Courts sentence example

courts
  • She considered the money still his, but the courts wouldn't.
    14
    5
  • Owing to the historical past of Naples, and its social and economic condition at the end of the 17th century, the only study that really flourished there was that of law; and this soon penetrated from the courts to the university, and was raised to the level of a science.
    7
    2
  • He did not find Prince Andrew in Olmutz that day, but the appearance of the town where the headquarters and the diplomatic corps were stationed and the two Emperors were living with their suites, households, and courts only strengthened his desire to belong to that higher world.
    5
    0
  • The camping facilities were secondary to the main park functions, multiple ball fields, tennis courts and twenty-four horse shoe pits, for the serious pitcher.
    3
    0
  • All this business with her got me thinking about them years— courts and jail and stuff like that.
    4
    2
    Advertisement
  • Let the courts decide.
    2
    0
  • Millions of men perpetrated against one another such innumerable crimes, frauds, treacheries, thefts, forgeries, issues of false money, burglaries, incendiarisms, and murders as in whole centuries are not recorded in the annals of all the law courts of the world, but which those who committed them did not at the time regard as being crimes.
    2
    0
  • I just don't like courts.
    1
    0
  • Meaning in general the "king's court," it is difficult to define the curia regis with precision, but it is important and interesting because it is the germ from which the higher courts of law, the privy council and the cabinet, have sprung.
    1
    0
  • Even private persons, lords and ladies, affected to establish in their honours courts of equity.
    1
    0
    Advertisement
  • The judges have appellate jurisdiction of cases civil and criminal coming up from the lower courts.
    0
    0
  • One cause of this separation was the rigid adherence to precedent on the part of the common law courts.
    0
    0
  • A more complete remedy was introduced by the Judicature Act 1873, which consolidated the courts of law and equity, and ordered that law and equity should be administered concurrently according to the rules contained in the 26th section of the act.
    0
    0
  • The kirk-session is the first of a series of councils or church courts which are an essential feature of Presbyterianism.
    0
    0
  • The general assembly reviews all the work of the Church; settles controversies; makes administrative laws; directs and stimulates missionary and other spiritual work; appoints professors of theology; admits to the ministry applicants from other churches; hears and decides complaints, references and appeals which have come up through the inferior courts; and takes cognizance of all matters connected with the Church's interests or with the general welfare of the people.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • The duty of teaching and of administering the sacraments and of always presiding in church courts being strictly reserved to him invests his office with a dignity and influence greater than that of the elder.
    0
    0
  • It is consistent with this view to argue the absolute parity of ministers and elders, conceding to all presbyters" equal right to teach, to rule, to administer the sacraments, to take part in the ordination of ministers, and to preside in church courts."The practice of the Presbyterian churches of the present day is in accord with the first-named theory.
    0
    0
  • A code of instructions for the guidance of church courts when engaged in cases of discipline is in general use, and bears witness to the extreme care taken not only to have things done decently and in order, but also to prevent hasty, impulsive and illogical procedure in the investigation of charges of heresy or immorality.
    0
    0
  • The ordinary judicial system of France comprises two classes of courts: (I) civil and criminal, (2) special, including courts dealing only with purely commercial cases; in addition there are the administrative courts, including bodies, the Conseil dEtat and the Conseils de Prefecture, which dGal, in their judicial capacity, with cases coming under the droit administratif.
    0
    0
  • When it deals with matters involving larger sums an appeal lies to the courts of appeal.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • The principal function of these courts is the hearing of appeals both civil and criminal from the courts of first instance; only in.
    0
    0
  • Its function is to examine criminal cases and to decide whether they shall be referred for trial to the lower courts or the cours dassises.
    0
    0
  • The cour de cassation can review the decision of any other tribunal, except administrative courts.
    0
    0
  • First there is the office or cabinet of the prefect for the general police (la police gnrale), with bureaus for various objects, such as the safety of the president of the republic, the regulation and order of public ceremonies, theatres, amusements and entertainments, &c.; secondly, the judicial police (la police judiciaire), with numerous bureaus also, in constant communication with the courts of judicature; thirdly, the administrative police (la police administrative) including bureaus, which superintend navigation, public carriages, animals, public health, &c. Concurrently with these divisions there is the municipal police, which comprises all the agents in enforcing police regulations in the streets or public thoroughfares, acting under the orders of a chief (chef de la police municipale) with a central bureau.
    0
    0
  • The ordinary business of the ports was conducted in two courts known respectively as the court of brotherhood and the court of brotherhood and guestling, - the former being composed of the mayors of the seven principal towns and a number of jurats and freemen from each, and the latter including in addition the mayors, bailiffs and other representatives of the corporate members.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • For convenience the judge often sits at the royal courts of justice.
    0
    0
  • Actions may be transferred to it, and appeals made to it, from the county courts in all cases arising within the jurisdiction of the Cinque Ports as defined by that act.
    0
    0
  • Educated at the neighbouring Benedictine abbey of Cerne and at Balliol College, Oxford, he graduated in law, and followed that profession in the ecclesiastical courts in London, where he attracted the notice of Archbishop Bourchier.
    0
    0
  • The judicial powers are vested in a high court and other federal courts, and the federal judges hold office for life or during good behaviour.
    0
    0
  • This tribunal differs from similar courts in the states inasmuch as it consists of a single member, called the " president," an officer appointed by the governor-general from among the justices of the High Court of Australia.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • He went to Sydney, where he set to work in the law courts.
    0
    0
  • A large part of the modern town lies south of the square de la Republique; in this quarter are the law courts, hotel de ville, post office and other public buildings.
    0
    0
  • The British minister demanded from the national government M`Leod's release, but his case was in the New York courts, over which the national government has no jurisdiction.
    0
    0
  • His name is not connected with the resistance to the levy of ship-money or to the action of the ecclesiastical courts, but in 1630 he was one of those fined for refusing to take up knighthood.
    0
    0
  • The vigour and success with which he organized the national resources and upheld the national honour, asserted the British sovereignty of the seas, defended the oppressed, and caused his name to be feared and respected in foreign courts where that of Stuart was despised and neglected, command praise and admiration equally from contemporaries and from modern critics, from his friends and from his opponents.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • The exact plan of the whole is obscure, but the apartments evidently varied in size from mere closets to extensive courts.
    0
    0
  • The so-called " contracts," including a great variety of deeds, conveyances, bonds, receipts, accounts and, most important of all, the actual legal decisions given by the judges in the law courts, exist in thousands.
    0
    0
  • If the adopted child failed to carry out the filial duty the contract was annulled in the law courts.
    0
    0
  • Divorce is forbidden by the Roman Catholic Church, and only 839 judicial separations were obtained from the courts in 1902, more than half of the demands made having been abandoned.
    0
    0
  • The jewellers art received large encouragement in a country which had so many independent courts; but nowhere has it attained a fuller development than at Rome.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Italy has courts of cassation at Rome, Naples, Palermo, Ttirin, Florence, 20 appeal court districts, I62 tribunal districts and 1535 mandamenti, each with its own magistracy (pretura).
    0
    0
  • The penal tribunals have jurisdiction in cases involving imprisonment up to ten years, or a fine exceeding 40, while the assize courts, with a jury, deal with offences involving imprisonment for life or over ten years, and have exclusive jurisdiction (except that the senate is on occasion a high court of justice) over all political offences.
    0
    0
  • Appeal may be made from the sentences of the pretori to the tribunals, and from the tribunals to the courts of appeal; from the assize courts there is no appeal except on a point of form, which appeal goes to the court of cassation at Rome.
    0
    0
  • In 1902 of 884,612 persons accused of penal offencs, 13.12% were acquitted during the period of the instruction, 30.31 by the courts, 46.32 condemned and the rest acquitted in some other way.
    0
    0
  • The courts of appeal and cassation, too, often have more than they can do; in the year 1907 the court of cassation at Rome decided 948 appeals on points of law in civil cases, while no fewer than 460 remained to be decided.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • The mass of the people remained unrepresented in the government; and even if the consuls existed in the days of Heribert, they were but humble legal officers, transacting business for their constituents in the courts of the bishop and his viscount.
    0
    0
  • The emperor retained the supreme courts of appeal within the cities, and his claim for sustenance at their expense when he came into Italy.
    0
    0
  • In 1847 Lord Minto visited the tionary Italian courts to try to induce the recalcitrant despots agitation, to mend their ways, so as to avoid revolution and war, 1847.
    0
    0
  • A French attempt to purchase the line was upset in the English courts, and the railway was finally secured by Italy at a price more than eight times its real value.
    0
    0
  • The fasci were suppressed, Sicily was filled with troops, the reserves were called out, a state of siege proclaimed, military courts instituted and the whole movement crushed in a few weeks.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Crispis methods aroused great outcry in the Radical press, but the severe sentences of the military courts were in time tempered by the Royal prerogative of amnesty.
    0
    0
  • For some time all appeals to the king, to parliament, and to the courts of justice were unavailing; but on the 12th of February 1684 his application to Chief Justice Jeffreys was at last successful, and he was set at liberty on finding bail to the amount of X40,000, to appear in the House of Lords in the following session.
    0
    0
  • Cranmer suggested that if the canonists and the universities should decide that marriage with a deceased brother's widow was illegal, and if it were proved that Catherine had been married to Prince Arthur, her marriage to Henry could be declared null and void by the ordinary ecclesiastical courts.
    0
    0
  • These must be heard in the county courts before two visiting justices and four knights of the shire.
    0
    0
  • The hardship of attendance at the county courts was to some extent obviated.
    0
    0
  • This writ was one transferring cases concerning the ownership of property from the courts of the feudal lords to those of the king.
    0
    0
  • In future attendance at the forest courts is only obligatory on those who have business thereat.
    0
    0
  • On the other hand, it is clear that all the faithful were subject to these courts (when acting within their own sphere), and that, in the earliest times, no distinction was made in this respect between clergy and laity.
    0
    0
  • (a) It is a system of courts.
    0
    0
  • (e) The ecclesiastical and temporal courts are kept distinct.
    0
    0
  • In France, where the bishop was a temporal baron, his feudal and his spiritual courts were kept by distinct officers (Fournier, p. 2).
    0
    0
  • In York there are two courts, one called the consistory for the diocese, the other called the chancery for the province.
    0
    0
  • But the same person was often official of both courts.
    0
    0
  • These courts were convenient, since it was the custom to appoint delegates resident in the neighbourhood, and the power of sub-delegation, general or limited, simplified questions of distance.
    0
    0
  • (n) Officials, even of bishops and metropolitans, need not be in holy orders, though Bishop Stubbs in his paper in the Report of the Commission on Ecclesiastical Courts seems to say so.
    0
    0
  • When the temporal courts interfered to prevent excess of jurisdiction, they did so by prohibiting the ecclesiastical court from trying and the suitor from suing in that court.
    0
    0
  • The subject matter over which the ecclesiastical courts had jurisdiction was no longer purely " criminal " with a civil quasijurisdiction by way of arbitration.
    0
    0
  • In the later middle ages these courts had jurisdiction over most questions, except indeed the then most important ones, those relating to real property.
    0
    0
  • From it followed the right of the courts Christian to pronounce upon questions of legitimacy.
    0
    0
  • But as to personal property, the jurisdiction of the courts Christian became exclusive in England.
    0
    0
  • As to the title to present to benefices, the courts Christian at one time had concurrent jurisdiction with the temporal courts.
    0
    0
  • In regard to the execution of these promises, the jurisdiction of the ecclesiastical courts was possibly traversed by c. 15 of the Constitutions of Clarendon; but allowed by the statute 13 Edw.
    0
    0
  • Concerning " felonious " clerks the great questions discussed were whether the courts Christian had exclusive jurisdiction or the king's court, or whether there was a concurrent jurisdiction.
    0
    0
  • In the year named the secular courts complained to the king, Philip of Valois, of the encroachments of the courts Christian.
    0
    0
  • Testamentary causes at first were subject to the concurrent jurisdiction of the spiritual and secular courts.
    0
    0
  • Questions in regard to the property in a benefice were for the courts Christian; in regard to its possession, for the king's courts.
    0
    0
  • On the European continent the courts Christian often carried.
    0
    0
  • In the cases of heresy, apostasy and sorcery, the spiritual courts sought the aid of the secular jurisdiction to superadd the punishment of death.
    0
    0
  • Unless the king was to be regarded as an ecclesiastical person, they were not properly ecclesiastical courts; although spiritual persons might sit in them, for they sat only as royal commissioners.
    0
    0
  • In this reign and the next, temporal courts were sometimes given jurisdiction over purely spiritual offences.
    0
    0
  • But they sat again for this purpose under Mary and Elizabeth and (save between 1640 and 1661) continued regular criminal sessions till towards the end of the 17th century as continuously and constantly as the king's courts (op. cit.).
    0
    0
  • The tribunals thus subsisting are the courts of the bishop and archbishop, the latter sometimes called the court of appeal of the province.
    0
    0
  • Most kinds of offerings are now recoverable in secular courts.
    0
    0
  • (4) The enforcement of contractual promises has long been abandoned by the courts Christian themselves.
    0
    0
  • (7) Laymen can no longer be tried in the spiritual courts for offences against clerks.
    0
    0
  • In the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands courts Christian have now jurisdiction substantially as in England.
    0
    0
  • In Jersey and in Guernsey there are courts of first instance with appeal to the bishop of Winchester.
    0
    0
  • The relations of their bishops, priests or other ministers and lay office-bearers inter se and to their lay folk depend upon contract; and these Y P P contracts will be enforced by the ordinary courts of law.
    0
    0
  • The Church had the same jurisdiction in Scotland, and exercised it through similar courts to those which she had in Ecciesias= England and France, till about 1570.
    0
    0
  • Then parliament enacted a new system of Church courts which, though to some extent in its turn superseded by the revival of episcopacy under James VI., was revived or ratified by the act of 1690, c. 7, and stands to this day.
    0
    0
  • The Presbyterian courts thus created are arranged in ascending order: (a) Kirk Session consists of the minister of the parish and the " ruling elders " (who are elected by the session).
    0
    0
  • These courts consist of every parochial minister or professor of divinity of any university within the limits, and of an elder commissioned from every kirk session.
    0
    0
  • As civil courts they judge in first instance all questions connected with glebes and the erection and repair of churches and manses.
    0
    0
  • Matrimonial matters and those relating to wills and succession (called in Scotland " consistorial " causes) were in 1563 taken from the old bishops' courts and given to " commissaries " appointed by the crown with an appeal to the court of session, which by act 1609, c. 6, was declared the king's great consistory.
    0
    0
  • With the Reformation in the 16th century, Church courts properly speaking disappeared from the non-episcopal religious communities which were established in g Holland, in the Protestant states of Switzerland and of Germany, and in the then non-episcopal countries of Denmark and Norway.
    0
    0
  • Disputed cases of contract were more often tried in the secular courts.
    0
    0
  • Kings began to insist upon trying ecclesiastics for treason or other political crimes in secular courts.
    0
    0
  • But there was no sudden change in the position of the courts Christian till the French Revolution.
    0
    0
  • The Concordat of 1856 and consequent legislation restored matrimonial jurisdiction to the courts Christian over marriages between Roman Catholics.
    0
    0
  • Bishops and beneficed incumbents (cures) must be regularly tried; and where the Church is established the canonical courts are recognized.
    0
    0
  • Heresy has been treated as a crime to be tried in and punished by the ordinary courts of the country, as in the cases of Servetus and Grotius.
    0
    0
  • The spiritual courts in the East have permanently acquired jurisdiction in the matrimonial causes of baptized persons; the Mahommedan governments allowing to Christians a personal law of their own.
    0
    0
  • The bishops had consistorial courts; the patriarchs, chanceries and consistories (ib.).
    0
    0
  • There remain to the spiritual courts in Russia the purely ecclesiastical discipline of clerks and laity and matrimonial causes.
    0
    0
  • The subject matter of the jurisdiction of Hellenic courts Christian seems to be confined to strictly spiritual discipline, mainly in regard to the professional misconduct of the clergy.
    0
    0
  • It has been decided in the law courts that a limited liability company is not a person in the eye of the law, and therefore does not come under the operation of the act of 1868.
    0
    0
  • He now caused them to build a great capital, Ecbatana, with a royal palace, and introduced the ceremonial of oriental courts; he surrounded himself with a guard and no longer showed' himself to the people, but gave his judgments in writing and controlled the people by officials and spies.
    0
    0
  • The judicial power is vested in a high court and many subordinate courts.
    0
    0
  • There are civil, commercial and criminal courts in Montevideo, a departmental court in each departmental capital, and a justice of the peace in each of 205 judicial districts into which the republic is divided, with sub-district courts under deputy judges in addition.
    0
    0
  • An approchement now began between the courts of Russia and Prussia; and in 1863 Gorchakov smoothed the way for the occupation of Holstein by the Federal troops.
    0
    0
  • The strictness of the principle of admission or exclusion differs at the various German courts, and has tended to be modified by the growth of a new aristocracy of wealth; but a single instance known to the present writer may serve to illustrate the fundamental divergence of German (a fortiori Austrian) ideas from English in this matter.
    0
    0
  • The judicial functions are discharged by four grades of officials - the local magistrates, the courts of common pleas, the quarterly courts (five in number) and the supreme court.
    0
    0
  • The public buildings include the cathedral (1760), the government palace, the municipal palace, the episcopal palace, the church of Santa Ana, a national theatre, a school of arts and trades, a foreign hospital, the former administration building of the Canal Company, Santo Tomas Hospital, the pesthouse of Punta Mala and various asylums. The houses are mostly of stone, with red tile roofs, two or three storeys high, built in the Spanish style around central patios, or courts, and with balconies projecting far over the narrow streets; in such houses the lowest floor is often rented to a poorer family.
    0
    0
  • Its charter is said to date from 121 8, and it was the seat of the courts of the earls of Strathearn till 1 747, when heritable jurisdictions were abolished.
    0
    0
  • To check this courts were multiplied (there were five, six or more instances), which only multiplied the evil.
    0
    0
  • The system established by the law of 1864 is remarkable in that it set up two wholly separate orders of tribunals, each having their own courts of appeal and coming in contact only in the senate, as the supreme court of cassation.
    0
    0
  • The first of these, based on the English model, are the courts of the elected justices of the peace, with jurisdiction over petty causes, whether civil or criminal; the second, based on the French model, are the ordinary tribunals of nominated judges, sitting with or without a jury to hear important cases.
    0
    0
  • This fact was recognized by the legislators of 1864, and beneath the statutory tribunals created in that year the special courts of the peasants were suffered to survive.
    0
    0
  • In these courts the ordinary written law had little to say; the decisions of the volost courts were based on the local customary law, which alone the peasants, and the peasants alone, understand.
    0
    0
  • They acted also as police courts in the case of petty thefts, breaches of the peace and the like.
    0
    0
  • Most of them had power to impose schedules of maximum rates; practically all of them had authority to prescribe rates upon complaint of shippers; and they could all seek the aid of the courts to enforce their decrees.
    0
    0
  • It held shipper as well as carrier, and corporation as well as its officer or agent, liable for violations of the act, and conferred upon United States courts power to employ equity processes in putting an end to discrimination.
    0
    0
  • This demand has in many instances led to ill-considered legislation, has frequently ignored the prerogatives and even the existence of the state commissions, and has brought about the passage by state legislatures of maximum freight and passenger rate laws, with rates so low in many cases that they have been set aside by the courts as unconstitutional.
    0
    0
  • As a natural result weak railway companies in the United States have frequently been declared insolvent by the courts, owing to their inability in periods of commercial depression to meet their acknowledged obligations, and in the reorganization which has followed the shareholders have usually had to accept a loss, temporary or permanent.
    0
    0
  • The attitude of the courts is not that the railways should work without compensation, but that the compensation should not exceed a fair return on funds actually expended by the railway.
    0
    0
  • The cost of intra-urban railways depends not only on the type of construction, but more especially upon local conditions, such as the nature of the soil, the presence of subsurface structures, like sewers, water and gas mains, electric conduits, &c.; the necessity of permanent underpinning or temporary supporting of house foundations, the cost of acquiring land passed under or over when street lines are not followed, and, in the case of elevated railways, the cost of acquiring easements of light, air and access, which the courts have held are vested in the abutting property.
    0
    0
  • Grindal indeed attempted a reform of the ecclesiastical courts, but his metropolitical activity was cut short by a conflict with the arbitrary temper of the queen.
    0
    0
  • As a philosopher, Favorinus belonged to the sceptical school; his most important work in this connexion appears to have been Hvppwvetot rpoiroc (the Pyrrhonean Tropes) in ten books, in which he endeavours to show that the methods of Pyrrho were useful to those who intended to practise in the law courts.
    0
    0
  • The judicial department consists of a supreme court with a chief justice and two associate justices, chosen for six years, and district courts, with judges chosen for four years.
    0
    0
  • All blasphemies against God, as denying His being, or providence, all contumelious reproaches of Jesus Christ, all profane scoffing at the Holy Scriptures, or exposing any part thereof to contempt or ridicule, are punishable by the temporal courts with fine, imprisonment and also infamous corporal punishment.
    0
    0
  • As the Austrian influence increased Panin found a fresh enemy in Joseph II., and the efforts of the old statesman to prevent a matrimonial alliance between the Russian and Austrian courts determined Catherine to get rid of a counsellor of whom, for some mysterious reason, she was secretly afraid.
    0
    0
  • Tradition depicts him as a worthy successor to his father, and represents a state of luxury and riches impressive to all who were familiar with the great Oriental courts.
    0
    0
  • The temple sacrifices were still offered and worshippers were admitted; but John's catapults were busy, and priest and worshippers at the altar were killed, because Eleazar's party occupied the inner courts of the Temple.
    0
    0
  • This was the original of all the medieval forms of oath more judaico, which still prevailed in many European lands till the 19th century, and are even now maintained by some of the Rumanian courts.
    0
    0
  • There are two assize courts at Canea and Candia respectively with jurisdiction in regard to serious offences (KaKOvpy17aaia).
    0
    0
  • Minor offences (1rX17gµeVillaTa) and civil causes are tried by courts of first instance in each of the five departments.
    0
    0
  • This of course impaired the obligation of a contract, but under the Eleventh Amendment to the Constitution of the United States the bondholders could not bring suit against the state in the Federal courts.
    0
    0
  • To this end John Locke drafted for them in 1669 the famous Fundamental Constitutions providing for the division of the province into eight counties and each county into seigniories, baronies, precincts and colonies, and the division of the land among hereditary nobles who were to grant three-fifths of it to their freemen and govern through an elaborate system of feudal courts.
    0
    0
  • Among interesting ancient buildings may be mentioned the palace within the fort, containing an armoury and fine library; and the Brihadiswaraswami temple, of the r rth century, enclosed in two courts, surmounted by a lofty tower and including the exquisitely decorated shrine of Subrahmanya.
    0
    0
  • It is a matter of history that both mother and daughter were active agents in fostering that view of the social relations of the sexes which found its most famous expression in the "Courts of Love," and which was responsible for the dictum that love between husband and wife was impossible.
    0
    0
  • British courts of justice are established side by side with the native courts throughout the province.
    0
    0
  • This cost him his seat in Congress after the 4th of March 1817, and for the next six Years he was engaged chiefly in the practice of law in the courts of Massachusetts and before the U.S. Supreme Court.
    0
    0
  • They are rigid non-resistants, and will not bear arms or study the art of war; they refuse to take oaths, and discountenance going to law over issues that can possibly be settled out of the courts.
    0
    0
  • The forests of Peak and Duffield had their separate courts and officers, the justice seat of the former being in an extra-parochial part at equal distances from Castleton, Tideswell and Bowden, while the pleas of Duffield Forest were held at Tutbury.
    0
    0
  • Other elective officers are the mayor, city treasurer, city sergeant, commonwealth attorney, city collector, city auditor, sheriff and high constable, elected for four years; and clerks of the various courts elected for eight years.
    0
    0
  • But he watched all public incidents with a vigilant eye, and seized every passing opportunity of exposing departures from sound principle in parliament and courts of justice.
    0
    0
  • Already at Cherasco and Leoben he had dictated the preliminaries of peace to the courts of Turin and Vienna quite independently of the French Directory.
    0
    0
  • The effect of these extraordinary changes, then, was the carrying out of Napoleonic satrapies in the north and centre of Italy in a way utterly inconsistent with the treaty of Luneville; and the weakness with which the courts of London and Vienna looked on at these singular events confirmed Bonaparte in the belief that he could do what he would with neighbouring states.
    0
    0
  • In his belief that he could ensnare the courts of London and St Petersburg into separate and proportionately disadvantageous treaties, he overreached himself.
    0
    0
  • In 1862 he was moderator of the Free Church General Assembly; but he seldom took a prominent part in the business of the church courts.
    0
    0
  • The judicial department in 1910 was composed of a supreme court of six judges, eight circuit courts.'
    0
    0
  • The county and the township are the units of the rural, the city and the village the units of the urban local The provision for circuit courts was first made in the constitution by an amendment of 1883.
    0
    0
  • The other officials are the sheriff, treasurer and coroner, elected for two years; the auditor, recorder, clerk of courts, prosecuting attorney, surveyor and infirmary directors, elected for two years; and the board of school examiners (three) and the board of county visitors (six, of whom three are women), appointed usually by the probate judge for three years.
    0
    0
  • The Federal courts compelled a restoration of the money and pronounced the taxing law unconstitutional.
    0
    0
  • As a lawyer he was engaged during his later years in most of the especially important cases in the Supreme Court of the United States and in the courts of Maryland.
    0
    0
  • He was sued for libel for printing a rebuke to some of his parishioners who had travestied the sacrament of the Lord's Supper; and after several years in the courts he was ordered to pay damages of £150, which was raised by his parishioners.
    0
    0
  • Two great central courts sat in Jerusalem to do justice - the high court of the nobles, and the court of burgesses for the rest of the Franks.
    0
    0
  • In each there was a court for the noblesse, and a court (or courts) for the bourgeoisie.
    0
    0
  • Of the feudal courts there were some twenty-two.
    0
    0
  • Midway between the seignorial cours de bourgeoisie and the privileged jurisdictions of the Italian quarter, there were two kinds of courts of a commercial character - the cours de la fonde in towns where trade was busy, and the cours de la chaine in the sea-ports.
    0
    0
  • The former courts, under their bailiffs, gradually absorbed the separate courts which the Syrians had at first been permitted to enjoy under their own refs; and the bailiff with his 6 assessors (4 Syrians and 2 Franks) thus came to judge both commercial cases and cases in which Syrians were involved.
    0
    0
  • Distinct from all these courts, if similar in its sphere, is the court which the Italian quarter generally enjoyed in each town under its own consuls - a court privileged to try all but the graver cases, like murder, theft and forgery.
    0
    0
  • The Church had its separate courts, as in the West; but their province was perhaps greater than elsewhere.
    0
    0
  • The church courts could not indeed decide cases of perjury; but, on the other hand, they tried all matters in which clerical property was concerned, and all cases of dispute between husband and wife.
    0
    0
  • The chiefs have jurisdiction in cases affecting natives, but there is a right of appeal to the courts of the commissioners, who try all cases in which any of the parties are European.
    0
    0
  • The three judges of the Supreme Court and the seven of the circuit court serve for six years, those of the county courts for four years, and justices of the peace (one for each justice district, of which the county commissioners must form at least two in each county) hold office for four years.
    0
    0
  • At first there were separate admirals or rear-admirals of the north, south and west, each with deputies and courts.
    0
    0
  • Sir Thomas Beaufort, afterwards earl of Dorset and duke of Exeter (appointed admiral of the fleet 1407, and admiral of England, Ireland and Aquitaine 1412, which latter office he held till his death in 1426), certainly had a court, with a marshal and other officers, and forms of legal process - mandates, warrants, citations, compulsories, proxies, &c. Complaints of encroachment of jurisdiction by the Admiralty Courts led to the restraining acts, 13 Ric. II.
    0
    0
  • The original object of the institution of the courts or court seems to have been to prevent or punish piracy and other crimes upon the narrow seas and to deal with questions of prize; tion.
    0
    0
  • In an act of 1534, with regard to ecclesiastical appeals from the courts of the archbishops to the crown, it is provided that the appeal shall be to the king in Chancery, "and that upon every such appeal a commission shall be directed under the great seal to such persons as shall be named by the king's highness, his heirs or successors, like as in cases of appeal from the Admiralty Court."
    0
    0
  • The early jurisdiction of the court appears to have been exercised very much under the same procedure as that used by the courts of common law.
    0
    0
  • All the while, however, the patents of the admiralty judge purported to confer on him a far ampler jurisdiction than the jealousy of the other courts would concede to him.
    0
    0
  • In 1875, by the operation of the Judicature Acts of 1873 and 1875, the High Court of Admiralty was with the other great courts of England formed into the High Court of Justice.
    0
    0
  • Till the year 1859 the practitioners in the High Court of Admiralty were the same as those in the ecclesiastical courts and distinct from those who practised in the ordinary courts.
    0
    0
  • The king's advocate also represented the crown in the ecclesiastical courts, and was its standing adviser in matters of international and foreign law.
    0
    0
  • The king's advocate led the bar of his courts, and before the privy council took precedence of the attorney-general.
    0
    0
  • Upon the next vacancy after the courts were thrown open, the crown altered the precedence and placed the queen's advocate after the attorneyand solicitor-general.
    0
    0
  • The admiralty had, when the courts were thrown open, a standing counsel for the ordinary courts and a solicitor.
    0
    0
  • The High Court of Admiralty of Ireland, being formed on the same pattern as the High Court in England, sat in the Four Courts, Dublin, having a judge, a registrar, a marshal and a king's or queen's advocate.
    0
    0
  • The greater part of the old village of Luxor lay inside the courts: it was known also as Abu '1 Haggag from a Moslem saint of the 7th century, whose tombmosque, mentioned by Ibn Batuta, stands on a high heap of debris in the court of Rameses.
    0
    0
  • Nor can we doubt that it was his influence which shaped the famous ordinance separating the ecclesiastical from the secular courts (c. 1076).
    0
    0
  • Becket had not shrunk from excommunicating a tenant in chief who had encroached upon the lands of Canterbury, and had protected against the royal courts a clerk named Philip de Brois who was charged with an assault upon a royal officer.
    0
    0
  • He was willing that the accused should be tried in the courts Christian provided that the punishment of the guilty were left to the lay power.
    0
    0
  • Navarre was not reconquered for the couple as Francis had promised, but ample apanages were assigned to Marguerite, and at Nerac and Pau miniature courts were kept up, which yielded to none in Europe in the intellectual brilliancy of their frequenters.
    0
    0
  • Becoming convinced that the common law in America, and particularly in New York state, needed radical changes in respect to the unification and simplification of its procedure, he visited Europe in 1836 and thoroughly investigated the courts, procedure and codes of England, France and other countries, and then applied himself to the task of bringing about in the United States a codification of the common law procedure.
    0
    0
  • The administration of justice is vested in a United States district court and a supreme court, district courts, municipal courts and justice of the peace courts of Porto Rico.
    0
    0
  • The judge of the United States district court and the chief justice and associate justices of the supreme court are appointed by the President with the consent of the Senate, and the judges of the district courts by the governor with the consent of the Executive Council.
    0
    0
  • Sophia: they have courts in front with a range of arcades round, and the centre portion forms the prayer chamber, the side aisles serving as passages.
    0
    0
  • The materials of the native styles of India, however, did not lend themselves to their utilization as in Syria, Egypt and North Africa, where the columns and capitals formed the substructure of the arcades which surrounded their courts.
    0
    0
  • The retaining of alchemists at various courts shows the high opinion which the doctrines had gained.
    0
    0
  • Conscience Courts were local courts, established by acts of parliament in London and various provincial towns, for the recovery of small debts, usually sums under £5.
    0
    0
  • They were superseded by county courts (q.v.).
    0
    0
  • We hear of direct diplomatic intercourse between the courts of Alexandria and Pataliputra, i.e.
    0
    0
  • In language and manners the courts of Alexander's successors were Greek.
    0
    0
  • There were other traces in the Hellenistic courts of the old Macedonian tradition besides in dress.
    0
    0
  • All the Hellenistic courts felt it a great part of prestige to be filled with the light of Hellenic culture.
    0
    0
  • The values recognized in the great Hellenistic courts and the Greek world generally imposed their authority upon the dynasties of barbarian origin.
    0
    0
  • The Antigonid and Seleucid courts had much valuable material at hand for their armies in the barbarian races under their sway.
    0
    0
  • She instructed her daughter to show a proper respect to her husband's grandfather, Louis XV., by behaving with politeness to his mistresses, in order that the alliance between the two courts might run no risk.
    0
    0
  • Chastellain was constantly engaged during the earlier part of his career in negotiations between the French and Burgundian courts, and thus had personal knowledge of the persons and events dealt with in his history.
    0
    0
  • The student of English constitutional history will observe the success with which Friends have, by the mere force of passive resistance, obtained, from the legislature and the courts, indulgence for all their scruples and a legal recognition of their customs. In American history they occupy an important place because of the very prominent part which they played in the colonization of New Jersey and Pennsylvania.
    0
    0
  • In the years succeeding the Toleration Act at least twelve of their number were prosecuted (often more than once in the spiritual and other courts) for keeping school without a bishop's licence.
    0
    0
  • Friends have always held that the attempt to enforce truthspeaking by means of an oath, in courts of law and elsewhere, tends to create a double standard of truth.
    0
    0
  • Their testimony in this respect is the better understood when we bear in mind the large amount of perjury in the law courts, and profane swearing in general which prevailed at the time when the Society took its rise.
    0
    0
  • He could be liberated by will, or, during his Emanci- master's life, by proclamation in the theatre, the law courts, or other public places, or by having his name inscribed in the public registers, or, in the later age of Greece, by sale or donation to certain temples - an act which did not make the slave a hierodulus but a freeman.
    0
    0
  • The service of the magistrates was at first in the hands of freemen; but the lower offices, as of couriers, servants of the law courts, of prisons and of temples, were afterwards filled by slaves.
    0
    0
  • She was received with great consideration at foreign courts, and her literary and scientific reputation procured her the entree to the society of the learned in most of the capitals of Europe.
    0
    0
  • The most important are the law courts, exchange, Ottoman bank, English church and the Abbas Hilmi theatre.
    0
    0
  • In 1847 Morse was compelled to defend his invention in the courts, and successfully vindicated his claim to be called the original inventor of the electromagnetic recording telegraph.
    0
    0
  • The courts of justice were opened in 1892.
    0
    0
  • Special commissioners were to have concurrent jurisdiction with the U.S. circuit and district courts and the inferior courts of Territories in enforcing the law; fugitives could not testify in their own behalf; no trial by jury was provided; i The precise amount of organization in the Underground Railroad cannot be definitely ascertained because of the exaggerated use of the figure of railroading in the documents of the "presidents" of the road, Robert Purvis and Levi Coffin, and of its many "conductors," and their discussion of the "packages" and "freight" shipped by them.
    0
    0
  • The supreme court is almost without exception a court of appeal with jurisdiction in cases involving at least $2000, in cases of divorce, in suits regarding adoption, legitimacy and custody of children and as regards the legality and constitutionality of taxes, fines, &c. The supreme court appoints courts of appeal to judge cases involving less than $2000.
    0
    0
  • Discussions of the Roman Institute and Pandects were common in the deliberations of the courts.
    0
    0
  • The Louisiana code of 1808 was not, however, exhaustive; and the courts continued to go back to the old Spanish sources whenever the digest was inconclusive.
    0
    0
  • Justice is administered by courts of various grades, with a supreme court at Havana as the head; the members of this being appointed by the president and senate.
    0
    0
  • But all interference is subject to review of claims by the courts.
    0
    0
  • Two chief courts of justice (audiencias) sat at Havana (after 1832) and Puerto Principe (1800-1853); appeals could go to Spain; below the audiencias were "alcaldes mayores " or district judges and ordinary " alcaldes " or local judges.
    0
    0
  • These laws strictly defined the powers of the president; more clearly separated the executive departments, so as to lessen friction and jealousies; reformed the courts; reformed administrative routine; and increased the strength of the provinces at the expense of the municipalities.
    0
    0
  • As far as possible, the Turkish law was retained during the period of occupation; all cases between Moslems were settled in separate courts by Moslem judges, against whom there was an appeal to the supreme court, aided by assessors.
    0
    0
  • Among its buildings are the cathedral, dating from 1553 and once noted for its wealth; the president's palace and halls of congress, which are no longer occupied as such by the national government; the cabildo, or town-hall; a mint dating from 1572; the courts of justice, and the university of San Xavier, founded in 1624, with faculties of law, medicine and theology.
    0
    0
  • Probably no town in the kingdom has a nobler group of public buildings than those in Cathays Park, which also commands a view of the castle ramparts and the old keep. On opposite sides of a fine avenue are the assize courts and new town hall (with municipal offices), which are both in the Renaissance style.
    0
    0
  • The judicial department comprises a supreme court consisting of a chief justice and (since 1881) four associate justices elected for terms of six years, and lower courts consisting of district courts with original jurisdiction in civil cases in law and equity, and in criminal cases upon indictments by grand juries; justices' courts, in which the amount in litigation cannot exceed $ioo, or the punishment cannot exceed three months' imprisonment or a fine of $loo; and of municipal and probate courts with the usual jurisdictions.
    0
    0
  • Farther north, along the line of the former town wall, are the criminal law courts (1879-1882, enlarged 1893) and the civil law courts (finished in 1901).
    0
    0
  • Its principal courts are constituted of an equal number of ministers and laymen.
    0
    0
  • By sheer tenacity of purpose, Bestuzhev had extricated his country from the Swedish imbroglio; reconciled his imperial mistress with the courts of Vienna and London, her natural allies; enabled Russia to assert herself effectually in Poland, Turkey and Sweden, and isolated the restless king of Prussia by environing him with hostile alliances.
    0
    0
  • Among other buildings are the town hall (built 1899-1900), the palace of the hereditary prince, the theatre, the administration offices, the law courts, the Amalienstift, with a picture gallery, several high-grade schools, a library of 30,000 volumes and an excellently appointed hospital.
    0
    0
  • Cases of simony have come before the courts in which clergy of the highest rank have been implicated.
    0
    0
  • There are few decisions of Scottish courts on the subject.
    0
    0
  • Law courts, government offices, prisons and a substantial bridge were built, good roads made, and a large staff of sanitary inspectors appointed.
    0
    0
  • The popular indignation at such scandalous miscarriages of justice rendered a change in the composition of the courts imperative.
    0
    0
  • When the control of the courts passed into the hands of the property equites, all who were summoned to undertake the duties of judices were called equites; the ordo judicum (the official title) and the ordo equester were regarded as identical.
    0
    0
  • Various attempts were made by the senate to regain control of the courts, but without success.
    0
    0
  • In the jury courts, the equites, thanks to Julius Caesar, already formed two-thirds of the judices; Augustus, by excluding the senators altogether, virtually gave them the sole control of the tribunals.
    0
    0
  • He retained his influence during the reign of Henry II., fulfilling important missions in Switzerland and at the imperial court (1547-1551), and at the courts of the German princes (1553-1554).
    0
    0
  • Adopting the profession of an advocate, he came to Constantinople and practised in the prefectural courts there, reaching such eminence as to attract the notice of the emperor Justinian, who appointed him in 528 one of the ten commissioners directed to prepare the first Codex of imperial constitutions.
    0
    0
  • After the death of Frederick the Great, his presence was competed for by the courts of France, Spain and Naples, and a residence in Berlin having ceased to possess any attraction for him, he removed to Paris in 1787.
    0
    0
  • He was at once public prosecutor and judge, was responsible for the execution of the sentences of the courts, and as the king's representative exercised the royal right of protection (mundium regis) over churches, widows, orphans and the like.
    0
    0
  • Among other things they are charged with the supervision and support of primary education, with the maintenance of order, and with the organization and support of a system of state courts.
    0
    0
  • It also supervises secondary and superior education, issues patents, and provides federal courts for the trial of cases amenable to federal laws.
    0
    0
  • Each state has its own local laws and courts, independent of federal control, but subject to the review of the supreme tribunal, and with rights of appeal to that tribunal in specified cases.
    0
    0
  • The federal district, which has a municipal council instead of a legislature, has a system of municipal and higher courts peculiar to itself.
    0
    0
  • The members of the army and navy are governed by special laws, enjoy immunities from civil process, and are subject to the jurisdiction of military courts.
    0
    0
  • The military organization is provided with an elaborate code and systems of military courts, which culminate in a supreme military tribunal composed of 15 judges holding office for life, of which 8 are general army officers, 4 general naval officers and 3 civil judges.
    0
    0
  • Parliament House, begun in 1632 and completed in 1640, in which the later assemblies of the Scottish estates took place until the dissolution of the parliament by the Act of Union of 1707, has since been set apart as the meeting-place of the supreme courts of law.
    0
    0
  • At first occupied by the parliament and courts of justice, it served later as a prison, and was removed in 1817.
    0
    0
  • Further immunities and privileges were granted by James III.; and by a precept of 1482, known as the Golden Charter, he bestowed on the provost and magistrates the hereditary office of sheriff, with power to hold courts, to levy fines, and to impose duties on all merchandise landed at the port of Leith.
    0
    0
  • At this time also he exerted himself for the reform of justice in the ecclesiastical courts, for the uniformity of the law of marriage (which he held should be a purely civil contract) and for giving prisoners charged with felony the benefit of counsel.
    0
    0
  • He protests against Peel's Income Tax Bill of 1842; against the Aberdeen Act 1843, as conferring undue power on church courts; against the perpetuation of diocesan courts for probate and administration; against Lord Stanley's absurd bill providing compensation for the destruction of fences to dispossessed Irish tenants; and against the Parliamentary Proceedings Bill, which proposed that all bills, except money bills, having reached a certain stage or having passed one House, should be continued to next session.
    0
    0
  • William's writs show not only that he kept intact the old system of governing through the sheriffs and the courts of shire and hundred, but also that he found it highly serviceable.
    0
    0
  • But the king himself worked hard in hearing lawsuits, in holding councils and ceremonious courts, in travelling between England and Normandy, and finally in conducting military operations.
    0
    0
  • Kenner as special commissioner to the courts of England and France to obtain recognition of the Confederacy on condition of the abolition of slavery.
    0
    0
  • The Roman-Dutch law, as accepted and administered by the courts of Cape Colony up to 1845 (the date of the separation of Natal from the Cape), is the law of the land, save as modified by ordinances and laws enacted by the local legislature, mostly founded upon imperial statute law.
    0
    0
  • The law of evidence is the same as that of the courts of England.
    0
    0
  • The administration of justice is conducted by magistrates' courts, circuit courts and the provincial division of the supreme court.
    0
    0
  • The judges also hold circuit courts at Durban and other places.
    0
    0
  • Appeals from the circuit courts can be made to the provincial court; and from the provincial court appeals lie to the appellate division of the Supreme Court of South Africa, sitting at Bloemfontein.
    0
    0
  • There is no jury in this tribunal and single judges may hold circuit courts.
    0
    0
  • The possession of this property brought about frequent disputes with an adjoining landowner, Thomas de Grey, and, after many actions in the courts, his friends endeavoured to obtain, by a bill forced through the houses of parliament, the privileges which the law had not assigned to him (February 1774).
    0
    0
  • The judicial authorities in Hungary are: (1) the district courts with single judges (458 in 1905); (2) the county courts with collegiate judgeships (76 in number); to these are attached 15 jury courts for press offences.
    0
    0
  • These are courts of first instance.
    0
    0
  • (3) Royal Tables (12 in number), which are courts of second instance, established at Budapest, Debreczen, Gyor, Kassa, Kolozsvar, Maros-Vasarhely, Nagyvarad, Pecs, Pressburg, Szeged, Temesvar and Zagrab.
    0
    0
  • There are also a special commercial court at Budapest, a naval court at Fiume, and special army courts.
    0
    0
  • Of twelve of them it is said that foreigners took them at first for independent temporal princes, so vast were their estates, so splendid their courts, so numerous their armed retainers.
    0
    0
  • In royal Hungary the same object was aimed at by innumerable indictments against the richer landowners, indictments supported by false title-deeds and carried through by forged or purchased judgments of the courts.
    0
    0
  • Courts of first instance are presided over by magistrates, the whole colony being divided into sixteen magisterial wards.
    0
    0
  • Circuit courts are held as occasion requires.
    0
    0
  • That every one who has capacity to understand the law is presumed to know it is a very necessary principle, for otherwise the courts would be continually occupied in endeavouring to solve problems which by their very impracticability would render the administration of justice next to impossible.
    0
    0
  • He served on the ecclesiastical courts commission of 1881-1883, and wrote the weighty appendices to the report.
    0
    0
  • As a perfume it was strewn in Greek halls, courts and theatres, and in the Roman baths.
    0
    0
  • The ministers are required to countersign all acts relating to their respective departments, and are held responsible both before Congress and the courts for their acts.
    0
    0
  • As the laws and procedure are uniform throughout the republic and all decrees and findings have legal effect everywhere, the state judicial organizations may be considered as taking the place of district federal courts, although the constitution does not declare them so.
    0
    0
  • The judicial organization of the states includes in each a supreme court of three members, a superior court, courts of first instance, district courts and municipal courts.
    0
    0
  • In the territories there are civil and criminal courts of first instance, and municipal courts.
    0
    0
  • Enactments were also passed touching procedure in the ecclesiastical courts, the creation of new monastic orders, appointments to offices in the church, marriage-law, conventual discipline, the veneration of relics, pilgrimages and intercourse with Jews and Saracens.
    0
    0
  • Neile sat regularly in the courts of star-chamber and high commission.
    0
    0
  • On the north side of the square are the law courts, on the west side the Post Office.
    0
    0
  • He sat on the ecclesiastical courts commission (1881-1883) and the sweating commission (1888-1890).
    0
    0
  • The last-named place he reached (after a leisurely journey and many honours at the little courts just mentioned) at the beginning of October, and here he proposed to stay the winter, finish his Annals of and look about him.
    0
    0
  • Its use has been condemned as an illegal ceremony by the ecclesiastical courts.
    0
    0
  • The Lambeth "opinion," as it was called, failed to convince the clergy against whom it was directed any better than the judgments of the ecclesiastical courts, but at first a considerable degree of obedience to the archbishops' view was shown.
    0
    0
  • The Royal Courts of Justice or Law Courts stand adjacent to the Inns of Court, facing the Strand at the point where a memorial marks the site of Old Temple Bar (1672), at the entrance to the City, removed in 1878 and later re-erected at Theobald's Park, near Cheshunt, Hertfordshire.
    0
    0
  • The arrangements of quarter-sessions, justices, coroners, sheriffs, &c., were thus brought into line with other counties, except in so far as the ordinary organization is modified by the existence of the central criminal court, the metropolitan police, police courts and magistrates, and a paid chairman of quarter-sessions.
    0
    0
  • The chief courts for the trial of criminal cases are the Central Criminal Court and the Court of Quarter-sessions.
    0
    0
  • Criminal Court, taking the place of the provincial Courts.
    0
    0
  • The Metropolitan police courts are fourteen in number, namely - Bow Street, Covent Garden; Clerkenwell; Great Marlborough Street (Westminster); Greenwich and Woolwich; Lambeth; Marylebone; North London, Stoke Newington Road; Southwark; South Western, Lavender Hill (Battersea); Thames, Arbour Street East (Stepney); West Ham; West London, Vernon Street (Fulham); Westminster, Vincent Square; Worship Street (Shoreditch).
    0
    0
  • The police courts of the City are held at the Mansion House, the Lord Mayor or an alderman sitting as magistrate, and at the Guildhall, where the aldermen preside in rotation.
    0
    0
  • The two courts - that of aldermen and that of the common council - were probably formed about the same time, but it is remarkable that we have no definite information on the subject.
    0
    0
  • These laws are enforced by mine inspectors of the timber produces falls of ground, making necessary the excavawho are empowered to call upon the courts and other government tion and removal at times of hundreds of tons of heated rock and burning coal, in order to reach the fire.
    0
    0
  • Altenburg is the seat of the higher courts of the Saxon duchies, and possesses a cathedral and several churches, schools, a library, a gallery of pictures and a school of art, an infirmary and various learned societies.
    0
    0
  • That portion of the English law which has been introduced into India without legislation, and all the rules of law resting upon the authority of the courts, are made applicable to Burma by the same act.
    0
    0
  • The state has two Amtsgerichte (courts of first instance) at Bremen and Bremerhaven respectively, and a superior court, Landgericht, at Bremen, whence appeals lie to the Oberlandesgericht for the Hanseatic towns in Hamburg.
    0
    0
  • The judges of the Bremen courts are appointed by a committee of members of the senate, the Burgerschaft and the bench of judges.
    0
    0
  • Frankish law becomes a powerful modifying element in English legal history after the Conquest, when it was introduced wholesale in royal and in feudal courts.
    0
    0
  • It is at this Ghibel- time that the people of Florence first began to acquire influence, and while the countess presided at the courts of justice in the name of the Empire, she was assisted by a group of great feudal nobles, judges, lawyers, &c., who formed, as elsewhere in Tuscany, the boni homines or sapientes.
    0
    0
  • As the proper form of address "my lord" is used not only to those members of the nobility to whom the title "Lord" is applicable, and to bishops, but also to all judges of the High Court in England, and of the Scottish and Irish Superior Courts, and to lord mayors and lord provosts.
    0
    0
  • Among other public buildings may be enumerated the civic hall, the law courts and the old town-hall.
    0
    0
  • In the Theodosian Code the various crimes which are accounted sacrilege include - apostasy, heresy, schism, Judaism, paganism, attempts against the immunity of churches and clergy or privileges of church courts, the desecration of sacraments, &c. and even Sunday.
    0
    0
  • Distilling however prospers, and the town is important not only as regards its shipping and the deep-sea fishery, but also as a distributing centre for the islands and the seat of the superior law courts.
    0
    0
  • This change became gradually more apparent in his preaching and in his conferences with his clerical associates, and occasioned much controversy in the ecclesiastical courts where, however, he successfully defended his position.
    0
    0
  • The duty of giving the lord advice was often demanded and fulfilled in sessions of the court, and in these feudal courts the obligations of lord and vassal were enforced, with an ultimate appeal to war.
    0
    0
  • There is abundant evidence that riding courts were held after the Norman Conquest.
    0
    0
  • As yet, however, the jurisdiction and functions of these courts have not been ascertained.
    0
    0
  • The high priest Joshua is accused before Yahweh by Satan, but is acquitted and given rule in Yahweh's house and courts, with the right of access to Yahweh in priestly intercession.
    0
    0
  • In 1883 the new situation under the French protectorate was recognized by the British government withdrawing its consular jurisdiction in favour of the French courts, and in 1885 it ceased to be represented by a diplomatic official.
    0
    0
  • He also controlled, with consummate ability, the operations of the brand-new Russian diplomatists at the various foreign courts.
    0
    0
  • No member of the executive branch of the government (president, cabinet minister, prefect, sub-prefect, or governor) can be elected to either chamber, nor can any judge or " fiscal " of the supreme court, nor any member of the ecclesiastical hierarchy from his diocese, province or parish, nor any judge or " fiscal " of superior and first-instance courts from their judicial districts, nor any military officer from the district where he holds a military appointment at the time of election.
    0
    0
  • The judiciary is composed of a supreme court, superior courts and courts of first instance, and justices of the peace.
    0
    0
  • The judges of the superior courts are chosen by the president from the list of nominees submitted by the supreme court.
    0
    0
  • Questions of jurisdiction between the superior and supreme courts, as well as questions of like character between the supreme court and the executive, are decided by the senate sitting as a court.
    0
    0
  • The courts of first instance are established in the capitals of provinces and their judges are chosen by the superior courts of the districts in which they are located.
    0
    0
  • The independence of the Peruvian courts has not been scrupulously maintained, and there has been much criticism of their character and decisions.
    0
    0
  • The foundation of new law courts was laid in 1900.
    0
    0
  • The architectural style which has been principally followed in the later public buildings, among them the law courts, finished in 1897, the German bank, St Martin's hospital, as well as in numerous private dwellings, is the Italian and French Rococo, or Renaissance, adapted to the traditions of Munich architecture in the 17th and 18th centuries.
    0
    0
  • As chairman of the committee having the matter in charge, he drafted the bill by the enactment of which the system of Federal courts, almost as it is to-day, was established.
    0
    0
  • He continued to serve Henry as a diplomatist, and in 1593 became the representative of the French king at the courts of the imperial princes.
    0
    0
  • The principal are the governor's residence and government offices, the barracks, the cathedral, the missionary institutions, the fruit market, Wilberforce Hall, courts of justice, the railway station and the grammar school.
    0
    0
  • Below this are the twelve district courts, the town councils, probate courts in the larger towns, and justices of the peace.
    0
    0
  • The courts are ornamented by sculptures of great beauty and richness; the delicately-carved cedar ceiling bears traces of polychromatic painting.
    0
    0
  • At the foot of the castle stands the modern residence of the governor, built c. 1830, with several spacious courts and gardens.
    0
    0
  • Anastasia, and by many more or less mutilated palaces, with fine courts surrounded by arcades in one or more storeys.
    0
    0
  • The supreme courts of justice of the duchy are in Karlsruhe, Freiburg, Offenburg, Heidelberg, Mosbach, Waldshut, Constance and Mannheim, whence appeals lie to the Reichsgericht (supreme tribunal of the empire) in Leipzig.
    0
    0
  • The Roman oratory of the law courts had to deal not with petty questions of disputed property, of fraud, or violence, but with great imperial questions, with matters affecting the well-being of large provinces and the honour and safety of the republic; and no man ever lived who, in these respects, was better fitted than Cicero to be the representative of the type of oratory demanded by the condition of the later republic. To his great artistic accomplishment, perfected by practice and elaborate study, to the power of his patriotic, his moral, and personal sympathies, and his passionate emotional nature, must be added his vivid imagination and the rich and copious stream of his language, in which he had no rival among Roman writers or speakers.
    0
    0
  • In the Ecclesia a private citizen might propose another assessment, or the case might be referred to the law courts.
    0
    0
  • It is now called in the district the Sarant' Aulai or Forty Courts, and is said to be capable of holding 3000 people.
    0
    0
  • The law courts are in the centre of Government Square.
    0
    0
  • Finally, the function of the archbishop as judge in a court of appeal, though it still subsists, is of little practical importance now that the clergy, in civil matters, are universally subject to the secular courts.
    0
    0
  • The Arches court was also the court of appeal from the consistory courts of the bishops of the province in all testamentary and matrimonial causes.
    0
    0
  • He has also an appellate jurisdiction of an analogous character, which he exercises through his provincial court, whilst his diocesan jurisdiction is exercised through his consistorial court, the judges of both courts being nominated by the archbishop. His ancient testamentary and matrimonial jurisdiction was transferred to the crown by the same statutes which divested the see of Canterbury of its jurisdiction in similar matters.
    0
    0
  • As a general rule each wapentake had its own court, which had the same jurisdiction as the hundred courts of the southern counties.
    0
    0
  • The Palazzo del Tribunale (law courts) is a fine building, and the upper town contains several good houses of rich proprietors of the province; while the lower portion is unhealthy.
    0
    0
  • The county buildings, designed after the temple of Isis in Rome, accommodate the circuit and provincial courts and various local authorities.
    0
    0
  • By Isolda, granddaughter of Robert de Cardinan, the town was given to Richard, king of the Romans, who in the third year of his reign granted to the burgesses a gild merchant sac and soc, toll, team and infangenethef, freedom from pontage, lastage, &c., throughout Cornwall, and exemption from the jurisdiction of the hundred and county courts, also a yearly fair and a weekly market.
    0
    0
  • In 1609 a charter of incorporation provided for a mayor, recorder, six capital burgesses and seventeen assistants and courts of record and pie powder.
    0
    0
  • This interruption, due to the practical prohibition of the industry by the United States courts, on the ground that it was injuring, through the deposit of tailings, agricultural lands and navigable streams, was lessened, though not entirely removed, by compromises and regulations which permit, under certain restrictions, the renewed exploitation of the ancient river-beds by the hydraulic method.
    0
    0
  • The chief officer of this, as of other forests, was the justice in eyre who held the justice seat, the highest forest court and the only court of record capable of entering and executing judgments on offenders; the lower courts were the Swainmote and Wodemote, the former of which is still held, in a modified form, in the Verderers' Hall of the King's House at Lyndhurst.
    0
    0
  • Latin was the language of the courts till 1784, and was not ceppletely supplanted by Italian till 1815.
    0
    0
  • An order in council (1899) making English the language of the courts after fifteen years (by which the Maltese would have obtained the right to be tried in English) was promulgated at a time when the system of taxation was also being revised; henceforth agitation in favour of Italian and against taxation attained proportions unpleasant for those who preferred popularity to reform and progress.
    0
    0
  • If the bishop rejects the clerk within that time he is liable to a duplex querela in the ecclesiastical courts, or to a quare impedit in the common law courts, and the bishop must then certify the reasons of his refusal.
    0
    0
  • The Tour Hautefeuille (a keep of the 11th century) is the principal relic of a château of the counts of Champagne; the rest of the site is occupied by the law courts.
    0
    0
  • After the accession of the Whigs to office in 1832 he held various important offices in the ministry, and most of the measures of reform for Scotland, such as burgh reform, the improvements in the law of entail, and the reform of the sheriff courts, owed much to his sagacity and energy.
    0
    0
  • The ordinary law courts are under the control of the ministry of justice, but in accordance with the extra-territorial rights enjoyed by foreign powers in Siam, each consulate has attached to it a court, having jurisdiction in all cases in which a subject of the power represented by such consulate is defendant.
    0
    0
  • The third, Gabriel Espinosa, was a man of some education,, whose adherents included members of the Austrian and Spanish courts and of the Society of Jesus in Portugal.
    0
    0
  • Remarkable among the other old buildings are the town-hall, of the 14th century and restored in the 17th century, with a crypt, and the Petershof, formerly the episcopal palace, but now utilized as law courts and a prison.
    0
    0
  • His financial situation was desperate, and his life was chiefly occupied in begging at European courts.
    0
    0
  • A certain number of them hold courts of chancery, general sessions, oyer and terminer, and an orphans' court; the six together constitute the supreme court, but the judge from whose decision appeal is made may not hear the appealed case unless the appeal is made at his own instance.
    0
    0
  • There are cantonal courts and two 1 It should be noticed, however, that the Salic law is subordinate to the Nassau family law, which provides for the succession in the case of the complete extinction of males.
    0
    0
  • The judicial system, revised by a constitutional amendment of 1891, consists of a supreme court of three members, elected for a term of six years, with civil jurisdiction only, largely appellate; a court of criminal appeals, of three members, elected for six years, with appellate jurisdiction in criminal cases; courts of civil appeals (number determined by the legislature) of three members each, elected for six years; district courts, each with one judge, elected for four years, with original jurisdiction in the more important civil and criminal (felony) cases and a limited appellate jurisdiction; county and justice of the peace courts with original jurisdiction in misdemeanours and petty civil cases.
    0
    0
  • The district court has general, original and exclusive jurisdiction in all matters civil, criminal and probate not expressly conferred on an inferior court, and may hear appeals from inferior courts, boards or officers.
    0
    0
  • Iowa, having separated from Wisconsin in 1838 on account of lack of courts for judicial relief, the question of applying for admission into the Union as.
    0
    0