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crannogs

crannogs Sentence Examples

  • The existence of these lakedwellings in Scotland was first made known by John Mackinlay, a fellow of the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland, in a letter sent to George Chalmers, the author of Caledonia, in 1813, describing two crannogs, or fortified islands in Bute.

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  • But it was not until after the discovery of the pile-villages of the Swiss lakes, in 1853, had drawn public attention to the subject of lake-dwellings, that the crannogs of Scotland and Ireland were systematically investigated.

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  • From their common feature of a substructure of brushwood and logs built up from the bottom, the crannogs have been classed as fascine-dwellings, to distinguish them from the typical piledwellings of the earlier periods in Switzerland, whose platforms are supported by piles driven into the bed of the lake.

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  • On the other hand, the implements and weapons found in the Scottish and Irish crannogs are usually of iron, or, if objects of bronze and stone are found, they are commonly such as were in use in the Iron Age.

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  • Crannogs are frequently referred to in the Irish annals.

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  • Judging from the historical evidence of their late continuance, and from the character of the relics found in them, the crannogs may be included among the latest prehistoric strongholds, reaching their greatest development in early historic times, and surviving through the middle ages.

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  • Munro, The Lake Dwellings of Europe: being the Rhind Lectures in Archaeology for 1888 (with a bibliography of the subject) (London, 1890); Ancient Scottish Lake-Dwellings or Crannogs (Edinburgh, 1882); Col.

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  • Wood-Martin, The Lake-Dwellings of Ireland, or Ancient Lacustrine Habitations of Erin, commonly called Crannogs (Dublin, 1886); Sir W.

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  • In the neighbourhood are a cromlech and two ruined towers, and crannogs, or ancient stockaded islands, have been discovered in the lough.

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  • Diving into the Iron Age Diving archeologists have been exploring the crannogs in Loch Tay since 1980.

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  • For a guide book providing more information about Scottish crannogs, click here.

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  • Alex Hale marine crannogs: the archeological and palaeoenvironmental potential with special reference to Redcastle marine crannog, Beauly Firth, Scotland.

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  • There is an absence of notable archeological sites, apart from a few crannogs.

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  • Crannogs are mainly sited in 0-5 meters of water on underwater land shelves which stretch out from the shore to deep water drop-offs.

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  • Ten crannogs (ancient loch dwellings) on Islay have been surveyed by Mark Holley.

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  • The existence of these lakedwellings in Scotland was first made known by John Mackinlay, a fellow of the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland, in a letter sent to George Chalmers, the author of Caledonia, in 1813, describing two crannogs, or fortified islands in Bute.

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  • But it was not until after the discovery of the pile-villages of the Swiss lakes, in 1853, had drawn public attention to the subject of lake-dwellings, that the crannogs of Scotland and Ireland were systematically investigated.

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  • Three crannogs in Dowalton Loch, Wigtownshire, examined by Lord Lovaine in 1863, were found to be constructed of layers of fern and birch and hazel branches, mixed with boulders and penetrated by oak piles, while above all there was a surface layer of stones and soil.

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  • From their common feature of a substructure of brushwood and logs built up from the bottom, the crannogs have been classed as fascine-dwellings, to distinguish them from the typical piledwellings of the earlier periods in Switzerland, whose platforms are supported by piles driven into the bed of the lake.

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  • On the other hand, the implements and weapons found in the Scottish and Irish crannogs are usually of iron, or, if objects of bronze and stone are found, they are commonly such as were in use in the Iron Age.

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  • Crannogs are frequently referred to in the Irish annals.

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  • Judging from the historical evidence of their late continuance, and from the character of the relics found in them, the crannogs may be included among the latest prehistoric strongholds, reaching their greatest development in early historic times, and surviving through the middle ages.

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  • Munro, The Lake Dwellings of Europe: being the Rhind Lectures in Archaeology for 1888 (with a bibliography of the subject) (London, 1890); Ancient Scottish Lake-Dwellings or Crannogs (Edinburgh, 1882); Col.

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  • Wood-Martin, The Lake-Dwellings of Ireland, or Ancient Lacustrine Habitations of Erin, commonly called Crannogs (Dublin, 1886); Sir W.

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  • Wilde, Descriptive Catalogue of the Antiquities in the Museum of the Royal Irish Academy, article "Crannogs," pp. 220-233 (Dublin, 1857); John Stuart, "Scottish Artificial Islands or Crannogs," in the Proceedings of the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland, vol.

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  • In the neighbourhood are a cromlech and two ruined towers, and crannogs, or ancient stockaded islands, have been discovered in the lough.

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