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cynic

cynic

cynic Sentence Examples

  • He was incredulous as a Missouri cynic but interested.

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  • Eubulides wrote a treatise on Diogenes the Cynic and also a number of comedies.

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  • Epictetus, however, would have the sage hold aloof from domestic cares, another Cynic trait.

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  • Finally it is necessary to point out two flaws in the Cynic philosophy.

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  • Finally it is necessary to point out two flaws in the Cynic philosophy.

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  • ANTISTHENES (c. 444-365 B.C.), the founder of the Cynic school of philosophy, was born at Athens of a Thracian mother, a fact which may account for the extreme boldness of his attack on conventional thought.

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  • ANTISTHENES (c. 444-365 B.C.), the founder of the Cynic school of philosophy, was born at Athens of a Thracian mother, a fact which may account for the extreme boldness of his attack on conventional thought.

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  • But he frequently describes an ideal character of a missionary sage, the perfect Stoic - or, as he calls him, the Cynic. This missionary has neither country nor home nor land nor slave; his bed is the ground; he is without wife or child; his only mansion is the earth and sky and a shabby cloak.

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  • Zeno, we have reason to believe, adopted the Cynic Logos for his guidance to truth as well as to morality.

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  • METROCLES, a Greek philosoper of the Cynic school, was a contemporary of Crates, under whose persuasion he deserted the views of Theophrastus.

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  • Zeno commenced, then, as a Cynic; and in the developed system we can point to a kernel of Cynic doctrine to which various philosophemes of other thinkers (more especially Heraclitus and Aristotle, but also Diogenes of Apollonia, the Pythagoreans, and the medical school of Hippocrates in a lesser degree) were added.

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  • He flouted life and all philosophies but the Cynic in light compositions, partly in prose and partly in verse.

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  • 4); and the dialogue Protrepticus was known to the Cynic Crates, pupil of Diogenes and master of Zeno (Fragm.

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  • He became a Cynic philosopher, and is a figure familiar to readers of Lucian.

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  • 4); and the dialogue Protrepticus was known to the Cynic Crates, pupil of Diogenes and master of Zeno (Fragm.

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    6
  • From a popular conception of the intellectual characteristics of the school comes the modern sense of "cynic," implying a sneering disposition to disbelieve in the goodness of human motives and a contemptuous feeling of superiority.

    8
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  • Merimee was tried for a week, but the cool cynic and the perfervid apostle of women's rights proved mutually repulsive.

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  • He differed from Zeno on many points, and approximated more closely to the Cynic school.

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  • There is, however, in the Cynic notion of wisdom, no positive criterion beyond the mere negation of irrational desires and prejudices.

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  • The closeness of the connexion is illustrated by Juvenal's epigram that a Cynic differed from a Stoic only by his cloak.

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  • That this cynic manner, and Epicurean speech, were only the outside of.

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  • Among his opponents was the Cynic Crescentius (Apol.

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  • Zeno visited all the schools in turn, but seems to have attached himself definitely to the Cynics;, as a Cynic he composed at least one of his more important works, " the much admired Republic," which we know to have been later on a stumbling-block to the school.

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  • The Cynosarges, from earliest times a sanctuary of Heracles, later a celebrated gymnasium and the school of Antisthenes The Cyno- Cynic, has hitherto been generally supposed to on the eastern slope of Lycabettus; its situation, however, has been fixed by D6rpfeld at a point a little to the south of the Olympieum, on the left bank of the Ilissus.

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  • An idea of his writings can be gathered from the fragments of Teles, a cynic philosopher who lived towards the end of the 3rd century, and who made great use of them.

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  • The Cynosarges, from earliest times a sanctuary of Heracles, later a celebrated gymnasium and the school of Antisthenes The Cyno- Cynic, has hitherto been generally supposed to on the eastern slope of Lycabettus; its situation, however, has been fixed by D6rpfeld at a point a little to the south of the Olympieum, on the left bank of the Ilissus.

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    5
  • With Plutarch, who dedicated to him his treatise IIEpi Tov irpwrov 11vxpov, with Herodes Atticus, to whom he bequeathed his library at Rome, with Demetrius the Cynic, Cornelius Fronto, Aulus Gellius, and with Hadrian himself, he lived on intimate terms; his great rival, whom he violently attacked in his later years, was Polemon of Smyrna.

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  • If the recognition of physics and logic as two studies coordinate with ethics is sufficient to differentiate the mature Zeno from the Cynic author of the Republic, no less than from his own heterodox disciple Aristo, the Cleanthes.

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    6
  • With but four drachmae in his possession he came to Athens, where he listened first to the lectures of Crates the Cynic, and then to those of Zeno, the Stoic, supporting himself meanwhile by working all night as water-carrier to a gardener (hence his nickname (1 3 p€/wrXrls).

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  • Among these were Antisthenes the Cynic and Aristippus of Cyrene.

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  • In the Cynic school he found the practical spirit which he divined to be the great need of that stirring troublous age.

    5
    3
  • Reading the Ephesian doctrine with the eyes of a Cynic, and the Cynic ethics in the light of Heracliteanism, he came to formulate his distinctive theory of the universe far in advance of either.

    5
    3
  • Such Cynic crudity Chrysippus rightly judged to be out of keeping with the requirements of a great dogmatic school, and he laboured on all sides after thoroughness, erudition and scientific completeness.

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  • Suetonius, in his Life of Nero, refers to a Cynic philosopher named Isidore, who is said to have jested publicly at the expense of Nero.

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  • In taking this immense stride and identifying the Cynic " reason," which is a law for man, with the " reason " which is the law of the universe, Zeno has been compared with Plato, who similarly extended the Socratic " general notion " from the region of morals - of justice, temperance, virtue - to embrace all objects of all thought, the verity of all things that are.

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    5
  • At an advanced age he became a pupil of Diogenes the Cynic, and gained such repute as a student of philosophy that he was selected by Alexander to hold a conference with the Indian Gymnosophists.

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  • He extolled the Cynic luraBeia (loosely, self-control) as the principal virtue.

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  • Both Stoic and Cynic maintained, in its sharpest form, the fundamental tenet that the practical knowledge which is virtue, with the condition of soul that is inseparable from it, is alone to be accounted good.

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  • They found this by bringing out the positive significance of the notion of Nature, which the Cynic had used chiefly in a negative way, as an antithesis to the " consentions " (voµos), from which his knowledge had made him free.

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  • Four distinct philosophical schools trace their immediate origin to the circle that gathered round Socrates - the Megarian, the Platonic, the Cynic and the Cyrenaic. The impress of the master is manifest on all, in spite of the wide differences that divide them; they all agree in holding the most important possession of man to be wisdom or knowledge, and the most important knowledge to be knowledge of Good.

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  • It is evident that the merit of these qualities in our eyes is chiefly due to our perception of their tendency to serve the person possessed of them; so that the cynic in praising them is really exhibiting the unselfish sympathy of which he doubts the existence.

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  • It is evident that the merit of these qualities in our eyes is chiefly due to our perception of their tendency to serve the person possessed of them; so that the cynic in praising them is really exhibiting the unselfish sympathy of which he doubts the existence.

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  • The narrative of Tacitus breaks off at the moment when Thrasea was about to address Demetrius, the Cynic philosopher, with whom he had previously on the fatal day held a conversation on the nature of the soul.

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  • They found this by bringing out the positive significance of the notion of Nature, which the Cynic had used chiefly in a negative way, as an antithesis to the " consentions " (voµos), from which his knowledge had made him free.

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    2
  • This philosopher, a man of striking and attractive personality, succeeded in fusing the Megarian dialectic with Cynic naturalism.

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  • Four distinct philosophical schools trace their immediate origin to the circle that gathered round Socrates - the Megarian, the Platonic, the Cynic and the Cyrenaic. The impress of the master is manifest on all, in spite of the wide differences that divide them; they all agree in holding the most important possession of man to be wisdom or knowledge, and the most important knowledge to be knowledge of Good.

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  • I think you owe me an apology, Mr. Cynic.

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  • In modern scientific literature the principal Servian names are those of the electrician Nicholas Tesla, the botanist Dr Josif Panchich, and the geologists Dr Yovan Zhuyevich and Dr Yovan Tsviyich (Cynic).

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  • He was incredulous as a Missouri cynic but interested.

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  • He was the resident cynic and nay-sayer and now the first to jump in and embrace this scary opportunity.

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  • I think you owe me an apology, Mr. Cynic.

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  • The examples above demonstrate the unique confluence of humor, fearless truth telling, and political subversion which distinguishes the Cynic way of living.

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  • I'm quite a hardened cynic when direct mail drops through my door.

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  • Merimee was tried for a week, but the cool cynic and the perfervid apostle of women's rights proved mutually repulsive.

    0
    0
  • From a popular conception of the intellectual characteristics of the school comes the modern sense of "cynic," implying a sneering disposition to disbelieve in the goodness of human motives and a contemptuous feeling of superiority.

    0
    0
  • The closeness of the connexion is illustrated by Juvenal's epigram that a Cynic differed from a Stoic only by his cloak.

    0
    0
  • With Plutarch, who dedicated to him his treatise IIEpi Tov irpwrov 11vxpov, with Herodes Atticus, to whom he bequeathed his library at Rome, with Demetrius the Cynic, Cornelius Fronto, Aulus Gellius, and with Hadrian himself, he lived on intimate terms; his great rival, whom he violently attacked in his later years, was Polemon of Smyrna.

    0
    0
  • Among his opponents was the Cynic Crescentius (Apol.

    0
    0
  • In these cynic weeds and with Epicurean good humour did he dictate his politics, and in this school did the heir of the empire attend his lessons and imbibe them."

    0
    0
  • That this cynic manner, and Epicurean speech, were only the outside of.

    0
    0
  • This philosopher, a man of striking and attractive personality, succeeded in fusing the Megarian dialectic with Cynic naturalism.

    0
    0
  • At an advanced age he became a pupil of Diogenes the Cynic, and gained such repute as a student of philosophy that he was selected by Alexander to hold a conference with the Indian Gymnosophists.

    0
    0
  • An idea of his writings can be gathered from the fragments of Teles, a cynic philosopher who lived towards the end of the 3rd century, and who made great use of them.

    0
    0
  • METROCLES, a Greek philosoper of the Cynic school, was a contemporary of Crates, under whose persuasion he deserted the views of Theophrastus.

    0
    0
  • He extolled the Cynic luraBeia (loosely, self-control) as the principal virtue.

    0
    0
  • Johnson saw with more envy than became so great a man the villa, the plate, the china, the Brussels carpet, which the little mimic had got by repeating, with grimaces and gesticulations, what wiser men had written; and the exquisitely sensitive vanity of Garrick was galled by the thought that, while all the rest of the world was applauding him, he could obtain from one morose cynic, whose opinion it was impossible to despise, scarcely any compliment not acidulated with scorn.

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  • The Stoic or Cynic preacher, attacking the ways of society, in pungent, often coarse, phrase, became a familiar figure of the Greek market-place (P. Wendland, Beitrage zur Gesch.

    0
    0
  • He differed from Zeno on many points, and approximated more closely to the Cynic school.

    0
    0
  • Eubulides wrote a treatise on Diogenes the Cynic and also a number of comedies.

    0
    0
  • But he frequently describes an ideal character of a missionary sage, the perfect Stoic - or, as he calls him, the Cynic. This missionary has neither country nor home nor land nor slave; his bed is the ground; he is without wife or child; his only mansion is the earth and sky and a shabby cloak.

    0
    0
  • Zeno visited all the schools in turn, but seems to have attached himself definitely to the Cynics;, as a Cynic he composed at least one of his more important works, " the much admired Republic," which we know to have been later on a stumbling-block to the school.

    0
    0
  • In the Cynic school he found the practical spirit which he divined to be the great need of that stirring troublous age.

    0
    0
  • Zeno commenced, then, as a Cynic; and in the developed system we can point to a kernel of Cynic doctrine to which various philosophemes of other thinkers (more especially Heraclitus and Aristotle, but also Diogenes of Apollonia, the Pythagoreans, and the medical school of Hippocrates in a lesser degree) were added.

    0
    0
  • Reading the Ephesian doctrine with the eyes of a Cynic, and the Cynic ethics in the light of Heracliteanism, he came to formulate his distinctive theory of the universe far in advance of either.

    0
    0
  • In taking this immense stride and identifying the Cynic " reason," which is a law for man, with the " reason " which is the law of the universe, Zeno has been compared with Plato, who similarly extended the Socratic " general notion " from the region of morals - of justice, temperance, virtue - to embrace all objects of all thought, the verity of all things that are.

    0
    0
  • If the recognition of physics and logic as two studies coordinate with ethics is sufficient to differentiate the mature Zeno from the Cynic author of the Republic, no less than from his own heterodox disciple Aristo, the Cleanthes.

    0
    0
  • Such Cynic crudity Chrysippus rightly judged to be out of keeping with the requirements of a great dogmatic school, and he laboured on all sides after thoroughness, erudition and scientific completeness.

    0
    0
  • Zeno, we have reason to believe, adopted the Cynic Logos for his guidance to truth as well as to morality.

    0
    0
  • Epictetus, however, would have the sage hold aloof from domestic cares, another Cynic trait.

    0
    0
  • He became a Cynic philosopher, and is a figure familiar to readers of Lucian.

    0
    0
  • He flouted life and all philosophies but the Cynic in light compositions, partly in prose and partly in verse.

    0
    0
  • The narrative of Tacitus breaks off at the moment when Thrasea was about to address Demetrius, the Cynic philosopher, with whom he had previously on the fatal day held a conversation on the nature of the soul.

    0
    0
  • With but four drachmae in his possession he came to Athens, where he listened first to the lectures of Crates the Cynic, and then to those of Zeno, the Stoic, supporting himself meanwhile by working all night as water-carrier to a gardener (hence his nickname (1 3 p€/wrXrls).

    0
    0
  • Among these were Antisthenes the Cynic and Aristippus of Cyrene.

    0
    0
  • There is, however, in the Cynic notion of wisdom, no positive criterion beyond the mere negation of irrational desires and prejudices.

    0
    0
  • Both Stoic and Cynic maintained, in its sharpest form, the fundamental tenet that the practical knowledge which is virtue, with the condition of soul that is inseparable from it, is alone to be accounted good.

    0
    0
  • In modern scientific literature the principal Servian names are those of the electrician Nicholas Tesla, the botanist Dr Josif Panchich, and the geologists Dr Yovan Zhuyevich and Dr Yovan Tsviyich (Cynic).

    0
    0
  • Suetonius, in his Life of Nero, refers to a Cynic philosopher named Isidore, who is said to have jested publicly at the expense of Nero.

    0
    0
  • The optimist would probably try to hug the cynic.

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  • But let's adopt the cynic's view for a moment and assume people in these corporations are chiefly concerned about their financial benefit, not about human suffering, when it comes to war.

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  • Whilst I 'm being the cynic, I 'd like to comment on the pull-up diaper scenario.

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  • A short list includes The Cynic, One Story, SORMAG, Rhapsody, and Narrative Magazine.

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