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curacy

curacy

curacy Sentence Examples

  • His first curacy was at Papworth St.

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  • Next year he was ordained to the curacy of St Mary's, Bryanston Square, and took priest's orders in 1868.

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  • He afterwards added to his charge at Sparkford, Lovington, South Barrow and North Barrow, and in September 1782 was presented to the perpetual curacy of South Barrow by the Rev. John Hughes, Coln St Denys.

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  • He took orders in 1874 and held a curacy at Dartford, in Kent, till 1877, when he became resident chaplain and private secretary to Dr Tait, archbishop of Canterbury, a position which he occupied till Dr Tait's death, and retained for a short time (1882-1883) under his successor Dr Benson.

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  • Entering St John's College, Cambridge, in 1724, he graduated in 1728; and on taking orders (in 1732) was presented to a small country curacy.

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  • One of his most intimate friends was William Stukeley (1687-1765) with whom he studied anatomy, chemistry, &c. In1708-1709Hales was presented to the perpetual curacy of Teddington in Middlesex, where he remained all his life, notwithstanding that he was subsequently appointed rector of Porlock in Somerset, and later of Faringdon in Hampshire.

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  • He was ordained in 1834, and after a short curacy at Bubbenhall in Warwickshire was appointed chaplain of Guy's Hospital, and became thenceforward a sensible factor in the intellectual and social life of London.

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  • Returning to Wurttemberg in 1828, he first undertook the duties of repetent or theological tutor in Tubingen, and afterwards accepted a curacy in Stuttgart; but having in 1830 received an appointment in the royal public library at Stuttgart, he thenceforth gave himself exclusively to literature and historical science.

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  • In 1532 he exchanged his curacy for a living at Witmarsum, in response to a popular call.

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  • In 1636 he was appointed rector (or perhaps only lecturer) of Rochford in Essex, which was so unhealthy that he had soon to leave it, and in 1639 he was elected to the perpetual curacy of St Mary Aldermanbury in London, where he had a large following.

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  • After holding a curacy at Barton, Cambridgeshire, he became curate of St Matthew, Friday Street, London, and of West Horsley, Surrey, in 1750, and then of Clapham in 1754.

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  • curacy near Wexford.

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  • Ordained to the priesthood in 1819, he was appointed to a curacy at Riedlingen, but speedily returned as "repetent" to Tubingen, where he became privatdozent in 1822, extraordinary professor of theology in 1826 and ordinary professor in 1828.

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  • After holding a curacy at Exbury in Hampshire, he became rector of St Thomas's, Winchester (1843), rector of Helmingham, Suffolk (1844), vicar of Stradbroke (1861), honorary canon of Norwich (1872), and dean of Salisbury (1880); but before taking this office was advanced to the new see of Liverpool, where he remained until his resignation, which took place three months before his death at Lowestoft on the 10th of June 1900.

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  • He was ordained to the curacy of St Thomas's, Dublin, but, being threatened with consumption, went after two years to Malaga.

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  • On his return he took a curacy at Bath, and was speedily appointed to the Octagon Chapel, where his fame both as preacher and platform speaker continued to spread.

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  • In 1838 he entered Magdalene College, Cambridge, and in 1842 he was ordained to the curacy of Eversley in Hampshire, to the rectory of which he was not long afterwards presented, and this, with short intervals, was his home for the remaining thirty-three years of his life.

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  • 1826, and was Hulsean Lecturer in1831-1832while holding a curacy in Shropshire.

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  • His first curacy was at St.

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  • He won an open scholarship, took his degree with a first-class in literis humanioribus (1833), and became fellow and tutor of Balliol; he was also ordained deacon (1836) and priest (1838), and served the curacy of Baldon.

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  • Sterne's clerical character was far from being universally injured by his indecorous freaks as a humorist: Lord Fauconberg presented the author of Tristram Shandy with the perpetual curacy of Coxwold.

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  • He was ordained in 1883 to a curacy at Corscombe, Dorset, but resided in London as head of St Martin's mission, Stepney.

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  • David's Theological College, Lampeter, where he gathered about him a band of earnest religious enthusiasts, known as the Lampeter Brethren, and was eventually ordained to the curacy of Charlinch in Somerset, where he had sole charge in the illness and absence of the rector, the Rev. Samuel Starkey.

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  • He was educated at King's College, London, and at Trinity College, Cambridge, and was ordained in 1860 to a curacy at Alrewas, near Rugeley.

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  • In 1827 Rose was collated to the prebend of Middleton; in 1830 he accepted the rectory of Hadleigh, Suffolk, and in 1833 that of Fairsted, Essex, and in 1835 the perpetual curacy of St Thomas's, Southwark.

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  • Early in 1842, after a few months' rest, he accepted a curacy in Cheltenham, which he retained for upwards of four years.

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  • Pleased with his success, the canons at Noyon gave him the curacy of St Martin de Marteville in September 1527.

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  • In 1753 he accepted the curacy of Durley, and in 1757 he was a candidate for the provostship of Oriel, but failed to secure election.

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  • Gwyn and Kay moved to St David's Diocese early in 1970 where he served a second curacy at Pembroke Dock.

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  • He and three of his descendants held the curacy of Bolton Abbey continuously for 117 years.

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  • He then took the curacy of the Parish Church at Cheltenham under the Reverend Francis Close, afterward Dean of Carlisle.

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  • It is a parish in the deanry of Furness and Cartmel; the living a perpetual curacy; patron, the King.

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  • There followed a curacy in Llanelli, a period of teaching in Nassau, the Bahamas, and then hospital Chaplaincies in London.

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  • Newton accepted the curacy of Olney, where he lived until 1780 when he became Rector of St Mary Woolnoth in London.

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  • The living is a perpetual curacy in the diocese of Durham, value £ 62.

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  • The living is a p. curacy in the diocese of Chester.

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  • He served his first curacy at St Nicholas, Kingston upon Hull in the Diocese of York.

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  • The living is a donative curacy in the diocese of Durham, value £ 93, in the patronage of Sir M. W. Ridley.

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  • curacy in the diocese of Durham, value £ 60.

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  • curacy in the gift of trustees.

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  • curacy in the patronage of the Earl of Thanet, and incumbency of the Rev. John Wharton.

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  • donative curacy in the diocese of Durham, value £ 93, in the patronage of Sir M. W. Ridley.

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  • The living is a perpetual curacy, in the gift of Christ college, Oxford, and present incumbency of the Rev. Charles Lacy.

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  • perpetual curacy in the diocese of Durham, value £ 62.

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  • After studying for ordination and serving a curacy, Francis became a postulant in Father Algy's group of Franciscans at St Ives.

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  • In 1617 he accepted the curacy of Chatillon-les-Dombes (or sur-Chalaronne), and here he received from the countess of Joigny the means by which he was enabled to found his first "confrerie de charite," an association of women who ministered to the poor and the sick.

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  • Next year he was ordained to the curacy of St Mary's, Bryanston Square, and took priest's orders in 1868.

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  • He afterwards added to his charge at Sparkford, Lovington, South Barrow and North Barrow, and in September 1782 was presented to the perpetual curacy of South Barrow by the Rev. John Hughes, Coln St Denys.

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  • He took orders in 1874 and held a curacy at Dartford, in Kent, till 1877, when he became resident chaplain and private secretary to Dr Tait, archbishop of Canterbury, a position which he occupied till Dr Tait's death, and retained for a short time (1882-1883) under his successor Dr Benson.

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  • Entering St John's College, Cambridge, in 1724, he graduated in 1728; and on taking orders (in 1732) was presented to a small country curacy.

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  • One of his most intimate friends was William Stukeley (1687-1765) with whom he studied anatomy, chemistry, &c. In1708-1709Hales was presented to the perpetual curacy of Teddington in Middlesex, where he remained all his life, notwithstanding that he was subsequently appointed rector of Porlock in Somerset, and later of Faringdon in Hampshire.

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  • He was ordained in 1834, and after a short curacy at Bubbenhall in Warwickshire was appointed chaplain of Guy's Hospital, and became thenceforward a sensible factor in the intellectual and social life of London.

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  • Returning to Wurttemberg in 1828, he first undertook the duties of repetent or theological tutor in Tubingen, and afterwards accepted a curacy in Stuttgart; but having in 1830 received an appointment in the royal public library at Stuttgart, he thenceforth gave himself exclusively to literature and historical science.

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  • In 1532 he exchanged his curacy for a living at Witmarsum, in response to a popular call.

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  • In 1636 he was appointed rector (or perhaps only lecturer) of Rochford in Essex, which was so unhealthy that he had soon to leave it, and in 1639 he was elected to the perpetual curacy of St Mary Aldermanbury in London, where he had a large following.

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  • After holding a curacy at Barton, Cambridgeshire, he became curate of St Matthew, Friday Street, London, and of West Horsley, Surrey, in 1750, and then of Clapham in 1754.

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  • curacy near Wexford.

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  • Ordained to the priesthood in 1819, he was appointed to a curacy at Riedlingen, but speedily returned as "repetent" to Tubingen, where he became privatdozent in 1822, extraordinary professor of theology in 1826 and ordinary professor in 1828.

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  • His first curacy was at Papworth St.

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  • After holding a curacy at Exbury in Hampshire, he became rector of St Thomas's, Winchester (1843), rector of Helmingham, Suffolk (1844), vicar of Stradbroke (1861), honorary canon of Norwich (1872), and dean of Salisbury (1880); but before taking this office was advanced to the new see of Liverpool, where he remained until his resignation, which took place three months before his death at Lowestoft on the 10th of June 1900.

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  • He was ordained to the curacy of St Thomas's, Dublin, but, being threatened with consumption, went after two years to Malaga.

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  • On his return he took a curacy at Bath, and was speedily appointed to the Octagon Chapel, where his fame both as preacher and platform speaker continued to spread.

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  • In 1838 he entered Magdalene College, Cambridge, and in 1842 he was ordained to the curacy of Eversley in Hampshire, to the rectory of which he was not long afterwards presented, and this, with short intervals, was his home for the remaining thirty-three years of his life.

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  • 1826, and was Hulsean Lecturer in1831-1832while holding a curacy in Shropshire.

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  • His first curacy was at St.

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  • He won an open scholarship, took his degree with a first-class in literis humanioribus (1833), and became fellow and tutor of Balliol; he was also ordained deacon (1836) and priest (1838), and served the curacy of Baldon.

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  • Sterne's clerical character was far from being universally injured by his indecorous freaks as a humorist: Lord Fauconberg presented the author of Tristram Shandy with the perpetual curacy of Coxwold.

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  • He was ordained in 1883 to a curacy at Corscombe, Dorset, but resided in London as head of St Martin's mission, Stepney.

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  • David's Theological College, Lampeter, where he gathered about him a band of earnest religious enthusiasts, known as the Lampeter Brethren, and was eventually ordained to the curacy of Charlinch in Somerset, where he had sole charge in the illness and absence of the rector, the Rev. Samuel Starkey.

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  • He was educated at King's College, London, and at Trinity College, Cambridge, and was ordained in 1860 to a curacy at Alrewas, near Rugeley.

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  • In 1827 Rose was collated to the prebend of Middleton; in 1830 he accepted the rectory of Hadleigh, Suffolk, and in 1833 that of Fairsted, Essex, and in 1835 the perpetual curacy of St Thomas's, Southwark.

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  • Early in 1842, after a few months' rest, he accepted a curacy in Cheltenham, which he retained for upwards of four years.

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  • Pleased with his success, the canons at Noyon gave him the curacy of St Martin de Marteville in September 1527.

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  • In 1753 he accepted the curacy of Durley, and in 1757 he was a candidate for the provostship of Oriel, but failed to secure election.

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