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crusoe

crusoe

crusoe Sentence Examples

  • Robinson Crusoe sailed first on one ship and then on another.

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  • For a long time Robinson Crusoe was all alone.

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  • The first volume of his most famous work, the immortal story - partly adventure, partly moralizing - of The Life and Strange Surprizing Adventures of Robinson Crusoe, was published on the 25th of April 1719.

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  • The first volume of his most famous work, the immortal story - partly adventure, partly moralizing - of The Life and Strange Surprizing Adventures of Robinson Crusoe, was published on the 25th of April 1719.

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  • Robinson Crusoe was immediately popular, and a wild story was set afloat of its having been written by Lord Oxford in the Tower.

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  • Robinson Crusoe was immediately popular, and a wild story was set afloat of its having been written by Lord Oxford in the Tower.

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  • It contains Chalmers's Life, annotated and completed from Wilson and Lee, Robinson Crusoe, pts.

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  • Its connexion with the two former parts is little more than nominal, Crusoe being simply made the mouth-piece of Defoe's sentiments on various points of morals and religion.

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  • Crusoe's shipwreck and adventures, his finding the footprint in the sand, his man "Friday," - the whole atmosphere of romance which surrounds the position of the civilized man fending for himself on a desert island - these have made Defoe's great work an imperishable part of English literature.

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  • At a later period he was unjustly described as "a scurrilous party writer," which he certainly was not; but, on the other hand, Johnson spoke of his writing "so variously and so well," and put Robinson Crusoe among the only three books that readers wish longer.

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  • The reprint (3 vols.) edited for the "Pulteney Library" by Hazlitt in 1840-1843 contains a good and full life mainly derived from Wilson, the whole of the novels (including the Serious Reflections now hardly ever published with Robinson Crusoe), Jure Divino, The Use and Abuse of Marriage, and many of the more important tracts and smaller works.

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  • If we turn to separate works, the bibliography of Defoe is practically confined (except as far as original editions are concerned) to Robinson Crusoe.

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  • A facsimile reprint (1883) of Robinson Crusoe has an introduction by Mr Austin Dobson.

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  • But they are to be judged as Oriental literature and if they contain jarring extravagances and puerilities, one may recall that even in modern Palestine it was found that the natives understood Robinson Crusoe as a religious book more readily than the Pilgrim's Progress (J.

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  • These instances of the very early use of this metal, intrinsically at once so useful and so likely to disappear by rusting away, tell a story like that of the single foot-print of the savage which the waves left for Robinson Crusoe's warning.

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  • He read and re-read in early boyhood the Bible, Aesop, Robinson Crusoe, Pilgrim's Progress, Weems's Life of Washington and a history of the United States; and later read every book he could borrow from the neighbours, Burns and Shakespeare becoming favourites.

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  • Gracian was punished for publishing without his superior's permission El Criticon (in which Defoe is alleged to have found the germ of Robinson Crusoe); but no objection was taken to its substance.

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  • He had naturally read Lucian and Rabelais - possibly Crusoe and the Arabian Nights.

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  • Campe's German Robinson Crusoe (1816) and his Discovery of America were translated by Draghici (1835).

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  • The old 19th century granary overlooking the harbor is now the Crusoe hotel.

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  • Jan: ' Robinson Crusoe ' - first panto by Headley Theater Club.

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  • On this occasion Straddling quarrelled with Alexander Selkirk, who, at his own request, became the island's most famous colonist, for his adventures are commonly believed to have inspired Daniel Defoe's Robinson Crusoe.

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  • Its connexion with the two former parts is little more than nominal, Crusoe being simply made the mouth-piece of Defoe's sentiments on various points of morals and religion.

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  • Robinson Crusoe (especially the story part, with the philosophical and religious moralizings largely cut out) is one of the world's classics in fiction.

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  • Crusoe's shipwreck and adventures, his finding the footprint in the sand, his man "Friday," - the whole atmosphere of romance which surrounds the position of the civilized man fending for himself on a desert island - these have made Defoe's great work an imperishable part of English literature.

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  • There is hardly in Robinson Crusoe a scene equal, and there is consequently not in English literature a scene superior, to that where the youthful pickpocket first exercises his trade, and then for a time loses his ill-gotten gains.

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  • At a later period he was unjustly described as "a scurrilous party writer," which he certainly was not; but, on the other hand, Johnson spoke of his writing "so variously and so well," and put Robinson Crusoe among the only three books that readers wish longer.

    0
    0
  • The reprint (3 vols.) edited for the "Pulteney Library" by Hazlitt in 1840-1843 contains a good and full life mainly derived from Wilson, the whole of the novels (including the Serious Reflections now hardly ever published with Robinson Crusoe), Jure Divino, The Use and Abuse of Marriage, and many of the more important tracts and smaller works.

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  • Bohn's "British Classics" includes the novels (except the third part of Robinson Crusoe), The History of the Devil, The Storm, and a few political pamphlets, also the undoubtedly spurious Mother Ross.

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  • It contains Chalmers's Life, annotated and completed from Wilson and Lee, Robinson Crusoe, pts.

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  • If we turn to separate works, the bibliography of Defoe is practically confined (except as far as original editions are concerned) to Robinson Crusoe.

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    0
  • A facsimile reprint (1883) of Robinson Crusoe has an introduction by Mr Austin Dobson.

    0
    0
  • But they are to be judged as Oriental literature and if they contain jarring extravagances and puerilities, one may recall that even in modern Palestine it was found that the natives understood Robinson Crusoe as a religious book more readily than the Pilgrim's Progress (J.

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    0
  • These instances of the very early use of this metal, intrinsically at once so useful and so likely to disappear by rusting away, tell a story like that of the single foot-print of the savage which the waves left for Robinson Crusoe's warning.

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  • He read and re-read in early boyhood the Bible, Aesop, Robinson Crusoe, Pilgrim's Progress, Weems's Life of Washington and a history of the United States; and later read every book he could borrow from the neighbours, Burns and Shakespeare becoming favourites.

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  • Gracian was punished for publishing without his superior's permission El Criticon (in which Defoe is alleged to have found the germ of Robinson Crusoe); but no objection was taken to its substance.

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    0
  • He had naturally read Lucian and Rabelais - possibly Crusoe and the Arabian Nights.

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  • Campe's German Robinson Crusoe (1816) and his Discovery of America were translated by Draghici (1835).

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  • So he sat down and wrote a wonderful story, which he called "The Adventures of Robinson Crusoe."

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  • Every boy has heard of Robinson Crusoe.

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  • "I am not afraid" said Robinson Crusoe.

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  • All the sailors were drowned but Robinson Crusoe.

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  • Robinson Crusoe (especially the story part, with the philosophical and religious moralizings largely cut out) is one of the world's classics in fiction.

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  • There is hardly in Robinson Crusoe a scene equal, and there is consequently not in English literature a scene superior, to that where the youthful pickpocket first exercises his trade, and then for a time loses his ill-gotten gains.

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  • Bohn's "British Classics" includes the novels (except the third part of Robinson Crusoe), The History of the Devil, The Storm, and a few political pamphlets, also the undoubtedly spurious Mother Ross.

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  • But the reprints and editions of Crusoe have been innumerable; it has been often translated; and the eulogy pronounced on it by Rousseau gave it special currency in France, where imitations (or rather adaptations) have also been common.

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  • But the reprints and editions of Crusoe have been innumerable; it has been often translated; and the eulogy pronounced on it by Rousseau gave it special currency in France, where imitations (or rather adaptations) have also been common.

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