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cytoplasm

cytoplasm

cytoplasm Sentence Examples

  • The protoplasm of a living cell con.sists of a semifluid granular substance, called the cytoplasm, one or more nuclei, and sometimes centrosomes and plastids.

  • Young cells ar full of cytoplasm, old cells generally contain a large vacuole or vacuoles, containing cell-sap, and with only a thin, almost invisible layer of cytoplasm on their walls.

  • Very little is known of the finer structure of the cytoplasm of a vegetable cell.

  • Evidence is not wanting, however, that the cytoplasm must be regarded as, fundamentally, a semifluid, homogeneous substance in which by its own activity, granules, vacuoles, fibrils, &c., can be formed as secondary structures.

  • The cytoplasm is largely concerned in the formation of spindle fibres and centrosomes, and such structures as the cell membrane, cilia, or flagella, the coenocentrum, nematoplasl~ or vibrioids and physodes are also products of its activity.

  • Protoplasmic Movements.In the cells of many plants the cytoplasm frequently exhibits movements of circulation or rotation.

  • In these, under favorable conditions, streaming movements of the cytoplasm in various directions can be observed.

  • In other forms such as Elodea, Nitella, Chara, &c., where the cytoplasm is mainly restricted to the periphery of the sap vacuole and lining the cell wall, the streaming movement is exhibited in one direction only.

  • In some cases both the nucleus and the chromatophores may be carried along in the rotating stream, but in others, such as T.Titeila, the chloroplasts may remain motionless iii a non-motile layer of the cytoplasm in direct contact with the cell wall.i Desmids, Diatoms and Oscillaria show creeping movements probably due to the secretion of slime by the cells; the swarmspores and plasmodium of the Myxomycetes exhibit amoehoid movements; and the motile spores of Fungi and Algae, the spermatozoids of mosses, ferns, &c., move by means of delicate prolongations, cilia or flagella cf the protoplast.

  • Chromatophores.The chromatophores or plastids are protoplasmic structures, denser than the cytoplasm, and easily distinguishable from it by their color or greater refractive power.

  • They are spherical, oval, fusiform, or rod-like, and are always found in the cytoplasm, never in the cell-sap. They appear to be permanent organs of the cell, and are transmitted from one cell to another by division.

  • In Spirogyra the pyrenoids are distinctly connected by cytoplasmic strands to the central mass of cytoplasm, which surrounds the nucleus, and according to some observers, they increase exclusively by division, followed by a splitting of the cytoplasmic strands.

  • The separate layers of the starch-grain are deposited on it by the activity of the chrmatophore, and according to Meyer the grain is always surrounded by a thin layer of the chromatophore which completely separates it from the cytoplasm.

  • Albumen crystals are also to be found in the cytoplasm, in leucoplasts and rarely in the nucleus.

  • Reference must also be made here to the enzymes or unorganized ferments which occur so largely in the cytoplasm.

  • The Structure of the Nucleus.In the living condition the resting nucleus appears to consist of a homogeneous ground substance containing a large number of small chromatin granules and one or more large spherical granulesnucleolithe whole being surrounded by a limiting membrane which separates it from the cytoplasm.

  • Centrosome.The centrosome is a minute homogeneous granule found in the cytoplasm of some cells in the neighborhood of the nucleus.

  • At each pole of this spindle figure there often occur fibres radiating in all directions into the cytoplasm, and sometimes a minute granular body, the centrosome, is also found there.

  • The spindle arises partly from the cytoplasm, partly from the nucleus, or it may be derived entirely from the nucleusintranuclear spindleas occurs in many of the lower plants (Fungi, &c.).

  • As division proceeds, the filamentous nature of this cytoplasm becomes more prominent and the threads begin either to converge towards the poles of the nucleus, to form a bipolar spindle, or may converge towards, or radiate from, several different points, to form a multipolar spindle.

  • In the Thallophytes the cytoplasm may be segmented by constriction, due to the in-growth of a new cell wall from the old one, as in Spirogyra and Cladophora, or by the formation of cleavage furrows in which the new cell-wall is secreted, as occurs in the formation of the spores in many Algae and Fungi.

  • In a few cases both among the higher and the lower plants, of which the formation of spores in the ascus is a typical example, new cells are formed by the aggregation of portions of the cytoplasm around the nuclei which become delimited from the rest of the cell iontents by a membrane.

  • In Fucus and allied forms the spindle-fibres between the daughter nuclei disappear early and the new cell-wall is formed in the cytoplasm.

  • contents of the two cells fuse together, cytoplasm ~ B

  • with cytoplasm, nucleus ~.

  • reduction in size is due to A, Two vermiform nuclei in the emthe absence of cytoplasm, bryo sac; one approaching the eggwhich is in some cases so nucleus, the other uniting with the 11 ~ ~h ~h upper polar nucleus.

  • In the Algae, such as Fucus, Volvox, Oedogonium, Bulbochaete, and in the Fungus Monoblepharis, the spermatozoid is a small oval or elongate cell containing nucleus, cytoplasm and sometimes plastids.

  • In some cases the region where the penetration of the male organ takes place is indicated on the oosphere by a hyaline receptive spot (Oedogonium, Vaucheria, &c.), or by a receptive papilla consisting of hyaline cytoplasm (Peronosporeae).

  • The strongest direct evidence seems to be that the nuclear substances are the only parts of the cells which are always equivalent in quantity, and that in the higher plants and animals the male organ or spermatozoid is composed almost entirely of the nucleus, and that the male nucleus is carried into the female cell without a particle of cytoplasm.i Since, however, the nucleus of the female cell is always accompanied by a larger or smaller quantity of cytoplasm, and that in a large majority of the power plants and animals the male cell also contains cytoplasm, it cannot yet be definitely stated that the cytoplasm does not play some part in the process.

  • The chromatin is distributed throughout the cytoplasm in the form of granules which may be regarded as a distributed nucleus corresponding to what Hertwig has designated, in protozoa, chromidia.

  • varies in shape, but is usually round or oval, and is sharply defined by a nuclear membrane from the cytoplasm in which it lies.

  • The cell body, or cytoplasm, is apparently composed of a fine reticulum or network, containing within the meshes a soft viscid, transparent substance, the cell-sap, or hyaloplasm, which is probably a nutrient material to the living cell.

  • Within the cytoplasm are found manifestations of functional activity, in the form of digestive vacuoles, granules, fat, glycogen, pigment, and foreign bodies.

  • Usually the cytoplasm shows a marked affinity for the acid stains, but the different bodies found in the cell may show great variation in their staining reactions.

  • It consists in an unequal number of chromosomes passing over to each of the daughter nuclei, so that one may become hypochromatic, the other hyperchromatic. When this happens the resulting cleavage of the cytoplasm and nucleus is also unequal.

  • In pathological cell-division it happens occasionally that the segmentation of the cytoplasm is delayed beyond that of the mitotic network.

  • The vitality of these cells being altered there is imbibition and accumulation of watery fluid in their cytoplasm, causing swelling and vacuolation of the cells.

  • Fatty degeneration is a retrogressive change associated with the deposit of fatty granules or globules in the cytoplasm, and is caused by disorganized cellular activity (figs.

  • Some investigators hold that the soaps may become combined with albumin, and that on becoming incorporated with the cytoplasm they can no longer be distinguished as fat.

  • It can develop vacuoles, or rather fine bubbles of carbonic acid gas in its cytoplasm, to float up to the surface of the water.

  • A differentiation of the peripheral cytoplasm in the form of an ectoplasmic layer has been described in one or two instances, and it seems probable that in most Trypanosomes there is such a layer, although only poorly developed, as a rule, around the body generally.

  • This is usually much clearer and more hyaline than the general cytoplasm.

  • In many forms deep-staining grains or granules, of a chromatoid nature and of var y ing size, are to be seen in the cytoplasm.

  • They have never been found to cause in fection, and they have not the characters of conidia; the large size of their nuclei, the reduction of their cytoplasm and the absence of reserve material and their thin cell wall all point to their being male gametes.

  • Embedded in the chromatophore, much in the same way as the nucleus is embedded in the cytoplasm, are the pyrenoids.

  • This is the carpogonium; it consists of a ventral portion which contains a nucleus, but in which no oosphere is differentiated, and an elongated tubular portion known as the trichogyne, into which the cytoplasm extends.

  • In the course of division two bodies appear in the cytoplasm, and behave as centrosomes during the karyokinesis; they gradually become threadlike and coil round each daughter nucleus.

  • All cells contain cytoplasm surrounded by a plasma membrane.

  • cytoplasm surrounded by a plasma membrane.

  • It should be noted that the effector ligand does not enter the bacterial cell cytoplasm in order to exert its effects.

  • The Schwann cell has an extensive cytoplasm which allows it to wrap a myelin sheath around nerve axons.

  • These proteins fill the cytoplasm of the highly organized eye lens fiber cells.

  • Each cell has a central control, the nucleus surrounded by cytoplasm (Fig.

  • It gives access to an ample gastric pouch, covered with very evident cells, whose granular cytoplasm surrounds a clear nucleus.

  • The tumor cells showed abundant, granular eosinophilic cytoplasm.

  • Fat cells arise from the fibroblast lineage, and consist of a central lipid droplet, surounded by a thin skin of active cytoplasm.

  • For two or three minutes, things were definitely in flux: more cytoplasm leaked out, and I couldn't locate the WEV.

  • In all cases tumor cells were relatively small and showed monomorphic or pleomorphic nuclei, prominent nucleoli, and ill-defined cytoplasm.

  • cytoplasm cell membrane nucleus cell wall 7 Which structure controls what enters and leaves a cell?

  • Fertilization occurs in the animal pole and this triggers a displacement of the egg cytoplasm.

  • This graph could be used to estimate the concentration of onion cell cytoplasm.

  • Select your answer ----------------- cell wall nucleus cytoplasm cell membrane 5 Which of the following types of cell is a plant cell?

  • cytoplasm in cultured fibroblast cells.

  • cytoplasm of bacteria which is able to reproduce itself independently of it host.

  • cytoplasm of hepatocytes (Ref.

  • cytoplasm by a double membrane called the nuclear envelope.

  • ACTH releases cholesterol from lipid droplets in the cytoplasm of the cells.

  • endoderm cells, the water is forced to move through the cytoplasm.

  • fusion pore rapidly closes again releasing the synaptic vesicle back into the cytoplasm.

  • The germ cells arise from a region of cytoplasm at the vegetal pole of the egg called the germ plasm.

  • potassium hydroxide solution removes the cytoplasm from the root cells.

  • Often, a plant intron is introduced into the code for the bacterial enzyme to enhance transport of the message from nucleus to cytoplasm.

  • localized in the cytoplasm in contrast to most viruses that need to enter the nucleus.

  • mitochondrionm bind specific sites like mitochondria in the cytoplasm in vivo, hence vital stain.

  • multinucleate masses of cytoplasm and enclosed by a branched tube system.

  • oxalate crystals (the botanist's crystal sand) shine in the cytoplasm.

  • The germ cells arise from a region of cytoplasm at the vegetal pole of the egg called the germ plasm at the vegetal pole of the egg called the germ plasm.

  • potassium hydroxide solution removes the cytoplasm from the root cells.

  • potassium hydroxide solution removes the cytoplasm from the root cells.

  • proteolysis of viral proteins in the cytoplasm of an infected cell.

  • reactivatec science of fusing the cytoplasm and nucleus and reactivating the cell is very poorly understood.

  • replicated entirely in the cytoplasm, outside the nucleus containing the cell's own genetic material.

  • ribosomes in the cytoplasm.

  • stamen hair cell which clearly shows the cytoplasm strands.

  • Nuclear translocation - In every known clock, a key step is the translocation of a protein from the cytoplasm into the nucleus.

  • The fixation made evident the cytoplasm that surrounds the great central vacuole.

  • Lysosomes - small membrane bound vesicles in the cytoplasm of cells which contain toxic enzymes.

  • The plastids are not rigidly embedded in the cytoplasm, but are capable of a certain amount of movement therein.

  • The protoplasm of a living cell con.sists of a semifluid granular substance, called the cytoplasm, one or more nuclei, and sometimes centrosomes and plastids.

  • Young cells ar full of cytoplasm, old cells generally contain a large vacuole or vacuoles, containing cell-sap, and with only a thin, almost invisible layer of cytoplasm on their walls.

  • Very little is known of the finer structure of the cytoplasm of a vegetable cell.

  • Evidence is not wanting, however, that the cytoplasm must be regarded as, fundamentally, a semifluid, homogeneous substance in which by its own activity, granules, vacuoles, fibrils, &c., can be formed as secondary structures.

  • The cytoplasm is largely concerned in the formation of spindle fibres and centrosomes, and such structures as the cell membrane, cilia, or flagella, the coenocentrum, nematoplasl~ or vibrioids and physodes are also products of its activity.

  • Protoplasmic Movements.In the cells of many plants the cytoplasm frequently exhibits movements of circulation or rotation.

  • In these, under favorable conditions, streaming movements of the cytoplasm in various directions can be observed.

  • In other forms such as Elodea, Nitella, Chara, &c., where the cytoplasm is mainly restricted to the periphery of the sap vacuole and lining the cell wall, the streaming movement is exhibited in one direction only.

  • In some cases both the nucleus and the chromatophores may be carried along in the rotating stream, but in others, such as T.Titeila, the chloroplasts may remain motionless iii a non-motile layer of the cytoplasm in direct contact with the cell wall.i Desmids, Diatoms and Oscillaria show creeping movements probably due to the secretion of slime by the cells; the swarmspores and plasmodium of the Myxomycetes exhibit amoehoid movements; and the motile spores of Fungi and Algae, the spermatozoids of mosses, ferns, &c., move by means of delicate prolongations, cilia or flagella cf the protoplast.

  • Chromatophores.The chromatophores or plastids are protoplasmic structures, denser than the cytoplasm, and easily distinguishable from it by their color or greater refractive power.

  • They are spherical, oval, fusiform, or rod-like, and are always found in the cytoplasm, never in the cell-sap. They appear to be permanent organs of the cell, and are transmitted from one cell to another by division.

  • In Spirogyra the pyrenoids are distinctly connected by cytoplasmic strands to the central mass of cytoplasm, which surrounds the nucleus, and according to some observers, they increase exclusively by division, followed by a splitting of the cytoplasmic strands.

  • The separate layers of the starch-grain are deposited on it by the activity of the chrmatophore, and according to Meyer the grain is always surrounded by a thin layer of the chromatophore which completely separates it from the cytoplasm.

  • Albumen crystals are also to be found in the cytoplasm, in leucoplasts and rarely in the nucleus.

  • Vol ut-in occurs in the cytoplasm of various Fungi, Bacteria, Cyanophyceae, diatoms, &c., in the form of minute granules which have a characteristic reaction towards methylene blue (Meyer).

  • Numerous other substances are also found in the cytoplasm, such as tannin, fats and oil, resins, mucilage, caoutchouc, guttapercha, sulphur and calcium oxalate crystals.

  • Reference must also be made here to the enzymes or unorganized ferments which occur so largely in the cytoplasm.

  • The Structure of the Nucleus.In the living condition the resting nucleus appears to consist of a homogeneous ground substance containing a large number of small chromatin granules and one or more large spherical granulesnucleolithe whole being surrounded by a limiting membrane which separates it from the cytoplasm.

  • Centrosome.The centrosome is a minute homogeneous granule found in the cytoplasm of some cells in the neighborhood of the nucleus.

  • the cytoplasm converge (see fig.

  • At each pole of this spindle figure there often occur fibres radiating in all directions into the cytoplasm, and sometimes a minute granular body, the centrosome, is also found there.

  • The spindle arises partly from the cytoplasm, partly from the nucleus, or it may be derived entirely from the nucleusintranuclear spindleas occurs in many of the lower plants (Fungi, &c.).

  • As division proceeds, the filamentous nature of this cytoplasm becomes more prominent and the threads begin either to converge towards the poles of the nucleus, to form a bipolar spindle, or may converge towards, or radiate from, several different points, to form a multipolar spindle.

  • In the Thallophytes the cytoplasm may be segmented by constriction, due to the in-growth of a new cell wall from the old one, as in Spirogyra and Cladophora, or by the formation of cleavage furrows in which the new cell-wall is secreted, as occurs in the formation of the spores in many Algae and Fungi.

  • In a few cases both among the higher and the lower plants, of which the formation of spores in the ascus is a typical example, new cells are formed by the aggregation of portions of the cytoplasm around the nuclei which become delimited from the rest of the cell iontents by a membrane.

  • In Fucus and allied forms the spindle-fibres between the daughter nuclei disappear early and the new cell-wall is formed in the cytoplasm.

  • contents of the two cells fuse together, cytoplasm ~ B

  • with cytoplasm, nucleus ~.

  • reduction in size is due to A, Two vermiform nuclei in the emthe absence of cytoplasm, bryo sac; one approaching the eggwhich is in some cases so nucleus, the other uniting with the 11 ~ ~h ~h upper polar nucleus.

  • In the Algae, such as Fucus, Volvox, Oedogonium, Bulbochaete, and in the Fungus Monoblepharis, the spermatozoid is a small oval or elongate cell containing nucleus, cytoplasm and sometimes plastids.

  • In Characeae and Muscineae they are of elongate spiral form, and consist of an elongate dense nucleus and a small quantity of - cytoplasm.

  • In some cases the region where the penetration of the male organ takes place is indicated on the oosphere by a hyaline receptive spot (Oedogonium, Vaucheria, &c.), or by a receptive papilla consisting of hyaline cytoplasm (Peronosporeae).

  • The strongest direct evidence seems to be that the nuclear substances are the only parts of the cells which are always equivalent in quantity, and that in the higher plants and animals the male organ or spermatozoid is composed almost entirely of the nucleus, and that the male nucleus is carried into the female cell without a particle of cytoplasm.i Since, however, the nucleus of the female cell is always accompanied by a larger or smaller quantity of cytoplasm, and that in a large majority of the power plants and animals the male cell also contains cytoplasm, it cannot yet be definitely stated that the cytoplasm does not play some part in the process.

  • Response to the action of gravity appears to be associated with the movements of starch grains in certain cellsstatolith cellsby which pressure is exerted on the cytoplasm and a stimulus set up which results in the geotropic response.

  • The chromatin is distributed throughout the cytoplasm in the form of granules which may be regarded as a distributed nucleus corresponding to what Hertwig has designated, in protozoa, chromidia.

  • varies in shape, but is usually round or oval, and is sharply defined by a nuclear membrane from the cytoplasm in which it lies.

  • The cell body, or cytoplasm, is apparently composed of a fine reticulum or network, containing within the meshes a soft viscid, transparent substance, the cell-sap, or hyaloplasm, which is probably a nutrient material to the living cell.

  • Within the cytoplasm are found manifestations of functional activity, in the form of digestive vacuoles, granules, fat, glycogen, pigment, and foreign bodies.

  • Usually the cytoplasm shows a marked affinity for the acid stains, but the different bodies found in the cell may show great variation in their staining reactions.

  • The cytoplasm of the cell now undergoes division in a line between the two daughter nuclei.

  • It consists in an unequal number of chromosomes passing over to each of the daughter nuclei, so that one may become hypochromatic, the other hyperchromatic. When this happens the resulting cleavage of the cytoplasm and nucleus is also unequal.

  • In pathological cell-division it happens occasionally that the segmentation of the cytoplasm is delayed beyond that of the mitotic network.

  • The vitality of these cells being altered there is imbibition and accumulation of watery fluid in their cytoplasm, causing swelling and vacuolation of the cells.

  • Fatty degeneration is a retrogressive change associated with the deposit of fatty granules or globules in the cytoplasm, and is caused by disorganized cellular activity (figs.

  • Some investigators hold that the soaps may become combined with albumin, and that on becoming incorporated with the cytoplasm they can no longer be distinguished as fat.

  • If from some cause the cell be damaged in such a way as to produce disintegration of the cytoplasm, there will be a breaking down of that combination, so that the fat will be set free from the complex protein molecule in which it was combined as a soap-albumin, and will become demonstrable by the usual methods as small droplets of oil.

  • It can develop vacuoles, or rather fine bubbles of carbonic acid gas in its cytoplasm, to float up to the surface of the water.

  • A differentiation of the peripheral cytoplasm in the form of an ectoplasmic layer has been described in one or two instances, and it seems probable that in most Trypanosomes there is such a layer, although only poorly developed, as a rule, around the body generally.

  • This is usually much clearer and more hyaline than the general cytoplasm.

  • In many forms deep-staining grains or granules, of a chromatoid nature and of var y ing size, are to be seen in the cytoplasm.

  • The division of the cytoplasm in most forms is equal or sub-equal, and two approximately equal daughter-Trypanosomes result (fig.

  • lewisi differs from most Trypanosomes in that the cytoplasm divides in a very unequal manner (fig.

  • The cytoplasm is finely granular and fairly uniform in character.

  • They have never been found to cause in fection, and they have not the characters of conidia; the large size of their nuclei, the reduction of their cytoplasm and the absence of reserve material and their thin cell wall all point to their being male gametes.

  • Embedded in the chromatophore, much in the same way as the nucleus is embedded in the cytoplasm, are the pyrenoids.

  • This is the carpogonium; it consists of a ventral portion which contains a nucleus, but in which no oosphere is differentiated, and an elongated tubular portion known as the trichogyne, into which the cytoplasm extends.

  • In the course of division two bodies appear in the cytoplasm, and behave as centrosomes during the karyokinesis; they gradually become threadlike and coil round each daughter nucleus.

  • The basic science of fusing the cytoplasm and nucleus and reactivating the cell is very poorly understood.

  • Within the cell, the viral RNA is replicated entirely in the cytoplasm, outside the nucleus containing the cell's own genetic material.

  • Translation Messenger RNA then passes out of the nucleus and travels to small structures called ribosomes in the cytoplasm.

  • Includes a splendid image of a Tradescantia stamen hair cell which clearly shows the cytoplasm strands.

  • Nuclear translocation - In every known clock, a key step is the translocation of a protein from the cytoplasm into the nucleus.

  • The fixation made evident the cytoplasm that surrounds the great central vacuole.

  • Lysosomes - small membrane bound vesicles in the cytoplasm of cells which contain toxic enzymes.

  • Dendrite-A threadlike extension of the cytoplasm of a neuron that conducts electrical impulses toward the cell body of the neuron.

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