Cowardice sentence examples

cowardice
  • His display of cowardice was pitiful.

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  • His father, when upbraiding his surviving sons for their cowardice, speaks in the Iliad (xxiv.

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  • The court had indeed acquitted him of personal cowardice or of disaffection, and only condemned him for not having done his utmost.

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  • He called them cowards, whereas the cowardice was really his own, and he deserted them in their utmost need.

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  • The general and colonel looked sternly and significantly at one another like two fighting cocks preparing for battle, each vainly trying to detect signs of cowardice in the other.

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  • When they retreated before overwhelming odds they were publicly accused of cowardice and incompetence.

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  • Hospitality, generosity, personal bravery were the subjects of praise; meanness and cowardice those of satire.

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  • The cowardice of this hyena is proverbial; despite its powerful teeth, it rarely attempts to defend itself.

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  • He was almost the only one among them whom Dundonald, with whom he served in a successful attack on an Egyptian war-ship near Alexandria, exempts from the sweeping charges of cowardice he brings against the Greeks.

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  • Philip took advantage of this hatred of the lower classes and the cowardice of, his creature, Pope Clement V., to satisfy his desire for money.

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  • Rank, with the accompanying privileges, jurisdiction and responsibility, was based upon a qualification of kinship and of property, held by a family for a specified number of generations, together with certain concurrent conditions; and it could be lost by loss of property, crime, cowardice or other disgraceful conduct.

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  • At last in the winter of 1013-1014, more as it would seem from sheer disgust at their kings cowardice and incompetence than Canute because further resistance was impossible, the English gave up the struggle and acknowledged Sweyn as king.

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  • Four of the captains who had misbehaved on the 3rd of June were shot for cowardice, and others were dismissed.

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  • Count Casimir Batthyany attacked him in The Times, and Szemere, who had been prime minister under him, published a bitter criticism of his acts and character, accusing him of arrogance, cowardice and duplicity.

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  • The new grand vizier, Cicala, by his severity to the soldiers, mainly Asiatics, who had shown cowardice in the battle, drove thousands to desert; and the sultan, who had himself little stomach for the perils of campaigning, returned to Constantinople, leaving the conduct of the war to his generals.

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  • The most remarkable statement of this point of view is that of Friedrich Nietzsche, who went so far as to denounce all forms of self-denial as cowardice: - let every one who is strong seek to make himself dominant at the expense of the weak.

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  • But he is best vindicated from the charges of selfishness and cowardice by the thoughts and meditations contained in his private diaries and papers, where the purity and honour of his motives are clearly seen.

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  • Darnley was esteemed handsome, though his portraits give an opposite impression; his native qualities of cowardice, perfidy, profligacy and overweening arrogance were at first concealed, and in mid April 1565 Lethington was sent to London, not to renew the negotiations with Leicester (as had been designed till the 31st of March), but to announce Mary's intended wedding with her cousin.

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  • For the two ealdormen whom he delighted to honor and placed at the head of his armies, ~lfric and Eadric Streona, are accused, the one of persistent cowardice, the other of underhand intrigue with the Danes.

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  • Peter, who behaved with abject cowardice, was sent to a country house at Ropcha, where he died on the 15th or 18th of July of official "apoplexy."

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  • The accession of Russia to the anti-Prussian coalition (1756) was made over his head, and the cowardice and incapacity of Bestuzhev's friend, the Russian commander-in-chief, Stephen Apraksin, after the battle of Gross-Jagersdorf (1757), was made the pretext for overthrowing the chancellor.

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  • The story is full of picturesque detail and stirring incident, full also of interesting problems in folk-lore and mythology; and throughout it is dominated by the figure of the grim Hagen, who, twitted with cowardice and his advice spurned, is determined that there shall be no turning back and that they shall go through with it to the bitter end.

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  • (1643), answered by Prynne and Clement Walker accusing him of treachery and cowardice, to which he opposed Col.

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  • The accounts of early writers as to its courage, nobility and magnanimity have led to a reaction, causing some modern authors to accuse it of cowardice and meanness.

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  • By its side is a smaller tomb, ascribed to Strongbow's son, whom his father killed for showing cowardice in battle.

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  • But, though he kept his place by this piece of cowardice, Madame de Vercellis died not long afterwards and he was turned off.

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  • Though to death he was wounded he struck so strong a stroke That from the shattered shield-rim forthwith out there broke Showers of flashing jewels; the shield in fragments lay.2 Then reproaching them for their cowardice and treachery, Siegfried fell dying "amid the flowers," while the knights gathered round lamenting.

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  • Before long Charles the Balds followers were dictating to him; and in the disaffection caused by his feebleness and cowardice prelates and nobles allied themselves ~stablisfh~ against him.

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  • The general tendency seems to have been to accept too easily the accounts of the chroniclers of the east Frankish kingdom, which are favourable to Louis the German, and to accuse Charles of cowardice and bad faith.

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  • Like most of the papal armies of the last three centuries, Urban's troops distinguished themselves by wretched strategy, cowardice in rank and file, and a Fabian avoidance of fighting which, discreet as it may be in the field of diplomacy, has invariably failed to save Rome on the field of battle.

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  • After Pultava (June 26, 1709), Peter, hitherto commendably cautious even to cowardice, but now puffed up with pride, rashly plunged into as foolhardy an enterprise as ever his rival engaged in.

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  • By their cowardice, incapacity, fished, egotism and treachery during the crisis of the struggle, the Danish aristocracy had justly forfeited the respect of every other class of the community, and emerged from the war hopelessly discredited.

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  • There is no sufficient ground for finding an allusion to this act in the noted line of Dante, "Che fece per viltate it gran rifiuto" ("who made from cowardice the great refusal," Inferno, 3, 60).

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  • Originally accepted as a political necessity, he soon came to be detested by the people as a tyrant and despised by the nobles for his cowardice and sloth.

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  • Another theory, propounded by Captain Bazeries (La Masque de fer, 1883), identified the prisoner with General du Bulonde, punished for cowardice at the siege of Cuneo; but Bulonde only went to Pignerol in 1691, and has been proved to be living in 1705.

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  • His wife attributed his refusal to cowardice, but it seems from certain passages in his own work that he really regarded it as a crime to revolt against the rightful heir; the only reproach that can be brought against him is that he did not nip the conspiracy in the bud.

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  • craven cowardice of the highest order.

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  • The troops at Tacna, indignant at the inglorious part they had been condemned to play by the incompetence or cowardice of their president, deprived him of their command and elected Colonel Camacho to lead them.

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  • cowardice of the IRA men who murdered them?

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  • cowardice of the union leaders for the workers ' mood.

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  • Because if you ran away then it meant you were afraid - " flight was not an option, it meant cowardice " .

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  • He was reliving the pain of Darian's death, sickened by his own cowardice.

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  • I believe that this exhibits professional cowardice and a stunning lack of imagination.

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  • Early on he said that cowardice is the biggest threat to the world today, but pressed on this he refined his point somewhat.

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  • Some might call that cowardice, and they might be right.

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  • Short term political cowardice is going to have terrible economic effects over the next 5 years.

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  • cowardice in the face of the enemy.

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  • The Piersons Puppeteers are Niven's most inventive creations; two-headed, three-legged creatures of a vast empire, whose culture is dominated by cowardice.

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  • We can dismiss the former position as moral cowardice, which leaves only the latter as a serious response.

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  • He is calling for a pardon for those men who were shot for cowardice, for desertion, for being shell-shocked.

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  • The Thracian spearmen, who were watching him from the door, began to gibe at his cowardice.

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  • On the rzth of June Knollys wrote to Cecil at once the best description and the noblest panegyric extant of the queen of Scots - enlarging, with a brave man's sympathy, on her indifference to form and ceremony, her daring grace and openness of manner, her frank display of a great desire to be avenged of her enemies, her readiness to expose herself to all perils in hope of victory, her delight to hear of hardihood and courage, commending by name all her enemies of approved valour, sparing no cowardice in her friends, but above all things athirst for victory by any means at any price, so that for its sake pain and peril seemed pleasant to her, and wealth and all things, if compared with it, contemptible and vile.

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  • The 'TiroOi icae, which are of considerable merit, contain exhortations to bravery and a warning against the disgrace of cowardice.

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  • But these men were not all busy over the problem of how many angels could stand on a needle-point; nor were they all dominated by the religious spirit of faith or intellectual cowardice.

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  • Therefore, to have bottle is to have courage; to bottle out is to show cowardice.

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  • The last lines of the inscription on the grave are a bitter reference to Carey's supposed cowardice.

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  • No words can express the contempt all decent people would feel for such abject cowardice.

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  • What I did, tho, was to bid 3, craven cowardice of the highest order.

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  • We show this video as we want the public to realize the true staggering hypocrisy and moral cowardice of this corrupt Labor government.

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  • The basic point is incredibly complex, examining tolerance, loyalty and cowardice with a visceral punch to the audience.

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  • shootis calling for a pardon for those men who were shot for cowardice, for desertion, for being shell-shocked.

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  • staggering hypocrisy and moral cowardice of this corrupt Labor government.

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  • Damian closed his eyes to the heat and light, tormented by his brother's death and his own cowardice.

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  • You are forced by your own psychological cowardice to believe impossibilities for fear of actually dying when you die.

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