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crucibles

crucibles Sentence Examples

  • Directly work is suspended the glass remaining in the crucibles is ladled into water, drained and dried.

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  • Brunner's process consisted in forming an intimate mixture of potassium carbonate and carbon by igniting crude tartar in covered iron crucibles, cooling the mass, and then distilling it at a white heat from iron bottles, the vaporized metal being condensed beneath the surface of paraffin or naphtha contained in a copper vessel.

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  • But the most eager search of Arabian chemistry was the transmutation of metals, and the elixir of immortal health: the reason and the fortunes of thousands were evaporated in the crucibles of alchemy, and the consummation of the great work was promoted by the worthy aid of mystery, fable and superstition."

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  • The crucibles or pots used for the production of optical glass very closely resemble those used in the manufacture of flint glass for other purposes; they are " covered " and the molten materials are thus protected from the action of the furnace gases by the interposition of a wall of fireclay, but as crucibles for optical glass are used for only one fusion and are then broken up, they are not made so thick and heavy as those used in flint-glass making, since the latter remain in the furnace for many weeks.

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  • On the other hand, the chemical and physical nature of the fireclays used in the manufacture of such crucibles requires careful attention in order to secure the best results.

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  • For melting the leadless glasses, open, bowl-shaped crucibles are used, ranging from 12 to 40 in.

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  • Glass mixtures containing lead are melted in covered, beehive-shaped crucibles holding from 12 to 18 cwt.

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  • crucibles.

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  • In some works, the older method of melting the glass in large pots or crucibles is still adhered to, although the old-fashioned coal-fired furnaces have nearly everywhere given place to the use of producer gas and regenerators.

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  • The glass to be used for the production of plate is universally melted in pots or crucibles and not in open tank furnaces.

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  • To the last is credited the first introduction of covered crucibles to protect the molten glass from the products of burning coal.

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  • The duty on flint-glass was imposed on the molten glass in the crucibles and on the unfinished goods.

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  • Volatilized more or less readily when heated beyond their fusing points in open crucibles: antimony (very readily), lead, bismuth, tin, silver.

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  • For manufacturing purposes a furnace similar to that used for the making of glass was employed to heat a circular row of crucibles standing on a shelf along the wall of the furnace.

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  • The well-known Passau crucibles are made at the neighbouring village of Obernzell.

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  • The bullion left in the retorts is then melted in black-lead crucibles, with the addition of small quantities of suitable fluxes, e.g.

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  • The precipitated gold is washed, treated with salt and sulphuric acid to remove iron salts, roughly dried by pressing in cloths or on filter paper, and then melted with salt, borax and nitre in graphite crucibles.

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  • This dissolves out the zinc. Lime is added to bring down the gold, and the sediment, after washing and drying, is fused in graphite crucibles.

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  • The solution of metallic chlorides or sulphates so obtained is precipitated by iron, the metallic bismuth filtered, washed with water, pressed in canvas bags, and finally fused in graphite crucibles, the surface being protected by a layer of charcoal.

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  • A better process is to remelt the metal in crucibles with the addition of certain refining agents.

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  • The process is not continuous, but a change of crucibles only takes two or three minutes under the best conditions, and only occurs every ten or fifteen hours.

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  • Among the incidental operations are (a) the valuation of the bullion by weighing and assaying it; (b) " rating" the bullion, or calculating the amount of copper to be added to make up the standard alloy; (c) recovering the values from ground-up crucibles, ashes and floor sweepings (the Mint " sweep "); (d) assaying the melted bars; (e) " pyxing " the finished coin or selecting specimens to be weighed and assayed; (f) " telling " or counting the coin.

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  • Formerly bullion was melted in crucibles made of refractory clay, but they are liable to crack and require careful handling These were succeeded by iron crucibles, especially for melting silver, and these have now been generally replaced by graphite (plumbago) crucibles made of a mixture of clay and graphite.

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  • Good graphite crucibles can be used many times in succession if they are heated gradually each time, but they are usually discarded after about fifteen or twenty meltings.

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  • At the Royal Mint gold is melted in crucibles about 10 in.

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  • In some other mints still larger crucibles are used, containing various amounts up to about moo kilograms or over 30,000 oz.

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  • In foreign mints the molten metal is generally transferred from the crucible to the moulds by dipping crucibles or iron ladles covered with clay.

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  • For silver larger crucibles are used, containing/about 5000 oz.

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  • At the Denver mint the crucibles are used for from twelve to fifteen meltings with oil fuel, whereas they were soon destroyed when gas was employed.

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  • All crucibles and other materials which might contain precious metal are ground up and washed in a pan, and the pannings together with a selection from the floor sweepings are remelted.

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  • Of clay and earthenware there were many varieties of domestic dishes, cups and pipkins, and crucibles or melting pots made of clay and horse dung and still retaining the drossy coating of the melted bronze.

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  • Graphite is used for the manufacture of pencils, dry lubricants, grate polish, paints, crucibles and for foundry facings.

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  • On account of its refractory nature, it is employed in the manufacture of crucibles, furnace linings, &c. It is also used in making hydraulic cements.

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  • 49 the necessary proportion, and melted in crucibles to give merchantable bronzes containing between 14 and 10% of aluminium.

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  • But the best class of steel, crucible steel, was freed from slag by fusion in crucibles; hence its name, " cast steel."

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  • About 1740 Benjamin Huntsman introduced the " crucible process " of melting steel in small crucibles, and thus freeing it from the slag, or rich iron silicate, with which it, like wrought iron, was mechanically mixed, whether it was made in the old forge or in the puddling furnace.

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  • The shaping processes include the mechanical ones, such as rolling, forging and wire-drawing, and the remelting ones such as the crucible process of melting wrought iron or steel in crucibles and casting it in ingots for the manufacture of the best kinds of tool steel.

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  • For long all the best high-carbon steel was made by remelting this blister steel in crucibles (§ 106), but in the last few years the electric processes have begun to make this steel (§ 108).

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  • charges in closed crucibles, and then casting it into ingots or other castings, though in addition the metal while melting may be carburized.

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  • Huntsman showed that the mere act of freeing these slag-bearing steels from their slag by melting them in closed crucibles greatly improved them.

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  • It is true that Reaumur in 1722 described his method of making molten steel in crucibles, and that the Hindus have for centuries done this on a small scale, though they let the molten steel resolidify in the crucible.

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  • He could make only high-carbon steel, because he could not develop within his closed crucibles the temperature needed for melting low-carbon steel.

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  • This sulphide is then by further heating converted into the oxide and finally reduced to the state of metal by ignition with carbon in clay crucibles.

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  • Nickel is used for the manufacture of domestic utensils, for crucibles, coinage, plating, and for the preparation of various alloys, such as German silver, nickel steels such as invar (nickel, 35.7%; steel, 64.3%), which has a negligible coefficient of thermal expansion, and constantan (nickel, 45%; copper, 55%), which has a negligible thermal coefficient of its electrical resistance.

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  • Lower Nubia was one of the crucibles in which several times was formed a mixed nation which defied or actually dominated Egypt.

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  • These are known as muffle or chamber furnaces; and by supposing the crucibles or retorts to represent similar chambers of only temporary duration, the ordinary pot melting air furnaces, and those for the reduction of zinc ores or the manufacture of coal gas, may be included in the same category.

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  • Among the chief localities are the neighbourhood of Stourbridge in Worcestershire and Stannington near Sheffield, which supply most of the materials for crucibles used in steel and brass melting, and the pots for glass houses; Newcastle-on-Tyne and Glenboig near Glasgow, where heavy blast furnace and other firebricks, gas retorts, &c., are made in large quantities.

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  • In Germany, Ips and Passau on the Danube, and Gross Almerode in Hesse, are the best known localities producing fireclay goods, the crucibles from the last-mentioned place, known as Hessian crucibles, going all over the world.

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  • Plumbago or graphite is largely used in the production of crucibles, not in the pure state but in admixture with fireclay; the proportion of the former varies with the quality from 25 to nearly 50%.

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  • These are the most enduring of all crucibles, the best lasting out 70 or 80 meltings in brass foundries, about 50 with bronze, and 8 to ro in steel-melting.

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  • Small air-furnaces with hot plates or sand bath flues were formerly much employed in chemical laboratories, as well as small blast furnaces for crucibles heated with charcoal or coke.

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  • Sefstrom's blast furnace, used in Sweden for the assay of iron ores, is a convenient form of portable furnace applied to melting in crucibles.

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  • Charcoal is the fuel used, and the crucibles stand upon the bottom of the clay lining.

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  • have the anvils and crucibles of your spirit labored here only for dust and wind?

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  • The chemistry equipment found in the pit included numerous crucibles, as well as flasks and possible acid bottles.

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  • In 1842, Parsons, now the third Earl, cast a 72 inch mirror, weighing over four tons, using three crucibles.

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  • The smelting too would have been handled by small scale crucibles - probably fuelled by charcoal.

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  • Figure 4: Group of triangular crucibles from the Oberstockstall laboratory.

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  • None of these cultural crucibles exist today and I wasn't able to find anything that resembles them.

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  • But the most eager search of Arabian chemistry was the transmutation of metals, and the elixir of immortal health: the reason and the fortunes of thousands were evaporated in the crucibles of alchemy, and the consummation of the great work was promoted by the worthy aid of mystery, fable and superstition."

    0
    0
  • The crucibles or pots used for the production of optical glass very closely resemble those used in the manufacture of flint glass for other purposes; they are " covered " and the molten materials are thus protected from the action of the furnace gases by the interposition of a wall of fireclay, but as crucibles for optical glass are used for only one fusion and are then broken up, they are not made so thick and heavy as those used in flint-glass making, since the latter remain in the furnace for many weeks.

    0
    0
  • On the other hand, the chemical and physical nature of the fireclays used in the manufacture of such crucibles requires careful attention in order to secure the best results.

    0
    0
  • For melting the leadless glasses, open, bowl-shaped crucibles are used, ranging from 12 to 40 in.

    0
    0
  • Glass mixtures containing lead are melted in covered, beehive-shaped crucibles holding from 12 to 18 cwt.

    0
    0
  • Directly work is suspended the glass remaining in the crucibles is ladled into water, drained and dried.

    0
    0
  • In some works, the older method of melting the glass in large pots or crucibles is still adhered to, although the old-fashioned coal-fired furnaces have nearly everywhere given place to the use of producer gas and regenerators.

    0
    0
  • The glass to be used for the production of plate is universally melted in pots or crucibles and not in open tank furnaces.

    0
    0
  • To the last is credited the first introduction of covered crucibles to protect the molten glass from the products of burning coal.

    0
    0
  • The duty on flint-glass was imposed on the molten glass in the crucibles and on the unfinished goods.

    0
    0
  • Volatilized more or less readily when heated beyond their fusing points in open crucibles: antimony (very readily), lead, bismuth, tin, silver.

    0
    0
  • For manufacturing purposes a furnace similar to that used for the making of glass was employed to heat a circular row of crucibles standing on a shelf along the wall of the furnace.

    0
    0
  • The well-known Passau crucibles are made at the neighbouring village of Obernzell.

    0
    0
  • The bullion left in the retorts is then melted in black-lead crucibles, with the addition of small quantities of suitable fluxes, e.g.

    0
    0
  • The precipitated gold is washed, treated with salt and sulphuric acid to remove iron salts, roughly dried by pressing in cloths or on filter paper, and then melted with salt, borax and nitre in graphite crucibles.

    0
    0
  • This dissolves out the zinc. Lime is added to bring down the gold, and the sediment, after washing and drying, is fused in graphite crucibles.

    0
    0
  • The solution of metallic chlorides or sulphates so obtained is precipitated by iron, the metallic bismuth filtered, washed with water, pressed in canvas bags, and finally fused in graphite crucibles, the surface being protected by a layer of charcoal.

    0
    0
  • A better process is to remelt the metal in crucibles with the addition of certain refining agents.

    0
    0
  • The process is not continuous, but a change of crucibles only takes two or three minutes under the best conditions, and only occurs every ten or fifteen hours.

    0
    0
  • Among the incidental operations are (a) the valuation of the bullion by weighing and assaying it; (b) " rating" the bullion, or calculating the amount of copper to be added to make up the standard alloy; (c) recovering the values from ground-up crucibles, ashes and floor sweepings (the Mint " sweep "); (d) assaying the melted bars; (e) " pyxing " the finished coin or selecting specimens to be weighed and assayed; (f) " telling " or counting the coin.

    0
    0
  • Formerly bullion was melted in crucibles made of refractory clay, but they are liable to crack and require careful handling These were succeeded by iron crucibles, especially for melting silver, and these have now been generally replaced by graphite (plumbago) crucibles made of a mixture of clay and graphite.

    0
    0
  • Good graphite crucibles can be used many times in succession if they are heated gradually each time, but they are usually discarded after about fifteen or twenty meltings.

    0
    0
  • At the Royal Mint gold is melted in crucibles about 10 in.

    0
    0
  • In some other mints still larger crucibles are used, containing various amounts up to about moo kilograms or over 30,000 oz.

    0
    0
  • In foreign mints the molten metal is generally transferred from the crucible to the moulds by dipping crucibles or iron ladles covered with clay.

    0
    0
  • For silver larger crucibles are used, containing/about 5000 oz.

    0
    0
  • At the Denver mint the crucibles are used for from twelve to fifteen meltings with oil fuel, whereas they were soon destroyed when gas was employed.

    0
    0
  • All crucibles and other materials which might contain precious metal are ground up and washed in a pan, and the pannings together with a selection from the floor sweepings are remelted.

    0
    0
  • Of clay and earthenware there were many varieties of domestic dishes, cups and pipkins, and crucibles or melting pots made of clay and horse dung and still retaining the drossy coating of the melted bronze.

    0
    0
  • Graphite is used for the manufacture of pencils, dry lubricants, grate polish, paints, crucibles and for foundry facings.

    0
    0
  • Brunner's process consisted in forming an intimate mixture of potassium carbonate and carbon by igniting crude tartar in covered iron crucibles, cooling the mass, and then distilling it at a white heat from iron bottles, the vaporized metal being condensed beneath the surface of paraffin or naphtha contained in a copper vessel.

    0
    0
  • On account of its refractory nature, it is employed in the manufacture of crucibles, furnace linings, &c. It is also used in making hydraulic cements.

    0
    0
  • 49 the necessary proportion, and melted in crucibles to give merchantable bronzes containing between 14 and 10% of aluminium.

    0
    0
  • But the best class of steel, crucible steel, was freed from slag by fusion in crucibles; hence its name, " cast steel."

    0
    0
  • About 1740 Benjamin Huntsman introduced the " crucible process " of melting steel in small crucibles, and thus freeing it from the slag, or rich iron silicate, with which it, like wrought iron, was mechanically mixed, whether it was made in the old forge or in the puddling furnace.

    0
    0
  • The shaping processes include the mechanical ones, such as rolling, forging and wire-drawing, and the remelting ones such as the crucible process of melting wrought iron or steel in crucibles and casting it in ingots for the manufacture of the best kinds of tool steel.

    0
    0
  • For long all the best high-carbon steel was made by remelting this blister steel in crucibles (§ 106), but in the last few years the electric processes have begun to make this steel (§ 108).

    0
    0
  • charges in closed crucibles, and then casting it into ingots or other castings, though in addition the metal while melting may be carburized.

    0
    0
  • Huntsman showed that the mere act of freeing these slag-bearing steels from their slag by melting them in closed crucibles greatly improved them.

    0
    0
  • It is true that Reaumur in 1722 described his method of making molten steel in crucibles, and that the Hindus have for centuries done this on a small scale, though they let the molten steel resolidify in the crucible.

    0
    0
  • He could make only high-carbon steel, because he could not develop within his closed crucibles the temperature needed for melting low-carbon steel.

    0
    0
  • This sulphide is then by further heating converted into the oxide and finally reduced to the state of metal by ignition with carbon in clay crucibles.

    0
    0
  • Nickel is used for the manufacture of domestic utensils, for crucibles, coinage, plating, and for the preparation of various alloys, such as German silver, nickel steels such as invar (nickel, 35.7%; steel, 64.3%), which has a negligible coefficient of thermal expansion, and constantan (nickel, 45%; copper, 55%), which has a negligible thermal coefficient of its electrical resistance.

    0
    0
  • Lower Nubia was one of the crucibles in which several times was formed a mixed nation which defied or actually dominated Egypt.

    0
    0
  • These are known as muffle or chamber furnaces; and by supposing the crucibles or retorts to represent similar chambers of only temporary duration, the ordinary pot melting air furnaces, and those for the reduction of zinc ores or the manufacture of coal gas, may be included in the same category.

    0
    0
  • Among the chief localities are the neighbourhood of Stourbridge in Worcestershire and Stannington near Sheffield, which supply most of the materials for crucibles used in steel and brass melting, and the pots for glass houses; Newcastle-on-Tyne and Glenboig near Glasgow, where heavy blast furnace and other firebricks, gas retorts, &c., are made in large quantities.

    0
    0
  • In Germany, Ips and Passau on the Danube, and Gross Almerode in Hesse, are the best known localities producing fireclay goods, the crucibles from the last-mentioned place, known as Hessian crucibles, going all over the world.

    0
    0
  • Plumbago or graphite is largely used in the production of crucibles, not in the pure state but in admixture with fireclay; the proportion of the former varies with the quality from 25 to nearly 50%.

    0
    0
  • These are the most enduring of all crucibles, the best lasting out 70 or 80 meltings in brass foundries, about 50 with bronze, and 8 to ro in steel-melting.

    0
    0
  • Small air-furnaces with hot plates or sand bath flues were formerly much employed in chemical laboratories, as well as small blast furnaces for crucibles heated with charcoal or coke.

    0
    0
  • Sefstrom's blast furnace, used in Sweden for the assay of iron ores, is a convenient form of portable furnace applied to melting in crucibles.

    0
    0
  • Charcoal is the fuel used, and the crucibles stand upon the bottom of the clay lining.

    0
    0
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