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cuenca

cuenca

cuenca Sentence Examples

  • He was admitted a Jesuit in 1612, and afterwards sent on mission work to Chile and Peru, where he became rector of the college of Cuenca.

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  • At length the Almoravides, whom he had several times beaten, marched against him in great force, inflicting a crushing defeat at Cuenca upon the Cid's army, under his favourite lieutenant, Alvar Fanez.

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  • In 1772 important glass works were established at Recuenco in the province of Cuenca, mainly to supply Madrid.

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  • JOSE ANTONIO CONDE (1766-1820), Spanish Orientalist, was born at Peraleja (Cuenca) on the 28th of October 1766, and was educated at the university of Alcala.

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  • by Cuenca, E.

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  • In 1833 Old Castile was divided into the provinces of Avila, Burgos, Logrono, Palencia, Santander, Segovia, Soria and Valladolid; while New Castile was similarly divided into Ciudad Real, Cuenca, Guadalajara, Madrid and Toledo.

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  • The existing frontier is marked on the north by the Cantabrian Mountains; on the east by the Sierra de la Demanda with its offshoots, and by the Serrania de Cuenca; on the south by the Sierra Morena; and on the west by various minor ranges which link together the three more or less parallel chains of the Sierra de Gredos, Sierra de Guadalupe and Sierra Morena.

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  • It rises in the north of the province of Cuenca, at the foot of the Cerro de San Felipe (59 06 ft.), and flows south past Cuenca to the borders of Albacete; here it bends towards the east, and maintains this direction for the greater part of its remaining course.

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  • These are known as the Quito, Ambato and Cuenca basins.

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  • above the sea, Ambato 8500, and Cuenca 7800.

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  • They are also characterized by the increasing aridity of the plateau from north to south, the Quito plain being fertile and well covered with vegetation, and the Ambato and Cuenca plains being barren and desolate except in some favoured localities.

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  • In the intra-andine depression, between the East and West Cordilleras, recent deposits with plant remains occur near Loja, and to the north-east of Cuenca is a sandstone containing mercury ores, somewhat similar to that of Peru.

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  • A disagreement with Peru in 1828 resulted in the invasion of Ecuador and the temporary occupation of Cuenca and Guayaquil by Peruvian forces; but peace was restored in the following year after the Ecuadorian victory at Tarqui.

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  • of Seville; Alcala del Jucar (2968), on the Jucar, in Albacete; Alcala de la Selva (1490), on the southern slopes of the Sierra del Gudar, in Teruel; Alcala de la Vega (712), on the river Cabriel, in Cuenca; Alcala de Gurrea (632), on the river Seton, in Huesca; Alcala del Obispo (432), in the same province; Alcala de Ebro (388) and Alcala de Moncayo (367), both in Saragossa.

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  • Cuenca, Ecuador >>

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  • AUGUSTIN FERNANDEZ MUNOZ RIANSARES, DUKE OF (1808 or 1810-1873), morganatic husband of Maria Christina, queen and regent of Spain, was born at Tarancon, in the province of Cuenca, in New Castile.

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  • LUIS MOLINA (1535-1600), Spanish Jesuit, was born at Cuenca in 1535.

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  • It was formerly called Cuenca, and formed part of the department of Azuay, which also included the province of Loja.

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  • The capital is Cuenca.

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  • CUENCA, a city and the capital of the province of Azuay, Ecuador, about 190 m.

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  • Cuenca stands at the northern end of a broad valley, or basin, of the Andes, lying between the transverse ridges of Azuay and Loja, and is about 8640 ft.

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  • Cuenca is the third most important city of Ecuador, being the seat of a bishopric, and having a college, a university faculty, a cathedral, and several churches, and a considerable industrial and commercial development.

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  • Cuenca, Spain (Province) >>

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  • Later, the missionaries of Cuenca and Quito established many missions in the Pais de los Maynas, and made extensive use of the Pongo de Manseriche as an avenue of communication with their several convents on the Andean plateau.

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  • A river called the Paute dashes through the eastern Andes from the valley of Cuenca; and a second, the Zamora, has broken through the same range from the basin of Loja.

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  • In other parts, as in the Basque country, in Galicia, in the Serrania de Cuenca (between the headwaters of the Tagus and those of the Jiicar), in the Sierra de Albarracin (between the headwaters of the Tagus and those of the Guadalaviar), there are extensive tracts of undulating forest-clad hill country, and almost contiguous to these there are apparently boundless plains, or tracts of level table-land, some almost uninhabitable, and some streaked with irrigation canals and richly cultivatedlike the Rcquena of Valencia.

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  • Farther south the mountains clustered on the east of the table-land (Sierra de Albarracin, Serrania de Cuenca) long rendered direct communication between Valencia and Madrid extremely difficult, and the principal communications with the east and south-east are effected where the southern table-land of La Mancha merges in the hill country which connects the interior of Spain with the Sierra Nevada.

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  • On the other hand, those of the east and south are of great value for irrigation, and the Jticar and Segura are employed in floating timber from the Serrania de Cuenca.

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  • The Permian is probably represented by some of the red sandstones, conglomerates and shales in the Pyrenees, in the Serrania de Cuenca, and in Andalusia.

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  • which the modern kingdom was built up. All Toledo Cuenca the continental provinces, ancient and modern, Ciudad Real -

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  • Their winter quarters are in the lower parts of Leon and Estremadura, La Mancha, and the lowlands of Andalusia, their summer quarters the more mountainous districts to the east and north (Plasencia in the province of Cceres, Avila, Segovia, Cuenca, Valencia), which are not so much affected by the summer droughts of the Peninsula.

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  • In the mountain country of Cuenca, Albacete, and the Sierra Nevada the natives known as the Orospedans were entirely independent in the middle of the 6th century.

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  • Aiphonso had conquered Cuenca, in the hill country between Castile and Valencia, in 1177, with the help of the king of Aragon, also an Alphonso, the son of Petronilla and of Ramon Berenguer of Barcelona.

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  • LORENZO HERVAS Y PANDURO (1735-1809), Spanish philologist, was born at Horcajo (Cuenca) on the 10th of May 1 735.

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  • He was admitted a Jesuit in 1612, and afterwards sent on mission work to Chile and Peru, where he became rector of the college of Cuenca.

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    0
  • At length the Almoravides, whom he had several times beaten, marched against him in great force, inflicting a crushing defeat at Cuenca upon the Cid's army, under his favourite lieutenant, Alvar Fanez.

    0
    0
  • In 1772 important glass works were established at Recuenco in the province of Cuenca, mainly to supply Madrid.

    0
    0
  • JOSE ANTONIO CONDE (1766-1820), Spanish Orientalist, was born at Peraleja (Cuenca) on the 28th of October 1766, and was educated at the university of Alcala.

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  • by Cuenca, E.

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  • of Castile to conquer Cuenca, and to suppress one Pero Ruiz de Azagra, who was endeavouring to carve out a kingdom for himself in the debatable land between Christian and Mahommedan.

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  • In 1833 Old Castile was divided into the provinces of Avila, Burgos, Logrono, Palencia, Santander, Segovia, Soria and Valladolid; while New Castile was similarly divided into Ciudad Real, Cuenca, Guadalajara, Madrid and Toledo.

    0
    0
  • The existing frontier is marked on the north by the Cantabrian Mountains; on the east by the Sierra de la Demanda with its offshoots, and by the Serrania de Cuenca; on the south by the Sierra Morena; and on the west by various minor ranges which link together the three more or less parallel chains of the Sierra de Gredos, Sierra de Guadalupe and Sierra Morena.

    0
    0
  • It rises in the north of the province of Cuenca, at the foot of the Cerro de San Felipe (59 06 ft.), and flows south past Cuenca to the borders of Albacete; here it bends towards the east, and maintains this direction for the greater part of its remaining course.

    0
    0
  • These are known as the Quito, Ambato and Cuenca basins.

    0
    0
  • above the sea, Ambato 8500, and Cuenca 7800.

    0
    0
  • They are also characterized by the increasing aridity of the plateau from north to south, the Quito plain being fertile and well covered with vegetation, and the Ambato and Cuenca plains being barren and desolate except in some favoured localities.

    0
    0
  • In the intra-andine depression, between the East and West Cordilleras, recent deposits with plant remains occur near Loja, and to the north-east of Cuenca is a sandstone containing mercury ores, somewhat similar to that of Peru.

    0
    0
  • A disagreement with Peru in 1828 resulted in the invasion of Ecuador and the temporary occupation of Cuenca and Guayaquil by Peruvian forces; but peace was restored in the following year after the Ecuadorian victory at Tarqui.

    0
    0
  • of Seville; Alcala del Jucar (2968), on the Jucar, in Albacete; Alcala de la Selva (1490), on the southern slopes of the Sierra del Gudar, in Teruel; Alcala de la Vega (712), on the river Cabriel, in Cuenca; Alcala de Gurrea (632), on the river Seton, in Huesca; Alcala del Obispo (432), in the same province; Alcala de Ebro (388) and Alcala de Moncayo (367), both in Saragossa.

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  • Cuenca, Ecuador >>

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  • AUGUSTIN FERNANDEZ MUNOZ RIANSARES, DUKE OF (1808 or 1810-1873), morganatic husband of Maria Christina, queen and regent of Spain, was born at Tarancon, in the province of Cuenca, in New Castile.

    0
    0
  • LUIS MOLINA (1535-1600), Spanish Jesuit, was born at Cuenca in 1535.

    0
    0
  • It was formerly called Cuenca, and formed part of the department of Azuay, which also included the province of Loja.

    0
    0
  • The capital is Cuenca.

    0
    0
  • CUENCA, a city and the capital of the province of Azuay, Ecuador, about 190 m.

    0
    0
  • Cuenca stands at the northern end of a broad valley, or basin, of the Andes, lying between the transverse ridges of Azuay and Loja, and is about 8640 ft.

    0
    0
  • Cuenca is the third most important city of Ecuador, being the seat of a bishopric, and having a college, a university faculty, a cathedral, and several churches, and a considerable industrial and commercial development.

    0
    0
  • Cuenca, Spain (Province) >>

    0
    0
  • Later, the missionaries of Cuenca and Quito established many missions in the Pais de los Maynas, and made extensive use of the Pongo de Manseriche as an avenue of communication with their several convents on the Andean plateau.

    0
    0
  • A river called the Paute dashes through the eastern Andes from the valley of Cuenca; and a second, the Zamora, has broken through the same range from the basin of Loja.

    0
    0
  • In other parts, as in the Basque country, in Galicia, in the Serrania de Cuenca (between the headwaters of the Tagus and those of the Jiicar), in the Sierra de Albarracin (between the headwaters of the Tagus and those of the Guadalaviar), there are extensive tracts of undulating forest-clad hill country, and almost contiguous to these there are apparently boundless plains, or tracts of level table-land, some almost uninhabitable, and some streaked with irrigation canals and richly cultivatedlike the Rcquena of Valencia.

    0
    0
  • Farther south the mountains clustered on the east of the table-land (Sierra de Albarracin, Serrania de Cuenca) long rendered direct communication between Valencia and Madrid extremely difficult, and the principal communications with the east and south-east are effected where the southern table-land of La Mancha merges in the hill country which connects the interior of Spain with the Sierra Nevada.

    0
    0
  • On the other hand, those of the east and south are of great value for irrigation, and the Jticar and Segura are employed in floating timber from the Serrania de Cuenca.

    0
    0
  • The Permian is probably represented by some of the red sandstones, conglomerates and shales in the Pyrenees, in the Serrania de Cuenca, and in Andalusia.

    0
    0
  • which the modern kingdom was built up. All Toledo Cuenca the continental provinces, ancient and modern, Ciudad Real -

    0
    0
  • Their winter quarters are in the lower parts of Leon and Estremadura, La Mancha, and the lowlands of Andalusia, their summer quarters the more mountainous districts to the east and north (Plasencia in the province of Cceres, Avila, Segovia, Cuenca, Valencia), which are not so much affected by the summer droughts of the Peninsula.

    0
    0
  • In the mountain country of Cuenca, Albacete, and the Sierra Nevada the natives known as the Orospedans were entirely independent in the middle of the 6th century.

    0
    0
  • Aiphonso had conquered Cuenca, in the hill country between Castile and Valencia, in 1177, with the help of the king of Aragon, also an Alphonso, the son of Petronilla and of Ramon Berenguer of Barcelona.

    0
    0
  • LORENZO HERVAS Y PANDURO (1735-1809), Spanish philologist, was born at Horcajo (Cuenca) on the 10th of May 1 735.

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  • There are two kinds of Panama: the Montecristi, made of a thin straw; and the Cuenca, the less expensive but still fine hat made of thicker straw.

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