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credo

credo

credo Sentence Examples

  • Aemilius Scaurus, praetor in 53 B.C. Cicero, speaking no doubt to his brief, gives them a very bad character, adding " ignoscent alii viri boni ex Sardinia; credo enim esse quosdam ".

  • In that case, all who accept a revelation without professing to understand its content would require to be ranked as mystics; the fierce sincerity of Tertullian's credo quia ab-' surdum, Pascal's reconciliation of contradictions in Jesus Christ, and Bayle's half-sneering subordination of reason to faith would all be marks of this standpoint.

  • Anselm's motto, Credo ut intelligam, marks well the distance that has been traversed since Tertullian's Credo quia absurdum est.

  • To Anselm speciall y belongs the motto Credo ut intelligam, or, as it is obscurity of the schools..

  • credo, I believe), or Confessions Of Faith.

  • His chief works are: De la connaissance de Dieu, opposing Positivism (1855); La Logique (1856); Les Sources, conseils pour .la conduite de l'esprit (1861-1862); La Philosophie du credo (1861); Commentaire sur l'evangile de Saint Matthieu (1863); Jesus-Christ, lettres a M.

  • Soon after it becomes French the river rushes furiously through a deep gorge, being imprisoned on the north by the Credo and on the south by the Vuache, while the great fortress of 1'Ecluse guards this entrance into France.

  • The railway pierces the Credo by a tunnel.

  • He has been represented as a determined apologist of intellectual orthodoxy animated by an almost fanatical "hatred of reason," and possessed with a purpose to overthrow the appeal to reason; as a sceptic and pessimist of a far deeper dye than Montaigne, anxious chiefly to show how any positive decision on matters beyond the range of experience is impossible; as a nervous believer clinging to conclusions which his clearer and better sense showed to be indefensible; as an almost ferocious ascetic and paradoxer affecting the credo quia impossibile in intellectual matters and the odi quia amabile in matters moral and sensuous; as a wanderer in the regions of doubt and belief, alternately bringing a vast though vague power of thought and an unequalled power of expression to the expression of ideas incompatible and irreconcilable.

  • in 1823; the Crown of Our Lord, attributed to Michael of Florence, a Camaldolese monk (c. 1516), and consisting of 33 Paters, 5 A y es and a Credo; St Bridget's, 7 Paters and 63 A y es, in honour of the joys and sorrows of the Blessed Virgin and the 63 years of her life.

  • Now the texts of the Gloria and Credo were more voluminous than any others which 16th-century composers attempted to handle in a continuous scheme.

  • Accordingly, Palestrina and his great contemporaries and predecessors treated the Gloria and Credo in a style midway in polyphonic organization and rhythmic breadth between that of the elaborate motet (adopted in the Sanctus) and the homophonic reciting style of the Litany.

  • Obviously the greatest difficulty in any elaborate instrumental setting of the Credo is the inevitable anti-climax after the Resurrexit.

  • This gives the utmost possible effect of finality to the whole Credo, and contrasts admirably with the coldly formal instrumental end of the Resurrexit three movements further back.

  • The text of the Dies Irae so imperatively demands either a very dramatic elaboration or none at all, that even in the 16th century it could not possibly be set to continuous music on the lines of the Gloria and Credo.

  • credo) - is the duty and privilege of the eldest son of the deceased, or, failing him, of the nearest relative who thereby establishes his right as next of kin in respect of inheritance; and those other relatives who have the right to take part in the ceremony are called sapinda, i.e.

  • Credo, quia absurdum was applied, notably by the popular writers of the French Second Empire, in a fashion grotesquely literal enough to scandalize Tertullian himself.

  • Besides his Histoire de Saint Louis and his Credo or "Confession of Faith" written much earlier, a considerable number, relatively speaking, of letters and business documents concerning the fief of Joinville and so forth are extant.

  • Yet he was a sincerely religious man, as the curious Credo, written at Acre and forming a kind of anticipatory appendix to the history, sufficiently shows.

  • Although her parents were in easy circumstances, Joan never learned to read or write, and received her sole religious instruction from her mother, who taught her to recite the Pater Noster, Ave Maria, and Credo.

  • Nam et hoc credo, quia, nisi credidero, non intelligam."

  • Atlantic city the been soliciting restaurant Davis's credo during.

  • For the sake of national survival, nonintervention became a Haitian credo.

  • AMP is a lovely company, however in terms of choreography its artistic credo is not firm.

  • In 1889 he published his personal artistic credo, The Soul of Man Under Socialism.

  • That is at least partly because, in Scotland, Brown's political credo has been implemented.

  • In effect, everyone must practice non credo, a basic but often forgotten principle of macrobiotics.

  • It's a revival, in some ways, of the old credo of the Victorian ruling class.

  • It is a key to Cunningham's own credo.

  • I said the Deare was not a haud credo, ' twas a Pricket Hol.

  • Mozart therefore omits formal closing fugues for the Gloria and Credo.

  • The left regards Marxism as adequate for a defining credo of some confessional sect.

  • Evidence is deliberately suppressed whenever science may have the edge over their particular brand of primitive credo.

  • Aemilius Scaurus, praetor in 53 B.C. Cicero, speaking no doubt to his brief, gives them a very bad character, adding " ignoscent alii viri boni ex Sardinia; credo enim esse quosdam ".

  • In that case, all who accept a revelation without professing to understand its content would require to be ranked as mystics; the fierce sincerity of Tertullian's credo quia ab-' surdum, Pascal's reconciliation of contradictions in Jesus Christ, and Bayle's half-sneering subordination of reason to faith would all be marks of this standpoint.

  • Anselm's motto, Credo ut intelligam, marks well the distance that has been traversed since Tertullian's Credo quia absurdum est.

  • To Anselm speciall y belongs the motto Credo ut intelligam, or, as it is obscurity of the schools..

  • credo, I believe), or Confessions Of Faith.

  • His chief works are: De la connaissance de Dieu, opposing Positivism (1855); La Logique (1856); Les Sources, conseils pour .la conduite de l'esprit (1861-1862); La Philosophie du credo (1861); Commentaire sur l'evangile de Saint Matthieu (1863); Jesus-Christ, lettres a M.

  • Soon after it becomes French the river rushes furiously through a deep gorge, being imprisoned on the north by the Credo and on the south by the Vuache, while the great fortress of 1'Ecluse guards this entrance into France.

  • The railway pierces the Credo by a tunnel.

  • He has been represented as a determined apologist of intellectual orthodoxy animated by an almost fanatical "hatred of reason," and possessed with a purpose to overthrow the appeal to reason; as a sceptic and pessimist of a far deeper dye than Montaigne, anxious chiefly to show how any positive decision on matters beyond the range of experience is impossible; as a nervous believer clinging to conclusions which his clearer and better sense showed to be indefensible; as an almost ferocious ascetic and paradoxer affecting the credo quia impossibile in intellectual matters and the odi quia amabile in matters moral and sensuous; as a wanderer in the regions of doubt and belief, alternately bringing a vast though vague power of thought and an unequalled power of expression to the expression of ideas incompatible and irreconcilable.

  • in 1823; the Crown of Our Lord, attributed to Michael of Florence, a Camaldolese monk (c. 1516), and consisting of 33 Paters, 5 A y es and a Credo; St Bridget's, 7 Paters and 63 A y es, in honour of the joys and sorrows of the Blessed Virgin and the 63 years of her life.

  • Now the texts of the Gloria and Credo were more voluminous than any others which 16th-century composers attempted to handle in a continuous scheme.

  • Accordingly, Palestrina and his great contemporaries and predecessors treated the Gloria and Credo in a style midway in polyphonic organization and rhythmic breadth between that of the elaborate motet (adopted in the Sanctus) and the homophonic reciting style of the Litany.

  • By this time the resources of music were such that the long and varied text of the Gloria and Credo inevitably either overbalanced the scheme or met with an obviously perfunctory treatment.

  • Obviously the greatest difficulty in any elaborate instrumental setting of the Credo is the inevitable anti-climax after the Resurrexit.

  • This gives the utmost possible effect of finality to the whole Credo, and contrasts admirably with the coldly formal instrumental end of the Resurrexit three movements further back.

  • The text of the Dies Irae so imperatively demands either a very dramatic elaboration or none at all, that even in the 16th century it could not possibly be set to continuous music on the lines of the Gloria and Credo.

  • credo) - is the duty and privilege of the eldest son of the deceased, or, failing him, of the nearest relative who thereby establishes his right as next of kin in respect of inheritance; and those other relatives who have the right to take part in the ceremony are called sapinda, i.e.

  • Credo, quia absurdum was applied, notably by the popular writers of the French Second Empire, in a fashion grotesquely literal enough to scandalize Tertullian himself.

  • Besides his Histoire de Saint Louis and his Credo or "Confession of Faith" written much earlier, a considerable number, relatively speaking, of letters and business documents concerning the fief of Joinville and so forth are extant.

  • Yet he was a sincerely religious man, as the curious Credo, written at Acre and forming a kind of anticipatory appendix to the history, sufficiently shows.

  • Although her parents were in easy circumstances, Joan never learned to read or write, and received her sole religious instruction from her mother, who taught her to recite the Pater Noster, Ave Maria, and Credo.

  • "Neque enim quaero intelligere ut credam, sed credo ut intelligam.

  • Nam et hoc credo, quia, nisi credidero, non intelligam."

  • Evidence is deliberately suppressed whenever science may have the edge over their particular brand of primitive credo.

  • With the Navy commando credo, "Never leave a man behind" repeatedly playing in his head, he sets out to rescue the sole survivor and get off the island.

  • The trefoil part of the insignia represents the three parts of the promise, with the vein coming up the middle representing the law that feeds the rest of the credo.

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