0
  • high, carved in low relief with scenes representing Trajan's conquest of Dacia.

    0
    0
  • For information upon this period, and upon the subsequent centuries of Roman or Byzantine rule, see Dacia.

    0
    0
  • Not only had Michael succeeded in rolling back for a time the tide of Turkish conquest, but for the first and last time in modern history he united what once had been Trajan's Dacia, in its widest extent, and with it the whole Ruman race north of the Danube, under a single sceptre.

    0
    0
  • Xenopol, Istoria Rominilor din Dacia Traiana (Jassy, 1888-93, 6 vols.

    0
    0
  • It represents the original rustic Latin of the Roman provincials in Moesia and Dacia, as modified by centuries of alien rule.

    0
    0
  • Unfortunately his writings, with a few exceptions, are still in MS. He is the author of the first history of the Rumanians in Dacia written according to the standards of Western science.

    0
    0
  • Cogalniceanu published various reviews, some of a political, others of a more literary character, such as the Dacia literar y (1840) and Archiva romdneasca (1845-46); he has also the great merit of having published for the first time a collection of the Moldavian chronicles.

    0
    0
  • Handing over the reins of government to his mother, he set out in 213 for Raetia, where he carried on war against the Alamanni; in 214 he attacked the Goths in Dacia, whence he proceeded by way of Thrace to Asia Minor, and in 215 crossed to Alexandria.

    0
    0
  • He drove the Vandals out of Dacia, compelled the allegiance of the neighbouring tribes of West Goths, procured the submission of the Herules, of many Slav and Finnish tribes, and even of the Esthonians on the shores of the Gulf of Bothnia.

    0
    0
  • He drove them out of Moesia across the Danube, where he left them in possession of Dacia, which he did not think himself able to retain; the name was transf erred to Moesia, which was then called Dacia Aureliani.

    0
    0
  • The chronology, however, of Aurelian's reign is very confused, and the abandonment of Dacia is placed by some authorities towards its close.

    0
    0
  • GETAE, an ancient people of Thracian origin, closely akin to the Daci (see Dacia).

    0
    0
  • From this time the Getae seem to have been usually called Daci; for their further history see Dacia.

    0
    0
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