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cousin

cousin

cousin Sentence Examples

  • My cousin Frank lives in Louisville.

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  • Cousin Arthur made me a swing in the ash tree.

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  • "The cousin is always the illegitimate daughter of the old man," Dean answered.

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  • Can this one boon be as bad as my cousin believes?

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  • My cousin tells me I've lost my way in the lessons of my forefathers.

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  • I'd leave that up to his cousin Martha.

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  • The cousin had to be the illegitimate daughter of the old man.

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  • "How do you do, cousin?" said Pierre.

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  • "You betcha, cousin," she replied as she leaned over the table and kissed him on the cheek.

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  • The summer you two came up here, I had a major crush on my handsome California cousin but you were seven years older than me and didn't know I existed.

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  • In 1839 he succeeded his master Cousin as professor of philosophy at the Sorbonne.

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  • Her cousin can Travel and has a knack for weapons she's hiding from Jessi.

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  • Her cousin hurried back, her face falling when she realized Jonny was gone.

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  • Jessi almost begged her cousin not to leave her alone with Xander, whose direct gaze hadn't left her.

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  • I ask just one thing of you, cousin," she went on, "arrange for me to be taken to Petersburg.

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  • Cousin Bell will come to see us Saturday.

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  • Brandon flushed, confirming the instinct that he wasn't as pure as his cousin thought.

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  • His chief philosophical importance consists in the fact that he was a leader in the attempt to revivify French philosophy by the new thought of Germany, to which he had been introduced by Cousin, but of which he never had more than a second-hand knowledge.

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  • What if he tried to hurt her sweet cousin, like Jonny promised to do?

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  • What if he tried to hurt her sweet cousin, like Jonny promised to do?

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  • The demon told me I'd gone mad when I saw what my cousin did.

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  • The demon told me I'd gone mad when I saw what my cousin did.

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  • Jessi watched her cousin walk away then break into a run as she crossed the street and headed towards the bookstore.

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  • His cousin is flying out there tomorrow... today, and she's to take it out to him.

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  • My cousin is sensitive.

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  • Cousin dedicated to him the fourth volume of his translation of Plato, and the long dedication is a compressed biography.

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  • Cousin Anna gave me a pretty doll.

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  • "If she goes to her cousin first and then to another lady, she will be my wife," said Prince Andrew to himself quite to his own surprise, as he watched her.

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  • In 737 he voluntarily retired to a monastery and left the kingdom to his cousin Eadberht.

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  • "He's Martha's cousin," Quinn grumbled.

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  • Her focus was clear: getting her cousin to safety without any sort of consideration for her own welfare.

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  • But your cousin, Drubetskoy, is also very attentive to her.

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  • "Excuse my coming to you, cousin," she said in a reproachful and agitated voice.

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  • My cousin and I thought the madness died with him.

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  • He pulled off one of the gem-studded medallions marking him a cousin to the king.

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  • Xander's introduction to her cousin made the reality of her situation starker.

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  • Your cousin is in love with you, I know.

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  • Might it have been one of those situations where Fred mentioned something to Cora Abernathy who told it to her second cousin, once removed, whose brother-in-law's best friend was seeing the sister of Arthur's housekeeper?

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  • Might it have been one of those situations where Fred mentioned something to Cora Abernathy who told it to her second cousin, once removed, whose brother-in-law's best friend was seeing the sister of Arthur's housekeeper?

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  • In 1858 he had married Eliza Roscoe, a cousin of his first wife; she died early in 1897, and Hutton's own death followed on the 9th of September of the same year.

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  • Cousin Leila thinks he will walk in a little while.

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  • I have been observing Helen's little cousin lately.

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  • This seems too simple, and I cannot yet dismiss the caution my great-uncle - -and his son, my cousin - -took when discussing the creature.

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  • I killed my cousin when he tried to act against my daughter so long ago and replaced him with a man I trust with all I have.

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  • Jessi went to the couch, expecting to see her cousin lying there watching TV, as she did at home.

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  • Jessi went to the couch, expecting to see her cousin lying there watching TV, as she did at home.

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  • Her cousin was dressed and pale, seated on the edge of her bed.

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  • Your cousin is considering dating a man she'd have to defend in a dark alley.

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  • She ignored Ashley's protests and led her cousin away from the bookstore.

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  • In 1814-1815, before the decrees of the Vienna Congress were known, an extraordinary attempt was made by Philippe d'Auvergne of the British navy, the cousin and adopted son of the last duke, to revive the ancient duchy of Bouillon.

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  • The newly born son of Philip by Cleopatra, and Alexander's cousin Amyntas, were put to death, and Alexander took up the interrupted work of his father.

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  • With much love and kisses, from your Affectionate cousin HELEN A. KELLER.

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  • Like her baby cousin, she expresses whole sentences by single words.

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  • This was an old bachelor, Shinshin, a cousin of the countess', a man with "a sharp tongue" as they said in Moscow society.

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  • "Why don't you speak, cousin?" suddenly shrieked the princess so loud that those in the drawing room heard her and were startled.

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  • "My cousin has nothing to do with this and it's not necessary to mention her!" he exclaimed fiercely.

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  • Now you know, Count," she said to Pierre, "even our dear cousin Boris, who, between ourselves, was very far gone in the land of tenderness..."

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  • You can see it from the window, she said to her cousin, evidently wishing to distract her mind.

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  • This is my son and the cousin of the dhjan, Leyon.

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  • "I pity my cousin," he said at last.

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  • "My brother's son, the cousin of Vara," Hilden said, motioning to a gangly youth with Vara's green eyes.

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  • She hoped her cousin had the sense to go straight home.

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  • Jessi carefully placed Ashley's project in a corner of the box, praying her cousin was alive to finish it one day.

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  • Jessi meet Ashley's gaze, willing her cousin not to panic.

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  • He grunted, eyes on her cousin, but instinctively wrapped his arms around her.

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  • Jessi meet Ashley's gaze, willing her cousin not to panic.

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  • Writing of the moment when she learned that everything has a name, she says: We met the nurse carrying my little cousin; and teacher spelled 'baby.'

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  • But Nicholas is my cousin... one would have to... the Metropolitan himself... and even then it can't be done.

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  • Sleeping with you is not a way out, and involving my seventeen-year-old cousin will not make me more likely to sleep with you!

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  • Ashley's eyes glowed, and Jessi hated herself for wanting to leave or prevent her cousin from ever seeing Xander again, when it clearly made her happy.

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  • Brandon was all but clinging to his cousin, whose gray eyes were taking in the group uneasily.

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  • 1885) a novelist of some literary repute, her best books perhaps being Cousin Stella (1859) and Who breaks, pays (1861).

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  • 1885) a novelist of some literary repute, her best books perhaps being Cousin Stella (1859) and Who breaks, pays (1861).

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  • I wished to get a nap, mon cousin, but I can't.

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  • She crossed to her cousin and set down the clothes at the foot of the bed.

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  • She crossed to her cousin and set down the clothes at the foot of the bed.

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  • Silently, he acknowledged that he was a fool to lower his guard around the teens and their cousin, to the point he recognized Ashley the first time he saw her but didn't check her mind.

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  • The African elephant is a very different animal from its Asiatic cousin, both as regards structure and habits; and were it not for the existence of intermediate extinct species, might well be regarded as the representative of a distinct genus.

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  • Within four years he had paid off all his remaining debts without selling any of his wife's property, and having received a small inheritance on the death of a cousin he paid his debt to Pierre as well.

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  • His name is Eduardo, and he is my cousin.

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  • You said Eduardo was your cousin.

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  • Why should I remember a 'Get out of Jail Free' card and not recognize my own mother, or a picture of my father or sister; or this bratty cousin?

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  • Martha turned to her cousin.

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  • Martha took her cousin's hand.

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  • I threw my cousin's body from the Cliffs into the ocean, and I told my mate a bandit killed our daughter.

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  • My cousin's son will take his place as my advisor.

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  • Jessi, this is Laurie again, the nurse overseeing your cousin's care.

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  • Somehow, they made it to the hospital and managed to track down her cousin's room.

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  • Jessi was crying by the time she reached her cousin.

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  • "I don't watch much television," Jessi said, anxious to get back to her cousin.

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  • Jessi bit her tongue, not wanting to get into a pissing match with her cousin.

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  • Jessi covered her mouth, willing him not to say anything stupid to her delicate cousin.

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  • "Go to the car, Ashley," Jessi told her cousin.

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  • "Yeah," Jessi managed, hugging her cousin.

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  • I appreciate you helping me, Xander, and for being somewhat decent to my cousin.

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  • "It's Thursday, Ashley," Jessi reminded her cousin.

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  • Jessi wasn't going to stand on the sideline when it came to her cousin.

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  • Posters of teen pop stars populated her cousin's wall.

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  • Ashley wasn't in the room, though Jessi recognized some of her cousin's things: a pink cell phone charger, a backpack that yawned open to reveal clothes, the stack of colorful beaded bracelets on the arm of the couch.

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  • She looked uncertain rather than scared, and Jessi's eyes took in her cousin's features with relief.

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  • Jonny blocked her from going to her cousin.

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  • Jessi struggled to keep from running across the road and grabbing her cousin.

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  • No cell phone activity on either Jessi or her cousin.

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  • Not sure we can get a signal on the GPS tags Jessi put on her cousin.

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  • Jessi hugged her tight for a few seconds, kissing her cousin's forehead.

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  • Someone go get my cousin!

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  • In 1745 he entered the 1 He succeeded his cousin, Solomon Van Rensselaer (1744-1852), who was in the regular army in 1792-1800, who had fought under General Anthony Wayne at Maumee Rapids in 1794 and under Stephen Van Rensselaer at Queenston Heights in 1812, and who was in the House of Representatives in 1819-1822.

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  • Her early years were clouded by the execution of the duc de Montmorency, her mother's only brother, for intriguing against Richelieu in 1631, and that of her mother's cousin the comte de Montmorency-Boutteville for duelling in 1635; but her parents made their peace with Richelieu, and being introduced into society in 1635 she soon became one of the stars of the Hotel Rambouillet, at that time the centre of all that was learned, witty and gay in France.

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  • Victor Cousin has devoted four volumes to her, which, though immensely diffuse, give a vivid picture of her time.

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  • His first wife died in 1563, and in 1572 he married a cousin, Elizabeth Mowbray, by whom he had three sons, the eldest of whom was named Alexander.'

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  • The philosophy of Cousin influenced him strongly, but his strength lay in exposition and criticism rather than in original thought.

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  • In 1186 at Woodstock William married Ermengarde de Beaumont, a cousin of Henry II., and peace with England being assured three years later, he turned his arms against the turbulent chiefs in the outlying parts of his kingdom.

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  • The remainder, which was still considerable, passed to his cousin the duke of Penthievre.

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  • He inherited Flanders and Artois, purchased the county of Namur (1427) and compelled his cousin Jacqueline, the heiress of Holland, Zeeland, Hainault and Friesland, to surrender her possessions to him, 1428.

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  • On the death in 1430 of his cousin Philip, duke of Brabant, he took possession of Brabant and Limburg; the duchy of Luxemburg he acquired by purchase, 1 443.

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  • In 1631 he converted his landed property into money, and John Hampden, his cousin, a patentee of Connecticut in 1632, was on the point of emigrating.

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  • As the cousin of Hampden and St.

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  • He there came under the influence of Victor Cousin, and in 1817 he was appointed assistant professor of philosophy at the normal and Bourbon schools.

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  • The kings uncle is duke of Aosta, his son is prince of Piedmont and his cousin is duke of Genoa.

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  • This, while the elder branch of the Hauteville family still held the title and domains of the Apulian duchy; but in 1127, upon the death of his cousin Duke William, Roger united the whole of the future realm.

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  • His glove was carried to his cousin Constance, wife of Peter of Aragon, the last of th great Norman-Swabian family.

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  • But the princes of the house of Savoy were a race of warriors; and what Emmanuel Philibert lost as sovereign he regained as captain of adventure in the service of his cousin Philip II.

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  • 1 Thomas Osborne, the future lord treasurer, succeeded to the baronetcy and estates in Yorkshire on his father's death in 1647, and after unsuccessfully courting his cousin Dorothy Osborne, married Lady Bridget Bertie, daughter of the earl of Lindsey.

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  • Before he reached Rome, Pope John XV., who had invited him to Italy, had died, whereupon he raised his own cousin Bruno, son of Otto duke of Carinthia, to the papal chair as Pope Gregory V., and by this pontiff Otto was crowned emperor on the 21st of May 996.

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  • The status of the apothecary, as subordinate to the physician in the time of Henry VIII., is evident from the following, out of 2 1 rules laid down by a prominent apothecary, who was a cousin of Anne Boleyn: " His garden must be at hand, with plenty of herbs and seeds and roots.

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  • Sir John Howard, only son of the match between Howard and Mowbray, took service with his cousin the third duke of Norfolk, who had him returned as knight of the shire for Norfolk, where, according to the Paston Letters, this Howard of the Essex branch was regarded by the gentry as a strange man.

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  • A third cousin succeeded him in 1815, Bernard Edward Howard, who, although a Roman Catholic, was enabled, by the act of 1824, to act as earl marshal.

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  • Prince Gorchakov, Alexander Mikhailovich (1798-1883), Russian statesman, cousin of Princes Petr and Mikhail Gorchakov, was born on the 16th of July 1798, and was educated at the lyceum of Tsarskoye Selo, where he had the poet Pushkin as a school-fellow.

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  • See Memoires de Madame de Motteville; Victor Cousin, Madame de Hautefort (Paris, 1868); L'Abbe Sorin, Louise-Angele de La Fayette (Paris, 1893).

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  • All the male descendants of the 1st earl of Anglesey became extinct in the person of George, 2nd earl of Mountnorris, in 1844, when the titles of Viscount Valentia and Baron Mountnorris passed to his cousin Arthur Annesley (1785-1863), who thus became 10th Viscount Valentia, being descended from the 1st Viscount Valentia, the father of the 1st earl of Anglesey in the Annesley family.

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  • The latter, as a counterpoise to Turlough, supported his cousin Hugh, brother of Brian, whom Turlough had murdered.

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  • Alexander II., entering Alexandria under Roman patronage, married, and within twenty days assassinated, his elderly cousin and stepmother.

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  • In 1740 Reid married a cousin, the daughter of a London physician.

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  • In 1429, instigated by the emperor Sigismund, whom he magnificently entertained at his court at Lutsk, Witowt revived his claim to a kingly crown, and Jagiello reluctantly consented to his cousin's coronation; but before it could be accomplished Witowt died at Troki, on the 27th of October 1430.

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  • Henry Seymour Conway's elder brother, Francis, 2nd Baron Conway, was created marquess of Hertford in 1793; his mother was a sister of Sir Robert Walpole's wife, and he was therefore first cousin to Horace Walpole, with whom he was on terms of intimate friendship throughout his life.

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  • He sentenced to death his own cousin and nephew by marriage, Flavius Clemens, whose wife he banished for her supposed leaning towards Judaism (Christianity).

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  • Only in Asia Minor, where the Seleucid cause was represented by the king's cousin, the able Achaeus, was its prestige restored and the Pergamene power driven back to its earlier limits.

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  • John Adams had none of the qualities of popular leadership which were so marked a characteristic of his second cousin, Samuel Adams; it was rather as a constitutional lawyer that he influenced the course of events.

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  • Cousin and Charles think that Albertus Magnus is aimed at, and certainly much of what is said applies with peculiar force to him.

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  • Ingram, On the Opus Majus of Bacon (Dublin, 1858); Cousin, "Fragments phil.

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  • On the one hand, the death of the count of Champagne (May 1201) had induced the crusaders to elect as their leader Boniface of Montferrat, the brother of Conrad; and Boniface was the cousin of Philip, and interested in Constantinople, where not only Conrad, but another brother as well, had served, and suffered for their service at the hands of their masters.

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  • On being ransomed he went to Constantinople,where was held the court of his cousin,the emperor Manuel, with whom he was a great favourite.

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  • On the death of Guy II., last duke of the house of la Roche, in 1308, the duchy passed to his cousin, Walter of Brienne.

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  • Marca's biography was written in Latin by two of his intimate friends, Etienne Baluze, his secretary (Epistola ad Samuelem Sorbierium, de vita, gestis et scriptis Petri de Marca, Paris, 1663), and his cousin, Paul de Faget (at the beginning of a collection of Marca's theological pamphlets, first published by Paul de Faget in 1668).

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  • He obtained the throne by murdering his uncle, his cousin and his half-brother, the legitimate heir, but proved a capable and beneficent ruler.

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  • On the 12th of February 1736 she was married to her cousin Francis of Lorraine, then grand duke of Tuscany, and afterwards emperor.

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  • He was born on the 27th of December 1350, and died by a fall from his horse, like his namesake, cousin and contemporary of Castile.

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  • His cousin and heir, the 6th earl (1657-1666) was uncle of the 8th and 9th earls (1687-1722), both of whom fought for James II.

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  • Roderick Mackenzie, cousin of Sir Alexander Mackenzie, built Fort Chipewyan on Lake Athabasca in 1788.

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  • His first disciple, Maidhyoimaongha, was his cousin: his father was, according to the later Avesta, Pourushaspa, his mother Dughdova, his great-grandfather Haecataspa, and the ancestor of the whole family Spitama, for which reason Zarathushtra usually bears this surname.

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  • Levi Coffin (1798-1877), a native of North Carolina (whose cousin, Vestal Coffin, had established before 1819 a "station" of the Underground near what is now Guilford College, North Carolina), in 1826 settled in Wayne County, Ohio; his home at New Garden (now Fountain City) was the meeting point of three "lines" from Kentucky; and in 1847 he removed to Cincinnati, where his labours in bringing slaves out of the South were even more successful.

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  • was succeeded by his cousin Mustafa.

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  • His cousin R.

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  • In philosophy he was a follower of Victor Cousin, and through him of Hegel.

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  • Having lost his elder son in 1789 Louis left two children, Louis Charles, usually known as Louis XVII., and Marie Therese Charlotte (1778-1851), who married her cousin, Louis, duke of Angouleme, son of Charles X., in 1799.

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  • During the reign of her cousin Anne (1730-1740), Elizabeth effaced herself as much as possible; but under the regency of Anne Leopoldovna the course of events compelled the indolent but by no means incapable beauty to overthrow the existing government.

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  • In philosophy, he was one of the school of Cousin, with whom, however, he was at issue in many important points.

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  • Of these the earliest were Pierre Paul Royer-Collard, who was mainly a follower of Thomas Reid, and Maine de Biran; but the name is still more appropriately given to the school of which the most distinguished members are Victor Cousin, Theodore Jouffroy, J.

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  • Eclecticism gained great popularity, and, partly owing to Cousin's position as minister of public instruction, became the authorized system in the chief seats of learning in France, where it has given a most remarkable impulse to the study of the history of philosophy.

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  • Suspected, however, of sympathizing with the reformers, he deemed it prudent to leave Paris, and in 1535 went to the East with his cousin Jean de la Foret, the first French ambassador at Constantinople.

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  • Cunning and ambitious, he soon made his mark, and his cousin having died during his embassy, Marillac was appointed his successor.

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  • Henry, who already ruled lower Lusatia and the new and smaller Saxon east mark, was succeeded in 1103 by his cousin Thimo, and in 1104 by his son Henry II., whose claim on the mark was contested by Thimo's son Conrad.

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  • Amalasuntha, now queen, with a view of strengthening her position, made her cousin Theodahad partner of her throne (not, as sometimes stated, her husband, for his wife was still living).

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  • Through the favour of Leo X., he was succeeded by his cousin Raffaello Petrucci, previously governor of St Angelo and afterwards a cardinal.

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  • In 1695 the boy Holberg was taken into the house of his uncle, Peder Lem, who sent him to the Latin school, and prepared him for the profession of a soldier; but soon after this he was adopted by his cousin Otto Munthe, and went to him up in the mountains.

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  • But this is only to say again that Erigena is more of a Neoplatonist than a Scholastic. Hence Cousin suggested in respect of this point a threefold chronological division - at the outset the absolute subordination of philosophy to theology, then the period of their alliance, and finally the beginning of their separation.

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  • The collected works of Hrabanus himself contain nothing new, but in some glosses on Aristotle and Porphyry, first exhumed by Cousin, there are several noteworthy expressions of opinion in a Nominalistic sense.

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  • Eric or Heiricus, who studied there under Haimon, the successor of Hrabanus, and after wards taught at Auxerre, wrote glosses on the margin of his copy of the pseudo-Augustinian Categoriae, which have been published by Cousin and Haureau.

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  • As Cousin says, " Realism and Nominalism were undoubtedly there in germ, but their true principles with their necessary consequences remained profoundly unknown; their connexion with all the great questions of religion and politics was not even suspected.

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  • Henceforth discussion is carried on with a full 1 Victor Cousin, Ouvrages inedits d'Abelard, Introd.

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  • William of Champeaux (1070-1121), who is reputed the founder of a definitely formulated Realism, much Y as Roscellinus is regarded as the founder of Nominalism, was instructed by Roscellinus himself in dialectic. Unfortunately none of William's philosophical works have survived, and we depend upon the statements of his opponent Abelard, in the Historia calamitatum mearum, and in certain manuscripts discovered by Cousin.

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  • According to these men, even though rationality did not exist in any individual, its existence in nature would still remain intact " (Cousin, Introduction, &c., p. cxx.).

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  • But there is in some of the manuscripts the various reading of " indifferenter " for " individualiter," and this is accepted as giving the true sense of the passage by Cousin and Remusat (Haureau and Prantl taking, on different grounds, the opposite view).

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  • difference of opinion as to his system, some, like Ritter and Erdmann, regarding it as a moderate form of Realism - a return indeed to the position of Aristotle - while others, like Cousin, Remusat, Haureau and Ueberweg, consider it to be essentially Nominalistic, only more prudently and perhaps less consistently expressed than was the case with Roscellinus.

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  • For that system still seems to recognize a generic substance as the core of the individual, whereas, according to Cousin's rendering of Abelard's doctrine, " only individuals exist, and in the individual nothing but the individual."

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  • In the 14th century the original house of Dalberg became extinct in the male line, the fiefs passing to Johann Gerhard, chamberlain of the see of Worms, who married the heiress of his cousin, Anton of Dalberg, about 1330.

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  • He produced his first play or opera in 1733, and the next year he married a cousin, D.

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  • Chesterfield, who had no children by his wife, Melusina von Schulemberg, illegitimate daughter of George I., whom he married in 1733, adopted his godson, a distant cousin, named Philip Stanhope (1755-1815), as heir to the title and estates.

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  • of England had mediated to make peace, and Charles was liberated on the understanding that he was to retain Naples alone, Sicily being left to the Aragonese; Charles was also to induce his cousin Charles of Valois to renounce for twenty thousand pounds of silver the kingdom of Aragon which had been given to him by Pope Martin IV.

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  • After spending a short time at Woolwich to complete his military education, he made a tour through Spain in 1787; and then, dejected by unrequited love for his cousin Georgina Lennox (afterwards Lady Bathurst), he sailed for New Brunswick to join the 54th regiment with the rank of major.

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  • In 1322, freed from his first marriage, Charles married his cousin Mary of Luxemburg, daughter of the emperor Henry VII., and upon her death, two years later, Jeanne, daughter of Louis, count of Evreux.

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  • From Rugby he went to be first headmaster of Wellington College, which was opened in January 1859; and in the course of the same year he married his cousin, Mary'Sidgwick.

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  • Anne's only daughter, Suzanne, had married in 1505 her cousin, Charles of Bourbon, count of Montpensier, the future constable; and the question of the succession of Suzanne, who died in 1521, was the determining factor of the treason of the constable de Bourbon (1523).

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  • Lucius Junius Brutus, her husband's cousin, put himself at the head of the people, drove out the Tarquins, and established a republic. The accounts of this tradition in later writers present many points of divergence.

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  • Early in 1878 Alphonso married his cousin, Princess Maria de las Mercedes, daughter of the duc de Montpensier, but she died within six months of her marriage.

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  • In 1834 he was with Fesal on an expedition against El Hasa when news came of the amir's murder by his cousin Masharah.

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  • Warned by a hurried sign by Hamud that his life was in danger, Mahommed at once attacked Bandar, stabbed him and took possession of the citadel; a general massacre of all members of the house of Ibn Rashid followed, and next day Mahommed appeared with his cousin Hamud in the market-place of Hail, and announced his assumption of the amirship. A strong and capable ruler, he soon established his authority over all northern and western Nejd, and in 1872 the opportunity arrived for his intervention in the east.

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  • Educated at the semi-Oriental provincial court of Juan Manuel, duke of Penafiel, Inez grew up side by side with Costanga, the duke's daughter by a scion of the royal house of Aragon, and her own cousin.

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  • In 1341 the two girls left Penafiel; Costanca's marriage was celebrated in the same year, and the young infanta and her cousin went to reside at Lisbon, or at Coimbra, where Dom Pedro conceived that luckless and furious passion for Inez which has immortalized them.

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  • The senate and the estates, naturally anxious about the succession to the throne, had repeatedly urged her majesty to marry, and had indicated her cousin, Charles Gustavus, as her most befitting consort.

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  • During the reign of his first cousin Theodore I.

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  • (1188-1230) of Leon, first cousin of Alphonso VIII.

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  • He was first married to his cousin Teresa of Portugal, who bore him two daughters, and a son who died young.

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  • It cannot have been his conscience which constrained him to leave Teresa, for his next step was to marry Berengaria of Castile, who was his second cousin.

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  • It lingered nine years under the new editor, who was replaced in 1675 by the abbe de la Roque, and the latter in his turn by the president Cousin, in 1686.

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  • After the hands of Elizabeth of England, Mary of Scotland and Renata of Lorraine had successively been sought for him, the council of state grew anxious about the succession, but he finally married his cousin, Sophia of Mecklenburg, on the 10th of July 1572.

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  • had narrowly escaped the fate of his deposed cousin Eric XIV.

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  • Francke and Philipp Spencer, with Paul Gerhardt and his cousin Johann.

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  • 3), and especially with a cousin, is recommended now even as in the past.

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  • 1867), and cousin of King Frederick VII.

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  • He was a second cousin to the elder John Adams. His father, whose Christian name was also Samuel, was a wealthy and prominent citizen of Boston, who took an active part in the politics of the town, and was a member of the Caucus (or Caulker's) Club, with which the political term "caucus" is said to have originated; his mother was Mary Fifield.

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  • Although he lacked oratorical fluency, his short speeches, like his writings, were forceful; his plain dress and unassuming ways helped to make him extremely popular with the common people, in whom he had much greater faith than his cousin John had; and, above all, he was an eminently successful manager of men.

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  • Nicolas Bernoulli (1687-1759), cousin of the three preceding, and son of Nicolas Bernoulli, one of the senators of Basel, was born in that city on the 10th of October 1687.

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  • It was supposed that he would marry the queen regnant, Christina, but her unsurmountable objection to wedlock put an end to these anticipations, and to compensate her cousin for a broken half-promise she declared him (1649) her successor, despite the opposition of the senate headed by the venerable Axel Oxenstjerna.

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  • Sandwich was displaced, and his command was transferred to Monk, with whom was associated the king's cousin, Prince Rupert.

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  • The third was undertaken by the king in pursuit of a policy arranged between him and his cousin Louis XIV.

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  • Whether Hadrian, the relative of Trajan (cousin's son), was actually adopted by him or not is impossible to determine; certainly Hadrian had not been advanced to any great honours by Trajan.

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  • and his cousin, the cardinal Giulio de' Medici, were much perplexed about the management of the republic. It seemed necessary, if possible, in the gradual extinction of their family to give the city at least a semblance of self-government.

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  • After his death his papers were collected and published by his cousin and successor in the Plumian chair, Dr Robert Smith, under the title Harmonia Mensurarum (1722).

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  • In 1543 he had been married to his cousin Mary of Portugal, who bore him a son, the unhappy Don Carlos, and who died in 1545.

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  • The peace of the Pyrenees was a decisive event in his personal history as well as in that of France, for one of its most important stipulations referred to his marriage, He had already been strongly attracted to one of the nieces of Mazarin, but reasons of state triumphed over personal impulse; and it was agreed that the new friendship with Spain should be cemented by the marriage of Louis to his cousin, the Infanta Maria Theresa.

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  • C. de Trye, formerly echevin of Lyons, to his cousin Antoine Arneys in that city.

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  • The town, with wide streets and picturesque promenades, is finely situated on a promontory, the base of which is washed on the south by the Cousin, on the east and west by small streams. Its chief building, the church of St Lazare, dates from the 12th century.

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  • He began life as a lawyer, and rose rapidly in the legal hierarchy owing to the influence of his cousin Antoine Bohier, cardinal archbishop of Bourges.

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  • Cousin, "Le Duc et connetable de Luynes," in Journal des savants (1861-1863); B.

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  • CHARLES ALBERT [CARLO ALBERTO] (1798-1849), king of Sardinia (Piedmont), son of Prince Charles of Savoy-Carignano and Princess Albertine of Saxe-Courland, was born on the 2nd of October 1798, a few days before the French occupied Piedmont and forced his cousin King Charles Emmanuel to take refuge in Sardinia.

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  • His unfortunate first marriage with his cousin Charlotte Frederica of MecklenburgSchwerin was dissolved in 1810.

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  • The duchy of Anjou then passed to his cousin Rene, second son of Louis II.

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  • He had a brother Theodore, and an uncle or cousin Panyasis, the epic poet, a personage of so much importance that the tyrant Lygdamis, suspecting him of treasonable projects, put him to death.

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  • Until the king came of age in 1171 the government was controlled first by the chancellor Stephen of Perche, cousin of Marguerite (1166-1168), and then by Walter Ophamil, archbishop of Palermo, and Matthew d'Ajello, the vice-chancellor.

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  • According to Homer, he was brought up by his mother at Phthia with his cousin and intimate friend Patroclus, and learned the arts of war and eloquence from Phoenix, while the Centaur Chiron taught him music and medicine.

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  • His first wife was his cousin, Miss Isabella Clark, who died in 1858, leaving one surviving son, the Hon.

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  • At the age of ten he composed a tragedy under the inspiration of Caesarotti's translation of the Ossianic poems. On the marriage of his twin sister Rosina with a maternal cousin at Lyons he went to reside in that city, devoting himself during four years to the study of French literature.

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  • A cousin, James Henry Roosevelt (1800-1863), was founder of the Roosevelt Hospital in New York City.

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  • His life was spared owing to the supplications of his cousin Boris, but he was deprived of his boyardom, his estates were confiscated and he was banished successively to Kargopol, Mezen and Kologora, where he died on the 21st of April 1714.

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  • The duchess of Kent and her brothers, King Leopold and the duke of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha, had always hoped to arrange that the queen should marry her cousin, Albert of Saxe-CoburgGotha, and the prince himself had been made acquainted with this plan from his earliest years.

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  • Lord Melbourne ascertained that the queen's dis- The positions towards her cousin, Prince Albert, were un- queen's changed, and he advised King Leopold, through M.

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  • was increased by the fact that only a short time before it had been announced that the prince was about to marry his second cousin, Princess May, daughter of the duke and duchess of Teck.

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  • Having finished the verse of the 34th Psalm where it is written, "They who seek the Lord shall want no manner of thing that is good," he said, "Here I must stop: - what follows let Baithen write"; indicating, as was believed, his wish that his cousin Baithen should succeed him as abbot.

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  • He married his cousin, Zena^de Bonaparte, daughter of Joseph, in 1822.

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  • He sat in the right of the Legislative Assembly, but had no direct part in the coup d'etat of his cousin on the 2nd of December 1851.

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  • His attitude contributed greatly to give popular confidence to his cousin Louis Napoleon (Napoleon III.), of whose coup d'etat on the 2nd of December 1851 he disapproved; but he was soon reconciled to the emperor, and accepted the title of prince.

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  • His wife, Maria Luisa of Parma, his first cousin, a thoroughly coarse and vicious woman, ruled him completely, though he was capable of obstinacy at times.

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  • See Victor Cousin, introduction to his Ouvrages ine'dits d'Abelard (1836), and Fragments pour servir a l'histoire de la philosophie (1865); G.

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  • (1504-1553), to secure Geneva for his family, at first with the help of his bastard cousin John (1513-1522), the last of his house to hold the see.

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  • A short reconciliation with Matthias was followed by further disorder in Bohemia, which was invaded by Rudolph's cousin, the archduke Leopold (1586-1632).

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  • He at once made peace with his cousin; restored him his patrimony; and, to secure Lithuania against the future vengeance of the Knights, Jagiello made overtures to Poland for the hand of Jadwiga, and received the Polish crown along with it, as already mentioned Before proceeding to describe the Jagiellonic period of Polish history, it is necessary to cast a rapid glance at the social and political condition of the country in the preceding Piast period.

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  • Jan Kochanowski 1 (1530-1584), called the prince of Polish poets, came of a poetical family, having a brother, a cousin and a nephew who all enriched the literature of their country with some productions.

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  • In that year Ayub Khan made a fruitless inroad from Persia; and in 1888 the amir's cousin, Ishak Khan, rebelled against him in the north; but these two enterprises came to nothing.

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  • In 1646 he was sent at the head of an extraordinary mission to France, and on his return married the queen's cousin Marie Euphrosyne of Zweibri cken, who, being but a poor princess, benefited greatly by her wedding with the richest of the Swedish magnates.

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  • He was succeeded by his Cousin William John Arthur Charles James Cavendishbentinck (b.

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  • Marcantonio Raimondi, the famous engraver, is the most renowned of them; next to him Amico Aspertini, and Francia's own son Giacomo, and his cousin Julio.

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  • Jean Cousin >>

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  • Scranton and his cousin Joseph Hand Scranton.

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  • His mother, now in extreme old age, lived with him, as did also his cousin, Miss Jane Douglas, who superintended his household.

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  • In 1137 his cousin, Henry the Proud, had been deprived by King Conrad III.

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  • He left a son, lEthelwold, who gave some trouble to his cousin Edward the Elder, when the latter succeeded to the kingdom.

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  • His mother, Marthe Marguerite le Valois de Vilette de Murray, comtesse de Caylus (1673-1729), was a cousin of Mme de Maintenon, who brought her up like her own daughter.

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  • Flavius Clemens, who was consul with his cousin, the Emperor Domitian, in A.D.

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  • Beckers of a work by Cousin, he gave public utterance to the antagonism in which he stood to the Hegelian.

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  • Peter accompanied his cousin, King Philip Augustus, on the crusade of 1190, fought against the Albigenses, and was present at the battle of Bouvines in 1214.

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  • of England, by which John, his son John, and his cousin Donald Balloch, became bound to assist King Edward and James, earl of Douglas, in subduing the kingdom of Scotland.

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  • Learning that his cousin Sturla in Iceland had fallen in battle against Gissur, Snorri's son-in-law, Snorri, although expressly forbidden by his liege lord, returned to Iceland in 1239 and once more took possession of his property.

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  • In 1878 he joined with his cousin, Donald Smith (afterwards Lord Strathcona), in the purchase of the St Paul & Pacific railway.

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  • This led to his interest in the development of western Canada, and from 1881 onwards he was associated with his cousin in the construction of the Canadian Pacific railway, for his services in connexion with which he was in 1886 made a baronet, in 1891 raised to the peerage; and in 1905 made G.C.V.O.

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  • Egilshay (142) is the island on which St Magnus was murdered by his cousin Hacco in 115.

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  • In France there are the works of Cousin (1835), Felix Ravaisson, who wrote on the Metaphysics (1837-1846), and Barthelemy St Hilaire, who translated the Organon and other works (1844 seq.).

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  • In 1152 Frederick received the duchy of Swabia from his cousin the German king Frederick I., and on his death in 1167 it passed successively to Frederick's three sons Frederick, Conrad and Philip. The second Hohenstaufen emperor was Frederick Barbarossa's son, Henry VI., after whose death a struggle for the throne took place between Henry's brother Philip, duke of Swabia, and Otto of Brunswick, afterwards the emperor Otto IV.

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  • iii.; for his early life to Cousin's Jeunesse de Mazarin (1865, and for the careers of his nieces to Renee's Les Nieces de Mazarin (1856).

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  • As king of Aragon he took a share in the work of the reconquest, by helping his cousin Alphonso VIII.

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  • In 1268 he took the cross with his cousin Edward, who, however, sent him back from Sicily to pacify the unruly province of Gascony.

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  • He was a distant cousin of Theodore Roosevelt.

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  • In April 1826 he entered the Mexican navy, of which his father was commander-in-chief, and which he left in 1828, after the capture by the Spanish of the "Guerrero," on which he was serving under his cousin, David H.

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    0
  • At nineteen he entered the normal school, where he studied under Burnouf, Villemain, and Cousin.

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    0
  • After a delay of nine years, having at last obtained an adequate income, he married his cousin, Margaret Cox, who had already lived for eighteen years with his mother, the widow of John Ruskin of Edinburgh.

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    0
  • John still lived there with his mother, aged 83, infirm, and failing in sight, to whom came as a companion their cousin, Joanna Ruskin Agnew, afterwards Mrs Arthur Severn.

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  • In 1871 his mother died, at the age of 90, and his cousin, Miss Agnew, married Mr Arthur Severn.

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  • In 1834 these writings, together with the essay entitled Nouvelles considerations sur les rapports du physique et du moral de l'homme, were published by Victor Cousin, who in 1841 added three volumes, under the title CEuvres philosophiques de Maine de Biran.

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  • Cousin.

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  • Meanwhile his cousin Nestor L'Hote, the friend and fellow-traveller of Champollion, died, and upon Mariette devolved the task of sorting the papers of the deceased savant.

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  • Her father wished her to marry a son of Philip IV., king of Spain, while her cousin, the elector palatine, Charles Louis, was also a suitor for her hand, but both proposals fell through and she became the wife of a Dutch prince, William, son of Frederick Henry, prince of Orange.

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  • In France, the home of Cartesian realism, after the vicissitudes of sensationalism and materialism, which became connected in French the French mind with the Revolution, the spirit of Descartes revived in the 19th century in the spiritualistic realism of Victor Cousin.

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  • But Cousin's psychological method of proceeding from consciousness outwards, and the emphasis laid by him on spirit in comparison with body, prevented a real revival of realism.

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  • At the same time, like Cousin, his works show a tendency to underrate body, tending as they do to the Leibnitzian analysis of the material into the immaterial, and to the supposition that the unity of the body is only given by the soul.

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  • The psychological metaphysics of Cousin and of Janet was, however, too flimsy a realism to withstand its passage into this very idealism of matter which has become the dominant French metaphysics.

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  • SIR SAMUEL HOOD (1762-1814), British vice-admiral, cousin of Lord Hood and of Lord Bridport, entered the Royal Navy in 1776.

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  • His first engagement was the battle off Ushant in 1778, and, soon afterwards transferred to the West Indies, he was present, under the command of his cousin Sir Samuel Hood, at all the actions which culminated in Rodney's victory of April 12th, 1782.

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  • Cardinal Giulio de' Medeci, the cousin of that pope, had already exercised a decisive influence upon Catholic policy; and the tiara now fell to his lot.

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  • The Mongols were interested in the religion of the lamas, especially since 1576, when Altan, khakan of the Tumeds, and his cousin summoned the chief lama of the most important monastery to visit him.

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    0
  • The operation of Mendelian processes in human heredity is further shown by the close relationship that exists between the appearance of albinoes and cousin marriages.

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  • Hence it is readily seen that it is among cousin marriages that the greater probabilities exist that two individuals bearing identical characters will meet, than in the population at large.

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  • Now, if one of these latter children of the second brother marries a cousin - a child of the first brother, - their offspring, if large enough, will consist of some pure normals N, impure normals N(A), and of albinoes A.

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  • A b X N N(A) N+2N(A)+A No other rational explanation of the close relationship between albinism and cousin marriages is at present forthcoming.

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  • Charles was brought up by his mother and grandfather, Robert the Frisian, on whose death he did great services to his uncle, Robert II., and his cousin, Baldwin VII., counts of Flanders.

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  • But he had received some instruction in mathematics from a distant relative, Elihu Robinson, and in 1781 he left his native village to become assistant to his cousin George Bewley who kept a school at Kendal.

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  • There he passed the next twelve years, becoming in 1785, through the retirement of his cousin, joint manager of the school with his elder brother Jonathan.

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  • Martino was followed by two other Torriani, Filippo his brother (1263-1265) and Napoleone his cousin (1265-1277), as lords of Milan.

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  • That he was, as his Roman surname would suggest, a Hellenist, follows from the fact that he was also cousin ("nephew" is a later sense of avet ' t6, see J.

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  • Cousin, Tanger (Paris, 1902); Archives Marocaines (Paris, 1904-6).

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  • The shameless profligacy of the emperor's life was such as to shock even a Roman public. His popularity with the army declined, and Maesa, perceiving that the soldiers were in favour of Alexander Severus, persuaded Heliogabalus to raise his cousin to the dignity of Caesar (221), a step of which he soon repented.

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  • ABNER (Hebrew for "father of [or is a] light"), in the Bible, first cousin of Saul and commander-in-chief of his army (I Sam.

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  • He married his cousin Hedwig Elizabeth Charlotte of Holstein-Gottorp (1759-1818), but their only child, Carl Adolf, duke of Vermland, died in infancy (1798).

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  • About 1417 he became involved in a violent quarrel with his cousin, Henry of Bavaria-Landshut, fell under both the papal and the imperial ban, and in 1439 was attacked by his son Louis the Lame.

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  • died, followed in 1334 by his cousin Otto; and as both died without sons the whole of Lower Bavaria then passed to Henry II.

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  • In 1723 he married Alexandra Naruishkina, Peter's cousin.

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    0
  • In 1734 his cousin, the duke of Liria, afterwards duke of Berwick, who was proceeding to join Don Carlos in his struggle for the crown of Naples, passed through Rome.

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  • At the side of Maurice, as a wise adviser, stood his cousin William Louis, stadholder of Friesland, a trained soldier and good commander in the field.

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  • feeling death approaching, resolved to marry his elder daughter, the Infanta Isabel Clara Eugenia, to her cousin, the Cardinal Archduke Albert of Austria, who had been governor-general of the Netherlands since 1596, and to erect the Provinces into an independent sovereignty under their joint rule.

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  • In 1672 the stadholdership in five provinces had been made hereditary in the family of the prince of Orange, but William died childless, and the republican burgher party was strong enough to prevent the posts being filled up. William had wished that his cousin, Count John William Friso of Nassau, stadholder of Friesland and Gron- - ingen, should succeed him, but his extreme youth and the jealousy of Holland against a " Frisian " stood in the way of his election.

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  • In his eighteenth year he was sent to the court of his cousin Sten Sture.

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  • Philip was now nearing his end, and in 1598 he gave his eldest daughter Isabel Albert in marriage to her cousin the archduke Albert, and erected the Netherlands into a sovereign state under their joint rule.

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  • The battle was fought between Olaf Trygvesson, king of Norway, and a coalition of his enemies - Eric Hakonson, his cousin and rival; Olaf, the king of Sweden; and Sweyn Forkbeard, king of Denmark.

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  • He concluded his years of preparation by a European tour, in the course of which he received kind attention from almost every distinguished man in the world of letters, science and art; among others, from Goethe, Humboldt, Schleiermacher, Hegel, Byron, Niebuhr, Bunsen, Savigny, Cousin, Constant and Manzoni.

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  • In 1494 Giulio went with them into exile; but, on Giovanni's restoration to power, returned to Florence, of which he was made archbishop by his cousin Pope Leo X., a special dispensation being granted on account of his illegitimate birth, followed by a formal declaration of the fact that his parents had been secretly married and that he was therefore legitimate.

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  • On the 19th of May 13 59 he married his cousin Blanche, daughter and ultimately sole heiress of Henry, duke of Lancaster.

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  • Newcastle himself, who was a cousin of Hobbes's late patron and to whom he dedicated the " little treatise " of 1640, found his way to Paris, and was followed by a stream of fugitives, many of whom were known to Hobbes.

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  • It was not till 1842 that Victor Cousin drew attention to the absolutely untrustworthy condition of the text, nor till 1844 that A.

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  • Works on Pascal are innumerable: Sainte-Beuve's Port Royal, Cousin's writings on Pascal and his Jacqueline Pascal, and the essays of the editors of the Pensees just mentioned are the most noteworthy.

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  • In 522 the young Amalaric was proclaimed king, and four years later, on Theodoric's death, he assumed full royal power in Spain and a part of Languedoc, relinquishing Provence to his cousin Athalaric. He married Clotilda, daughter of Clovis; but his disputes with her, he being an Arian and she a Catholic, brought on him the penalty of a Frankish invasion, in which he lost his life in 531.

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  • Philip, however, himself claimed Brabant as having been bequeathed to him by his cousin Philip, the late duke, with the result that the Burgundians repulsed the troops of the duke of Gloucester, and Jacqueline was forced to recognize the duke of Burgundy as her lieutenant and heir.

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  • Maximilian found time to make earnest but unavailing efforts to mediate between his cousin, Philip II.

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    0
  • Wace, who, while translating Geoffrey, evidently knew, and used, popular tradition, combines these two, asserting that she was of Roman parentage on the mother's side, but cousin to Cador of Cornwall by whom she was brought up. The tradition relating to Guenevere is decidedly confused and demands further study.

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  • Another son of the first John Lowell, Francis Cabot Lowell (1775-1817), the founder in the United States of cotton manufacturing, was born in Newburyport on the 7th of April 1775, graduated at Harvard in 1793, became a merchant in Boston, and, during the war of 1812, with his cousin (who was also his brother-in-law), Patrick Tracy Jackson, made use of the knowledge of cotton-spinning gained by Lowell in England (whither he had gone for his health in 1810) and devised a power loom.

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    0
  • On the death of his cousin Duke William of Apulia, Roger gradually founded (1127-1140) a great Italian dominion.

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    0
  • In 1061 Abu Bakr made a division of the power he had established, handing over the more settled parts to his cousin Yusef ibn Tashfin, as viceroy, resigning to him also his favourite wife Zainab, who had the reputation of a sorceress.

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  • Ibn 'Abbas, a cousin of Mahomet, and the chief source of the traditional exegesis of the Koran, has, on theological and other grounds, given currency to a number of falsehoods; and at least some of his pupils have emulated his example.

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  • On the death of his cousin, Jean Louis Charles, duc de Longueville (1646-1694), Conti in accordance with his cousin's will, claimed the principality of Neuchatel against Marie, duchesse de Nemours (1625-1707), a sister of the duke.

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  • Although Conti did not secure the Polish throne he remained in the confidence of Louis until 1755, when his influence was destroyed by the intrigues of Madame de Pompadour; so that when the Seven Years' War broke out in 1756 he was refused the command of the army of the Rhine, and began the opposition to the administration which caused Louis to refer to him as "my cousin the advocate."

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  • The Ikshldl governor of Damascus, a cousin of Abul-Fawaris Al3mad, endeavoured to save Syria, but was defeated at Ramleh by a general sent by Jauhar and taken prisoner.

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  • The succeeding caliph, Abul-Maimn Abd al-Majtd, ~ho took the title al-~Iafi~ lidin allah, was not the son but the cousin of the deceased caliph, and of ripe age, being about fifty-eight years old at the time; for more than a year he was kept in prison by the new vizier, a son of al-Af~aI, whom the army had placed in the post; but towards the end of II~lI this vizier fell by the hand of assassins, and the caliph was set free.

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  • In six months the greater part of the Arabian peninsula was subject to All Bey, and he appointed as sherif of Mecca a cousin of his own, who bestowed on All by an official proclamation the titles Sultan of Egypt and Khk~n of the Two Seas.

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  • without heirs, in 1448, the Rigsraad elected his distant cousin, Count Christian of Oldenburg, king; but Sweden preferred Karl Knutsson (Charles " VIII."), while Norway finally combined with Denmark, at the conference of Halmstad, in a double of the Union.

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  • It was not until after the death of his cousin Childebert II.

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  • This involved a rejection of Henry's suit, not because Charles cared anything for his aunt, but because a divorce would mean disinheriting Charles's cousin Mary, and perhaps the eventual succession of the son of a French princess to the English throne.

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  • was held aloof by Beaton and two French marriages; and France was alarmed by Henry's growing friendliness with Charles V., who was mollified by his cousin Mary's restoration to her place in the succession to the throne.

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  • succeeded his own cousin, and, in accordance with the native system of royal inheritance, should have been followed by the unnamed grandson of his own predecessor, Kenneth III.

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  • The Lord of the Isles made submission, but Donald Balloch, his cousin, defeated Mar near Inverlochy, later fled to Ireland, and was reported dead, though he lived to give trouble.

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  • Darnley was esteemed handsome, though his portraits give an opposite impression; his native qualities of cowardice, perfidy, profligacy and overweening arrogance were at first concealed, and in mid April 1565 Lethington was sent to London, not to renew the negotiations with Leicester (as had been designed till the 31st of March), but to announce Mary's intended wedding with her cousin.

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  • On the 30th of May 1864 he married his cousin, the princess Marie Isabelle, daughter of the duc de Montpensier; and his son and heir, the duc d'Orleans, was born at York House, Twickenham, in 1869.

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  • All the evidence he finds in support of this is (I) the existence of the custom above mentioned in Hawaii; and (2) the absence of special terms for the relationship of uncle, aunt and cousin, this indicating, he thinks, that these were regarded as fathers, mothers, brothers and sisters.

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  • They held Kunduz, Balkh, Khwarizm and Khorasan, and for a time Badakshan also; but Badakshan was soon won by the emperor Baber, and in 1529 was bestowed on his cousin Suleiman, who by 1555 had established his rule over much of the region between the Oxus and the Hindu Kush.

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  • He married his cousin, Sarah Wedgwood, in 1764, and they had a numerous family of sons and daughters.

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  • He preferred to support the claims of his cousin, William II.

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  • Even at a later period foreign critics like Cousin saw much that was alike in the two doctrines, and did not hesitate to regard Hegel as a disciple of Schelling.

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  • While he was there Cousin first made his acquaintance, but a more intimate relation dates from Berlin.

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  • O'Connell married in 1802 his cousin Mary O'Connell, by whom he had three daughters and four sons, Maurice, Morgan, John (1810-1858), known as the "Young Liberator," and Daniel, who all sat in parliament.

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  • In his philosophy Brownson was a more or less independent follower of Comte for a short time, and of Victor Cousin, who, in his Fragmens philosophiques, praised him; he may be said to have taught a modified intuitionalism.

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  • Some local revolts among the tribes were rigorously suppressed; and two attempts to upset his rulership - the first by Ayub Khan, who entered Afghanistan from Persia, the second and more dangerous one by Ishak Khan, the amir's cousin, who rebelled against him in Afghan Turkestan - were defeated.

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  • The title, which became extinct on the death of his grandson, the 3rd viscount, in 1725 (when the family estate of Monasterevan, re-named Moore Abbey, passed to his daughter's son Henry, 4th earl of Drogheda), was re-granted in 1756 to his cousin Nicholas Loftus, a lineal descendant of the archbishop. It again became extinct more than once afterwards, but was on each occasion revived in favour of a descendant through the female line; and it is now held by the marquis of Ely in conjunction with other family titles.

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  • Contrary to what might be anticipated from its size and from the habits of its African cousin, the Indian elephant is now, at any rate, an inhabitant, not of the plains, but of the hills; and even on the hills it is usually found among the higher ridges and plateaus, and not in the valleys.

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  • Mahommed was succeeded by his cousin Feroz, who likewise was not content without a new capital, which he placed a few miles north of Delhi, and called after his own name.

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  • At the invitation of his cousin, he delivered a course of lectures on English poets before the Lowell Institute in Boston in the winter of 1855.

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  • See Ein Wort der Erinnerung an Albrecht von Grcife (Halle, 1870) by his cousin, Alfred Grafe (1830-1899), also a distinguished ophthalmologist, and the author of Das Sehen der Schielenden (Wiesbaden, 1897); and E.

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  • The hereditary principle had not been recognized by Islam in the cases of Abu Bekr, Omar and Othman; it had had some influence upon the choice of Ali, the husband of Fatima and the cousin of the Prophet.

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  • When, in the year (69 A.H.) 689 Abdalmalik had at last encamped at Botnan Habib in the vicinity of Kinnesrin (Qinnasrin),1 with the purpose of marching against Mus`ab, his cousin `Amr Ashdaq, to whom by the treaty of Jabia, before the battle of Merj Rahit, the succession to Merwan had been promised, took advantage of his absence to lay claim to the supreme power, and to have himself proclaimed caliph by his partisans.

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  • Abi Bakra, a cousin of Ziyad.

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  • Walid immediately on his accession appointed as governor of Hejaz his cousin Omar b.

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  • Qasim, the conqueror of India, cousin of Hajjaj, was dismissed from his post and outlawed.

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  • Haywa, renowned for his piety, whose influence began under Abdalmalik and increased under Walid, was his constant adviser and even determined him to designate as his successor his devout cousin Omar b.

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  • Without difficulty, Yazid made himself master of Damascus, and immediately sent his cousin Abdalaziz with 2000 men against Walid, who had not more than 200 fighting men about him.

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  • Merwan and cousin of Maslama, was a man of energy, and might have revived the strength of the Omayyad dynasty, but for the general disorder which pervaded the whole empire.

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  • Ali, Syria; to his uncle Da`ud, Hejaz, Yemen and Yamama (Yemama); to his cousin `Isa b.

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  • - Abu`l-Abbas had designated as his successors first Abu Ja`far, surnamed al-Mansur (the victorious), and after him his cousin `Isa b.

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  • Mansur now sent in 757 an army of 70,000 men under the command of his cousin Abda]wahhab, the son of Ibrahim the Imam, whom he had made governor of Mesopotamia, the real chief being Hasan b.

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  • The Turkish soldiery, now the chief power in the state, chose, by the advice of Ibn Khasib, in succession to Montasir, his cousin Ahmad, who took the title of al-Mosta`in billala (" he who looks for help to God").

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  • A son of Motawakkil was brought out of prison to succeed his cousin, and reigned for twenty-three years under the name of al-Mottamid `ala'llah (" he whose support is God").

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  • Next year Mofawwid was compelled to abdicate in favour of his cousin.

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  • The Turks who had placed him on the throne could not maintain themselves, but so insignificant was the person of the caliph that `Adod addaula, who succeeded his cousin Bakhtiyar in Bagdad, did not think of replacing him by another.

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  • Abigail Hill, Mrs Masham, a cousin of the duchess of Marlborough, had been introduced by the latter as a poor relation into Anne's service, while still princess of Denmark.

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  • His original name was Bassianus, but he changed it in 221 when his grandmother, Maesa, persuaded the emperor Heliogabalus to adopt his cousin as successor and create him Caesar.

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  • Under these circumstances, Nathaniel Bacon (1647-1676), whose grandfather was a cousin of Francis Bacon, took up the cause of the borderers and severely punished the Indians at the battle of Bloody Run.

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  • After his cousin Gustavus Adolphus, whom in many respects he strikingly resembled, he was indubitably the most amiable and brilliant of all the princes of the House of Vasa.

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  • Ponzio and Cellini, who quitted Italy for France, found themselves outrivalled in their own sphere by Jean Goujon, Cousin and Pilon.

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  • For these epitaphs, with others of a humbler kind, were brought before St Elizabeth to be identified in her ecstatic converse with St Verena, her cousin St Ursula, and others.

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  • She was the daughter of a clergyman named Francis Marbury, and, according to tradition, was a cousin of John Dryden.

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  • He procured, through his cousin Cecil, the dignity of knighthood, which, contrary to his inclination, he received along with about 300 others, on the 23rd of July 1603.

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    0
  • In the course of this session Bacon married Alice Barnham " the alderman's daughter, an handsome maiden, to my liking," of whom he had written some years before to his cousin Cecil.

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    0
  • After fighting for the king of Denmark he returned to England in 1049, when his murder of his cousin Beorn compelled him to leave England for the second time.

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    0
  • His father was first cousin to Richard Henry Lee.

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  • Mary had wearied of her guiding statesmen, Moray and the more pliant Maitland; the Italian secretary David Rizzio, through whom she had corresponded with the pope, now more and more usurped their place; and a weak fancy for her handsome cousin, Henry Darnley, brought about a sudden marriage in 1565 and swept the opposing Protestant lords into exile.

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  • A motion for an inquiry into the conduct of the war was skilfully evaded by obtaining precedence for the succession question (Queen Ulrica Leonora had lately died childless and King Frederick was old); and negotiations were thus opened with the new Russian empress, Elizabeth, who agreed to restore the greater part of Finland if her cousin, Adolphus Frederick of Holstein, were elected successor to the Swedish crown.

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  • In 1807, in conjunction with his cousin Karl van Ess, he had published a German translation of the New Testament, and, as its circulation was discountenanced by his superiors, he published in 1808 a defence of his views, entitled Ausziige aus den heiligen Veitern and anderen Lehrern der katholischen Kirche fiber das nothwendige and niitzliche Bibellesen.

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  • 120; an edict to Gadatas in Magnesia, Cousin et Deschamps, Bulletin de corresp. hellenique xii.

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  • Junaid, a grandson of the last, married a sister of Uzun I-~Iasan, and by her had a son named Sheikh Sb ikh Haidar, who married his cousin Martha, daughter Haldar.

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  • Mahmud was succeeded by his first cousin, Ashraf, the son of Mir Ahdallah.

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  • While revolution prevailed in the city, robbery was rife in the province of Yezd; and from Kazvin the son of Au Mirza otherwise called the zulus-sultan, the prince-governor of Teheran, who disputed the succession of Mahommed Shah, came forth to contest the crown with his cousin, the heir-apparent.

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  • He soon transferred his services to Tachos's cousin and rival Nectanabis, who, in return for his help, gave him a sum of over zoo talents.

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  • He graduated at Yale in 1815, and in 1819 began to practise law at Dover, Delaware, 'where for a time he was associated with his cousin, Thomas Clayton (1778-1854), subsequently a United States senator and chief-justice of the state.

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    0
  • On the death of Hunneric (484) he was succeeded by his cousin Gunthamund, Gaiseric having established seniority among his own descendants as the law of succession to his throne.

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    0
  • Hilderic, elderly, Catholic and timid, was very unpopular with his subjects, and after a reign of eight years he was thrust into prison by his warlike cousin Gelimer (531-34).

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  • In 1512 at the battle of Ravenna, where his father and elder brother were killed, he displayed prodigies of valour, and received the highest honours of chivalry from his imperial cousin, who conferred upon him with his own hands the spurs, the collar and the eagle of gold.

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  • By this treaty it was stipulated that the king was to receive the cousin of Nasir Khan in marriage; and that the khan was to pay no tribute, but only, when called upon, to furnish troops to assist the armies, for which he was to receive an allowance in cash equal to half their pay.

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  • Having succeeded in quelling a dangerous rebellion headed by his cousin Behram Khan, this able prince at length died in extreme old age in the month of June 1795, leaving three sons and five daughters.

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  • He was succeeded by his brother, Mir Khodadad Khan, when a youth of twelve years of age, who, however,'did not obtain his position before he had put down by force a rebellion on the part of his turbulent chiefs, who had first elected him, but, not receiving what they considered an adequate reward from his treasury, sought to depose him in favour of his cousin Sher dil Khan.

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  • This duty was successfully performed until 1863, when, during the temporary absence of Major Malcolm Green, the then political agent, Khodadad Khan was, at the instigation of some of his principal chiefs, attacked while out riding by his cousin, Sher dil Khan, and severely wounded.

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  • His rule was, however, a short one, for early in 1864, when proceeding to Kalat, he was murdered in the Gandava Pass; and Khodadad was again elected chief by the very men who had only the previous year caused his overthrow, and who had lately been accomplices to the murder of his cousin.

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  • of England despatched a powerful force to Lisbon, and betrothed his cousin Prince Edward to Beatrice, only child of Ferdinand, who had been recognized as heiress to the throne by the cortes of Leiria (1376).

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  • Ega de Queiroz (q.v.) founded the Naturalist school in Portugal by a powerful book written in 1871, but only published in 1875, under the title The Crime of Father Amara; and two of his great romances, Cousin Basil '' and Os Maias, were written during his occupancy of consular posts in England.

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  • He too died without an heir in 1544 at the siege of St Dizier, having devised all his titles and possessions to his first cousin William, the eldest son of William, count of Nassau-Dillenburg, who was the younger brother of Rene's father, and had inherited the German possessions of the family.

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  • William married his cousin Mary, the eldest daughter of James, duke of York, in 1677.

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  • to the dignity of a duke, but as he left no son this title died along with him in 1718, and the earldom of Shrewsbury devolved on his cousin Gilbert, a Roman Catholic priest.

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  • A nephew three times succeeded to an uncle, and then the title devolved upon a cousin, who died unmarried in 1856.

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  • On the death of this cousin the descent of the title was for a short time in dispute, and the lands were claimed for Lord Edmund Howard (now Talbot), an infant son of the duke of Norfolk, under the will of the last earl; but the courts decided that, under a private act obtained by the duke of Shrewsbury shortly before his death, the title and bulk of the estates must go together, and the true successor to the earldom was found in Earl Talbot, the head of another line of the descendants of Sir Gilbert Talbot of Grafton, sprung from a second marriage of Sir Gilbert's son, Sir John Talbot of Albrighton.

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  • le comte Henri Gregoire, preceded by a biographical notice by Cousin d'Avalon, was published in 1821; and the Memoires ...

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  • His cousin, William Campbell Preston Breckinridge (1837-1904), was a Democratic representative in Congress from 1885 to 1893.

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  • Another cousin, Joseph Cabell Breckinridge (1842-), served on the Union side in the Civil War, was a major-general of volunteers during the Spanish-American War (1898),(1898), became a major-general in the regular United States army in 1903, and was inspector-general of the United States army from 1899 until his retirement from active service in 1904.

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  • He appointed Charles of Miinsterberg, a cousin of Prince Bartholomew and also a grandson of King George, as regent of Bohemia during his absences, and John of Wartenberg as burgrave.

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  • In 1611 the peace of Bohemia was again disturbed by the invasion of the archduke Leopold of Austria, bishop of Passau, who probably acted in connivance with his cousin King Rudolph.

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  • The king wished to secure the succession to his cousin Ferdinand, duke of Styria.

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  • His grandfather was the poet-naturalist Erasmus Darwin, and Charles Darwin was his cousin.

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  • Three years later the Moderado party or Castilian Conservatives made their queen marry, at sixteen, her cousin, Prince Francisco de Assisi de Bourbon (1822-1902), on the same day (loth October 1846) on which her younger sister married the duke of Montpensier.

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  • the surrender of his cousin Pierre de Craon, who had tried to assassinate the constable Olivier de Clisson in the streets of Paris.

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  • His two daughters, both named Laodice, were married, one to Antiochus the Great, the other to his cousin Achaeus, a dynast of Asia Minor.

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  • According to his cousin, Edmund Davy,' then his laboratory assistant, he was so delighted with this achievement that he danced about the room in ecstasy.

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  • He was a Lycian prince who, along with his cousin Sarpedon, assisted Priam in the Trojan War.

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  • Subsequently, about the 1st of November 1603, Catesby sent a message to his cousin Robert Winter at Huddington, near Worcester, to come to London, which the latter refused.

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  • Winter's brother Thomas, John Grant, Ambrose Rokewood, Robert Keyes, Sir Everard Digby, Francis Tresham, a cousin of Catesby and Thomas Bates Catesby's servant, all, with the exception of the last, being men of good family and all Roman Catholics.

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  • to Nigel de Albini, Robert's cousin, who took the name of Mowbray.

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  • In 1824 he was ordained priest, and married a daughter of President Eliphalet Nott of Union College; she died in 1839, and in 1841 he married her cousin.

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  • Berenice, daughter of Salome, sister of Herod I., and wife of her cousin Aristobulus, who was assassinated in 6 B.C. Their relations had been unhappy and she was accused of complicity in his murder.

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  • This lady, to whom he was much attached, had been endeavouring to secure the succession of one of her own sons to the throne of Shoa, and had almost succeeded in getting rid of Mashasha, son of Siefu and cousin of Menelek, who was the apparent heir.

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  • As Rivers left no legitimate son the earldom passed on his death to his cousin, John Savage, grandson of the 2nd earl, and a priest in the Roman Catholic Church, on whose death, about 1735, all the family titles became extinct.

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  • At this time he was introduced to Cousin, and made the acquaintance of Michelet.

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  • Cousin procured him a post on a government mission to the Morea in 1829, and on his return he published in 1830 a book on La Grece moderne.

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  • After the Yorkist failure at Ludlow field in October 1459, Edward fled with the earls of Salisbury and Warwick, his uncle and cousin, to Calais.

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  • Indeed, it was not till the 9th century, when Cousin in 1836 issued the collection entitled Ouvrages inedits d'Abelard, that his philosophical performance could be judged at first hand; of his strictly philosophical works only one, the ethical treatise Scito to ipsum, having been published earlier, namely, in 1721.

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  • Cousin's collection, besides giving extracts from the theological work Sic et Non (an assemblage of opposite opinions on doctrinal points, culled from the Fathers as a basis for discussion, the main interest in which lies in the fact that there is no attempt to reconcile the different opinions), includes the Dialectica, commentaries on logical works of Aristotle, Porphyry and Boethius, and a fragment, De Generibus et Speciebus.

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  • The last-named work, and also the psychological treatise De Intellectibus, published apart by Cousin (in Fragmens Philosophiques, vol.

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  • LEONIDAS POLK (1806-1864), American soldier, was born at Raleigh, North Carolina, on the 10th of April 1806, and was a cousin of James Knox Polk, president of the United States.

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  • Mrs Donne's cousin, Sir Francis Wooley, offered the young couple an asylum at his country house of Pyrford, where they resided until the end of 1604.

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  • He was the first cousin of the Buddha, and was devotedly attached to him.

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  • of Brabant, her third husband Humphrey of Gloucester, her cousin Philip the Good of Burgundy, all behaved shamefully to her.

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  • Hence the familiarity of the poet's well-known "cooling-card" to the budding genius of his kinsman Jonathan: "Cousin Swift, you will never be a poet."

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  • Niall Garve O'Donnell (1569-1626), who was incensed at the elevation of his cousin Hugh Roe to the chieftainship in 1592, was further alienated when the latter deprived him of his castle of Lifford, and a bitter feud between the two O'Donnells was the result.

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  • Niall Garve made terms with the English government, to whom he rendered valuable service both against the O'Neills and against his cousin.

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  • He married his cousin Nuala, sister of Hugh Roe and Rory O'Donnell.

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  • The government now sent Sir Henry Docwra to Derry, and O'Donnell entrusted to his cousin Niall Garve the task of opposing him.

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  • Meanwhile she had been married in 1418 by her uncle, John the Fearless, duke of Burgundy, to her cousin John IV., duke of Brabant.

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  • In 1425 Humphrey deserted his wife, who found herself obliged to seek refuge with her cousin, Philip V., duke of Burgundy, to whom she had to submit, and she was imprisoned in the castle of Ghent.

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  • When he was nineteen years old he was married to his cousin Yasodhara, daughter of a Koliyan chief, and gave himself up to a life of luxury.

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  • It was the voice of a young girl, his cousin, who sang a stanza, saying, "Happy the father, happy the mother, happy the wife of such a son and husband."

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  • In the twentieth year his cousin Ananda became a mendicant, and from that time seems to have attended on the Buddha, being constantly near him, and delighting to render him all the personal service which love and reverence could suggest.

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  • The account of the manner in which the Buddha is said to have overcome the wicked devices of this apostate cousin and his parricide protector is quite legendary; but the general fact of Ajatasattu's opposition to the new sect and of his subsequent conversion may be accepted.

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  • The Lycee had a connexion with the university, and when Cousin left the secondary school he was "crowned" in the ancient hall of the Sorbonne for the Latin oration delivered by him there, in the general concourse of his school competitors.

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  • In the second preface to the Fragmens philosophiques, in which he candidly states the varied philosophical influences of his life, Cousin speaks of the grateful emotion excited by the memory of the day in 1811, when he heard Laromiguiere for the first time.

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  • Cousin was set forthwith to lecture on philosophy, and he speedily obtained the position of master of conferences (maitre de conferences) in the school.

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  • There was still another thinker who influenced him at this early period, - Maine de Biran, whom Cousin regarded as the unequalled psychological observer of his time in France.

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  • These men strongly influenced both the method and the matter of Cousin's philosophical thought.

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  • It was through this "triple discipline," as he calls it, that Cousin's philosophical thought was first developed, and that in 1815 he entered on the public teaching of philosophy in the Normal School and in the faculty of letters.'

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  • In this year appeared Hegel's Encyclopddie der philosophischen Wissenschaften, of which Cousin had one of the earliest copies.

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  • The following year Cousin went to Munich, where he met Schelling for the first time, and spent a month with him and Jacobi, obtaining a deeper insight into the Philosophy of Nature.

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  • The Normal School itself was swept away, and Cousin shared at the hands of a narrow and illiberal government the fate of Guizot, who was ejected from the chair of history.

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  • For Cousin was as eclectic in thought and habit of mind as he was in philosophical principle and system.

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  • de Vatimesnil, minister of public instruction in Martignac's ministry, recalled Cousin and Guizot to their professorial positions in the university.

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  • The three Career years which followed were the period of Cousin's greatest triumph as a lecturer.

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  • Tested by the power and effect of his teaching influence, Cousin occupies a foremost place in the rank of professors of philosophy, who like Jacobi, Schelling and Dugald Stewart have united the gifts of speculative, expository and imaginative power.

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  • Among the men who were influenced by Cousin we may note T.

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  • Jouffroy, however, always kept firm to the early - the French and Scottish - impulses of Cousin's teaching.

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  • Cousin continued to lecture regularly for two years and a half after his return to the chair.

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  • In fact, during the seventeen and a half years of the reign of Louis Philippe, Cousin mainly moulded the philosophical and even the literary tendencies of the cultivated class in France.

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  • It was to the efforts of Cousin that France owed her advance, in Relation to primary education, between 1830 and 1848.

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  • Prussia Primary and Saxony had set the national example, and France was guided into it by Cousin.

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  • Cousin remarks that, among all the literary distinctions which he had received, "None has touched me more than the title of foreign member of the American Institute for Education."

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  • To the enlightened views of the ministries of Guizot and Thiers under the citizen-king, and to the zeal and ability of Cousin in the work of organization, France owes what is best in her system of primary education, - a national interest which had been neglected under the Revolution, the Empire and the Restoration (see Exposé, p. 17).

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  • During this period Cousin seems to have turned with fresh interest to those literary studies which he had abandoned for speculation under the influence of Laromiguiere and RoyerCollard.

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  • When the reign of Louis Philippe came to a close through the opposition of his ministry, with Guizot at its head, to the demand for electoral reform and through the policy of the Spanish marriages, Cousin, who was opposed to the government on these points, lent his sympathy to Cavaignac and the Provisional government.

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  • There are three distinctive points in Cousin's philosophy.

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  • Otherwise, as Cousin himself remarks, it is simply a blind and useless syncretism.

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  • And Cousin saw and proclaimed from an early period in his philosophical teaching the necessity of a system on which to base his eclecticism.

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  • On no point has Cousin more strongly insisted than the importance of method in philosophy.

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  • This observational method Cousin regards as that of the 18th century, - the method which Descartes began and abandoned, and which Locke and Condillac applied, though imperfectly, and which Reid and Kant used with more success, yet not completely.

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  • By his method of observation and induction as thus explained, his philosophy will be found to be marked off very clearly, on the one hand from the deductive construction of notions of an absolute system, as represented either by Schelling or Hegel, which Cousin regards as based simply on hypothesis and abstraction, illegitimately obtained; and on the other, from that of Kant, and in a sense, of Sir W.

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  • Hamilton, both of which in the view of Cousin are limited to psychology, and merely relative or phenomenal knowledge, and issue in scepticism so far as the great realities of ontology are concerned.

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  • What Cousin finds psychologically in the individual consciousness, he finds also spontaneously expressed in the common sense or universal experience of humanity.

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  • But there is a peculiarity in Cousin's doctrine of activity or freedom, and in his doctrine of reason, which enters deeply into his system.

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  • But it is in his doctrine of the Reason that the distinctive principle of the philosophy of Cousin lies.

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  • This was the point which Kant missed in his analysis, and this is the fundamental truth which Cousin thinks he has restored to the integrity of philosophy by the method of the observation of consciousness.

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  • Kant reviewing the enterprise of Aristotle in modern times has given a complete list of the laws of thought, but it is arbitrary in classifica Cousin, there are but two primary laws of thought, that of causality and that of substance.

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  • This theodicy of Cousin laid him open obviously enough to the charge of pantheism.

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  • Cousin Relations was opposed to Kant in asserting that the uncondi- to Kant, tioned in the form of infinite or absolute cause is but Schelling a mere unrealizable tentative or effort on the part of and Hegel.

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  • With Cousin the absolute as the ground of being is grasped positively by the intelligence, and it renders all else intelligible; it is not as with Kant a certain hypothetical or regulative need.

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  • With Schelling again Cousin agrees in regarding this supreme ground of all as positively apprehended, and as a source of development, but he utterly repudiates Schelling's method.

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  • This led Cousin, still holding by essential knowledge of being, to ground it in an analysis of consciousness, - in psychology.

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  • The doctrine of Cousin was criticized by Sir W.

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  • The correlation of the ideas of infinite and finite does not necessarily imply their correality, as Cousin supposes; on the contrary, it is a presumption that finite is simply positive and infinite negative of the same - that the finite and infinite are simply contradictory relatives.

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  • This is one among many flaws in the Hegelian dialectic, and it paralyzes the whole of the Logic. Secondly, the conditions of intelligence, which Cousin allows, necessarily exclude the possibility of knowledge of the absolute - they are held to be incompatible with its unity.

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  • Here Schelling and Hamilton argue that Cousin's absolute is a mere relative.

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  • Thirdly, it is objected that in order to deduce the conditioned, Cousin makes his absolute a relative; for he makes it an absolute cause, i.e.

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  • Cousin made no reply to Hamilton's criticism beyond alleging that Hamilton's doctrine necessarily restricted human knowledge and certainty to psychology and logic, and destroyed metaphysics by introducing nescience and uncertainty into its highest sphere - theodicy.

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  • But if these three correlative facts are immediately given, it seems to be thought possible by Cousin to vindicate them in reflective consciousness.

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  • When Cousin thus set himself to vindicate those points by reflection, he gave up the obvious advantage of his other position that the realities in `question are given us in immediate and spontaneous apprehension.

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  • The truth is that Cousin's doctrine of the spontaneous apperception of impersonal truth amounts to little more than a presentment in philosophical language of the ordinary convictions and beliefs of mankind.

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  • And whether the laws of our reason are the laws of all intelligence and being - whether and how we are to relate our fundamental, intellectual and moral conceptions to what is beyond our experience, or to an infinite being - are problems which Cousin cannot be regarded as having solved.

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  • Cousin's doctrine of spontaneity in volition can hardly be said to be more successful than his impersonality of the reason through.

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  • It was the tendency of the philosophy of Cousin to outline things and to fill up the details in an artistic and imaginative interest.

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  • As an educational reformer, as a man of letters and learning, who trod "the large and impartial ways of knowledge," and who swayed others to the same paths, as a thinker influential alike in the action and the reaction to which he led, Cousin stands out conspicuously among the memorable Frenchmen of the 29th century.

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  • Hamilton (Discussions, p. 541), one of his most resolute opponents, described Cousin as "A profound and original thinker, a lucid and eloquent writer, a scholar equally at home in ancient and in modern learning, a philosopher superior to all prejudices of age or country, party or profession, and whose lofty eclecticism, seeking truth under every form of opinion, traces its unity even through the most hostile systems."

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  • Cousin, sa vie et sa correspondence (3 vols., Paris, 1895); H.

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  • Cousin (Paris, 1864); P. Janet, Victor Cousin et son oeuvre (Paris, 1885); Jules Simon, V.

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  • Cousin (1887); Adolphe Franck, Moralistes et philosophes (1872); J.

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  • Cousin >>

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  • According to this version, which may be accepted as substantially true, he was brought up at Antwerp by a cousin Jehan Stienbecks, and served a succession of employers as a boy servant.

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  • He fell into the hands of William the Bastard, of the duke of Normandy, King Edwards cousin and best- Norman loved relative.

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  • William alleged that his cousin had promised to make him his heir, and to recommend him to the witan as king of England.

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  • Stephen, count of floulogne, the younger brother of Theobald, had landed at Dover within a few days of Henrys death, determined to make a snatch at the crown, though he had been one of the first who had taken the oath to his cousin a few years before.

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  • good terms with his first cousin, Philip III.

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  • He returned suddenly in 1289, called home by complaints that reached him as to the administration of justice by his officials, who were slighting the authority of his cousin Edmund of Cornwall, whom he had left behind as regent.

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  • of France, who had always pursued a friendly policy with his cousin of England, had diedin 1285, and had been succeeded by his son Philip IV., a prince of a Ed rd I very different type, the most able and unscrupulous of an~

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  • The English king replied by welcoming and harbouring Robert of Artois, a cousin whom Philip VI.

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  • and than was Charless cousin Philip of Valois.

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