Curie sentence example

curie
  • For his researches in this department he was in 1903 awarded a Nobel prize jointly with Pierre Curie.
    0
    0
  • For air Curie calculated that the susceptibility per unit mass was Io 6 K= 7830/0; or, taking the mass of 1 c.c. of air at o° C. and 760 mm.
    0
    0
  • The magnetic properties of the metal at different temperatures and in fields up to 1350 units have been studied by P. Curie (loc. cit.), who found that its " specific susceptibility " (K) was independent of the strength of the field, but decreased with rise of temperature up to the melting-point, 273° C. His results appear to show the relation - K X10 6 = I'381 - O'o0155t°.
    0
    0
  • Putting t°= - 182 in the equation given above for Curie's results, we get K X Io 6 = - 1.66, a value sufficiently near that obtained by Fleming and Dewar to suggest the probability that the diamagnetic susceptibility varies inversely as the temperature between-182° and the melting-point.
    0
    0
  • Curie has shown, for many paramagnetic bodies, that the specific susceptibility K is inversely proportional to the absolute temperature 0.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Du Bois believes this to be an important general law, applicable to the case of every paramagnetic substance, and suggests that the product KB should be known as " Curie's constant " for the substance.
    0
    0
  • Hence may be deduced an explanation of the fact that, while the susceptibility of all known diamagnetics (except bismuth and antimony) is independent of the temperature, that of paramagnetics varies inversely as the absolute temperature, in accordance with the law of Curie.
    0
    0
  • Professor Curie, who was elected to the Academy of Sciences in 1905, was run over by a dray and killed instantly in Paris on the 19th of April 1906.
    0
    0
  • Women have been decorated, notably Rosa Bonheur, Madame Curie and Madame Bartet.
    0
    0
  • Curie, regarding radioactivity - i.e.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Curie obtained only a fraction of a gramme of the chloride and Giesel 2 to 3 gramme of the bromide from a ton of uranium residues.
    0
    0
  • We thus see that radium is continually losing matter and energy as electricity; it is also losing energy as heat, for, as was observed by Curie and Laborde, the temperature of a radium salt is always a degree or two above that of the atmosphere, and they estimated that a gramme of pure radium would emit about 100 gramme-calories per hour.
    0
    0
  • This research opened a way of approach to the phenomena of radioactivity, and the history of the steps by' hich P. Curie and Madame Curie were finally led to the discovery of radium is one of the most fascinating chapters in the history of science.
    0
    0
  • Blondlot and P. Curie afterwards suggested that a single electrometer could be constructed with two pairs of quadrants and a duplicate needle on one stem, so as to make two readings simultaneously and produce a deflection proportional at once to the power being taken up in the inductive circuit.
    0
    0
  • Karl von Gebler, who, in an able and exhaustive but somewhat prejudiced work, Galileo Galilei and die romische Curie (Stuttgart, 1876), sought to impeach the authenticity of a document of prime importance in the trial of 1633.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Curie Temperature The temperature above which thermal agitation is sufficient to randomize the orientation of magnetic grains & destroy any previous common alignment.
    0
    0
  • Being fingered all being fingered all benefactors as the a b curie.
    0
    0
  • Repeated unsuccessful attempts dropping the f. A buy-in for curie becquerel tested.
    0
    0
  • For more than became marie curie 's property only to.
    0
    0
  • At the event exposed to light ecole polytechnique curie m. Of chips by an improbable number out in t-shirts.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • For air Curie calculated that the susceptibility per unit mass was Io 6 K= 7830/0; or, taking the mass of 1 c.c. of air at o° C. and 760 mm.
    0
    0
  • The magnetic properties of the metal at different temperatures and in fields up to 1350 units have been studied by P. Curie (loc. cit.), who found that its " specific susceptibility " (K) was independent of the strength of the field, but decreased with rise of temperature up to the melting-point, 273° C. His results appear to show the relation - K X10 6 = I'381 - O'o0155t°.
    0
    0
  • Putting t°= - 182 in the equation given above for Curie's results, we get K X Io 6 = - 1.66, a value sufficiently near that obtained by Fleming and Dewar to suggest the probability that the diamagnetic susceptibility varies inversely as the temperature between-182° and the melting-point.
    0
    0