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creighton

creighton Sentence Examples

  • Creighton's Hist.

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  • Brewer, in his elaborate prefaces to the Letters and Papers (reissued as his History of the Reign of Henry VIII.), originated modern admiration for Wolsey; and his views are reflected in Creighton's Wolsey in the "Twelve English Statesmen" series, and in Dr Gairdner's careful articles in the Dict.

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  • Creighton's History of the Papacy (London, 1897) is very learned and accurate, but the author is more lenient towards Alexander; F.

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  • Richard Whatcoat and Thomas Vasey were ordained by Wesley, Coke and Creighton to administer the sacraments in America.

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  • Creighton (1893).

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  • Among the sculptor's principal statues are " The Bishop of Carlisle " (1895; Carlisle Cathedral), " General Charles Gordon " (Trafalgar Square, London), " Oliver Cromwell " (Westminster), " Dean Colet " (a bronze group - early Italianate in feeling - outside St Paul's School, Hammersmith), " King Alfred " (a colossal memorial for Winchester), the " Gladstone Monument " (in the Strand, London) and " Dr Mandell Creighton, Bishop of London " (bronze, erected in St Paul's Cathedral).

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  • Greenhill (1814-1894) and C. Creighton in England, Maximilien P. Littre (1801-1881) and Charles V.

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  • It is not worth while to refer to all the wild guesses that were made by various writers, but Dr Creighton shows the absurdity of one of these calculations made in 1554 by Soranzo, the Venetian ambassador for the information of the doge and senators of Venice.

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  • He estimates the population to have been 180,000 persons, which Dr Creighton affirms to be nearly three times the number that we obtain by a moderate calculation from the bills of mortality in 1532 and 1 535.

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  • Following on his calculations from 1509, when the population may be supposed to have been about 50,000, Dr Creighton carries on his numbers to the Restoration The same causes that operated to bring about these changes in the whole kingdom were of course also at work in the case of the City of London.

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  • These numbers have been very generally accepted as fairly correct, and Dr Creighton 1 comes to the conclusion after careful consideration that the population of London from the reign of Richard I.

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  • Dr Creighton points out that the number given by certain chroniclers of the deaths from the early pestilences in London are incredible; such for instance as the statement that forty or fifty thousand bodies were buried in Charterhouse churchyard at the time of the Black Death in 1348-1349.

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  • Although there were fluctuations in the numbers at different periods there is evidence to show that on the average the amount of forty to fifty thousand fixed by Dr Creighton for the years between 1189 and 1509 is fairly correct.

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  • Dr Creighton had access to the manuscript returns of burials and christenings for five years from 1578 to 1582 preserved in the library at Hatfield House.

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  • The history of the Bills of Mortality which in the early years were intermittent in their publication is of much interest, and Dr Creighton has stated it with great clearness.

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  • Creighton, History of the Papacy (London, 1897); A.

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  • Creighton's History of the Papacy (1897).

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  • Creighton, History of the Papacy during the Reformation, 6 vols.

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  • Creighton, " Chillingworth " in the Diet.

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  • Bishop Creighton's Queen Elizabeth (1896) is the best biography; there are others by E.

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  • - ix., and Creighton's History of the Papacy.

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  • He succeeded Creighton as Dixie professor of ecclesiastical history at Cambridge (1891) and in 1903 gave the Gifford lectures at Edinburgh.

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  • Creighton and Titchener, 1896), Lehrbuch der Physiologie des Menschen (1865; 4th ed., 1878), and Grundziige der physiologischen Psychologie (1874; 6th ed., 3 vols., 1908).

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  • He repeated his challenge in 1560, and Dr Henry Cole took it up. The chief result was Jewel's Apologia ecclesiae Anglicanae, published in 1562, which in Bishop Creighton's words is "the first methodical statement of the position of the Church of England against the Church of Rome, and forms the groundwork of all subsequent controversy."

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  • by Bishop. Creighton).

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  • B., 1855, seq.); Hoffer, Die avignonesischen Pdpste (1871); Creighton, History of the Papacy (1882, seq.); L.

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  • 2; Vespasiano da Bisticci, Vite (1839); Georgius (1742); Mentz, Les Arts (1878-1879); Creighton, Papacy ii.

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  • Quirini (1740); Creighton, Papacy iii.

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  • Creighton, Hist.

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  • In 1901, after the death of Dr. Mandell Creighton, he was nominated by the Crown to the see of London.

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  • MANDELL CREIGHTON (1843-1901), English historian and bishop of London, was born at Carlisle on the 5th of July 1843, being the eldest son of Robert Creighton, a well-to-do upholsterer of that city.

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  • In 1897, on the translation of Dr Temple to Canterbury, Bishop Creighton was transferred to London.

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  • Bishop Creighton's principal published works are: History of the Papacy during the Period of the Reformation (5 vols., 1882-1897, new ed.); History of the Papacy from the Great Schism to the Sack of Rome (6 vols., 1897); The Early Renaissance in England (1895); Cardinal Wolsey (1895); Life of Simon de Montfort (1876, new ed.

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  • He also edited the series of Epochs of English History, for which he wrote "The Age of Elizabeth" (13th ed., 1897); Historical Lectures and Addresses by Mandell Creighton, &c., edited by Mrs Creighton, were published in 1903.

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  • See Life and Letters of Mandell Creighton, eec., by his wife (2 vols., 1904); and the article "Creighton and Stubbs" in Church Quarterly Review for Oct.

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  • Sir John was certainly a friend of Creighton, laird of Branston, who was deeply implicated in the plot, but Creighton also befriended the reformer during his evangelical labours in Midlothian.

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  • Creighton, A History of the Papacy during the Period of the Reformation (London, 1897); and L.

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  • Mandell Creighton >>

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  • by Creighton, London, 1883); Hecker's Volkskrankheiten des Mittelalters (Berlin, 1865), p. 101; Webb, Pathologia indica (2nd ed., Calcutta, 1848).

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  • A pit called the "Maelstrom," in Croghan's Hall, is the spot most remote from the mouth of Gerta's Grotto Creighton's Dome Index Hovey's Cathedral 0' Martel Nelson's Domes p a e t a j-?l . ?Einbigler Dome Edna's Dome Galloway's Dome Chief City Violet.

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  • of Russia in 1895, Dr Creighton, bishop of Peterborough, as representative of the English Church, was treated with peculiar distinction, and the compliment of his visit was returned by the presence of a high dignitary of the Russian Church at the service at St Paul's in London on the occasion of Queen Victoria's " diamond " jubilee in 1897.

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  • Lecky and Creighton are almost

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  • Lecky and Creighton are almost as dispassionate as Gardiner, but are more definitely committed to particular points of views, while democratic fervour pervades the fascinating pages of J.R.Green, and an intellectual secularism, which is almost religious in its intensity and idealism, inspired the genius of Maitland.

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  • Among the private educational institutions of the state are: Nebraska Wesleyan University (1888, Methodist Episcopal), at University Place, a suburb of Lincoln; Union College (1891, Adventist), at College View, suburb of Lincoln; Creighton University (1879, Roman Catholic), at Omaha; York College (1890, United Baptist), at York; Cotner University (1889; legally " The Nebraska Christian University "), at Bethany, a suburb of Lincoln; Grand Island College (1892, Baptist), at Grand Island; Doane College (1872, Congregational), at Crete; Hastings College (1882, Presbyterian), at Hastings; and Bellevue College (1883, Presbyterian), at Bellevue.

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  • Only one minute of the game had been played when the City striker was tackled by Creighton and received a suspected broken ankle.

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  • Creighton, History of the Papacy, vol.

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  • Creighton's Hist.

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  • Creighton's History of the Papacy, vol.

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  • Brewer, in his elaborate prefaces to the Letters and Papers (reissued as his History of the Reign of Henry VIII.), originated modern admiration for Wolsey; and his views are reflected in Creighton's Wolsey in the "Twelve English Statesmen" series, and in Dr Gairdner's careful articles in the Dict.

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  • Creighton, History of the Papacy, vol., (London, 1899); N.

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  • Creighton's History of the Papacy (London, 1897) is very learned and accurate, but the author is more lenient towards Alexander; F.

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  • Richard Whatcoat and Thomas Vasey were ordained by Wesley, Coke and Creighton to administer the sacraments in America.

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  • Creighton (1893).

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  • Among the sculptor's principal statues are " The Bishop of Carlisle " (1895; Carlisle Cathedral), " General Charles Gordon " (Trafalgar Square, London), " Oliver Cromwell " (Westminster), " Dean Colet " (a bronze group - early Italianate in feeling - outside St Paul's School, Hammersmith), " King Alfred " (a colossal memorial for Winchester), the " Gladstone Monument " (in the Strand, London) and " Dr Mandell Creighton, Bishop of London " (bronze, erected in St Paul's Cathedral).

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  • Greenhill (1814-1894) and C. Creighton in England, Maximilien P. Littre (1801-1881) and Charles V.

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  • It is not worth while to refer to all the wild guesses that were made by various writers, but Dr Creighton shows the absurdity of one of these calculations made in 1554 by Soranzo, the Venetian ambassador for the information of the doge and senators of Venice.

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  • He estimates the population to have been 180,000 persons, which Dr Creighton affirms to be nearly three times the number that we obtain by a moderate calculation from the bills of mortality in 1532 and 1 535.

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  • Following on his calculations from 1509, when the population may be supposed to have been about 50,000, Dr Creighton carries on his numbers to the Restoration The same causes that operated to bring about these changes in the whole kingdom were of course also at work in the case of the City of London.

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  • These numbers have been very generally accepted as fairly correct, and Dr Creighton 1 comes to the conclusion after careful consideration that the population of London from the reign of Richard I.

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  • Dr Creighton points out that the number given by certain chroniclers of the deaths from the early pestilences in London are incredible; such for instance as the statement that forty or fifty thousand bodies were buried in Charterhouse churchyard at the time of the Black Death in 1348-1349.

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  • Although there were fluctuations in the numbers at different periods there is evidence to show that on the average the amount of forty to fifty thousand fixed by Dr Creighton for the years between 1189 and 1509 is fairly correct.

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  • Dr Creighton had access to the manuscript returns of burials and christenings for five years from 1578 to 1582 preserved in the library at Hatfield House.

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  • The history of the Bills of Mortality which in the early years were intermittent in their publication is of much interest, and Dr Creighton has stated it with great clearness.

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  • Creighton, History of the Papacy (London, 1897); A.

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  • Creighton's History of the Papacy (1897).

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  • As Creighton well said, the chief importance of the " Letters of Obscure Men " lay in its success in popularizing the conception of a stupid party which was opposed to the party of progress.

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  • Creighton, History of the Papacy during the Reformation, 6 vols.

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  • Creighton, " Chillingworth " in the Diet.

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  • Bishop Creighton's Queen Elizabeth (1896) is the best biography; there are others by E.

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  • - ix., and Creighton's History of the Papacy.

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  • Creighton, A History of the Papacy during the Period of the Reformation, vol.

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  • He succeeded Creighton as Dixie professor of ecclesiastical history at Cambridge (1891) and in 1903 gave the Gifford lectures at Edinburgh.

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  • Creighton and Titchener, 1896), Lehrbuch der Physiologie des Menschen (1865; 4th ed., 1878), and Grundziige der physiologischen Psychologie (1874; 6th ed., 3 vols., 1908).

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  • He repeated his challenge in 1560, and Dr Henry Cole took it up. The chief result was Jewel's Apologia ecclesiae Anglicanae, published in 1562, which in Bishop Creighton's words is "the first methodical statement of the position of the Church of England against the Church of Rome, and forms the groundwork of all subsequent controversy."

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  • by Bishop. Creighton).

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  • B., 1855, seq.); Hoffer, Die avignonesischen Pdpste (1871); Creighton, History of the Papacy (1882, seq.); L.

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  • 2; Vespasiano da Bisticci, Vite (1839); Georgius (1742); Mentz, Les Arts (1878-1879); Creighton, Papacy ii.

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  • Quirini (1740); Creighton, Papacy iii.

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  • Creighton, Hist.

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  • In 1901, after the death of Dr. Mandell Creighton, he was nominated by the Crown to the see of London.

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  • MANDELL CREIGHTON (1843-1901), English historian and bishop of London, was born at Carlisle on the 5th of July 1843, being the eldest son of Robert Creighton, a well-to-do upholsterer of that city.

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  • In 1897, on the translation of Dr Temple to Canterbury, Bishop Creighton was transferred to London.

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  • Bishop Creighton's principal published works are: History of the Papacy during the Period of the Reformation (5 vols., 1882-1897, new ed.); History of the Papacy from the Great Schism to the Sack of Rome (6 vols., 1897); The Early Renaissance in England (1895); Cardinal Wolsey (1895); Life of Simon de Montfort (1876, new ed.

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  • He also edited the series of Epochs of English History, for which he wrote "The Age of Elizabeth" (13th ed., 1897); Historical Lectures and Addresses by Mandell Creighton, &c., edited by Mrs Creighton, were published in 1903.

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  • See Life and Letters of Mandell Creighton, eec., by his wife (2 vols., 1904); and the article "Creighton and Stubbs" in Church Quarterly Review for Oct.

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  • Sir John was certainly a friend of Creighton, laird of Branston, who was deeply implicated in the plot, but Creighton also befriended the reformer during his evangelical labours in Midlothian.

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  • Creighton, History of the Papacy (London, 1882), vol.

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  • Creighton, A History of the Papacy during the Period of the Reformation (London, 1897); and L.

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  • Creighton in the Dictionary of National Biography, vol.

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  • Mandell Creighton >>

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  • by Creighton, London, 1883); Hecker's Volkskrankheiten des Mittelalters (Berlin, 1865), p. 101; Webb, Pathologia indica (2nd ed., Calcutta, 1848).

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  • A pit called the "Maelstrom," in Croghan's Hall, is the spot most remote from the mouth of Gerta's Grotto Creighton's Dome Index Hovey's Cathedral 0' Martel Nelson's Domes p a e t a j-?l . ?Einbigler Dome Edna's Dome Galloway's Dome Chief City Violet.

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  • of Russia in 1895, Dr Creighton, bishop of Peterborough, as representative of the English Church, was treated with peculiar distinction, and the compliment of his visit was returned by the presence of a high dignitary of the Russian Church at the service at St Paul's in London on the occasion of Queen Victoria's " diamond " jubilee in 1897.

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  • Lecky and Creighton are almost

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  • Lecky and Creighton are almost as dispassionate as Gardiner, but are more definitely committed to particular points of views, while democratic fervour pervades the fascinating pages of J.R.Green, and an intellectual secularism, which is almost religious in its intensity and idealism, inspired the genius of Maitland.

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  • Among the private educational institutions of the state are: Nebraska Wesleyan University (1888, Methodist Episcopal), at University Place, a suburb of Lincoln; Union College (1891, Adventist), at College View, suburb of Lincoln; Creighton University (1879, Roman Catholic), at Omaha; York College (1890, United Baptist), at York; Cotner University (1889; legally " The Nebraska Christian University "), at Bethany, a suburb of Lincoln; Grand Island College (1892, Baptist), at Grand Island; Doane College (1872, Congregational), at Crete; Hastings College (1882, Presbyterian), at Hastings; and Bellevue College (1883, Presbyterian), at Bellevue.

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  • Ford and John Pitcairn founded the company in 1883 in Creighton, Pennsylvania.

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