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cremona

cremona

cremona Sentence Examples

  • Davila was murdered, while on his way to take possession of the government of Cremona for Venice in July 1631, by a ruffian, with whom some dispute seems to have arisen concerning the furnishing of the relays of horses ordered for his use by the Venetian government.

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  • LUIGI CREMONA (1830-1903), Italian mathematician, was born at Pavia on the 7th of December 1830.

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  • His first appointment was as elementary mathematical master at the gymnasium and lyceum of Cremona, and he afterwards obtained a similar post at Milan.

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  • Cremona's reputation had now become European, and in 1879 he was elected a corresponding member of the Royal Society.

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  • Cremona >>

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  • Of the Latin version there were about thirty editions, founded on the original translation by Gerard of Cremona.

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  • till it enters the Po between Piacenza and Cremona.

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  • An idea of the effects of the survey may be gathered from the fact that the assessments in the four provinces of Mantua, Ancona, Cremona and Milan, which formerly amounted to a total of I,454,696~ are now 2,788,080, an increase of 91%.

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  • ~Iilan Bergamo, Brescia, Como, Crema, Cremona, Lodi, Mantua, Pavia.

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  • Thence the Via Postumia led to Dertona, Placentia and Cremona, while the Via Aemilia and the Via Julia Augusta continued along the coast into Gallia Narbonensis.

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  • Cremona, on the north bank of the P0, was an important meeting point of roads and Hostilia (Ostiglia) another; so also was Patavium, farther east, and Altinum and Aquileia farther east still.

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  • Almost in Fredericks presence, they rebuilt Tortona, punished Pavia, Lodi, Cremona and the marquis of Montferrat.

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  • Crema yielded after an heroic siege in 1160, and was abandoned to the cruelty of its fierce rival Cremona.

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  • In April 1167 a new league was formed between Cremona, Bergamo, Brescia, Mantua and Ferrara.

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  • On the one side we find Vercelli, Novara, Milan, Lodi, Bergamo, Brescia, Mantua, Verona, Vicenza, Padua, Treviso, Bologna, Faenza, Modena, Reggio, Parma, Piacenza; on the other, Pavia, Genoa, Alba, Cremona, Como, Tortona, Asti, Cesarea.

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  • At Faenza, Piacenza, Cremona, Pavia and Milan, where subversive associa tions were stronger, it assumed the complexion of a political revolt.

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  • of Cremona).

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  • LIUDPRAND (LIUTPRAND, LUITPRAND) (c. 922-972), Italian historian and author, bishop of Cremona, was born towards the beginning of the 10th century, of a good Lombard family.

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  • Falling into disgrace with Berengar on his return, he attached himself to the emperor Otto I., whom in 961 he accompanied into Italy, and by whom in 962 he was made bishop of Cremona.

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  • Gerard Of Cremona >>

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  • This, with the exception of a brief tenure of Cremona (1499-1512), formed her permanent territory down to the fall of the republic. Her frontiers now ran from the seacoast near Monfalcone, following the line of the Carnic and Julian and Raetian Alps to the Adda, down the course of that river till it joins the Po, and thence along the line of the Po back to the sea.

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  • The making of these began about the 11th century, one of the earliest of the translators, Constantinus Africanus, wrote about 1075, and another, Gerard of Cremona, lived from 1114 to 1187.

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  • They entered Italy on the north-east under the leadership of Antonius Primus, defeated the army of Vitellius at Bedriacum (or Betriacum), sacked Cremona and advanced on Rome, which they entered after furious fighting and a frightful confusion, in which the Capitol was destroyed by fire.

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  • This ferula, mentioned by Luitprand of Cremona in his account of the deposition of Benedict V., and the baculus aureus of the Historia dedicationis ecclesiae cavensis (Acta Sanctorum, 4 March, i.

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  • de Cabrera de Cordova, Felipe Segundo (Madrid, 1619); James Wadsworth, Further Observations of the English Spanish Pilgrime (London, 1629, 1630); Ilario Mazzorali de Cremona, Le Reali Grandezze del Escuriale (Bologna, 1648); De los Santos, Descripcion del real monasterio, &c. (Madrid, 1657); Andres Ximenes, Descripcion, &c. (Madrid, 1764); Y.

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  • In 1907 he was president of the co-operative cor1gress at Cremona.

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  • CREMONA, a city and episcopal see of Lombardy, Italy, the capital of the province of Cremona, situated on the N.

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  • In front of it is a statue of the composer Amilcare Ponchielli, who was a native of Cremona.

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  • Cremona was founded by the Romans in 218 B.C. (the same year as Placentia) as an outpost against the Gallic tribes.

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  • bank of the Po, at the meeting-point of roads from Placentia, Mantua (the Via Postumia in both cases), Brixellum (where the roads from Cremona and Mantua to Parma met and crossed the river), Laus Pompeia and Brixia, still gave it considerable importance.

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  • 605, and rebuilt in 615, and was ruled by dukes; but in the 9th century the bishops of Cremona began to acquire considerable temporal power.

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  • The commune of Cremona is first mentioned in a document of r098, recording its investiture by the countess Matilda with the territory known as Isola Fulcheria.

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  • In the war of the Lombard League against Barbarossa, Cremona, after having shared in the destruction of Crema in 1160 and Milan in 1162, finally joined the league, but took no part in the battle of Legnano, and thus procured itself the odium of both sides.

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  • In the Guelph and Ghibelline struggles Cremona took the latter side, and defeated Parma decisively in 1250.

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  • It was during this period that Cremona erected its finest buildings.

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  • The Imperialists were!driven from Cremona after a sharp struggle, but captured Marshal Villeroi, the French commander.

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  • In the r8th century the prosperity of Cremona revived.

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  • See Guida di Cremona (Cremona, 1904).

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  • Gerard of Cremona, a physician of Toledo (1114-1187), made translations, it is said by command of Barbarossa, from Avicenna and others.

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  • Aemilius Scaurus from Vada Volaterrana and Luna to Vada Sabatia and thence over the Apennines to Dertona (Tortona), where it joined the Via Postumia from Genua to Cremona.

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  • His next move was against the Greeks and Saracens of southern Italy, but seeking to attain his objects by negotiation, sent Liudprand, bishop of Cremona, to the eastern emperor Nicephorus II.

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  • See Widukind, Res gestae Saxonicae; Liudprand of Cremona, Historia Ottonis; Flodoard of Rheims, Annales; Hrotsuit of Gandersheim, Carmen de gestis Oddonis - all in the Monumenta Germaniae historica.

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  • SONCINO, a town of Lombardy, Italy, in the province of Cremona, i i m.

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  • Luigi Cremona >>

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  • issued a bull for their extermination, and Alberto de' Capitanei, archdeacon of Cremona, put himself at the head of a crusade against them.

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  • While he was Venetian ambassador at Cremona he was elected doge (1414), and he escaped in secret, fearing that he might be held a prisoner by Gabrino Fondolo, tyrant of that city.

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  • In Italy the signs and works survive fragmentarily in the baptistery at Parma, completely on the porch of the cathedral of Cremona and on the west doorway of St Mark's at Venice.

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  • But they still cherished a hatred of the Romans, and during the Second Punic War (218), irritated by the foundation of the Roman colonies of Cremona and Placentia, they rendered valuable assistance to Hannibal.

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  • The following month he excommunicated Arnold of Brescia in a synod at Cremona, and thenceforth devoted most of his energies to the recovery of his see.

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  • Otho's advanced guard successfully defended Placentia against Alienus Caecina, and compelled that general to fall back on Cremona.

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  • Leaving a strong detachment to hold the camp at Bedriacum, the Othonian forces advanced along the Via Postumia in the direction of Cremona.

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  • He held successively the suburban sees of Albano and Sabina, also the sees of Cadiz, Maillezais, Arras and Cremona, and was made archbishop of Ravenna, 1524, by Clement VII.

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  • It was probably connected by road with Bononia in 175 B.C.; and subsequently with Genua in 148 B.C. by the Via Postumia, which ran through Cremona, Bedriacum and Altinum, joining the first-mentioned road at Concordia, while the construction of the Via Popilia from Ariminum to Ad Portum near Altinum in 132 B.C. improved the communications still further.

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  • Until 1898 the octroi circle did not extend beyond the walls; but in that year it was found necessary, owing to the growth of the city and of municipal expenditure, to include the external quarters or Corpi Santi (a name also applied to the extramural portions of Cremona and Pavia), with their large industrial population.

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  • Lacking often the protection of a strong ruler, the Lombard cities had been accustomed to act together for mutual defence, and in 1093 Milan, Lodi, Piacenza and Cremona formed an alliance against the emperor Henry IV., in favour of his rebellious son Conrad.

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  • This led to a coalition, formed in March 1167, between the cities of Cremona, Mantua, Bergamo and Brescia to confine Frederick to the rights which the emperors had enjoyed for the past hundred years.

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  • Brescia is situated on the main railway line between Milan and Verona, and has branch railways to Iseo, Parma, Cremona and (via Rovato) to Bergamo, and steam tramways to Mantua, Soncino, Ponte Toscolano and Cardone Valtrompia.

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  • Advancing into Italy, he gained a decisive victory over the Vitellians at Bedriacum (or Betriacum) in October 69, and on the same day stormed and set fire to Cremona.

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  • above Cremona.

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  • Serravalle, where remains of an amphitheatre and inscriptions have been found), Dertona, Iria, Placentia, Cremona, and thence eastwards.

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  • Livy gives their chief towns as Brixia (Brescia) and Verona; Pliny, Brixia and Cremona.

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  • Besides, the more powerful among them would subdue or destroy their weaker neighbours, and two parties were formed, one headed by Milan, the other by Cremona.

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  • Lanfranc, Pope John XIV., Porta the anatomist and Cremona the mathematician were born in the city.

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  • Cremona to prove the existence under certain conditions of reciprocal figures in, a plane (~ 5).

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  • A notable work on the general subject is that of Luigi Cremona, translated from the Italian by Professor T.

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  • It is a junction for Verona, Cremona and Bergamo, and steam tramways run to Monza, Lodi, &c.

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  • to the north, a branch line runs to Cremona.

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  • Later on it became a very important road centre; the continuation northwards of the Via Aemilia towards Milan, with a branch to Ticinum, crossed the Po there, and the Via Postumia from Cremona to Dertona and Genoa passed through it.

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  • MARCUS FURIUS BIBACULUS, Roman poet, flourished during the last century of the republic. According to Jerome, he was born at Cremona in 103 B.C., and probably lived to a great age.

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  • GERARD OF CREMONA (c. 1114-1187), the medieval translator of Ptolemy's Astronomy, was born at Cremona, Lombardy, in or?about 1114.

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  • In the last-named latitudes are reckoned from Cremona and Toledo.

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  • (333) and iv.; Arisi, Cremona literata; Jourdain, Recherches sur.

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  • The Vatican MS. 2392 is stated to contain a eulogy of "Gerard of Cremona" and a list of "his" translations, apparently confusing the two scholars.

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  • The epicycloid shown is termed the "three-cusped epicycloid" or the "epicycloid of Cremona."

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  • (Nicole, Sfondrato), pope 1590-1591, was born in Cremona, on the 11th of February 1535, studied in Perugia, and Padua, became bishop of his native place in 1560, and took part in the council of Trent, 1562-1563.

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  • The river is embanked from Piacenza, and continuously from Cremona, the total length of the embankments exceeding 600 m.

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  • And this was only the forerunner of more signal reverses; for, in a short time, Villeroi was forced to abandon the whole of the Mantuan territory and to take refuge in Cremona, where he seems to have considered himself secure.

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  • It lies on the main line of railway between Verona and Modena; and is also connected by rail with Cremona and with Monselice, on the line from Padua to Bologna, and by steam tramway with Brescia and other places.

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  • Gratian: Paucapalea (I, 50), 1 Rolando Bandinelli 2 (afterwards Alexander III., c. 1150), Rufinus 3 (c. 116 5), Etienne of Tournai 4 (Stephanus Tornacensis, c. 1168), John of Faenza (c. 1170), Sicard, bishop of Cremona (c. 1180), and above all Huguccio (c. 1180).

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  • Riemann, the rational transformation of a plane curve; Luigi Cremona, the rational transformation of a plane; and Chasles, correspondence of points on the same curve, and united points.

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  • It will be observed that the equations x': y' :z = X: Y: Z before mentioned do not of themselves lead to the other system of equations x: y : z= X': Y': Z', and thus that the theory does not in anywise establish a (r, I) correspondence between the points (x, y, z) and (x', y', z) of two planes or of the same plane; this is the correspondence of Cremona's theory.

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  • Cremona, Introduzione ad una teoria geometrica delle curve piane (Bologna, 1861); J.

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  • It was well fortified and built, and from this period date the ducal palace (now the Municipio), the theatre designed by Scomozzi, &c. The church and the summer palace contain frescoes by the Campi of Cremona.

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  • Avicenna's Canon of Medicine was first translated into Latin by Gerard of Cremona (d.

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  • The emperor's next step was an attempt to restore the imperial authority in northern Italy, and for the purpose a diet was called at Cremona.

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  • Cremona to prove them all, and that by a xxv.

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  • Others may take a moment to visit Cremona where the famous Stradivarius violins were made.

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  • Davila was murdered, while on his way to take possession of the government of Cremona for Venice in July 1631, by a ruffian, with whom some dispute seems to have arisen concerning the furnishing of the relays of horses ordered for his use by the Venetian government.

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  • LUIGI CREMONA (1830-1903), Italian mathematician, was born at Pavia on the 7th of December 1830.

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  • In 1848, when Milan and Venice rose against Austria, Cremona, then only a lad of seventeen, joined the ranks of the Italian volunteers, and remained with them, fighting on behalf of his country's freedom, till, in 1849, the capitulation of Venice put an end to the hopeless campaign.

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  • His first appointment was as elementary mathematical master at the gymnasium and lyceum of Cremona, and he afterwards obtained a similar post at Milan.

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  • Cremona's reputation had now become European, and in 1879 he was elected a corresponding member of the Royal Society.

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  • As early as 1856 Cremona had begun to contribute to the Annali di scienze matematiche e fesiche, and to the Annali di matematica, of which he became afterwards joint editor.

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  • During the civil war he fought on the side of Otho against Vitellius, and obtained a considerable success against Aulus Caecina Alienus (one of the Vitellian generals) near Cremona, but did not follow it up. When Caecina had been joined by Fabius Valens, Paulinus advised his colleagues not to risk a decisive battle, but his advice was disregarded, and Otho (q.v.) was utterly defeated at Bedriacum.

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  • Of the Latin version there were about thirty editions, founded on the original translation by Gerard of Cremona.

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  • till it enters the Po between Piacenza and Cremona.

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  • An idea of the effects of the survey may be gathered from the fact that the assessments in the four provinces of Mantua, Ancona, Cremona and Milan, which formerly amounted to a total of I,454,696~ are now 2,788,080, an increase of 91%.

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  • ~Iilan Bergamo, Brescia, Como, Crema, Cremona, Lodi, Mantua, Pavia.

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  • Thence the Via Postumia led to Dertona, Placentia and Cremona, while the Via Aemilia and the Via Julia Augusta continued along the coast into Gallia Narbonensis.

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  • Cremona, on the north bank of the P0, was an important meeting point of roads and Hostilia (Ostiglia) another; so also was Patavium, farther east, and Altinum and Aquileia farther east still.

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  • All we know for certain is that1 at this epoch, Rome attempts to ruin Tivoli, and Venice Pisa; Milan fights with Cremona, Cremona with Crema, Pavia with Verona, Verona with Padua, Piacenza with Parma, Modena and Reggio with Bologna, Bologna and Faenza with Ravenna and Imola, Florence and Pisa with Lucca and Siena, and so on through the whole list of cities.

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  • Almost in Fredericks presence, they rebuilt Tortona, punished Pavia, Lodi, Cremona and the marquis of Montferrat.

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  • Crema yielded after an heroic siege in 1160, and was abandoned to the cruelty of its fierce rival Cremona.

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  • In April 1167 a new league was formed between Cremona, Bergamo, Brescia, Mantua and Ferrara.

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  • On the one side we find Vercelli, Novara, Milan, Lodi, Bergamo, Brescia, Mantua, Verona, Vicenza, Padua, Treviso, Bologna, Faenza, Modena, Reggio, Parma, Piacenza; on the other, Pavia, Genoa, Alba, Cremona, Como, Tortona, Asti, Cesarea.

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  • At Faenza, Piacenza, Cremona, Pavia and Milan, where subversive associa tions were stronger, it assumed the complexion of a political revolt.

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  • of Cremona).

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  • LIUDPRAND (LIUTPRAND, LUITPRAND) (c. 922-972), Italian historian and author, bishop of Cremona, was born towards the beginning of the 10th century, of a good Lombard family.

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  • Falling into disgrace with Berengar on his return, he attached himself to the emperor Otto I., whom in 961 he accompanied into Italy, and by whom in 962 he was made bishop of Cremona.

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  • Gerard Of Cremona >>

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  • This, with the exception of a brief tenure of Cremona (1499-1512), formed her permanent territory down to the fall of the republic. Her frontiers now ran from the seacoast near Monfalcone, following the line of the Carnic and Julian and Raetian Alps to the Adda, down the course of that river till it joins the Po, and thence along the line of the Po back to the sea.

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  • The making of these began about the 11th century, one of the earliest of the translators, Constantinus Africanus, wrote about 1075, and another, Gerard of Cremona, lived from 1114 to 1187.

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  • They entered Italy on the north-east under the leadership of Antonius Primus, defeated the army of Vitellius at Bedriacum (or Betriacum), sacked Cremona and advanced on Rome, which they entered after furious fighting and a frightful confusion, in which the Capitol was destroyed by fire.

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  • This ferula, mentioned by Luitprand of Cremona in his account of the deposition of Benedict V., and the baculus aureus of the Historia dedicationis ecclesiae cavensis (Acta Sanctorum, 4 March, i.

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  • de Cabrera de Cordova, Felipe Segundo (Madrid, 1619); James Wadsworth, Further Observations of the English Spanish Pilgrime (London, 1629, 1630); Ilario Mazzorali de Cremona, Le Reali Grandezze del Escuriale (Bologna, 1648); De los Santos, Descripcion del real monasterio, &c. (Madrid, 1657); Andres Ximenes, Descripcion, &c. (Madrid, 1764); Y.

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  • In 1907 he was president of the co-operative cor1gress at Cremona.

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  • CREMONA, a city and episcopal see of Lombardy, Italy, the capital of the province of Cremona, situated on the N.

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  • In front of it is a statue of the composer Amilcare Ponchielli, who was a native of Cremona.

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  • Cremona was founded by the Romans in 218 B.C. (the same year as Placentia) as an outpost against the Gallic tribes.

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  • Macedonica, one of the legions which had been defeated at Betriacum, has been found near Cremona itself (F.

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  • bank of the Po, at the meeting-point of roads from Placentia, Mantua (the Via Postumia in both cases), Brixellum (where the roads from Cremona and Mantua to Parma met and crossed the river), Laus Pompeia and Brixia, still gave it considerable importance.

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  • 605, and rebuilt in 615, and was ruled by dukes; but in the 9th century the bishops of Cremona began to acquire considerable temporal power.

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  • The commune of Cremona is first mentioned in a document of r098, recording its investiture by the countess Matilda with the territory known as Isola Fulcheria.

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  • In the war of the Lombard League against Barbarossa, Cremona, after having shared in the destruction of Crema in 1160 and Milan in 1162, finally joined the league, but took no part in the battle of Legnano, and thus procured itself the odium of both sides.

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  • In the Guelph and Ghibelline struggles Cremona took the latter side, and defeated Parma decisively in 1250.

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  • It was during this period that Cremona erected its finest buildings.

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  • The Imperialists were!driven from Cremona after a sharp struggle, but captured Marshal Villeroi, the French commander.

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  • In the r8th century the prosperity of Cremona revived.

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  • See Guida di Cremona (Cremona, 1904).

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  • Gerard of Cremona, a physician of Toledo (1114-1187), made translations, it is said by command of Barbarossa, from Avicenna and others.

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  • Aemilius Scaurus from Vada Volaterrana and Luna to Vada Sabatia and thence over the Apennines to Dertona (Tortona), where it joined the Via Postumia from Genua to Cremona.

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  • His next move was against the Greeks and Saracens of southern Italy, but seeking to attain his objects by negotiation, sent Liudprand, bishop of Cremona, to the eastern emperor Nicephorus II.

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  • See Widukind, Res gestae Saxonicae; Liudprand of Cremona, Historia Ottonis; Flodoard of Rheims, Annales; Hrotsuit of Gandersheim, Carmen de gestis Oddonis - all in the Monumenta Germaniae historica.

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  • SONCINO, a town of Lombardy, Italy, in the province of Cremona, i i m.

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  • Guicciardini sent him in August to Cremona, to transact business with the Venetian provveditori.

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  • Luigi Cremona >>

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  • issued a bull for their extermination, and Alberto de' Capitanei, archdeacon of Cremona, put himself at the head of a crusade against them.

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  • While he was Venetian ambassador at Cremona he was elected doge (1414), and he escaped in secret, fearing that he might be held a prisoner by Gabrino Fondolo, tyrant of that city.

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  • In Italy the signs and works survive fragmentarily in the baptistery at Parma, completely on the porch of the cathedral of Cremona and on the west doorway of St Mark's at Venice.

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  • But they still cherished a hatred of the Romans, and during the Second Punic War (218), irritated by the foundation of the Roman colonies of Cremona and Placentia, they rendered valuable assistance to Hannibal.

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  • The most original hellenist of this age is Luitprand, bishop of Cremona (d.

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  • The following month he excommunicated Arnold of Brescia in a synod at Cremona, and thenceforth devoted most of his energies to the recovery of his see.

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  • Otho's advanced guard successfully defended Placentia against Alienus Caecina, and compelled that general to fall back on Cremona.

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  • Leaving a strong detachment to hold the camp at Bedriacum, the Othonian forces advanced along the Via Postumia in the direction of Cremona.

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  • He held successively the suburban sees of Albano and Sabina, also the sees of Cadiz, Maillezais, Arras and Cremona, and was made archbishop of Ravenna, 1524, by Clement VII.

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  • It was probably connected by road with Bononia in 175 B.C.; and subsequently with Genua in 148 B.C. by the Via Postumia, which ran through Cremona, Bedriacum and Altinum, joining the first-mentioned road at Concordia, while the construction of the Via Popilia from Ariminum to Ad Portum near Altinum in 132 B.C. improved the communications still further.

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  • Until 1898 the octroi circle did not extend beyond the walls; but in that year it was found necessary, owing to the growth of the city and of municipal expenditure, to include the external quarters or Corpi Santi (a name also applied to the extramural portions of Cremona and Pavia), with their large industrial population.

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  • Lacking often the protection of a strong ruler, the Lombard cities had been accustomed to act together for mutual defence, and in 1093 Milan, Lodi, Piacenza and Cremona formed an alliance against the emperor Henry IV., in favour of his rebellious son Conrad.

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  • This led to a coalition, formed in March 1167, between the cities of Cremona, Mantua, Bergamo and Brescia to confine Frederick to the rights which the emperors had enjoyed for the past hundred years.

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  • Brescia is situated on the main railway line between Milan and Verona, and has branch railways to Iseo, Parma, Cremona and (via Rovato) to Bergamo, and steam tramways to Mantua, Soncino, Ponte Toscolano and Cardone Valtrompia.

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  • Advancing into Italy, he gained a decisive victory over the Vitellians at Bedriacum (or Betriacum) in October 69, and on the same day stormed and set fire to Cremona.

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  • above Cremona.

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  • Serravalle, where remains of an amphitheatre and inscriptions have been found), Dertona, Iria, Placentia, Cremona, and thence eastwards.

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  • Livy gives their chief towns as Brixia (Brescia) and Verona; Pliny, Brixia and Cremona.

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  • The struggle against the bishops, in which a clamour for a reform of clerical life and a striving for local self-government were strangely interwoven, had raged for a couple of generations when King Henry V., great patron of municipal freedom as he was, legalized by a series of charters the status quo (Cremona, 1114, Mantua, 1116).

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  • Besides, the more powerful among them would subdue or destroy their weaker neighbours, and two parties were formed, one headed by Milan, the other by Cremona.

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  • Lanfranc, Pope John XIV., Porta the anatomist and Cremona the mathematician were born in the city.

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  • Cremona to prove the existence under certain conditions of reciprocal figures in, a plane (~ 5).

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  • A notable work on the general subject is that of Luigi Cremona, translated from the Italian by Professor T.

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  • It is a junction for Verona, Cremona and Bergamo, and steam tramways run to Monza, Lodi, &c.

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  • to the north, a branch line runs to Cremona.

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  • Later on it became a very important road centre; the continuation northwards of the Via Aemilia towards Milan, with a branch to Ticinum, crossed the Po there, and the Via Postumia from Cremona to Dertona and Genoa passed through it.

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  • MARCUS FURIUS BIBACULUS, Roman poet, flourished during the last century of the republic. According to Jerome, he was born at Cremona in 103 B.C., and probably lived to a great age.

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  • GERARD OF CREMONA (c. 1114-1187), the medieval translator of Ptolemy's Astronomy, was born at Cremona, Lombardy, in or?about 1114.

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  • In the last-named latitudes are reckoned from Cremona and Toledo.

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  • (333) and iv.; Arisi, Cremona literata; Jourdain, Recherches sur.

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  • The Vatican MS. 2392 is stated to contain a eulogy of "Gerard of Cremona" and a list of "his" translations, apparently confusing the two scholars.

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  • The epicycloid shown is termed the "three-cusped epicycloid" or the "epicycloid of Cremona."

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  • (Nicole, Sfondrato), pope 1590-1591, was born in Cremona, on the 11th of February 1535, studied in Perugia, and Padua, became bishop of his native place in 1560, and took part in the council of Trent, 1562-1563.

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  • The river is embanked from Piacenza, and continuously from Cremona, the total length of the embankments exceeding 600 m.

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  • And this was only the forerunner of more signal reverses; for, in a short time, Villeroi was forced to abandon the whole of the Mantuan territory and to take refuge in Cremona, where he seems to have considered himself secure.

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  • It lies on the main line of railway between Verona and Modena; and is also connected by rail with Cremona and with Monselice, on the line from Padua to Bologna, and by steam tramway with Brescia and other places.

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  • Gratian: Paucapalea (I, 50), 1 Rolando Bandinelli 2 (afterwards Alexander III., c. 1150), Rufinus 3 (c. 116 5), Etienne of Tournai 4 (Stephanus Tornacensis, c. 1168), John of Faenza (c. 1170), Sicard, bishop of Cremona (c. 1180), and above all Huguccio (c. 1180).

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  • Riemann, the rational transformation of a plane curve; Luigi Cremona, the rational transformation of a plane; and Chasles, correspondence of points on the same curve, and united points.

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  • It will be observed that the equations x': y' :z = X: Y: Z before mentioned do not of themselves lead to the other system of equations x: y : z= X': Y': Z', and thus that the theory does not in anywise establish a (r, I) correspondence between the points (x, y, z) and (x', y', z) of two planes or of the same plane; this is the correspondence of Cremona's theory.

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  • Cremona, Introduzione ad una teoria geometrica delle curve piane (Bologna, 1861); J.

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  • It was well fortified and built, and from this period date the ducal palace (now the Municipio), the theatre designed by Scomozzi, &c. The church and the summer palace contain frescoes by the Campi of Cremona.

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  • Avicenna's Canon of Medicine was first translated into Latin by Gerard of Cremona (d.

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  • The emperor's next step was an attempt to restore the imperial authority in northern Italy, and for the purpose a diet was called at Cremona.

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  • Cremona to prove them all, and that by a xxv.

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  • Others may take a moment to visit Cremona where the famous Stradivarius violins were made.

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