This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience. Learn more

cyrene

cyrene

cyrene Sentence Examples

  • Apollo carried off from Mount Pelion the nymph Cyrene, daughter or granddaughter of the river-god Peneus, and conveyed her to Libya, where she gave birth to Aristaeus.

    0
    0
  • From Alexandria we get Athanasius, Didymus and Cyril; from Cyrene, Synesius; from Antioch, Theodore of Mopsuestia, John Chrysostom and Theodoret; from Palestine, Eusebius of Caesarea and Cyril of Jerusalem; from Cappadocia, Basil, Gregory of Nyssa and Gregory of Nazianzus.

    0
    0
  • In Egypt and in Cyrene fugitive Zealots endeavoured to continue their rebellion against the emperor, but there also with disastrous results.

    0
    0
  • Towards the end of Trajan's reign (114-117) the Jews of Egypt and Cyrene rose against their Greek neighbours and set up a king.

    0
    0
  • i* r °w Y according to various versions of the legend, he either rebuilt a city on the site of Troy, or settled at Cyrene, or became the founder of Patavium.

    0
    0
  • 180), whence it was conveyed by colonists to Cyrene and thence to Libya, where there was a river Triton.

    0
    0
  • ARISTIPPUS (c. 435-356 B.C.), Greek philosopher, the founder of the Cyrenaic school, was the son of Aritadas, a merchant of Cyrene.

    0
    0
  • Subsequently he travelled through a number of Grecian cities, and finally settled in Cyrene, where he founded his school.

    0
    0
  • BATTUS, the legendary founder of the Greek colony of Cyrene in Libya (about 630 B.C.).

    0
    0
  • Various accounts are given both of the founding of Cyrene and of the origin of the founder's name.

    0
    0
  • 7) gives his name as Aristaeus who was worshipped at Cyrene.

    0
    0
  • Four kings named Battus, alternating with four named Arcesilaus, ruled in Cyrene till the fall of the dynasty about 450 B.C.

    0
    0
  • Here is the cathedral church of St Lucius (who is the patron of Coire, and is supposed to be a 2nd-century British king, though really the name has probably arisen from a confusion between Lucius of Cyrene - miswritten "curiensis" - with the Roman general Lucius Munatius Plancus, who conquered Raetia).

    0
    0
  • In Cyprus 240,000 men are said to have been put to death, and at Cyrene 220,000.

    0
    0
  • SYNESIUS (c. 373 - c. 414), bishop of Ptolemais in the Libyan Pentapolis after 410, was born of wealthy parents, who claimed descent from Spartan kings, at Cyrene between 370 and 375.

    0
    0
  • After the successful Aurelian had granted the petition of the embassy, Synesius returned to Cyrene in 400, and spent the next ten years partly in that city, when unavoidable business called him there, but chiefly on an estate in the interior of the province, where in his own words "books and the chase" made up his life.

    0
    0
  • Volkmann, Synesius von Cyrene (Berlin, 1869); A.

    0
    0
  • CARNEADES (214-129 B.C.), Greek philosopher, founder of the Third or New Academy, was born at Cyrene.

    0
    0
  • 51, 52; the fact that Simon of Cyrene was "coming from the country," xv.

    0
    0
  • The Greek towns lying west from Cyrene would naturally be called Libyan.

    0
    0
  • CYRENAICS, a Greek school of philosophy, so called from Cyrene, the birthplace of the founder, Aristippus.

    0
    0
  • Cyrene >>

    0
    0
  • In the same century the study of Plato was represented by Synesius of Cyrene (c. 370-c. 41 3) and by the Neoplatonists of Alexandria and of Athens.

    0
    0
  • He had seen Cyrene from the sea, probably on his voyage from Puteoli to Alexandria, where he remained a long time, probably amassing materials, and studying astronomy and mathematics.

    0
    0
  • LACYDES OF CYRENE, Greek philosopher, was head of the Academy at Athens in succession to Arcesilaus about 241 B.C. Though some regard him as the founder of the New Academy, the testimony of antiquity is that he adhered in general to the theory of Arcesilaus, and, therefore, that he belonged to the Middle Academy.

    0
    0
  • The northern half of this district, which alone was fertile, was known as Pentapolis from its possession of five considerable cities (1) Hesperides-Berenice (Bengazi), (2) Barca (Merj), (3) Cyrene (Ain Shahat-Grenna), (4) Apollonia (Marsa Susa), (5) Teucheira-Arsinoe (Tocra).

    0
    0
  • These all lay on the coast, with the exception of Barca and Cyrene, which were situated on the highland now called Jebel Akhdar, a few miles inland.

    0
    0
  • A great revolt of the Jewish settlers in the time of Trajan settled the fate of Cyrene and Barca; the former is mentioned by Ammianus Marcellinus in the 4th century A.D.

    0
    0
  • Long before this its most famous article of export, the silphium plant, a representation of which was the chief coin-type of Cyrene, had come to an end.

    0
    0
  • This mass is divided into two blocks, the higher being the western Jebel Akhdar, on which Cyrene was built (about 1800 f t.): the lower, the eastern Jebel el-Akabah, the ancient Marmaric highlands (700 ft.).

    0
    0
  • iv.); fragments of Philostorgius, Socrates, Sozomen, Zosimus, Synesius of Cyrene ("The Egyptian"), Claudian.

    0
    0
  • Taken in order from the west, the treasure-houses were founded by the following states: 1, Sicyon; 2, 3, unknown; 4, Syracuse (referred by Pausanias to Carthage); 5, Epidamnus; 6, Byzantium; 7, Sybaris; 8, Cyrene; 9, Selinus; 10, Metapontum; 11, Megara; 12, Gela.

    0
    0
  • These troops, returning home from a disastrous expedition to Cyrene, suspected that they had been betrayed in order that Apries, the reigning king, might rule more absolutely by means of his mercenaries, and their friends in Egypt fully sympathized with them.

    0
    0
  • He also married a Greek princess named Ladice, the daughter of Battus, king of Cyrene, and he made alliances with Polycrates of Samos and Croesus of Lydia.

    0
    0
  • His kingdom consisted probably of Egypt only, as far as the First Cataract, but to this he added Cyprus, and his influence was great in Cyrene.

    0
    0
  • Jason Of Cyrene >>

    0
    0
  • Ehrlichs, De Callimachi hymnis) that she is to be identified with the Arsinoe who became wife of Magas, king of Cyrene, and that she married him after her exile to Coptos.

    0
    0
  • Philadelphus, but Arsinoe, disliking the projected alliance, induced Demetrius the Fair, son of Demetrius Poliorcetes, to accept the throne of Cyrene as husband of Berenice.

    0
    0
  • C. Agatho- troops; by inviting and murdering Ophellas, lord of Cyrene, he doubled his army and brought Carthage near to despair.

    0
    0
  • Later, however, a disastrous expedition sent to aid the Libyans against the Greek colony of Cyrene roused the suspicion and anger of the native soldiery at favors shown to the mercenaries, who of course had taken no part in it.

    0
    0
  • The annual tribute imposed on the satrapy of Egypt and Cyrene was heavy, but it was probably raised with ease.

    0
    0
  • - Next in importance after Sardis among ancient sites explored in 1910-20 is the Greek city of Cyrene, also opened by American enterprise.

    0
    0
  • But except at Cyrene, the new material from Africa is Punic or Roman, and not Greek.

    0
    0
  • Marshall, Discovery in Greek Lands (1920); Cyrene, Notiziario Archeologico del Ministero delle Colonie (1915); Ecole Francaise d'Athenes, Exploration Archeologique de Delos (1911-4); J.

    0
    0
  • As they led Him out they forced the cross, which the sufferer commonly carried, upon the shoulders of one Simon of Cyrene, whose sons Alexander and Rufus are here mentioned - probably as being known to St Mark's readers; at any rate, it is interesting to note that, in writing to the Christians at Rome, St Paul a few years earlier had sent a greeting to " Rufus and his mother."

    0
    0
  • The first of these was Clidemus or Clitodemus (about 378 B.C.); the last, Ister of Cyrene (died 212 B.C.); the most important was Philochorus (first half of the 3rd century B.C.), of whose work considerable fragments have been preserved.

    0
    0
  • (I) the condemnation by Pilate, (2) the reception of the cross, (3) Christ's first fall, (4) the meeting with His mother, (5) Simon of Cyrene carrying the cross, (6) Veronica wiping the face of Jesus, (7) the second fall, (8) the exhortation to the women of Jerusalem, (9) the third fall, (io) the stripping of the clothes, (i 1) the crucifixion, (12) the death, (13) the descent from the cross, (14) the burial.

    0
    0
  • From a very early period the little civic communities of Greece had sent forth numerous colonizing streams. At points so far asunder as the Tauric Chersonese, Cyrene and Massilia were found prosperous centres of Greek commercial energy; but the regions most thickly peopled by settlers of Greek descent were the western seaboard of Asia Minor, Sicily and the southern parts of the Italian peninsula.

    0
    0
  • The proportion, however, was not long maintained: new provinces were added to the empire - Bithynia in 74, Cyrene about the same time, Crete in 67, Syria in 64 - and one or more new law courts were instituted.

    0
    0
  • 6 In 116-117 the Jews of Cyprus, with those of Egypt and Cyrene, revolted, massacred 240,000 persons, and destroyed a large part of Salamis.

    0
    0
  • The ruins of the ancient town, which superseded Cyrene and Barca as chief place in the province after the 3rd century A.D., are now nearly buried in the sand.

    0
    0
  • A revolt of Cyrene was crushed in the same year.

    0
    0
  • Cyrene, after a series of rebellions, was finally subjugated about 300 and placed under his stepson Magas (Beloch, Griech.

    0
    0
  • Berenice, the daughter of Magas, king of Cyrene, and the wife of Ptolemy III.

    0
    0
  • Merj), an ancient city founded in the territory of Cyrene in the middle of the 6th century B.C. Rising quickly to importance it became a rival of the older city, and gave its name to the western province of the latter's territory.

    0
    0
  • The latter lies, like Cyrene, about ten miles from the coast on the crest of Jebel Akhdar, here sunk to a low downland.

    0
    0
  • He found his brother, however, willing to pardon and was allowed to return as king to Cyrene.

    0
    0
  • Euergetes however, swooping from Cyrene, seized the throne and married Cleopatra, making away with his nephew.

    0
    0
  • Magas of Cyrene opened war on his half-brother (274), and Antiochus I., the son of Seleucus, desiring Palestine, attacked soon after.

    0
    0
  • JASON OF CYRENE, a Hellenistic Jew, who lived about 100 B.C. and wrote a history of the times of the Maccabees down to the victory over Nicanor (175-161 B.C.).

    0
    0
  • Among these were Antisthenes the Cynic and Aristippus of Cyrene.

    0
    0
  • Eratosthenes (276-196 B.C.), a native of Cyrene, was summoned from Athens to Alexandria by Ptolemy Euergetes to take charge of the royal library.

    0
    0
  • 2 Maccabees, the epitome of a larger work in five books by one Jason of Cyrene, deals with the same history as its predecessor, except that it begins at a point one year earlier (176 B.C.), and stops short at the death of Nicanor (161 B.C.), thus covering a period of only fifteen years.

    0
    0
  • ERATOSTHENES OF ALEXANDRIA (c. 276 - c. 194 B.C.), Greek scientific writer, was born at Cyrene.

    0
    0
  • Apollo carried off from Mount Pelion the nymph Cyrene, daughter or granddaughter of the river-god Peneus, and conveyed her to Libya, where she gave birth to Aristaeus.

    0
    0
  • From this circumstance the town of Cyrene took its name.

    0
    0
  • From Alexandria we get Athanasius, Didymus and Cyril; from Cyrene, Synesius; from Antioch, Theodore of Mopsuestia, John Chrysostom and Theodoret; from Palestine, Eusebius of Caesarea and Cyril of Jerusalem; from Cappadocia, Basil, Gregory of Nyssa and Gregory of Nazianzus.

    0
    0
  • In Egypt and in Cyrene fugitive Zealots endeavoured to continue their rebellion against the emperor, but there also with disastrous results.

    0
    0
  • Towards the end of Trajan's reign (114-117) the Jews of Egypt and Cyrene rose against their Greek neighbours and set up a king.

    0
    0
  • Scientific geography profited largely from the labours of Eratosthenes of Cyrene, whom Ptolemy Euergetes appointed The gnomon was known to the Chinese in the 5th century B.C., and reached the Greeks (Anaximander) through Babylon.

    0
    0
  • After having served with the army in Thrace and been quaestor in Crete and Cyrene, Vespasian rose to be aedile and praetor, having meanwhile married Flavia Domitilla, the daughter of a Roman knight, by whom he had two sons, Titus and Domitian, afterwards emperors.

    0
    0
  • i* r °w Y according to various versions of the legend, he either rebuilt a city on the site of Troy, or settled at Cyrene, or became the founder of Patavium.

    0
    0
  • 180), whence it was conveyed by colonists to Cyrene and thence to Libya, where there was a river Triton.

    0
    0
  • ARISTIPPUS (c. 435-356 B.C.), Greek philosopher, the founder of the Cyrenaic school, was the son of Aritadas, a merchant of Cyrene.

    0
    0
  • Subsequently he travelled through a number of Grecian cities, and finally settled in Cyrene, where he founded his school.

    0
    0
  • BATTUS, the legendary founder of the Greek colony of Cyrene in Libya (about 630 B.C.).

    0
    0
  • Various accounts are given both of the founding of Cyrene and of the origin of the founder's name.

    0
    0
  • 7) gives his name as Aristaeus who was worshipped at Cyrene.

    0
    0
  • Four kings named Battus, alternating with four named Arcesilaus, ruled in Cyrene till the fall of the dynasty about 450 B.C.

    0
    0
  • Here is the cathedral church of St Lucius (who is the patron of Coire, and is supposed to be a 2nd-century British king, though really the name has probably arisen from a confusion between Lucius of Cyrene - miswritten "curiensis" - with the Roman general Lucius Munatius Plancus, who conquered Raetia).

    0
    0
  • In Cyprus 240,000 men are said to have been put to death, and at Cyrene 220,000.

    0
    0
  • SYNESIUS (c. 373 - c. 414), bishop of Ptolemais in the Libyan Pentapolis after 410, was born of wealthy parents, who claimed descent from Spartan kings, at Cyrene between 370 and 375.

    0
    0
  • After the successful Aurelian had granted the petition of the embassy, Synesius returned to Cyrene in 400, and spent the next ten years partly in that city, when unavoidable business called him there, but chiefly on an estate in the interior of the province, where in his own words "books and the chase" made up his life.

    0
    0
  • Volkmann, Synesius von Cyrene (Berlin, 1869); A.

    0
    0
  • CARNEADES (214-129 B.C.), Greek philosopher, founder of the Third or New Academy, was born at Cyrene.

    0
    0
  • 51, 52; the fact that Simon of Cyrene was "coming from the country," xv.

    0
    0
  • The Greek towns lying west from Cyrene would naturally be called Libyan.

    0
    0
  • CYRENAICS, a Greek school of philosophy, so called from Cyrene, the birthplace of the founder, Aristippus.

    0
    0
  • In the same century the study of Plato was represented by Synesius of Cyrene (c. 370-c. 41 3) and by the Neoplatonists of Alexandria and of Athens.

    0
    0
  • He had seen Cyrene from the sea, probably on his voyage from Puteoli to Alexandria, where he remained a long time, probably amassing materials, and studying astronomy and mathematics.

    0
    0
  • LACYDES OF CYRENE, Greek philosopher, was head of the Academy at Athens in succession to Arcesilaus about 241 B.C. Though some regard him as the founder of the New Academy, the testimony of antiquity is that he adhered in general to the theory of Arcesilaus, and, therefore, that he belonged to the Middle Academy.

    0
    0
  • The northern half of this district, which alone was fertile, was known as Pentapolis from its possession of five considerable cities (1) Hesperides-Berenice (Bengazi), (2) Barca (Merj), (3) Cyrene (Ain Shahat-Grenna), (4) Apollonia (Marsa Susa), (5) Teucheira-Arsinoe (Tocra).

    0
    0
  • These all lay on the coast, with the exception of Barca and Cyrene, which were situated on the highland now called Jebel Akhdar, a few miles inland.

    0
    0
  • Cyrene was the first city to arise, being founded among Libyan barbarians by Aristotle of Thera (later called Battus) in the middle of the 7th century B.C. (see Cyrene).

    0
    0
  • A great revolt of the Jewish settlers in the time of Trajan settled the fate of Cyrene and Barca; the former is mentioned by Ammianus Marcellinus in the 4th century A.D.

    0
    0
  • Long before this its most famous article of export, the silphium plant, a representation of which was the chief coin-type of Cyrene, had come to an end.

    0
    0
  • This mass is divided into two blocks, the higher being the western Jebel Akhdar, on which Cyrene was built (about 1800 f t.): the lower, the eastern Jebel el-Akabah, the ancient Marmaric highlands (700 ft.).

    0
    0
  • iv.); fragments of Philostorgius, Socrates, Sozomen, Zosimus, Synesius of Cyrene ("The Egyptian"), Claudian.

    0
    0
  • Taken in order from the west, the treasure-houses were founded by the following states: 1, Sicyon; 2, 3, unknown; 4, Syracuse (referred by Pausanias to Carthage); 5, Epidamnus; 6, Byzantium; 7, Sybaris; 8, Cyrene; 9, Selinus; 10, Metapontum; 11, Megara; 12, Gela.

    0
    0
  • These troops, returning home from a disastrous expedition to Cyrene, suspected that they had been betrayed in order that Apries, the reigning king, might rule more absolutely by means of his mercenaries, and their friends in Egypt fully sympathized with them.

    0
    0
  • He also married a Greek princess named Ladice, the daughter of Battus, king of Cyrene, and he made alliances with Polycrates of Samos and Croesus of Lydia.

    0
    0
  • His kingdom consisted probably of Egypt only, as far as the First Cataract, but to this he added Cyprus, and his influence was great in Cyrene.

    0
    0
  • Jason Of Cyrene >>

    0
    0
  • Ehrlichs, De Callimachi hymnis) that she is to be identified with the Arsinoe who became wife of Magas, king of Cyrene, and that she married him after her exile to Coptos.

    0
    0
  • Philadelphus, but Arsinoe, disliking the projected alliance, induced Demetrius the Fair, son of Demetrius Poliorcetes, to accept the throne of Cyrene as husband of Berenice.

    0
    0
  • C. Agatho- troops; by inviting and murdering Ophellas, lord of Cyrene, he doubled his army and brought Carthage near to despair.

    0
    0
  • Later, however, a disastrous expedition sent to aid the Libyans against the Greek colony of Cyrene roused the suspicion and anger of the native soldiery at favors shown to the mercenaries, who of course had taken no part in it.

    0
    0
  • The annual tribute imposed on the satrapy of Egypt and Cyrene was heavy, but it was probably raised with ease.

    0
    0
  • - Next in importance after Sardis among ancient sites explored in 1910-20 is the Greek city of Cyrene, also opened by American enterprise.

    0
    0
  • But except at Cyrene, the new material from Africa is Punic or Roman, and not Greek.

    0
    0
  • Marshall, Discovery in Greek Lands (1920); Cyrene, Notiziario Archeologico del Ministero delle Colonie (1915); Ecole Francaise d'Athenes, Exploration Archeologique de Delos (1911-4); J.

    0
    0
  • As they led Him out they forced the cross, which the sufferer commonly carried, upon the shoulders of one Simon of Cyrene, whose sons Alexander and Rufus are here mentioned - probably as being known to St Mark's readers; at any rate, it is interesting to note that, in writing to the Christians at Rome, St Paul a few years earlier had sent a greeting to " Rufus and his mother."

    0
    0
  • The first of these was Clidemus or Clitodemus (about 378 B.C.); the last, Ister of Cyrene (died 212 B.C.); the most important was Philochorus (first half of the 3rd century B.C.), of whose work considerable fragments have been preserved.

    0
    0
  • (I) the condemnation by Pilate, (2) the reception of the cross, (3) Christ's first fall, (4) the meeting with His mother, (5) Simon of Cyrene carrying the cross, (6) Veronica wiping the face of Jesus, (7) the second fall, (8) the exhortation to the women of Jerusalem, (9) the third fall, (io) the stripping of the clothes, (i 1) the crucifixion, (12) the death, (13) the descent from the cross, (14) the burial.

    0
    0
  • From a very early period the little civic communities of Greece had sent forth numerous colonizing streams. At points so far asunder as the Tauric Chersonese, Cyrene and Massilia were found prosperous centres of Greek commercial energy; but the regions most thickly peopled by settlers of Greek descent were the western seaboard of Asia Minor, Sicily and the southern parts of the Italian peninsula.

    0
    0
  • The proportion, however, was not long maintained: new provinces were added to the empire - Bithynia in 74, Cyrene about the same time, Crete in 67, Syria in 64 - and one or more new law courts were instituted.

    0
    0
  • 6 In 116-117 the Jews of Cyprus, with those of Egypt and Cyrene, revolted, massacred 240,000 persons, and destroyed a large part of Salamis.

    0
    0
  • The ruins of the ancient town, which superseded Cyrene and Barca as chief place in the province after the 3rd century A.D., are now nearly buried in the sand.

    0
    0
  • A revolt of Cyrene was crushed in the same year.

    0
    0
  • Cyrene, after a series of rebellions, was finally subjugated about 300 and placed under his stepson Magas (Beloch, Griech.

    0
    0
  • Berenice, the daughter of Magas, king of Cyrene, and the wife of Ptolemy III.

    0
    0
  • Merj), an ancient city founded in the territory of Cyrene in the middle of the 6th century B.C. Rising quickly to importance it became a rival of the older city, and gave its name to the western province of the latter's territory.

    0
    0
  • (see CYRENE), but it is certain that it was rather a Libyan than a Greek town at all times.

    0
    0
  • Under Ptolemaic rule it began to decline, like Cyrene, and its port Ptolemais (Tolmeita) took its place: but after the Arab conquest (A.D.

    0
    0
  • The latter lies, like Cyrene, about ten miles from the coast on the crest of Jebel Akhdar, here sunk to a low downland.

    0
    0
  • He found his brother, however, willing to pardon and was allowed to return as king to Cyrene.

    0
    0
  • Euergetes however, swooping from Cyrene, seized the throne and married Cleopatra, making away with his nephew.

    0
    0
  • Magas of Cyrene opened war on his half-brother (274), and Antiochus I., the son of Seleucus, desiring Palestine, attacked soon after.

    0
    0
  • JASON OF CYRENE, a Hellenistic Jew, who lived about 100 B.C. and wrote a history of the times of the Maccabees down to the victory over Nicanor (175-161 B.C.).

    0
    0
  • Among these were Antisthenes the Cynic and Aristippus of Cyrene.

    0
    0
  • Eratosthenes (276-196 B.C.), a native of Cyrene, was summoned from Athens to Alexandria by Ptolemy Euergetes to take charge of the royal library.

    0
    0
  • After the death of Jugurtha as a captive at Rome in 106, the western part of his dominions was added to those of Bocchus, king of Mauretania, while the remainder (excluding perhaps the territory towards Cyrene) continued to be governed by native princes until the civil war between Caesar and Pompey, in which Juba I., then king of Numidia, who had espoused the cause of the Pompeians, was defeated by Caesar, and put an end to his own life (46 B.C.).

    0
    0
  • 2 Maccabees, the epitome of a larger work in five books by one Jason of Cyrene, deals with the same history as its predecessor, except that it begins at a point one year earlier (176 B.C.), and stops short at the death of Nicanor (161 B.C.), thus covering a period of only fifteen years.

    0
    0
  • ERATOSTHENES OF ALEXANDRIA (c. 276 - c. 194 B.C.), Greek scientific writer, was born at Cyrene.

    0
    0
Browse other sentences examples →