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cure

cure

cure Sentence Examples

  • I hope it will cure him.

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  • One can't cure anything.

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  • Carmen took her to the doctor, but he said there was no cure for the common cold and not to worry about it.

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  • I bankroll people who cure aids.

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  • If I find a cure, we'll revisit this conversation.

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  • curare, to take care of), properly a presbyter who has the cure of souls within a parish.

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  • Likewise for mental illnesses: We should be able to cure them to the extent the person in question would wish them to be.

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  • Upon this too static a view, both of clinical type and of post-mortem-room pathology, came a despairing spirit, almost of fatalism, which in the contemplation of organic ruins lost the hope of cure of organic diseases.

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  • The origin of such unendowed curacies is traceable to the fact that benefices were sometimes granted to religious houses pleno jure, and with liberty for them to provide for the cure; and when such appropriations were transferred to lay persons, being unable to serve themselves, the impropriators were required to nominate a clerk in full orders to the.

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  • They talk about medicine--what is the good of medicine when it can't cure a cold!

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  • She couldn't cure whatever it was, and she couldn't make sense of it.

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  • (The boy was afraid of the dark and they could not cure him of it.)

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  • "Howie," Quinn implored, "You have to realize you can't cure all the ills of the world.

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  • from the town, which yield over 500,000 gallons daily, are resorted to for the cure of rheumatism and skin diseases.

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  • The spread of syphilis, a disease equally unknown to the ancients, and the failure of Galen's remedies to cure it, had a similar effect.

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  • If the magic of Hell can't cure her, can yours?

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  • You didn't try as hard to cure me? she asked, perplexed.

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  • Fallopius, who gave them credit for the cure of his own deafness, sounded their praises in 1569; and they have been more or less in fashion since.

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  • If the magic of Hell can't cure her, can yours?

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  • This simple thought could not occur to the doctors (as it cannot occur to a wizard that he is unable to work his charms) because the business of their lives was to cure, and they received money for it and had spent the best years of their lives on that business.

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  • He offered her a choice: to cure the inoperable brain tumor killing her or to outright kill her before she declined, whichever outcome she preferred.

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  • Thousands of people research diseases because they individually want to cure them.

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  • She'd always hoped Wynn found some miracle cure, even while checking things off her bucket list.

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  • With a penchant for medicine and science and my magic, I can cure what others could not.

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  • Having taken priest's orders, he held in 1524 a cure in the neighbourhood of Augsburg, but soon (1525) went over to the Reformed party at Nuremberg and became preacher at Gustenfelden.

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  • It would be different if you grudged losing a laborer--that's how I regard him--but you want to cure him from love of him.

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  • As regards pulmonary disease, pneumonia has passed more and more definitely into the category of the infections: the modes of invasion of the lungs and pleura by tuberculosis has been more and more accurately followed; and the treatment of these diseases, in the spheres both of prevention and of cure, has undergone a radical change.

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  • Even for internal cancer cure or substantial relief is not infrequently obtained.

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  • 3515) as a goddess of healing, especially skilled to cure serpent bites by charms and the herbs of the Marsian woods.

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  • In medieval ecclesiastical usage the term might be applied to almost any person having ecclesiastical authority; it was very commonly given to the more dignified clergy of a cathedral church, but often also to ordinary priests charged with the cure of souls and, in the early days of monasticism, to monastic superiors, even to superiors of convents of women.

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  • According to the former of these accounts Veronica, in memory of her cure, caused a portrait of the Saviour to be painted.

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  • In medieval ecclesiastical usage the term might be applied to almost any person having ecclesiastical authority; it was very commonly given to the more dignified clergy of a cathedral church, but often also to ordinary priests charged with the cure of souls and, in the early days of monasticism, to monastic superiors, even to superiors of convents of women.

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  • Nature was sufficient for the cure of most diseases; art had only to interfere when the internal physician, the man himself, was tired or incapable.

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  • After being cure successively of two villages in that diocese, Loisy went in May 1881, to study and take a theological degree, to the Institut Catholique in Paris.

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  • Not that Hippocrates taught, as he was afterwards reproached with teaching, that nature is sufficient for the cure of diseases; for he held strongly the efficacy of art.

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  • They had from early times a very complicated system of superstitious medicine, or religion, related to disease and the cure of disease, borrowed, as is thought, from the Etruscans; and, though the saying of Pliny that the Roman people got on for six hundred years without doctors was doubtless an exaggeration, and not, literally speaking, exact, it must be accepted for the broad truth which it contains.

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  • Indeed, in such early stages, and in patients who are enabled to command the means of an expensive method of cure, phthisis is no longer regarded as desperate; while steps are being taken to provide for those who of their own means are unable to obtain these advantages, by the erection of special sanatoriums on a more or less charitable basis.

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  • In the treatment of effusions into the pleura and, though with less advantage, of pericardial effusions, direct mechanical interference was practised by one physician and another, till these means of attaining rapid and complete cure took their places as indispensable, and were extended from thoracic diseases to those of the abdominal and other inner parts formerly beyond the reach of direct therapeutics.

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  • While England endeavors to cure the potato-rot, will not any endeavor to cure the brain-rot, which prevails so much more widely and fatally?

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  • As a specific for gout colchicum was early employed by the Arabs; and the preparation known as eau medicinale, much resorted to in the 18th century for the cure of gout, owes its therapeutic virtues to colchicum; but general attention was first directed by Sir Everard Home to the use of the drug in gout.

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  • The law of which we are the instruments strives even through the, carnage to cure the wounds due to the law of war.

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  • This latter is absolute misery, and to cure it the Unconscious evokes its Reason and with its aid creates the best of all possible worlds, which contains the promise of its redemption from actual existence by the emancipation of the Reason from its subjugation to the Will in the conscious reason of the enlightened pessimist.

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  • It has a small spa, and its sulphur baths are resorted to for the cure of rheumatism and gout.

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  • He was henceforth assiduous in the performance of his duties, preaching in his cure of Novoli, and also in the cathedral and the church of the Angeli at Florence.

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  • In early times, though there is considerable variety in the cases treated and the methods of cure, there are certain characteristics common to the majority of the cases.

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  • This latter is absolute misery, and to cure it the Unconscious evokes its Reason and with its aid creates the best of all possible worlds, which contains the promise of its redemption from actual existence by the emancipation of the Reason from its subjugation to the Will in the conscious reason of the enlightened pessimist.

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  • It has a small spa, and its sulphur baths are resorted to for the cure of rheumatism and gout.

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  • In the Roman communion, on the other hand, both where the Church is established and where it is not, the tendency is to reduce the status of cure to that of desservant, and to deal with all members of the priestly or lower orders by administrative methods.

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  • So, regulars having cure of souls are subject to the jurisdiction of the bishop in matters pertaining thereto (ib.

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  • The first recognition of a disease may be at a necropsy, but then usually by irresponsible pathologists; it is another matter when the physician himself comes under rebuke for failing to seize a way to cure, while the chance remained to him, by section of the abdomen during life.

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  • Infantile diarrhoea has also been recognized as a common infection (Ballard), and the means of its avoidance and cure ascertained.

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  • Not a cure, but it sure beats insulin shots.

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  • A cure, in addition to his regular salary, received fees for baptisms, marriages, funerals and special masses, and had the benefit of a free house called a presbytre.

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  • The subject of patent medicines is but little understood by the general public. Any medicine, the composition of which is kept secret, but which is advertised on the label for the cure of diseases, must in Great Britain bear a patent medicine stamp equal to about one-ninth of its face value.

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  • The hot sulphur springs of Aix-la-Chapelle were known to the Romans and have been celebrated for centuries as specific in the cure of rheumatism, gout and scrofulous disorders.

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  • But little time was lost by the elder Gibbon in the formation of a new plan of education for his son, and in devising some method which if possible might effect the cure of his "spiritual malady."

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  • Froissart relates that he was burned to death through his bedclothes catching fire; Secousse says that he died in peace with many signs of contrition; another story says he died of leprosy; and a popular legend tells how he expired by a divine judgment through the burning of the clothes steeped in sulphur and spirits in which he had been wrapped as a cure for a loathsome disease caused by his debauchery.

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  • 3), who translated them from the Syriac. They are two in number, and purport to be a petition of Abgar Uchomo, king of Edessa, to Christ to visit Edessa, and Christ's answer, promising after his ascension to send one of his disciples, who should " cure thee of thy disease, and give eternal life and peace to thee and all thy people."

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  • The principles of treatment just mentioned apply more especially to the cure of acute diseases; but they are the most salient characteristics of the Hippocratic school.

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  • In the department of abdominal disease progress has been made, not only in this enormous extension of means of cure by operative methods, but also in the verification of diagnosis.

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  • At Belcoo, near Enniskillen, there is a famous well called Daragh Phadric, held in repute by the peasantry for its cure of paralytic and other diseases; and 4 m.

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  • Prepared as a draught, it was used as a cure for sterility and a remedy for poisons.

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  • No certain cure has been or is likely to be discovered for their poison, but in less serious cases strychnine has been used with advantage.

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  • And the principle at work in this technology could lead to a cure for other autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis and rheumatoid arthritis.

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  • Even to Natasha herself it was pleasant to see that so many sacrifices were being made for her sake, and to know that she had to take medicine at certain hours, though she declared that no medicine would cure her and that it was all nonsense.

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  • They all knew very well that the enchanting countess' illness arose from an inconvenience resulting from marrying two husbands at the same time, and that the Italian's cure consisted in removing such inconvenience; but in Anna Pavlovna's presence no one dared to think of this or even appear to know it.

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  • Sandy's steakhouse restaurants provide the perfect cure.

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  • Deidre made a deal with the Dark One, one good enough to bring her soul back from the dead, combine the two Deidres, cure the tumor of one and release the final product from Hell.

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  • Gabriel will not be able to take you, and he won't be able to cure you.

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  • Is there a cure?

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  • ordinary for his licence to serve the cure.

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  • The diseases or sicknesses of beer and wine had from time immemorial baffled all attempts at cure.

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  • It was said that the male figure represented Christ, and that the group had been set up in recognition of the miraculous cure.

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  • As regards the theory, it may be pointed out: (I) that the nature or cosmical miracles - feeding of the five thousand, stilling of the storm, withering of the fig-tree - are as wellattested as the miracles of healing; (2) that many of the diseases, the cure of which is reported, are of a kind with which moral therapeutics could not effect anything; 1 (3) that Christ's own insight regarding the power by which he wrought His works is directly challenged by this explanation, for He never failed to ascribe His power to the Father dwelling in Him.

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  • In the turmoil of his later life he looked back with regret to his student days; and "for all his troubles philosophy was his only cure."

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  • He rejected the vis medicatrix naturae, pointing out that nature in many cases not only did not help but marred the cure.

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  • Some of the most successful of the advances of medicine as a healing art have followed the detection of syphilitic disease of the vessels, or of the supporting tissues of nervous centres and of the peripheral nerves; so that, by specific medication, the treatment of paralytic, convulsive, and other terrible manifestations of nervous disease thus secondarily induced is now undertaken in early stages with definite prospect of cure.

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  • A remarkable help to the cure of headaches and wider nervous disorders has come out of the better appreciation and correction of errors of refraction in the eye.

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  • By the laryngoscope, invented about 1850 by Manuel Garcia the celebrated singingmaster, and perfected by Johann Czermak (1828-1873) and others, the diseases of the larynx also have been brought into the general light which has been shed on all fields of disease; and many of them, previously known more or less empirically, submitted to precise definition and cure.

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  • On the 30th of May the priests were once more sent for - to wit, his nephew, the abbe Mignot, the abbe Gaultier, who had officiated on the former occasion, and the parish priest, the cure of St Sulpice.

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  • iravaeaa, all-healing, from 7ras, all, and ae€iveac, to heal), a universal remedy, or cure for all diseases, a term applied in the middle ages to a mythical herb supposed to possess this quality.

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  • Speaking generally, clay soils retentive of moisture produce heavy-cropping tobaccos which cure to a dark brown or red colour.

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  • In flue curing, also known as the Virginian cure, fires are set outside the barn; and the heat led in iron pipes or flues, into the building are under the suspended tobacco, which is placed there quite fresh from the field.

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  • In a modification of this method, known as the Kentucky cure, large barns are used, the temperature is not raised above 100° F., and the process occupies from four to six weeks.

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  • One of the hospitals was founded by the famous Capuchin philanthropist, Father Theodosius Florentini (1808-1865), who was long the Romanist cure of Coire, and whose remains were in 1906 transferred from the cathedral here to Ingenbohl (near Schwyz), his chief foundation.

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  • FAITH HEALING, a form of "mind cure," characterized by the doctrine that while pain and disease really exist, they may be neutralized and dispelled by faith in Divine power; the doctrine known as Christian Science holds, however, that pain is only an illusion and seeks to cure the patient by instilling into him this belief.

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  • Used in this sense faith healing is indistinguishable from much of savage leech-craft, which seeks to cure disease by expelling the evil spirit in some portion of the body.

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  • From the psychological point of view all these different kinds of faith healing, as indeed all kinds of mind cure, including those of Christian Science and hypnotism, depend on suggestion.

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  • His health continued poor, and a fistula in the eye, from which he had suffered from early childhood, and to cure which he had undergone a number of painful operations, continued to trouble him.

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  • In the vicinity are Empfing, with baths of all kinds and a coldwater cure establishment on the Kneipp system.

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  • When quite a boy he checked his own tendency to fits of passion on learning that his father trusted him to cure his defects.

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  • The term benefice, according to the canon law, implies always an ecclesiastical office, propter quod beneficium datur, but it does not always imply a cure of souls.

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  • These services might be those of a secular priest with cure of souls, or they might be those of a regular priest, a member of a religious order, without cure of souls; but in every case a benefice implied three things: (I) An obligation to discharge the duties of an office, which is altogether spiritual; (2) The right to enjoy the fruits attached to that office, which is the benefice itself; (3) The fruits themselves, which are the temporalities.

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  • The bishop, by the act of institution, commits to the clerk the cure of souls attached to the office to which the benefice is annexed.

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  • By a decree of the Lateran council of 1215, which was enforced in England, no clerk can hold two benefices with cure of souls, and if a beneficed clerk shall take a second benefice with cure of souls, he vacates ipso facto his first benefice.

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  • By this statute the term benefice is defined to mean benefice with cure of souls and no other, and therein to comprehend all parishes, perpetual curacies, donatives, endowed public chapels, parochial chapelries and chapelries or districts belonging or reputed to belong, or annexed or reputed to be annexed, to any church or chapel.

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  • The provinces (hitherto senatorial) were in considerable disorder, which Pliny was sent to cure.

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  • Certain homilies, accordingly, composed by dignitaries of the lower house, were in the following year produced by the prolocutor; and after some delay a volume was published in 1547 entitled Certain sermons or homilies appointed by the King's Majesty to be declared and read by all parsons, vicars, or curates every Sunday in their churches where they have cure.

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  • He consulted the Pythia about a cure for the consequent madness, but she declined to answer him.

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  • 54): the Baptist's second testimony; Jesus' discourse with the woman at the well concerning the spiritual, universal character of the new religion; and cure of the ruler's son, the reward of faith in the simple word of Jesus.

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  • (f) Manifestation of Jesus as the vivifying Life-Logos and its contradiction in Judea, v.: the paralytic's cure.

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  • Journey to the feast of tabernacles; invitation to the soul athirst to come to Him (the fountain of Life) and drink, and proclamation of Himself as the Light of the world; cure of the man born blind; allegory of the good shepherd.

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  • 13-16); cure of the centurion's (ruler's) servant (son) (iv.

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  • Of his seven great symbolical, doctrinally interpreted " signs," John shares three, the cure of the ruler's son, the multiplication of the loaves, the walking on the waters, with the Synoptists: yet here the first is transformed almost beyond recognition; and the two others only typify and prepare the eucharistic discourse.

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  • The event justified his sombre previsions, but did not cure the recklessness of the so-called patriots.

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  • On his return to London he published an Enquiry into the Nature, Cause, and Cure of a Singular Disease of the Eyes, with a dedication to the Royal Society.

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  • Gaspard Mermillod (1824-1891) was named in 1864 cure of Geneva, and made bishop of Hebron in partibus, acting as the helper of the bishop of Lausanne.

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  • Chimkent is visited by consumptive patients who wish to try the koumiss cure.

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  • In the Premonstratensian order, however, founded in I120 by Norbert of Xanten, a new conception of the whole function of monachism was introduced: the duty of the priest-monk is not only to work out his own salvation, but, by preaching and cure of souls, to labour for others.

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  • Near it is the goats' whey cure establishment of Heinrichsbad, and the two castles of Rosenberg and Rosenburg, ruined in 1403 when the land rose against its lord, the abbot of St Gall.

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  • Let the medicine man or magician pray that the fever may pass into the frog, and the frog be forthwith released, and the cure will be effected.

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  • Harris had been sent to Oxford in the autumn of 1735 to " cure him of his fanaticism," but he left in the following February.

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  • The place is visited by 5000 people annually, partly for its warm mineral springs (70° F.), partly for its whey cure, and partly on account of its equable climate and picturesque surroundings.

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  • Vinegar, however, which contains about 5% acetic acid, is frequently taken as a cure for obesity, but there is no warrant for this application.

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  • In 1850 he was appointed pastor of Trinity Congregational Church, Arundel, and, after resigning his cure there, was engaged in ministerial work in Manchester.

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  • The use of mechanical refrigerating plants for chilling the pork has made it practicable to cure the bacon with the use of a small percentage of salt, leaving it mild in flavour when delivered in European markets.

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  • This relieves the dropsy, but it does not cure the condition on which the dropsy depends.

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  • Cornelius Sulla, and still frequented by the Greeks for the cure of gout, rheumatism and digestive disorders.

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  • For even nature does nothing in vain, but aims at final causes, which she uniformly realizes, except so far as matter by its spontaneity (Cure?) Tow atrop arov) causes accidental effects; and the ends of nature are no form of good, nor even the good of man, but the essences of natural substances themselves, and, above them all, the good God Himself.

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  • A town in the island was called Hephaestia, and the functions of the god must have been wide, as we are told that his Lemnian priests could cure snakebites.

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  • In the vicinity is Karlshof, a celebrated establishment for the cure of epileptic diseases.

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  • During the next six years, he so constantly advocated a responsible executive as the one cure for the political and economic evils of the time that he was known as "the man of one idea."

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  • by road south-east of Appenzell is Weissbad, a well-known goat's whey cure establishment, while 12 hours above it is the quaint little chapel of Wildkirchli, built (1648) in a rock cavern, on the way to the Santis.

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  • The cure proposed by Pasteur was simply to take care that the stock whence graine was obtained should be healthy, and the offspring would then be healthy also.

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  • This excessive adulteration quickly worked its own cure by a decreased consumption, and the weighting in practice in 1910 is confined to moderate and safer limits.

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  • to the important cure of St Martin's-in-the-Fields.

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  • Even though, in his all too brief pontificate, he failed to attain any definite results, he at least fulfilled the first condition of any cure by laying bare the seat of disease, gave an important impetus to the cause of the reform of the Church, and laid down the principles on which this was afterwards carried through.

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  • The mineral was made known to white men by the Indians, who sold it, under the name of Seneca oil, as a cure for various ills, and burned it at some of their ceremonies.

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  • It has an Evangelical, an English, a Russian and three Roman Catholic churches, a theatre, and various benevolent institutions, besides all the usual buildings for the lodging, cure and amusement of the numerous visitors who are attracted to this, the most popular watering-place in Bavaria.

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  • It was observed by the animal magnetists at the beginning of the 19th century in France and Germany, that certain of their subjects, when in the "magnetic" trance, could foretell accurately the course of their diseases, the date of the occurrence of a crisis and the length of time needed to effect a cure.

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  • The earth was considered in ancient times a cure for old festering wounds, and for the bite of poisonous snakes.

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  • It is much frequented as a health and summer resort, and has a variety of lake, brine, vegetable and pine-cone baths, a hydropathic establishment, inhalation chambers, whey cure, &c. There are a great number of excursions and points of interest round Gmunden, specially worth mentioning being the Traun Fall, 10 m.

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  • Peltigera canin g, which formed the basis of the celebrated " pulvis antilyssus " of Dr Mead, long regarded as a sovereign cure for hydrophobia; Platysma juniperinum, lauded as a specific in jaundice, no doubt on the similia similibus principle from a resemblance between its yellow colour and that of the jaundiced skin; Peltidea aphthosa, which on the same principle was regarded by the Swedes, when boiled in milk, as an effectual remedy for the aphthae or rash on their children.

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  • His chief works are: Dogmatique de l'Eglise reformee (1843), De l'etat actuel de l'Eglise reformee en France (1844), Esquisse dune theorie de l'Eglise chretienne (1845), La Critique et la foi (1850), Alexandre Vinet (1853), Lettres a mon cure (1853), Etudes critiques sur la litterature contemporaine (1863-1889), Etudes critiques de litterature (1876), Diderot (1880), La Democratie et la France (1883), Etudes sur la litterature XVIII° siècle (1891).

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  • The fishing industry of the Netherlands may be said to have been in existence already in the 13th century, and in the following century received a considerable impetus from the discovery how to cure herring by William Beukelszoon, a Zeeland fisherman.

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  • Moreover Gregory strictly forbade monks to minister in parish churches, ordaining that any monk who was promoted to such ecclesiastical cure should lose all rights in his monastery and should no longer reside there.

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  • difficulties he was greatly embarrassed by the brittleness or " redshortness " of his steel, which he did not know how to cure.

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  • Efforts have been made since 1882 to cure the waterlogged condition of the marshy grounds.

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  • Defective, however, as they may have been, and unfounded in fact, his kabbalistic doctrines led him to trace the dependence of the human body upon outer nature for its sustenance and cure.

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  • If he could get potent drugs to cure disease he was content, and he worked very hard in an empirical way to make them.

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  • Before 1898 there were also donative advowsons, but the Benefices Act 1898 made all donations with cure of souls presentative.

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  • The pay of the village cure averages £80 a year and a house.

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  • He had inherited from his ancestors a scrofulous taint, and his parents were weak enough to believe that the royal touch would cure him.

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  • A wiser but less vigorous reformer was Robert Baldwin, who saw that in responsible government lay the cure for the political green-sickness from which Upper Canada was suffering.

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  • The excellent toleration of atropine displayed by children must be remembered, and if its use is "pushed" a cure may almost always be expected.

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  • As the feeding of the hundred men and the cure of leprosy connect his work with that of Jesus, so the story that a dead man who was cast into his sepulchre was brought to life by the mere contact with his bones (2 Kings xiii.

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  • Information and statements including those regarding dietary supplements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration and are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.

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  • It has been used for the cure of lupus and of keloid, in which case it is administered hypodermically.

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  • In medicine it acts like other volatile oils and has a reputation as a cure for colds.

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  • Once more we come across a mysterious limitation of His powers: " He could not do there any miracle," save the cure of a few sick folk; and He marvelled because of their want of faith.

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  • In both the patient was withdrawn from the multitude and the cure was wrought with the accompaniment of symbolic actions.

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  • Moreover, in one case Jesus is described as groaning before He spoke; in the other the cure was at first incomplete; and both of the men were strictly charged to observe silence afterwards.

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  • The other disciples, in the meantime, had been vainly endeavouring to cure a peculiarly violent case of demoniacal possession.

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  • Thus in France the cure or head priest in a parish church is assisted by several vicaires.

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  • Its political capital is Trogen, though the largest town is Herisau, while Teufen has 4595 inhabitants, and Heiden (3745 inhabitants) in the north-east corner is the most frequented of the many goats' whey cure resorts for which the entire canton is .famous (Urnasch and Gais are also in Ausser Rhoden).

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  • Its political capital is Appenzell, which is also the largest village, while Weissbad (near it) and Gonten are the best-known goats' whey cure resorts.

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  • The mutiny was not successful, but Father Burgos, the leader of the reform party, was publicly garrotted with three other native priests; and the native clergy were declared to be incompetent to have the cure of souls.

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  • In pain due to violent sciatica relief and even permanent cure has been obtained by the injection of morphine directly into the muscle of the affected part, and in the treatment of renal and hepatic colic morphine given subcutaneously will relieve the acute pain consequent on the passage of biliary and urinary calculi.

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  • Side by side with the new processes introduced, the idea of the indeterminate sentence was started and put in practice, by which release was made to depend upon reasonable hope of amendment and sentences were prolonged until it was more or less certain that the treatment had resulted in cure.

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  • Siegfried bathed in the blood of heals in g g healing the dragon he slew and thus became invulnerable; the blind emperor Theodosius recovered his sight when a grateful serpent laid a precious stone upon his eyes; Cadmus and his wife were turned into serpents to cure human ills.

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  • " In 1899 a court in Larnaca, Cyprus, awarded 80 (Turkish) as damages for the loss of a snake's horn which had been lent to cure a certain disease " (Murison, p. 117, n.

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  • A serpent in a lagoon near Gimbo-Amburi in Africa could cure madness; another, which haunted an Algerian well, embodied the soul of a Mahommedan saint and could cure sore eyes.

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  • Further, as the serpent-" father " of Alexander the Great came with a healing-root to cure his general Pompey (Cicero, De div.

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  • Early Christian literature is filled with medical terms, applied (it is true) for the greater part to the cure of souls.

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  • distant from his cure.

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  • His real bent and choice were towards a pastoral cure in a country parish; but he remained in Oxford, acting first as a public examiner in the schools, then as a tutor in Oriel, till 1823.

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  • In 1835 Keble's father died at the age of ninety, and soon after this his son married Miss Clarke, left Fairford, and settled at Hursley vicarage in Hampshire, a living to which he had been presented by his friend and attached pupil, Sir William Heathcote, and which continued to be Keble's home and cure for the remainder of his life.

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  • The most effective cure, short of destruction and replantation, appears to be spraying with finely divided sulphur.

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  • The grama, buffalo and bunch varieties cure on the stem, and furnish throughout the winter an excellent ranging food.

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  • The Indian yogi fasts till he sees face to face all the gods of his Pantheon; the Indian magician fasts twelve days before producing rain or working any cure.

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  • are vitia temporis as well as vitia hominis, and that the beginning of reformations hath the contrary power to the pool of Bethseda, for that had strength to cure only him that was first cast in, and this hath commonly strength to hurt him only that is first cast in."

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  • Falling seriously ill, he went to Tours to seek a cure at the tomb of St Martin.

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  • After the departure of the Romans the baths seem to have been long neglected, but were again frequented in the 16th century, when the chapel of St Anne was hung round with the crutches of those who were supposed to owe their cure to her healing powers; these interesting relics were destroyed at the Reformation.

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  • No measure could now become law till it had obtained the assent of three at least of the four estates; but this provision, which seems to have been designed to protect the lower orders against the nobility, produced evils far greater than those which it professed to cure.

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  • The shahs grandmother, by feigning herself sick and dependent upon wine only for cure, obtained reversal of the edict.

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  • In the beginning of AbortIve 1898 the shahs medical advisers strongly recommended Negotiatlonsa cure of mineral waters in Germany or France, and for British as his departure from Persia without paying the arrears to the army and to thousands of functionaries, or providing a sufficient sum for carrying on the government during his absence, would have created grave discontent, serious negotiations for a loan were entered upon.

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  • His naturally weak constitution fell a prey to consumption, which he hoped to cure by visiting Italy, but he died on his return at Marseilles on the 8th of September 1853.

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  • BEparevruo), Sc. iixvrt, from 6EpaTrEbav, to serve), the name given to that branch of medicine which deals specifically with the means employed to cure disease if possible, or to control and lessen its evil results when a cure is impossible.

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  • The cure which is sought for may either be symptomatic or radical.

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  • the gouty condition underlying them all, and thus effecting a radical cure.

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  • But the object of therapeutics is not merely to cure.

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  • It is, in the words of the old formula, Curare, cito, tuto, et jucunde, to cure quickly, safely, and pleasantly.

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  • There are therefore in most prescriptions (i) a basis or chief ingredient intended to cure (curare), (2) an adjuvant to assist its action and make it cure quickly (cito), (3) a corrective to prevent or lessen any undesirable effect (tuto), and (4) a vehicle or excipient to make it suitable for administration and pleasant to the patient (jucunde).

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  • In psoriasis the epidermis separates in flakes at various spots which have not been subjected to pressure, and to cure it ointment containing tar or other products of the dry distillation of wood is employed.

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  • In the same way sterilized cultures of typhoid bacilli have been used to protect against attacks of typhoid fever, and an anti-typhoid serum has been employed with intent to cure.

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  • Although the anti-toxins which are used in the cure of infective diseases are not dangerous to life, yet they sometimes cause unpleasant consequences, more especially an urticarial eruption almost exactly like that which follows eating mussels or other shell-fish.

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  • If these means fail, exercise, massage and electricity may help a cure.

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  • 26 of whey is used as a means of cure for dyspepsia in adults, and also in cases of chronic bronchitis.

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  • The whey is drunk warm, and for this cure it is usual to go to some Alpine resort where pasturage is abundant and fresh milk can be had at all times of the day.

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  • The cure is greatly helped by the fresh air and sunshine of such places, among which are Interlaken, Rigi-Scheideck and Weggis in Switzerland; Ischl and Meran in Austria; Harzburg, Reichenhall and Sanct Blasien in Germany.

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  • Another therapeutic method is the so-called "grape cure," in which, along with a regulated diet, five or six pounds of grapes are eaten daily.

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  • The "grape cure" is used both in chronic disease of the stomach and intestines with or without constipation, and also in cases of gout or ailments depending upon a gouty constitution.

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  • The socalled "Salisbury" cure consists of living entirely upon minced beef and hot water.

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  • The dietaries already mentioned, the whey cure, the grape cure, the meat cure and the vegetarian cure, are all more or less systems of starvation, one or other article of ordinary diet being either reduced to a minimum or omitted altogether.

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  • In three of them at least - the whey cure, the grape cure and the meat cure-a diminution in one or other of the solid constituents of food is associated with the ingestion of an unusually large quantity of water.

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  • Sulphur-baths and sulphur waters are chiefly used in combination for rheumatism and gout, and massage, especially under water, is frequently combined most advantageously with baths and drinking water to effect a cure.

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  • It is a mistake, however, to send those in whom the disease is very far advanced away from home and friends, because when there is no hope of cure it is better for them to die in comfort at home.

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  • is regulated by the appetite of the patient himself, but a system of cure has been inaugurated by Dr Brehmer at Gorbersdorf, by Dr Dettweiler at Falkenstein, and by Dr Walther at Nordrach, in the Black Forest.

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  • In the well-known "rest" cure, which we owe to Weir Mitchell, forced feeding takes a prominent part.

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  • The essence of this cure is to give to the patient rest, bodily and mental, by confinement to bed and isolation from the outside world.

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  • Where nervous exhaustion is less marked and the Weir Mitchell treatment is not appropriate - for example, in men who are simply overworked or broken down by anxiety or sorrow - a sea voyage is often a satisfactory form of "rest" cure.

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  • Union with the neighbouring states would, he thought, cure its ills and promote the general welfare of South Africa.

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  • The recent application of the action of bactericidal rays to the cure of lupus is, however, an extension of the same discovery.

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  • Quinctius Flamininus in 198 B.C. The city was famous for its black hellebore, a herb which was regarded as a cure for insanity.

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  • Educated at the Jesuit college at Nancy, he became cure of Embermenil and a teacher at the Jesuit school at Pont-a-Mousson.

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  • During his last illness he confessed to his parish cure, a priest of Jansenist sympathies, and expressed his desire for the last sacraments of the Church.

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  • Thereupon, in defiance of the archbishop, the abbe Baradere gave him the viaticum, while the rite of extreme unction was administered by the abbe Guillon, an opponent of the civil constitution, without consulting the archbishop or the parish cure.

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  • By the Clergy Discipline Act of 1892 it was decreed that the trial of clerks accused of unfitness to exercise the cure of souls should be before the consistory court with five assessors.

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  • Another tradition states that he was regarded as insane by the Abderitans, and that Hippocrates was summoned to cure him.

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  • It may, however, surprise those who have been accustomed to hear him spoken of as "cure de Meudon," and who have read lives of him founded on legend, to find that there is very little ground for believing that he ever officiated or resided there.

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  • Under the name of anti-opium cure various remedies containing morphine in the form of powder, or of little pills, have been introduced, as well as the subcutaneous injection of the alkaloid, so that the use of morphine is increasing in China to an alarming extent, and considerable difficulty is experienced in controlling the illicit traffic in it, especially that sent through the post.

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  • Unless the indirect importation of morphine into China from Europe and the United States is stopped, a worse habit and more difficult to cure than any other (except perhaps that.

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  • He had a serious love affair about this time, which was broken off on the very eve of marriage by his catching a tertian fever which defied all attempts at cure for some two years.

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  • Another important part of the cure is the so-called moor or mud-baths, prepared from the peat of the Franzensbad marsh, which is very rich in mineral substances, like sulphates of iron, of soda and of potash, organic acids, salt, &c.

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  • It is well known as a health resort, for the grape cure and for the baths of the brine springs of Philippshalle, in the neighbourhood, which not only supply the bathing establishment, but produce considerable quantities of marketable salt.

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  • Corneille accordingly, as he tells us, set to work to cure these faults, and produced a truly wonderful work, Clitandre.

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  • A representative list includes: - the Charity Organization Society, the primary object of which is to organize the work of the others; the Baltimore Association for the Improvement of the Condition of the Poor, which seeks to discourage indiscriminate alms-giving; the Bay View asylum or city poorhouse; the Children's Aid Society; the Thomas Wilson Fuel-Saving Society, for furnishing coal at low rates; the Woman's Industrial Exchange, for assisting women in need to support themselves; Johns Hopkins hospital, noted for the excellence of its equipment especially for heating and ventilating; Saint Joseph's general hospital; hospital for the women of Maryland of Baltimore city; nursery and child's hospital; Baltimore eye, ear and throat charity hospital; Maryland hospital for the - insane; the Sheppard asylum, intended especially for the cure of the insane; the Sheppard and Enoch Pratt hospital; the Baltimore orphan asylum; Saint Vincent's infant asylum; the Thomas Wilson sanatorium for children, intended for children under three years of age, who are suffering from disease, during the warm summer months; the Free Summer Excursion Society, for affording a change of air to the indigent sick; home for the incurables; homes for the aged; homes for friendless children; institutions for the blind; and institutions for the deaf and dumb.

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  • To which Leibnitz, in a letter dated the 22nd of June, replied, " I am very glad that I received information of the cure of Mr Newton at the same time that I first heard of his illness, which doubtless must have been very alarming."

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  • Io to be a cleansing medium, and Naaman's cure was held to pre-figure Christian baptism.

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  • The only cure for waywardness is responsibility, and not only was this precisely what the Commons had not learned to feel, but it was that which it was impossible to make them feel directly.

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  • Its followers were still a minority in the House of Commons; an angry Reform agitation was going on; an ingenious resolution founded on the demand for an enlarged franchise serviceable to Liberals might extinguish the new government almost immediately; and it is pretty evident that the Tory leaders took office meaning to seek a cure for this desperate weakness by wholesale extension of the suffrage.

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  • A belief in its potency as a charm continued to be entertained throughout medieval times; and even to the present day in Italy it is worn as a preservative from the evil eye, and by females as a cure for sterility.

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  • The electors of the commune were to choose the cure, the electors of the department the bishop. Every cure was to receive at least 1200 livres (about £50) a year.

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  • No cure is possible, but as winter wheat suffers less than spring wheat, early sowing is recommended.

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  • The only cure appears to consist in breaking up the reflecting surfaces so that the reflexion shall be much less regular and distinct.

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  • He adopted revolutionary ideas, and became a cure of the Constitutional Church in the department of Pas-de-Calais, where he was later elected as a depute suppleant to the Convention.

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  • After holding this preferment for nearly two years, he exchanged it in July 1529 for the cure of Pont L'Eveque, a village 1 The family name of Calvin seems to have been written indifferently Cauvin, Chauve, Chauvin, Calvus, Calvinus.

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  • Three years later Barnes took holy orders, and was appointed to the cure of Whitcombe, 3 m.

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  • He made no secret of his belief that the establishment of an occupying proprietary was the only lasting cure, but the attitude of the clergy became gradually more moderate.

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  • Certain skin diseases, as psoriasis, pemphigus and occasionally chronic eczema, are much benefited by its use, though occasionally a too prolonged course will produce the very lesion for which under other circumstances it is a cure.

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  • Avarice, luxury and the glaring inequality in the distribution of wealth, threatened to bring about the speedy fall of the state if no cure could be found.

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  • to take his kingship in earnest, thinking to cure him by war of his effeminate passions; and, in the spring of 1744, the kings grave illness at Metz gave a momentary hope of reconciliation between him and the deserted queen.

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  • It should be " a place for everything and everything in its place " prepares the bee-keeper for any emergency; constant watchfulness is also necessary, not only to guard against disease in needs a reminder of this truism he surely has it in the borne in mind that the disease is much easier to cure in the earlier stages while the bacilli are still rod-shaped than when the rods have turned to spores.

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  • Semler denied the reality of demonic possession, and held that Christ in his language accommodated himself to the views of the sick whom he was seeking to cure.

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  • The ecclesiastical title rector, however, became ultimately confined in certain parts of Europe (Poland, Spain and notably England) to the office of a priest having a cure of souls.

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  • At first foreigners were attracted by the cheapness and good air of the region, added to the grape cure.

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  • In the former case he has no cure and no more than his revenue for his support; in the latter he has always a jurisdiction annexed.

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  • A prebend is practically a sinecure, and the holder has no cure of souls as such.

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  • Carmen took her to the doctor, but he said there was no cure for the common cold and not to worry about it.

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  • "Howie," Quinn implored, "You have to realize you can't cure all the ills of the world.

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  • I bankroll people who cure aids.

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  • She couldn't cure whatever it was, and she couldn't make sense of it.

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  • "So, Speck," she said with an exaggerated sigh, "they're more like humans with some nasty disease that might have a cure and not like vamps, which are just good for pushing up daisies.

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  • He had since they first crossed paths in the shadow world, when he offered her a choice: to cure the inoperable brain tumor killing her or to outright kill her before she declined, whichever outcome she preferred.

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  • Deidre made a deal with the Dark One, one good enough to bring her soul back from the dead, combine the two Deidres, cure the tumor of one and release the final product from Hell.

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  • She'd always hoped Wynn found some miracle cure, even while checking things off her bucket list.

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  • Gabriel will not be able to take you, and he won't be able to cure you.

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  • If I find a cure, we'll revisit this conversation.

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  • You didn't try as hard to cure me? she asked, perplexed.

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  • With a penchant for medicine and science and my magic, I can cure what others could not.

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