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cu Sentence Examples

  • It may also be obtained by heating carbon, sulphur and many metals with concentrated sulphuric acid: C + 2H 2 SO 4 = 2SO 2 }- CO 2 + 2H 2 O; S + 2H 2 SO 4 = 3S0 2 + 2H 2 0; Cu + 2H 2 SO 4 = SO 2 -fCuSO 4 + 2H 2 0; and by decomposing a sulphite, a thiosulphate or a thionic acid with a dilute mineral acid.

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  • AZURITE, or Chessylite, a mineral which is a basic copper carbonate, 2CuCO 3 Cu(OH) 2.

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  • The metals may be arranged in a series according to their power of displacing one another in salt solutions, thus Cs, Rb, K, Na, Mg, Al, Mn, Zn, Cd, Tl, Fe, Co, Ni, Sn, Pb, (H), Sb, Bi, As, Cu, Hg, Ag, Pd, Pt, Au.

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  • Group I.: the alkali metals Li, Na, K, Rb, Cs, and also Ag, monovalent; Cu, monovalent and divalent; Au, monovalent and trivalent.

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  • C T CI ?OH CI " N O Cl OH _Cl OH C1 2 Nz0 C12 C C Ciz C1 2 Clt Cit (r) (2) (3) (4) CCI /CH2 CU CI C 'CO H CH ?C02H CI C. t 'c% CCI t CH3 (5) (6) 0 C1 /N C1 2 ClZ',C12 NzO C12 (2) CI (3) HO 2 C [[Ccichc1 Cc1 2 Co Cc13 - (6) Ho 2 C Ccichci]] CCl?

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  • Ca, Ba, Sr, Pb; Fe, Zn, Mn, Mg; Ni, Co, Cu; Ce, La, Di, Er, Y, Ca; Cu, Hg, Pb; Cd, Be, In, Zn; Tl, Pb.

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  • Cu, Ag (when monovalent); Au.

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  • We have the theorem (I I, v; m, n) (/l l, v l; ml, n i) - (Il l, P 1; m l, n ') (/l, v; m, n) = (11, vl; ml, ni); where 1 /l1= (ml +m-1) ml (/l +nlv) - u-2 Cu '+nvl) 1 1 m-1 1 m1-1 vl =(n -n)vv-E ml / lY- m /lv, m i =7111+m-I, n1=nl+n, and we conclude that qua " alternation" the operators of the system form a " group."

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  • The following analysis of blast-furnace lead of Freiberg, Saxony, is from an exceptionally impure lead: Pb =95.088, Ag = 0.470, Bi = 0.019, Cu = 0.225, As = I.

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  • odorata, sweet violet, is highly prized for its fragrance, and in cu;tivation numerous varieties have originated.

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  • Of minerals containing this element mention may be made of cassiterite or tinstone, Sn02, tin pyrites, Cu 4 SnS 4 + (Fe,Zn) 2 SnS 4; the metal also occurs in some epidotes, and in company with columbium, tantalum and other metals.

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  • Cu.)

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  • Of the heavy metals, copper is the one which exhibits by far the greatest avidity for sulphur, its subsulphide Cu 2 S being the stablest of all heavy metallic sulphides in opposition to dry reactions.

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  • They have also formed in this way certain alloys of definite composition, such as AuCd 3, Cu 2 Cd, and, more interesting still, Cu 3 Sn.

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  • Thus, a number of copper-tin alloys when digested with hydrochloric acid leave the same crystalline residue, which on analysis proves to be the compound Cu 3 Sn.

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  • For example, the compound Cu3Sn is not indicated in the freezing-point curve, and indeed a liquid alloy of this percentage does not begin to solidify by the formation of crystals of Cu 3 Sn; the liquid solidifies completely to a uniform solid solution, and only at a lower temperature does this change into crystals of the compound, the transformation being accompanied by a considerable evolution of heat.

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  • 9 cu) external, to and an embolium in front of the corium.

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  • 9 cu), but not an embolium.

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  • Magnified 4 times, cu cuneus.

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  • Substituting these values and neglecting powerssof dy/dx above the second we get CU P= 17.

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  • Instances occur in 2, flower more cu highly magnified and cut open.

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  • Church, " On the Polymorphy of Cu tleria multifida," Ann.

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  • The chemical formula CuFeS 2 corresponds with the percentage composition Cu = 34' 5, Fe = 30' 5, S =35.0.

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  • The points whose displacements are in the direction of the resultant axis of rotation are determined by Ix: Iy: Iz = E: ~: ~, or (X +nz ly)IE = Cu + Ix ~z)/v = (e +:~y ~x)ft.

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  • With a very rapid spin, or (more precisely) with Cu large in comparison with ij(4AMgh cos 0), one value of ~l is small and the other large, viz, the two values are Mgh/Cn and Cu/A cos 6 approximately.

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  • ., C,,1 oIa,,i Cu o2a12, Cu O212n,.

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  • COPPER (symbol Cu, atomic weight 63.1, H =1, or 63.6, O =16), a metal which has been known to and used by the human race from the most remote periods.

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  • Chalcocite, redruthite, copper-glance or vitreous copper (Cu 2 S) contains about 80% of copper.

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  • Other copper minerals are percylite (PbCuC1 2 (OH) 2), boleite (3PbCuC1 2 (OH) 2j AgCI), stromeyerite {(Cu, Ag) 2 S}, cubanite (CuS, Fe 2 S 3), stannite (Cu 2 S, FeSnS3), tennantite (3Cu 2 S, As2S3), emplectite (Cu 2 S, Bi 2 S 3), wolfsbergite (Cu 2 S, Sb2S3), famatinite (3Cu 2 S, Sb 2 S 5) and enargite (3Cu2S, As2S5).

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  • Cu 4 0, Cu 3 0, Cu20, CuO, Cu 2 0 3 and Cu0 2.

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  • The most important are cuprous oxide, Cu 2 0, and cupric oxide, CuO, both of Oxides which give rise to well-defined series of salts.

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  • of the hydrated oxides Cu30 2 2H 2 O and Cu 4035H 2 O, described by M.

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  • Cuprous oxide, Cu 2 0, occurs in nature as the mineral cuprite (q.v.).

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  • Cupric hydroxide, Cu(OH) 2, is obtained as a greenish-blue flocculent precipitate by mixing cold solutions of potash and a cupric salt.

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  • Cu(OH)2.3CuO,Cu(OH)2.6H20,6CuO H20,have been described.

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  • Copper quadrantoxide, Cu 4 0, is an olive-green powder formed by mixing well-cooled solutions of copper sulphate and alkaline stannous chloride.

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  • The trientoxide, Cu 3 0, is obtained when cupric oxide is heated to 1500 0 -2000° C. It forms yellowish-red crystals, which scratch glass, and are unaffected by all acids except hydrofluoric; it also dissolves in molten potash.

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  • Cuprous chloride, CuCl or Cu 2 Cl 21 was obtained by Robert Boyle by heating copper with mercuric chloride.

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  • It melts at below red heat to a brown mass, and its vapour density at both red and white heat corresponds to the formula Cu 2 C1 2.

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  • This solution absorbs acetylene with the precipitation of red cuprous acetylide, Cu 2 C 2, a very explosive compound.

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  • The oxychloride Cu 3 0 2 C1 2.4H 2 O is obtained as a pale blue precipitate when potash is added to an excess of cupric chloride.

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  • The oxychloride Cu 4 O 3 C1 2, 4H 2 0 occurs in nature as the mineral atacamite.

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  • Cuprous iodide, Cu 2 l 21 is obtained as a white powder, which suffers little alteration on exposure, by the direct union of its components or by mixing solutions of cuprous chloride in hydrochloric acid and potassium iodide; or, with liberation of iodine, by adding potassium iodide to a cupric salt.

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  • It absorbs ammonia, forming the compound Cu 2 I 2r 4NH 3.

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  • Cupric iodide is only known in combination, as in Cu12, 4NH 31 H 2 O, which is obtained by exposing Cu 2 I 2, 4NH 3 to moist air.

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  • Cuprous sulphide, Cu 2 S, occurs in nature as the mineral chalcocite or copper-glance, and may be obtained as a black brittle mass by the direct combination of its constituents.

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  • Cu2S5, Cu 2 S 6, Cu4S5, Cu 2 S 3, have been described; they are all unstable, decomposing into cupric sulphide and sulphur.

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  • Cupric nitrate, Cu(NO 3) 2, is obtained by dissolving the metal or oxide in nitric acid.

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  • The trihydrate melts at 114.5°, and boils at 170 0, giving off nitric acid, and leaving the basic salt Cu(NO 3) 2.3Cu(OH) 2.

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  • The phosphide obtained by heating cupric phosphate, Cu 2 H 2 P 2 O 81 in hydrogen, when mixed with potassium and cuprous sulphides or levigated coke, constitutes " Abel's fuse," which is used as a primer.

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  • A phosphide, Cu 3 P 2, is formed by passing phosphoretted hydrogen over heated cuprous chloride.

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  • Soc., 1906, 3, p. 39.) Cupric phosphate, Cu 3 (PO 4) 2, may be obtained by precipitating a copper solution with sodium phosphate.

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  • Of these we may notice libethenite, Cu 2 (OH)PO 4; chalcosiderite, a basic copper iron phosphate; torbernite, a copper uranyl phosphate; andrewsite, a hydrated copper iron phosphate; and henwoodite, a hydrated copper aluminium phosphate.

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  • Of these we may mention whitneyite, Cu 9 As, algodonite, Cu 6 As, and domeykite, Cu3As.

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  • By the direct union of copper and silicon, cuprosilicon, consisting mainly of Cu 4 Si, is obtained (Lebeau, C.R., 1906; Vigouroux, ibid.).

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  • In the vowel-system a notable feature is the presence th the short vowels e and o, which are not found in Sanskrit and cu d Persian; thus the Sanskrit sanhi, Old Persian hantiy, becomes un, 11i in Zend.

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  • When potassium iodide is added to a solution of cupric acetate, the reaction (Cu(C 2 H 3 0 2) 2 + 2KI= Cul + 2K(C 2 H 3 0 2) + I takes place; that is, for each atom of copper one atom of iodine is liberated.

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  • The leading silver minerals are native silver; argentite or silver glance, Ag 2 S, usually containing small amounts of lead, copper and tin; dyscrasite or antimonial silver, Ag 2 Sb to Ag,3Sb, an isomorphous mixture of silver and antimony; proustite or light red silver ore, Ag 3 AsS 3; pyrargyrite or dark red silver ore, Ag 3 SbS 3; stephanite, Ag 5 SbS 4; miargyrite, AgSbS2; stromeyerite, CuAgS; polybasite, 9(Cu 2 S,Ag 2 S) (Sb 2 S 3, As 2 S 3); cerargyrite or horn silver, AgCI; bromite or bromargyrite, AgBr; embolite, Ag(C1,Br); iodite or iodargyrite, AgI.

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  • Cu 2 Se.

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  • A characteristic reaction is the formation of a red precipitate of cuprous hydride, Cu 2 H 21 when heated with copper sulphate solution to 60°.

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  • lorga, Acte si fragmente cu privire la istoria Romdnilor (Bucharest, 1895-97) M.

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  • CH2 CHz?CU; CO CH 3 CO CH2 from sodio-malonic ester and 0-unsaturated ketones or ketonic esters: /CH, CO (R02C)2CH2+ Ph CH :CH /CH:>; CH(C02R) C07 from aceto-acetic ester and esters of a$-unsaturated acids, followed by elimination of the carboxyl group: CH2 CR', CH 3 CO CH 2.

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  • The methods of Maillard and Zeuthen are substantially identical; in each case the question considered is that of finding the characteristics Cu, v) of a system of curves by consideration of the special or degenerate forms of the curves included in the system.

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  • Iron disulphide, FeS2, constitutes the minerals pyrite and marcasite; copper pyrites is (Cu, Fe)S2.

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  • The Sigillariae, like the (X about 12.) Lepidodendra, were large trees, but must cu, Lateral cushions on have differed from those of the previous sporophyll.

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  • We have attempted to address these issues by investigating the adsorption of a single Cu ion in different charge states.

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  • boxy van body gave a capacity of 120 cu ft, or 138 cu ft without the front passenger seat.

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  • The blue band is due to positive copper ions, Cu 2+, moving toward the negative electrode.

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  • fools joke by CU Amiga Magazine and was revealed the next day.

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  • Engine Engine is the 454 cu. in. unblown Chevrolet, using fuel injection with Hilborn injector.

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  • lattice of Cu atoms by pushing their neighbors out a bit.

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  • It is heavily reinforced with T40 rebar and will require the use of 1,000 cu m of concrete.

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  • A flash smelter operating continuously produces a matte containing 65 wt% Cu and 36 wt% Fe from a pure CuFeS 2 concentrate.

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  • tutelary goddess to the ill-fated hero Cu Chulainn; she was the Faery Queen and the Washer at the Ford.

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  • It may also be obtained by heating carbon, sulphur and many metals with concentrated sulphuric acid: C + 2H 2 SO 4 = 2SO 2 }- CO 2 + 2H 2 O; S + 2H 2 SO 4 = 3S0 2 + 2H 2 0; Cu + 2H 2 SO 4 = SO 2 -fCuSO 4 + 2H 2 0; and by decomposing a sulphite, a thiosulphate or a thionic acid with a dilute mineral acid.

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  • AZURITE, or Chessylite, a mineral which is a basic copper carbonate, 2CuCO 3 Cu(OH) 2.

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  • A great advance was made by Dalton, who, besides introducing simpler symbols, regarded the symbol as representing not only the element or compound but also one atom of that element or compound; in other words, his symbol denoted equivalent weights.4 This system, which permitted the correct representation of molecular composition, was adopted by Berzelius in 1814, who, having replaced the geometric signs of Dalton by the initial letter (or letters) of the Latin names of the elements, represented a compound by placing a plus sign between the symbols of its components, and the number of atoms of each component (except in the case of only one atom) by placing Arabic numerals before the symbols; for example, copper oxide was Cu +0, sulphur trioxide S+30.

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  • The metals may be arranged in a series according to their power of displacing one another in salt solutions, thus Cs, Rb, K, Na, Mg, Al, Mn, Zn, Cd, Tl, Fe, Co, Ni, Sn, Pb, (H), Sb, Bi, As, Cu, Hg, Ag, Pd, Pt, Au.

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  • Group I.: the alkali metals Li, Na, K, Rb, Cs, and also Ag, monovalent; Cu, monovalent and divalent; Au, monovalent and trivalent.

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  • C T CI ?OH CI " N O Cl OH _Cl OH C1 2 Nz0 C12 C C Ciz C1 2 Clt Cit (r) (2) (3) (4) CCI /CH2 CU CI C 'CO H CH ?C02H CI C. t 'c% CCI t CH3 (5) (6) 0 C1 /N C1 2 ClZ',C12 NzO C12 (2) CI (3) HO 2 C [[Ccichc1 Cc1 2 Co Cc13 - (6) Ho 2 C Ccichci]] CCl?

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  • Ca, Ba, Sr, Pb; Fe, Zn, Mn, Mg; Ni, Co, Cu; Ce, La, Di, Er, Y, Ca; Cu, Hg, Pb; Cd, Be, In, Zn; Tl, Pb.

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  • Cu, Ag (when monovalent); Au.

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  • We have the theorem (I I, v; m, n) (/l l, v l; ml, n i) - (Il l, P 1; m l, n ') (/l, v; m, n) = (11, vl; ml, ni); where 1 /l1= (ml +m-1) ml (/l +nlv) - u-2 Cu '+nvl) 1 1 m-1 1 m1-1 vl =(n -n)vv-E ml / lY- m /lv, m i =7111+m-I, n1=nl+n, and we conclude that qua " alternation" the operators of the system form a " group."

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  • per ton) is desilverized (see below); the matte (Pb =8-12%, Cu =3-4%, Ag = 3-10f the assay-value of the base bullion, rest Fe and S) is roasted and resmelted, when part of the argentiferous lead is recovered as base bullion, while the rest remains with the copper, which becomes concentrated in a copper-matte (60% copper) to be worked up by separate processes.

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  • The following analysis of blast-furnace lead of Freiberg, Saxony, is from an exceptionally impure lead: Pb =95.088, Ag = 0.470, Bi = 0.019, Cu = 0.225, As = I.

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  • odorata, sweet violet, is highly prized for its fragrance, and in cu;tivation numerous varieties have originated.

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  • Of minerals containing this element mention may be made of cassiterite or tinstone, Sn02, tin pyrites, Cu 4 SnS 4 + (Fe,Zn) 2 SnS 4; the metal also occurs in some epidotes, and in company with columbium, tantalum and other metals.

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  • Of the heavy metals, copper is the one which exhibits by far the greatest avidity for sulphur, its subsulphide Cu 2 S being the stablest of all heavy metallic sulphides in opposition to dry reactions.

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  • They have also formed in this way certain alloys of definite composition, such as AuCd 3, Cu 2 Cd, and, more interesting still, Cu 3 Sn.

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  • Thus, a number of copper-tin alloys when digested with hydrochloric acid leave the same crystalline residue, which on analysis proves to be the compound Cu 3 Sn.

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  • For example, the compound Cu3Sn is not indicated in the freezing-point curve, and indeed a liquid alloy of this percentage does not begin to solidify by the formation of crystals of Cu 3 Sn; the liquid solidifies completely to a uniform solid solution, and only at a lower temperature does this change into crystals of the compound, the transformation being accompanied by a considerable evolution of heat.

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  • 9 cu) external, to and an embolium in front of the corium.

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  • 9 cu), but not an embolium.

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  • Magnified 4 times, cu cuneus.

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  • Substituting these values and neglecting powerssof dy/dx above the second we get CU P= 17.

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  • Instances occur in 2, flower more cu highly magnified and cut open.

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  • Among the heavy alloys, the aluminium bronzes (Cu, 9 o -97.5%; Al, 10-2.5%) occupy the most important position, showing mean tensile strengths increasing from 20 to 41 tons per sq.

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  • Church, " On the Polymorphy of Cu tleria multifida," Ann.

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  • The chemical formula CuFeS 2 corresponds with the percentage composition Cu = 34' 5, Fe = 30' 5, S =35.0.

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  • The points whose displacements are in the direction of the resultant axis of rotation are determined by Ix: Iy: Iz = E: ~: ~, or (X +nz ly)IE = Cu + Ix ~z)/v = (e +:~y ~x)ft.

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  • With a very rapid spin, or (more precisely) with Cu large in comparison with ij(4AMgh cos 0), one value of ~l is small and the other large, viz, the two values are Mgh/Cn and Cu/A cos 6 approximately.

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  • ., C,,1 oIa,,i Cu o2a12, Cu O212n,.

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  • COPPER (symbol Cu, atomic weight 63.1, H =1, or 63.6, O =16), a metal which has been known to and used by the human race from the most remote periods.

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  • Chalcocite, redruthite, copper-glance or vitreous copper (Cu 2 S) contains about 80% of copper.

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  • Other copper minerals are percylite (PbCuC1 2 (OH) 2), boleite (3PbCuC1 2 (OH) 2j AgCI), stromeyerite {(Cu, Ag) 2 S}, cubanite (CuS, Fe 2 S 3), stannite (Cu 2 S, FeSnS3), tennantite (3Cu 2 S, As2S3), emplectite (Cu 2 S, Bi 2 S 3), wolfsbergite (Cu 2 S, Sb2S3), famatinite (3Cu 2 S, Sb 2 S 5) and enargite (3Cu2S, As2S5).

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  • Cu 4 0, Cu 3 0, Cu20, CuO, Cu 2 0 3 and Cu0 2.

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  • The most important are cuprous oxide, Cu 2 0, and cupric oxide, CuO, both of Oxides which give rise to well-defined series of salts.

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  • of the hydrated oxides Cu30 2 2H 2 O and Cu 4035H 2 O, described by M.

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  • Cuprous oxide, Cu 2 0, occurs in nature as the mineral cuprite (q.v.).

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  • Cupric hydroxide, Cu(OH) 2, is obtained as a greenish-blue flocculent precipitate by mixing cold solutions of potash and a cupric salt.

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  • Cu(OH)2.3CuO,Cu(OH)2.6H20,6CuO H20,have been described.

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  • Copper quadrantoxide, Cu 4 0, is an olive-green powder formed by mixing well-cooled solutions of copper sulphate and alkaline stannous chloride.

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  • The trientoxide, Cu 3 0, is obtained when cupric oxide is heated to 1500 0 -2000° C. It forms yellowish-red crystals, which scratch glass, and are unaffected by all acids except hydrofluoric; it also dissolves in molten potash.

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  • Cuprous chloride, CuCl or Cu 2 Cl 21 was obtained by Robert Boyle by heating copper with mercuric chloride.

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  • It melts at below red heat to a brown mass, and its vapour density at both red and white heat corresponds to the formula Cu 2 C1 2.

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  • This solution absorbs acetylene with the precipitation of red cuprous acetylide, Cu 2 C 2, a very explosive compound.

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  • The oxychloride Cu 3 0 2 C1 2.4H 2 O is obtained as a pale blue precipitate when potash is added to an excess of cupric chloride.

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  • The oxychloride Cu 4 O 3 C1 2, 4H 2 0 occurs in nature as the mineral atacamite.

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  • Cuprous iodide, Cu 2 l 21 is obtained as a white powder, which suffers little alteration on exposure, by the direct union of its components or by mixing solutions of cuprous chloride in hydrochloric acid and potassium iodide; or, with liberation of iodine, by adding potassium iodide to a cupric salt.

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  • It absorbs ammonia, forming the compound Cu 2 I 2r 4NH 3.

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  • Cupric iodide is only known in combination, as in Cu12, 4NH 31 H 2 O, which is obtained by exposing Cu 2 I 2, 4NH 3 to moist air.

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  • Cuprous sulphide, Cu 2 S, occurs in nature as the mineral chalcocite or copper-glance, and may be obtained as a black brittle mass by the direct combination of its constituents.

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  • Cu2S5, Cu 2 S 6, Cu4S5, Cu 2 S 3, have been described; they are all unstable, decomposing into cupric sulphide and sulphur.

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  • A copper nitride, Cu 3 N, is obtained by heating precipitated cuprous oxide in ammonia gas (A.

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  • Cupric nitrate, Cu(NO 3) 2, is obtained by dissolving the metal or oxide in nitric acid.

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  • The trihydrate melts at 114.5°, and boils at 170 0, giving off nitric acid, and leaving the basic salt Cu(NO 3) 2.3Cu(OH) 2.

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  • The phosphide obtained by heating cupric phosphate, Cu 2 H 2 P 2 O 81 in hydrogen, when mixed with potassium and cuprous sulphides or levigated coke, constitutes " Abel's fuse," which is used as a primer.

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  • A phosphide, Cu 3 P 2, is formed by passing phosphoretted hydrogen over heated cuprous chloride.

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  • Soc., 1906, 3, p. 39.) Cupric phosphate, Cu 3 (PO 4) 2, may be obtained by precipitating a copper solution with sodium phosphate.

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  • Of these we may notice libethenite, Cu 2 (OH)PO 4; chalcosiderite, a basic copper iron phosphate; torbernite, a copper uranyl phosphate; andrewsite, a hydrated copper iron phosphate; and henwoodite, a hydrated copper aluminium phosphate.

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  • Of these we may mention whitneyite, Cu 9 As, algodonite, Cu 6 As, and domeykite, Cu3As.

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  • By the direct union of copper and silicon, cuprosilicon, consisting mainly of Cu 4 Si, is obtained (Lebeau, C.R., 1906; Vigouroux, ibid.).

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  • In the vowel-system a notable feature is the presence th the short vowels e and o, which are not found in Sanskrit and cu d Persian; thus the Sanskrit sanhi, Old Persian hantiy, becomes un, 11i in Zend.

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  • When potassium iodide is added to a solution of cupric acetate, the reaction (Cu(C 2 H 3 0 2) 2 + 2KI= Cul + 2K(C 2 H 3 0 2) + I takes place; that is, for each atom of copper one atom of iodine is liberated.

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  • The leading silver minerals are native silver; argentite or silver glance, Ag 2 S, usually containing small amounts of lead, copper and tin; dyscrasite or antimonial silver, Ag 2 Sb to Ag,3Sb, an isomorphous mixture of silver and antimony; proustite or light red silver ore, Ag 3 AsS 3; pyrargyrite or dark red silver ore, Ag 3 SbS 3; stephanite, Ag 5 SbS 4; miargyrite, AgSbS2; stromeyerite, CuAgS; polybasite, 9(Cu 2 S,Ag 2 S) (Sb 2 S 3, As 2 S 3); cerargyrite or horn silver, AgCI; bromite or bromargyrite, AgBr; embolite, Ag(C1,Br); iodite or iodargyrite, AgI.

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  • Cu 2 Se.

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  • Achilles hails the Dodonean God as Iiex cu yLKE, either in the sense of " Thessalian " or 1 Clemens, Protrept.

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  • A characteristic reaction is the formation of a red precipitate of cuprous hydride, Cu 2 H 21 when heated with copper sulphate solution to 60°.

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  • lorga, Acte si fragmente cu privire la istoria Romdnilor (Bucharest, 1895-97) M.

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  • CH2 CHz?CU; CO CH 3 CO CH2 from sodio-malonic ester and 0-unsaturated ketones or ketonic esters: /CH, CO (R02C)2CH2+ Ph CH :CH /CH:>; CH(C02R) C07 from aceto-acetic ester and esters of a$-unsaturated acids, followed by elimination of the carboxyl group: CH2 CR', CH 3 CO CH 2.

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  • The methods of Maillard and Zeuthen are substantially identical; in each case the question considered is that of finding the characteristics Cu, v) of a system of curves by consideration of the special or degenerate forms of the curves included in the system.

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  • Iron disulphide, FeS2, constitutes the minerals pyrite and marcasite; copper pyrites is (Cu, Fe)S2.

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  • The megasporangium is enclosed in an a A"° cu integument, which completely envelopes it, leaving only a narrow micropyle at the distal end (fig.

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  • The Sigillariae, like the (X about 12.) Lepidodendra, were large trees, but must cu, Lateral cushions on have differed from those of the previous sporophyll.

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  • The surface resistance of the YBa 2 Cu 3 O x thick film was measured using a dielectric resonator technique.

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  • The top images show alternating Cu and Fe growth rings on the submicron scale indicating a low oxygen environment.

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  • CU to shot of water swirling down drain of drinking fountain.

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  • She was the tutelary Goddess to the ill-fated hero Cu Chulainn; she was the Faery Queen and the Washer at the Ford.

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  • Pressure in power washers is typically measured as pounds per square inch (PSI), gallons per minute (GPM) or cleaning units (CU).

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  • The Classic Visa offered by Wescom Credit Union (CU) has a low interest rate when compared to other credit cards offered to applicants with similar credit scores by other lenders.

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  • The Gold Visa issued through Wescom CU has a lower interest rate than the Classic Visa.

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  • The Platinum Visa is the best card offered through Wescom CU.

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  • In order to get approved for a Platinum Visa, applicants must have excellent credit scores as well as membership with Wescom CU.

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  • This specialty credit card offered by Wescom CU is designed for younger credit union members aged 15 to 17.

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  • One of the most interesting features offered by Wescom CU with regards to debit and credit cards is the Imagine That program which allows cardholders to design the face of their credit cards.

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  • Achilles hails the Dodonean God as Iiex cu yLKE, either in the sense of " Thessalian " or 1 Clemens, Protrept.

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