Courage sentence examples

courage
  • I know you have the courage to talk to him.

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  • Maybe the last situation was what gave her the courage to speak up when the inheritance tension came back.

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  • His words put courage into every heart.

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  • Finally she worked up the courage and turned on the computer.

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  • One thing led to another and I finally worked up the courage to offer you the job.

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  • "I wish you courage and success," and, pressing Pierre's hand, he went out.

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  • "She let the hawk fly upward from her wide right sleeve," went the song, arousing an involuntary sensation of courage and cheerfulness.

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  • She sipped her coffee reflectively and finally found the courage ask him a question that had been nagging her since his offer.

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  • But no sooner had he left Bagration than his courage failed him.

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  • Was he working up the courage to ask?

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  • He got up the courage and asked me out but when I begged off he acted so devastated I felt like a heel.

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  • Did she have the courage to leave a cushion job and plush apartment?

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  • He had the courage to step forward and take chances, and the ability to persuade others to follow.

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  • That readiness will not weaken in me, but I and Russia have a right to expect from you all the zeal, firmness, and success which your intellect, military talent, and the courage of the troops you command justify us in expecting.

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  • For want of courage and energy see ii.

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  • She'd found courage in a kindred soul.

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  • "Have courage, my boy," said the king.

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  • She met his angry gaze and mustered all the courage she could find.

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  • And you fight with the courage of ten men.

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  • The child was small and somewhat deformed, but of great courage and intelligence.

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  • If Alex had given Brutus something to put him down, it was because he was afraid she didn't have the courage to make that decision.

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  • She gathered all the courage she could find and looked him in the eye.

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  • I was keenly surprised and disappointed years later to learn of their acts of persecution that make us tingle with shame, even while we glory in the courage and energy that gave us our "Country Beautiful."

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  • Certain features - the high physical courage, the impulsive energy, the fervid imagination - stand out clear; beyond that disagreement begins.

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  • Renewed with courage born of desperation, she met his gaze steadily.

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  • She gazed up at him in the dim light, summoning the courage to address a painful subject.

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  • Her courage fled to see him framed in his doorway, as seductive by day as he was by night.

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  • Her courage almost gave out at the idea of walking into the devil's personal hangout.

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  • He again recalled all the details of the victory and his own calm courage during the battle, and feeling reassured he dozed off....

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  • In 1815 he commanded the Dutch and Belgian contingents, and won high commendations for his courage and conduct at the battles of Quatre Bras and Waterloo, at the latter of which he was wounded.

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  • But now Quinn's gone too, so Howie couldn't go back even if he got up his courage to do it!

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  • When she finally found the courage to talk to Alex about the chair, she was surprised to find him unyielding in his decision to keep the chair.

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  • Finally she dragged up the courage to broach the subject.

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  • He declared that "a soldier who fights in the ranks does not require half so much courage as a footpad"--"that honor and religion have never stood in the way of a well-considered and a firm resolve."

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  • When Katie brought the twins over one hot August day, Carmen finally found the courage to bring up the subject.

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  • I look upon England today as an old gentleman who is travelling with a great deal of baggage, trumpery which has accumulated from long housekeeping, which he has not the courage to burn; great trunk, little trunk, bandbox, and bundle.

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  • Sometimes it takes more courage to give a child up than it does to keep it when you don't want it.

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  • Faith and courage were the only things that would get them through this dark hour.

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  • After that Anna Pavlovna led up to the courage and firmness of the King of Prussia, in order to draw Boris into the conversation.

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  • We should impart our courage, and not our despair, our health and ease, and not our disease, and take care that this does not spread by contagion.

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  • With calm courage he returned to his poverty and his favourite studies, and in 1725 published the first edition of the work that forms the basis of his renown, Principii d'una scienza nuova.

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  • Come back, Cadet! he cried angrily; and turning to Denisov, who, showing off his courage, had ridden on to the planks of the bridge:

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  • Angry at him again, she realized she'd been trying to work up the courage to break up with him for weeks.

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  • I could not have done it myself, I should not have had the courage, but it's splendid.

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  • As if testing her courage, it slowly slid down her chest to the swell of her breast.

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  • He was quiet and she finally found the courage to look up at him.

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  • I fell head over heals with the little goat lady who had the courage to get right up into my face and give me what-for about a hen I threw to the fox.

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  • Courage conquest guarantees; Have we not Bagration?

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  • The nomination was brought about by the Cordoba clique, and Roca lacked the moral courage to oppose the decision.

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  • They were quiet for a time, before Jackson summoned the courage to speak.

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  • Her directness and pure courage-- there was no other word for her insubordinate address!-- amazed him.

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  • Courage, courage, my friend!

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  • It seemed to Rostov that Bogdanich was only pretending not to notice him, and that his whole aim now was to test the cadet's courage, so he drew himself up and looked around him merrily; then it seemed to him that Bogdanich rode so near in order to show him his courage.

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  • She did not know how she found the courage, but she looked straight into his handsome face as it came near to her shortsighted eyes.

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  • The "Iliad" tells of almost nothing but war, and one sometimes wearies of the clash of spears and the din of battle; but the "Odyssey" tells of nobler courage--the courage of a soul sore tried, but steadfast to the end.

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  • Then they rose to fight the duel, and I followed the swift thrusts and parries of the swords and the waverings of poor Bob as his courage oozed out at his finger ends.

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  • Officers who approached him with disturbed countenances became calm; soldiers and officers greeted him gaily, grew more cheerful in his presence, and were evidently anxious to display their courage before him.

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  • And yet, for someone who was bold enough to drive up and introduce himself, he was certainly having a hard time working up the courage to ask her to a movie.

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  • She pushed her heels against the door and gazed up at him, her courage gone in the face of such a man.

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  • If she had an ounce of courage, she'd tell him now and get it over with.

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  • He was merciful as a conqueror, stern as a disciplinarian, enterprising and wary as a general; while his courage, loyalty and forbearance seem to have been almost unsullied.

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  • He feared that Bonaparte's genius might outweigh all the courage of the Russian troops, and at the same time could not admit the idea of his hero being disgraced.

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  • I see these men every day go about their business with more or less courage and content, doing more even than they suspect, and perchance better employed than they could have consciously devised.

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  • He lived two hundred years ago, and was famous for his courage in defending his country.

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  • But again the sense that she represented her father and her brother gave her courage, and she boldly began her speech.

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  • Brandishing the pitchfork with renewed courage, she boldly strode to Brutus.

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  • His courage, his bodily strength and size, his skill in the use of weapons, in riding, and in the chase, his speed of foot, his capacity for eating and drinking, his penetrating intellect and his mastery of 22 languages are celebrated to a degree which is almost incredible.

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  • The campaign which followed was a triumph for Selim, whose firmness and courage overcame the pusillanimity and insubordination of the Janissaries.

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  • Duty, honor, courage, selflessness.

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  • He admired Alex for his courage - and he thought Alex might be telling the truth.

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  • I admire your courage.

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  • They have no great physical courage.

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  • The king took courage to dismiss.

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  • Lastly it was the fiery counsels of the dying prophet, accompanied by the acted magic of the arrow shot through the open window, and also of the thrice smitten floor, that gave nerve and courage to Joash, king of Israel, when the armies of Syria pressed heavily on the northern kingdom (2 Kings xiii.

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  • Gibbon was eight-and-thirty when he entered parliament; and the obstacles which even at an earlier period he had not had courage to encounter were hardly likely to be vanquished then.

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  • Unfortunately the new government proved wholly unable either to conduct the struggle with France successfully or to pluck up courage to make a humiliating peacethe only wise course before them.

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  • King Richard, though he had shown such courage and ready resources at Smithfield, was still only a lad of fourteen.

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  • courage under fire in the Gulf.

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  • His personal popularity, too, due partly to his youth and genial manners, was at this time greatly increased by the cool courage he had shown after the dastardly bomb attack made upon him and his young wife, during the wedding procession at Madrid, by the anarchist Matteo Morales.1 Whatever his qualities, the growing entanglement of parliamentary affairs was soon to put them to the test.

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  • When an acute crisis arose out of the refusal of parliament, in 1862, to vote the money required for the reorganization of the army, which the king and Roon had carried through, he was summoned to Berlin; but the king was still unable to make up his mind to appoint him, although he felt that Bismarck was the only man who had the courage and capacity for conducting the struggle with parliament.

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  • courage, if little decision and initiative.

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  • Dean was forced to quiet the persistent instrument before hesitant Janet could muster enough courage to voice her reply.

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  • Jackson closed his eyes tightly in an attempt to summon courage.

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  • He was known to be truthful, upright and God-fearing; if he had neglected his studies it was to devote himself to manly sports and exercises; and in the pursuit of his favourite pastime, bear-hunting, he had already given proofs of the most splendid courage.

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  • This was a grievous blow to William, but his courage did not fail.

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  • But his courage did not fail him, and in his last year, in a public Latin letter, he exhorted his friend John Campanus to maintain freedom of thought in face of the charge of heresy., See Hegler, in Hauck's Realencyklopildie (1899); C. A.

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  • The final engagement, in which the Goths fought with the courage of despair, took place on swampy ground in the Dobrudja near Abritum (Abrittus) or Forum Trebonii and ended in the defeat and death of Decius and his son.

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  • By vigorous measures and inspiriting speeches he restored their courage, though his own heart was nearly failing him, and in his distress he abjured the use of wine, to which he had been addicted.

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  • His plans were foiled by the courage of Arminius and the inability of the Roman exchequer to pay a larger army.

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  • For the time, however, he made a virtue of necessity, and Alexander II., recognizing the wisdom and courage which Gorchakov had exhibited, appointed him minister of foreign affairs in place of Count Nesselrode.

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  • They have been called the Britons of the south, and their courage in defending their country and their intelligence amply justify the compliment.

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  • such enthusiastic devotees of Yahweh, in days when religion meant patriotism, did much to keep alive the flame of Israel's hope and courage in the dark period of national disaster.

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  • She had regarded the prospect of death with courage and almost with levity, laughing heartily as she put her hands about her "little neck" and recalled the skill of the executioner.

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  • It was a work of superb courage.

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  • Under the belief that they were now led by a messenger from heaven, the Dauphinois fought with a fiery courage that they had never before displayed.

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  • admiration for the courage of the bomb squad.

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  • One is the approach of pure nonviolence, which cannot readily or easily attract large masses, for it requires extraordinary discipline and courage.

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  • The Courage Consort is the new novella from the acclaimed and best selling author of The Crimson Petal and The White.

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  • The passion for wealth gives a kind of spurious courage to face obloquy.

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  • That's why I've recently had greater courage to become more outspoken on this particular issue.

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  • With characteristic courage and independence, next year, when the Revolution had spent its force and Beust executed his coup d'etat, he protested, with many of his colleagues, against this act.

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  • Its men were noted for their courage in war, and its women for their beauty.

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  • His life of ostentatious austerity, and the courage with which he met his death, had caused all his faults to be forgotten.

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  • The headlong courage which he showed at Lewes, his first battle, was soon tempered by caution, and already ~n.

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  • he was popular with his subjects, who pardoned him much in consideration of his knightly virtues, his courage, his ready courtesy and his love of adventure.

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  • outwitting an enemy, and showing courage in the face of hardship and danger.

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  • Hopefully, Chesnutt's new paymasters will have the courage to stick with him, to indulge him, even.

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  • The Maoris ate their enemies' hearts to gain their courage, but to whatever degree animistic beliefs may have once contributed to their cannibalism, it is certain that long before Captain Cook's visit religious sanction for the custom had long given place to mere gluttonous enjoyment.

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  • His courage amounted almost to recklessness.

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  • heroism on the part of the masses or courage on the part of individual revolutionists.

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  • He died at his home at Blechingdon in Oxfordshire on the 26th of April 1686, closing a career marked by great ability, statesmanship and business capacity, and by conspicuous courage and independence of judgment.

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  • The Marsi were a hardy mountain people, famed for their simple habits and indomitable courage.

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  • But in England, France and Germany persecution altogether failed to shake the courage of the Jews, and martyrdom was borne in preference to ostensible apostasy.

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  • 5-9 do not arise necessarily from motives of revenge; a young and untried sovereign could not courage which enabled him to hold an even and noble course in the face of dangers and treachery.

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  • 27 he had the courage to sign the Treaty of Neuilly on behalf of his country.

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  • Their chief man of action was a sturdy Breton peasant, Georges Cadoudal, whose zeal and courage served to bring to a head plans long talked over by the confidants of the Comte d'Artois (the future Charles X.

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  • Since his arrest the courage of Camille had miserably failed.

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  • In his last number, the seventh, which his publisher refused to print, he had dared to attack even Robespierre, but at his trial it was found that he was devoid of physical courage.

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  • He was remarkable for both his moral and physical courage, and in politics was notable for his independence of party.

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  • Two years later, with that degree of moral courage which was one of his distinguishing characteristics, as it has been of his descendants, he, aided by Josiah Quincy, Jr., defended the British soldiers who were arrested after the "Boston Massacre," charged with causing the death of four persons, inhabitants of the colony.

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  • Then one or two tactical blunders were committed; and the tsar, taking courage, enveloped the little band in a vast semicircle bristling with the most modern guns, which fired five times to the Swedes' once, and swept away the guards before they could draw their swords.

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  • But, as Darius said, nobody had the courage to oppose the new king, who ruled for seven months over the whole empire.

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  • He had, however, the courage to act up to his own professions in collocating the rollers (Coracias) with the beeeaters (Merops), and had the sagacity to surmise that Menura was not a Gallinaceous bird.

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  • For the rest his classification demands no particular remark; but that in a work of this kind he had the courage to recognize, for instance, such a fact as the essential difference between swallows and swifts lifts him considerably above the crowd of other ornithological writers of his time.

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  • Venice was placed under interdict (1606), but she asserted the rights of temporal sovereigns with a courage which was successful and won for her the esteem and approval of most European sovereigns.

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  • He showed courage on the field of battle, both in Italy and Spain, during the War of the Spanish Succession, and was flattered by his courtiers with the title of El Animoso, or the spirited.

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  • The courage of the Romans, however, soon overcame such fears; the Britons were put to flight; and the groves of Mona, the scene of many a sacrifice and bloody rite, were cut down.

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  • It was chiefly owing to his skill and courage as a parliamentary debater and his tact as a leader that the party held its own and constantly increased in numbers during the great struggle with the Prussian government.

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  • They brought with them youth, hope and courage, as well as a little money, and at once entered into business.

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  • He was helped of course by his sound education; but the true cause of his success lay in his strong sense, untiring industry, courage, clear-sightedness and great intellectual force.

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  • Almost his last public act was a speech, on the 24th of April 1844, in New York City, against the annexation of Texas; and in his eighty-fourth year he confronted a howling New York mob with the same cool, unflinching courage which he had displayed half a century before when he faced the armed frontiersmen of Redstone Old Fort.

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  • He stood, with Jefferson and Madison, at the head of his party, and won his place by force of character, courage, application and intellectual power.

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  • As soon as he had learnt the elements of reading and writing, he was sent as a page to the court of Ferdinand and Isabella; afterwards, until his twenty-sixth year, he took service with Antonio Maurique, duke of Nagera, and followed the career of arms. He was free in his relations with women, gambled and fought; but he also gave indications of that courage, constancy and prudence which marked his after life.

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  • In some districts the young men and boys sleep in the skull-chambers, in order that they may be inspired with courage.

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  • On the approach of misfortune, however, she showed great courage and fortitude.

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  • He had constant encounters with the mob, but his tact and courage never failed.

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  • He had no knowledge of the world or of men; he trusted every one with child-like simplicity; except personal courage he had none of the qualities essential to leadership in such an enterprise as armed rebellion.

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  • This is really an accretion of undetermined liabilities which has been indefinitely, and probably alternately, advancing and receding for a great number of years, and which no previous minister of finance, or Turkish government, had the courage to face.

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  • These belong to the new or European school, which, in spite of the bitter opposition of the partisans of the old Oriental system, has succeeded, partly through its own inherent superiority and partly through the talents and courage of its supporters, in expelling its rival from the position of undisputed authority which it had occupied for upwards of five hundred years.

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  • On the other hand, the Russians, once their fatherland was invaded, became dominated by an ever-growing spirit of fanaticism, and they were by nature too obedient to their natural leaders, and too well inured to the hardships of campaigning, to lose their courage in a retreat.

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  • Thus, in the last great battle of the war, the courage and resolution of the soldiers of the Peninsular army were conspicuously illustrated.

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  • During the crisis preceding the 9th Thermidor, Couthon showed considerable courage, giving up a journey to Auvergne in order, as he wrote, that he might either die or triumph with Robespierre and liberty.

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  • Unusual courage and self-reliance were necessary for success.

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  • The want of courage and self-reliance, the deficiency in truth and honesty sometimes noticed in connexion with them, are doubtless due to long servitude under an unsympathetic government.

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  • 427) take these to be Prudence, Courage (or Fortitude), Temperance and Justice.

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  • He was the first to recognize the insufficiency and the unreliability of the feudal levies, the first to employ a regular army on a large scale, the first to depend more upon strategy and tactics than upon mere courage.

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  • Waddington) was one that well illustrated his moral courage.

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  • He was a fighter through and through, and his courage was superb; but he was indiscreet in utterance, impolitic in management, opinionated, self-confident, and uncompromising in nature and methods.

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  • But Hamilton faced the necessity of revealing the true state of things with conspicuous courage, and the scandal only reacted on his accusers.

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  • 6 After the Democratic victory of 1800, his letters, full of retrospective judgments and interesting outlooks, are but rarely relieved in their sombre pessimism by flashes of hope and courage.

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  • A firm will, tireless energy, aggressive courage and bold self-confidence were its leading qualities; the word " intensity " perhaps best sums up his character.

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  • xxvii., p. 565-571) says: " We may admire, and for my own part I do very much admire General Gordon's personal courage, his disinterestedness and his chivalrous feeling in favour of the beleaguered garrisons, but admiration of these qualities is no sufficient plea against a condemnation of his conduct on the ground that it was quixotic. In his last letter to his sister, dated December 14, 1884, he wrote: ` I am quite happy, thank God, and, like Lawrence, I have tried to do my duty '.

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  • In fact, except personal courage, great fertility in military resource, a lively though sometimes ill-directed repugnance to injustice, oppression and meanness of every description, and a considerable power of acquiring influence over those, necessarily limited in numbers, with whom he was brought into personal contact, General Gordon does not appear to have possessed any of the qualities which would have fitted him to undertake the difficult task he had in hand."

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  • He was a soldier of infinite personal courage and daring, of striking military energy, initiative and resource; a high, pure and single character, dwelling much in the region of the unseen.

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  • His presence gave her courage to descend the last few steps.

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  • For some reason, that gave her the courage to continue.

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  • Because they'd like to be out there running free just like you, only they don't have the courage to do it, so they try to put you down.

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  • Sunny found her courage and emerged from the bedroom a short time later, meowing as she stood on her thigh, staring at her.

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  • He had the courage to step forward and take chances, and the ability to persuade her to follow.

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  • Mother Courage is translated and adapted by Oladipo Agboluaje has the full and enthusiastic backing of the Brecht Estate.

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  • It needs to reflect a sense of putting courage into someone's heart; of fortifying someone by standing back-to-back with them through trials.

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  • behaved with great dignity and courage throughout the trial, which took place at Westminster Hall.

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  • canoe slalom is one of the most spectacular watersports, demanding skill, stamina and courage.

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  • His description of the courage and despair of his fellow captives is very compelling.

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  • Only the black caucus in the House of Representatives has had the courage to openly protest, but to no avail.

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  • face the challenge with courage believe within the disaster there is a door that opens up a vista never yet known.

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  • Showing unusual courage, he made speeches advocating civil disobedience in opposition to the United States ' war effort in Vietnam.

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  • The Alliance acknowledges the desire of Courage to remain within the evangelical constituency and their desire for evangelical unity.

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  • However, central and local government should have more courage in their convictions to support plans which are environmentally acceptable and socially constructive.

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  • The courage of the early martyrs gave courage of the early martyrs gave courage to others.

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  • The Rock was held only by the indomitable courage of its garrison.

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  • In the eyes of Italians he is a hero who sacrificed his life with selfless courage.

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  • Then he went back to Mercy Bay with undaunted courage, to pass a third winter.

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  • moral courage will not rise to such a height.

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  • courage in face of pitiless terror.

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  • Maybe he will be able to get to the Courage meetings held twice monthly in London.

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  • muster the courage to read the book anyway.

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  • muster up the courage to open that Registry.

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  • mythic tale of courage, says Director Terry George.

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  • Second, have the occasional courage to tell the big nob: " You are wrong.

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  • It does take courage, and it takes perseverance.

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  • Weak- kneed, he passed a trembling hand over his incredulous eyes; with the courage of despair, he feebly pinched himself.

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  • I finally plucked up courage to go out to the Free Church prayer meeting on the Wednesday night.

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  • But, as more and more of my friends started wearing them, I eventually plucked up the courage to try them myself.

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  • plucked up the courage to write to him.

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  • But then I realized that the final act was much more contemplative, having the courage to examine the ramifications of that event.

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  • steadfast courage, his calm continual self-control.

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  • stoke up my courage a little by getting tight at a cocktail party, earlier on in the evening.

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  • summoned the courage to ask him where I knew him from.

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  • summon up the courage to talk to someone about debt or money issues.

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  • The business arena provides the opportunity to practice all the Aristotelian virtues -- including temperance, justice, courage and magnanimity.

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  • So when I came back to England I screwed up my courage and decided to become a class traitor and vote Labor.

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  • tremendous courage and bravery.

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  • true meaning of family - and give her the courage to follow her dream.

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  • unbelievable feats of courage.

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  • However, the courage of Hatteras was still undaunted.

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  • undaunted courage, to pass a third winter.

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  • underhand methods of a Government lacking moral courage.

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  • unflinching courage is a miracle of grace in itself.

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  • unselfish acts of courage are a testimony to the charge of liberty.

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  • Richard Cumberland, who was struck by the "Polish magnificence" of the primate, speaks in the highest terms of his courage, tact, and qualities as a popular leader.

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  • It has been said that he showed a want of personal courage; this is not improbable, the excess of feeling which made him so great an orator could hardly be combined with the coolness in danger required of a soldier; but no one was able, as he was, to infuse courage into others.

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  • Francois le champi and La Petite Fadette are of no less exquisite workmanship. Les Maitres sonneurs (1853) - the favourite novel of Sir Leslie Stephen - brings the series of village novels to a close, but as closely akin to them must be mentioned the Contes d'une grande-mere, delightful fairy tales of the Talking Oak, Wings of Courage and Queen Coax, told to her grandchildren in the last years of her life.

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  • His son, Count Otto VI., who succeeded his father in 1155, accompanied the German king, Frederick I., to Italy in 1154, where he distinguished himself by his courage, and later rendered valuable assistance to Frederick in Germany.

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  • Belisarius remained at Constantinople in tranquil retirement until 559, when an incursion of Bulgarian savages spread a panic through the metropolis, and men's eyes were once more turned towards the neglected veteran, who placed himself at the head of a mixed multitude of peasants and soldiers, and repelled the barbarians with his wonted courage and adroitness.

    1
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  • Others report that, feeling himself powerless to scatter the gathered clouds, and aware of his physical feebleness, he had had the moral courage to pass in the eyes of his family, which he did not wish to afflict, as the dupe of the efforts they employed to conceal the truth from him.

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  • He set duty above everything, had in the highest degree a reverence for honour, and placed his indomitable courage at the service of everything that was beneficial with an abnegation that nothing could tire.

    1
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  • g g and she filled the difficult post for eight years with great ability, courage and tact; and when Charles at the age, of fifteen assumed the government he found the Netherlands thriving and prosperous.

    1
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  • Nevertheless Magliani, who succeeded Seismit Doda, had neither the perspicacity nor the courage to resist the abolition of the grist tax.

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  • His absolution followed, and then he took courage.

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  • Verus, originally a man of considerable courage and ability, was sent to oppose the Parthians, but gave himself up to sensual excesses, and the Roman cause in Armenia would have been lost, and the empire itself, perhaps, imperilled, had not Verus had under him able generals, 2 the chief of whom was Avidius Cassius (see Cassius, AvIDius).

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    0
  • In the panic of the " Popish Plot " in 1678 he exhibited a saner judgment than most of his contemporaries and a conspicuous courage.

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  • DIONYSIUS (c. 432-367 B.C.), tyrant of Syracuse, began life as a clerk in a public office, but by courage and diplomacy succeeded in making himself supreme (see Syracuse).

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  • Even now he would listen to no offers of compromise, and after defending Stralsund with desperate courage till it was a mere rubbish heap, returned to Sweden after an absence of 14 years.

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  • They constituted his real fighting force, and to their fanatical courage his victories were due.

    1
    1
  • Courage is their only good quality."

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  • Courage, my dear fellow.

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    1
  • This perilous expedition, a monumental instance of courage and loyalty, had no substantial result.

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    1
  • he showed great courage.

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    1
  • He possessed courage, justice and frankness.

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    1
  • His courage at the battle of Mons-en-Pevele was the admiration of friend and foe alike.

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    1
  • As a soldier, Sheridan combined brilliant courage and painstaking skill.

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    1
  • He was prepared to face the death which he expected; but his courage, a rare quality at that time, won the day, and the hubbub subsided in cries of "Let Gregoire have his way!"

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    1
  • Whatever may be thought of the affaire itself, there can be no question of Zola's superb courage and disinterestedness.

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    1
  • Only his arrogance and procrastination and Marys own courage saved her throne.

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    1
  • In the autumn the courage of the troops and the arrival of reinforcements gradually restored the British cause.

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    1
  • He now devoted himself mainly to the study of criminal law, and in 1818 published La Justice criminelle en France, in which with great courage he attacked the special tribunals, provosts' courts or military commissions which were the main instruments of the Reaction, and advocated a return to the old common law and trial by jury.

    1
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  • His courage, as well as his moderation, was again displayed during the revolution of 1830, when, as president of the parliamentary commission for the trial of the ministers of Charles X., he braved the fury of the mob and secured a sentence of imprisonment in place of the death penalty for which they clamoured.

    1
    1
  • And Burke exhibited considerable courage in writing it; for many of its maxims seem to involve a contradiction, first, to the principles on which he withstood the movement in France, and second, to his attitude upon the subject of parliamentary reform.

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    1
  • Nature, indeed, cannot relieve men of their duty to be wise and brave, but, in the marvellous configuration of land and sea about Constantinople, nature has done her utmost to enable human skill and courage to establish there the splendid and stable throne of a great empire.

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    1
  • The while he did so sedition took courage and flourished exceedingly, so that to pacify Ireland the constable went hand in hand with the legislator.

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    1
  • The student of his life understands that Disraeli's claim to remembrance rests not only on the breadth of his views, his deep insight, his long foresight, but even more on the courage which allowed him to declare opinions supplied from those qualities when there was no visible likelihood of their justification by experience, and therefore when their natural fate was to be slighted.

    1
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  • With passive courage Louis refrained from making any promise to the insurgents.

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    1
  • Lyons, where the Royalists were strong, defended itself with courage, for the trial and execution of Challier made the townsmen hopeless of pardon.

    1
    1
  • Then the oppressed nation took courage and began to demand pardon for the innocent and even justice upon murderers.

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  • His courage and resolution averted what nearly became a terrible catastrophe.

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  • Whatever Le Bon's offences, his condemnation was to a great extent due to the violent attacks of one of his political enemies, Armand Guffroy; and it is only just to remember that it was owing to his courage that Cambrai was saved from falling.

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    1
  • The successful issue of the Moscow riots was the occasion of disquieting disturbances all over the tsardom culminating in dangerous rebellions at Pskov and Great Novgorod, with which the government was so unable to cope that they surrendered, practically granting the malcontents their own terms. One man only had displayed equal tact and courage at Great Novgorod, the metropolitan Nikon, who in consequence became in 1651 the tsar's chief minister.

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  • Wisdom will necessarily maintain orderly activity, and this latter consists in regulation by wisdom, while the two more special virtues of Courage (avbpeia) and Temperance (6cwcpotruvf) are only different sides or aspects of this wisely regulated action of the complex soul.

    1
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  • Then, in arranging the other special virtues, he begins with courage and temperance, which (after Plato) he considers as the excellences of the " irrational element " of the soul.

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  • Among them are the sagas of Thorgils and Haflidi (I118-1121), the feud and peacemaking of two great chiefs, contemporaries of Ari; of Sturla (1150-1183), the founder of the great Sturlung family, down to the settlement of his great lawsuit by Jon Loptsson, who thereupon took his son Snorri the historian to fosterage, - a humorous story but with traces of the decadence about it, and glimpses of the evil days that were to come; of the Onundar-brennusaga (1185-1200), a tale of feud and fire-raising in the north of the island, the hero of which, Gudmund Dyri, goes at last into a cloister; of Hrafn Sveinbiornsson (1190-1213), the noblest Icelander of his day, warrior, leech, seaman, craftsman, poet and chief, whose life at home, travels and pilgrimages abroad (Hrafn was one of the first to visit Becket's shrine), and death at the hands of a foe whom he had twice spared, are recounted by a loving friend in pious memory of his virtues, c. 1220; of Aron Hiorleifsson (1200-1255), a man whose strength, courage and adventures befit rather a henchman of Olaf Tryggvason than one of King Haakon's thanes (the beginning of the feuds that rise round Bishop Gudmund are told here), of the Svinefell-men (1248-1252), a pitiful story of a family feud in the far east of Iceland.

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  • He had the courage to censure the September massacres and to vote for the imprisonment only, and not for the death, of Louis XVI.

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  • I), and his tireless energy, unfaltering courage and strategic ability made him an officer of no mean order.

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  • At the end of a year La Barre was replaced by the marquis de Denonville, a man of ability and courage, who, though he showed some vigour in marching against the western Iroquois tribes, angered rather than intimidated them, and the massacre of Lachine (5th of August 1689) must be regarded as one of the unhappy results of his administration.

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    1
  • The old warrior endured the fatigue of the march as well as the youngest soldier, and for his courage and prowess he received the cross of St Louis.

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  • Brasidas united in himself the personal courage characteristic of Sparta with those virtues in which the typical Spartan was most signally lacking.

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  • dinand IV.), whose long minority was an anarchy, tempered by the courage and the tact of his mother, Maria de Molina.

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  • Unfortunately the insurgents displayed less political ability than military courage.

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  • 1843 Espartero, a man of much personal courage and of fitful energy, but of no political capacity, was expelled by a military rising, promoted by a combination of discontented Liberals and the Moderates.

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  • It was no wonder that the death of a king who had shown so much capacity for rule, so much unselfish energy and courage, Regency ~ and so many amiable personal qualities, should Queen have made Spaniards and foreigners extremely Christina.

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  • Two months before (March 1013) King Alphonso, with characteristic courage, had paid a surprise visit to Barcelona, and the general enthusiasm of his reception seemed to prove that the disaffection was less widespread or deep than had been supposed.

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  • The unbruised oats develop a spirit and courage in either a saddle or harness horse that no other food can.

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  • It had taken her two days to work up the courage to walk alone into what appeared to be the rear wall but was really a mirage disguising a grey bathroom with a clothing unit in the corner.

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  • She turned right into the first corridor, urging her courage not to falter just yet.

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  • With adversity you can feel stronger and face any of life's adversities with renewed courage which will make your life easier.

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    1
  • In this sense, fortitude is a special virtue; it is the virtue of courage in adversity.

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  • With courage and dogged perseverance, the Catholic faith was kept alive during the years of persecution.

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  • admirable inner courage and strength.

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  • admire the courage and drive of the younger generation.

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  • In 1961, the firm amalgamated with Courage's, who in 1972 were taken over by Imperial.

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  • Flippo makes a great antihero: he doesn't like who he's become but can't muster the courage to make a change.

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  • hesitated for a long time and had no courage to do it.

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  • Wherever has one seen such impudence or such courage?

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  • indomitable courage of his race.

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    1
  • He kept his father's sheep in the desert steppes of Judah, and there developed the strength, agility, endurance and courage which distinguished him throughout life (cf.

    1
    1
  • They would have been wise to accept the agreement; but with obstinate and misplaced courage they refused to acknowledge Charles as king of France, or to give up to him the capital.

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    2
  • When war broke out, October 1899, Milner rendered the military authorities "unfailing support and wise counsels," being, in Lord Roberts's phrase "one whose courage never faltered."

    0
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  • His courage and dignity during his trial and on the scaffold has left him a better reputation than he deserves.

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  • Fortunately Frederick had never been deficient in courage.

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  • Courage, watchfulness, striving for purity, were all necessary in the incessant combat with the forces of evil.

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  • His proposals came to nothing, but he continued the struggle at a series of diets, and urged the Germans to emulate the courage and union of the Swiss cantons.

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  • Sustained by their enthusiasm, however, the recruits displayed equal courage, and, at the end of four hours' stubborn fighting, their defence was still intact.

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  • in Siena gave fresh courage to the malcontents, who, backed by the imperial authority, overthrew the government of the nine and substituted a magistracy of twelve drawn from the lowest class.

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  • The alliance was cemented in July by a military demonstration, of which Jellachich was the hero, at Vienna; as the result of which the government mustered up courage to declare publicly that the basis of the Austrian state was " the recognition of the equal rights of all nationalities."

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  • When the cathedral chapter found courage to oppose this and opened suit to recover the ecclesiastical revenues for ecclesiastical purposes, Richelieu's mother proposed to make her second son, Alphonse, bishop. He defeated this scheme, however, by becoming a monk of the Grande Chartreuse, and Armand, whose health was rather feeble in any case for a military career, was induced to propose himself for the priesthood.

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  • His courage was mingled with a mean sort of cunning, and his ambition loved the outward trappings of power as well as its reality; yet he never swerved from his.

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  • The rebels now handled their bows in a menacing fashion, but at the critical moment the young king with great presence of mind and courage spurred his horse into the open, crying, "Sirs, will you shoot your king?

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  • As a ruler of the Church he showed wisdom and courage, and disregarded any effort to influence his policy by clamour.

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  • Subsequently he served in the French army under Turenne, and in the Spanish under Conde, and was applauded by both commanders for his brilliant personal courage.

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    0
  • These achievements won him a reputation for high courage, which, until the close of 1688, was amply deserved.

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  • At the end of 1688 James seemed to have lost his old courage.

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  • The Syracusans had been at first thoroughly cowed; but they were cowed no longer, and they even plucked up courage to sally out and fight the enemy on the high ground of Epipolae.

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  • Nathaniel Hodges of London (1629-1688) in 1665 seems to have been the first who had the courage to make a post mortem inspection of a plague patient.

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  • No one shows truer courage, not marred by irreverence, in confronting the great problems of human destiny, or greater strength in triumphing over human weakness.

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  • His brilliant personal courage, his amiability and his loyalty to the cause make him a very attractive figure, but a commander-in-chief of the Vendeans, who came and went as they pleased, had little real power or opportunity to display the qualities of a general.

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  • A coat-of-arms was given to the inhabitants by Ladislaus for their courage during the storming of Milan; and the place is mentioned as a royal town under Ottokar II.

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  • Long and patient efforts have been made to decipher this script, ever since it was first restored to our knowledge; and among the would-be decipherers honourable mention must be made, for persistence and courage, of Professor A.

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  • Again the heavens had opened and the divine teaching come to mankind, no longer merely in books bearing the names of ancient patriarchs, but on the lips of living men, who had taken courage to appear in person as God's messengers before His people.

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  • All this decreased Savonarola's popularity to some extent, but the enemy having been beaten at Leghorn and the league being apparently on the point of breaking up, the Florentines took courage and the friar's party was once more in the ascendant.

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  • For six months the siege went on with varying fortune, but at last the courage and determination of Ibrahim triumphed, and on the 9th of September, after a heroic resistance, Abdallah, with a remnant of four hundred men, was compelled to surrender.

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  • At this time, Isvolsky displayed great physical courage in that he went about St.

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  • i t I l ion), a term specially applied to warriors of extraordinary strength and courage, and generally to all who were distinguished from their fellows by superior moral, physical or intellectual qualities.

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  • Gawain (Welwain, Welsh Gwalchmai), Arthur's nephew, who in medieval romance remains the type of knightly courage and chivalry, until his character is degraded in order to exalt that of Lancelot.

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  • Porsena then laid siege to the city, but was so struck by the courage of Mucius Scaevola that he made peace on condition that the Romans restored the land they had taken from Veii and gave him twenty hostages.

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  • Lord Hartington soon found himself pushed aside from his position of titular leadership. For four years, from 1876 to 1880, Gladstone maintained the strife with a courage, a persistence and a versatility which raised the enthusiasm of his followers to the highest pitch.

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  • No dangers were too threatening for him to face, no obstacles too formidable,no tasks too laborious, no heights too steep. The love of power and the supporting courage were allied with a marked imperiousness.

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  • For the rest, frugality, industry and patience characteffize all the bread-winners; courage and burning patriotism are attributes of the whole nation.

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  • Unfortunately, even he had not all the courage of his creed, and while he would paint a bird or a fish with perfect realism, he no more dared to trust his eyes in larger motives than did the most devout follower of ShUbun or Motonobu.

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  • He was a devout and conscientious churchman, and had the courage to stand by his principles.

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  • While we recognize in the De Rerum Natura some of the most powerful poetry in any language and feel that few poets have penetrated with such passionate sincerity and courage into the secret of nature and some of the deeper truths of human life, we must acknowledge that, as compared with the great didactic poem of Virgil, it is crude and unformed in artistic design, and often rough and unequal in artistic execution.

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  • At Rome and Carthage, and in all other places where sincere Montanists were found, they were confronted by the imposing edifice of the Catholic Church, and they had neither the courage nor the inclination to undermine her sacred foundations.

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  • Towards the close of the 18th and in the early part of the 9th century, the state was subject to a series of spoliations by Sindia and Holkar, and was only preserved from destruction by the talents and courage of the adoptive mother of the fifth raja.

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  • In his youth Casimir was considered frivolous and licentious; while his sudden flight from the field of Plowce, the scene of his father's great victory over the Teutonic knights, argued but poorly for his personal courage.

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  • War was declared in 1690, but at the battle of Staffarda (18th of August 1691), Victor, in spite of his great courage and skill, was defeated by the French under Catinat.

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  • But the pursuit of the English fleet was feeble, and the retreat of the Dutch was ably covered by Cornelius van Tromp, son of Martin Tromp. Much scandal was caused by the mysterious circumstances in which an order to shorten sail was given in the English flagship, and doubts were expressed of the courage of the duke of York.

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  • He had the courage also to reform the games, in spite of all the traditions of the playing fields.

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  • Somewhere, in actual life, the stress of craft and courage acting on the springs of human vice and weakness fails, unless the hero of the comedy or tragedy, Callimaco or Cesare, allows for the revolt of healthier instincts.

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  • During all these events and the captivity in the Temple Marie Antoinette showed an unvarying courage and dignity, in spite of her failing health and the illness of her son.

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    0
  • With calm dignity and unflinching courage he met his fate and crowned a noble life with an heroic death.

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    0
  • The impeached ministers were, indeed, saved by the courage of the Chamber of Peers and the attitude of the National Guard; but their safety was bought at the price of Laffitte's popularity.

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    0
  • Moreover, there gradually developed a group of radicals who were convinced that Luther had not the courage of his convictions.

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  • It had previously narrowly escaped absorption by Napoleon, who passed through the town during the pursuit of the Prussians after the battle of Jena in 1806, and was only dissuaded from abolishing the duchy by the tact and courage of the duchess Louisa.

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    0
  • His endeavours to allay ecclesiastical panic, and to promote liberality of spirit, frequently required no ordinary moral courage.

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    0
  • The priest may not indeed himself have believed them, but he probably feared their effect on the moral courage of the people.

    0
    0
  • The 6th is related to degrees of courage, resolution, rashness or timidity; the 7th indicates sensitiveness, morality, good conduct, or immorality, overbearing temper and self-will.

    0
    0
  • Manjuyama, thanks to the courage of the army commander and of a single brigadier, was at last carried after nightfall, and the dislodged Russians made two counter-attacks in the dark before they would acknowledge themselves beaten.

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  • attention for its vigour and courage advocated the nomination of Senator George F.

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  • He was taken from the Federal service in Washington to New York City by a reform mayor and put in charge of the police, because he had shown both physical and moral courage in fighting corruption of all sorts; and the New York police force at that time was thoroughly tainted with corruption, not in its rank and file, but among its superior officers, who used the power in their hands to extort money bribes chiefly from saloonkeepers, liquor-dealers, gamblers and prostitutes.

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    0
  • By personal detective work, that is, by visiting police stations at unexpected times and by making the rounds at night of disorderly places which were suspected of violating the law, he not only displayed personal courage in positions of some danger, but aroused public opinion.

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    0
  • His personal courage and extreme affability made him highly popular among the lower orders, but he showed himself quite incapable of taking advantage permanently of the revival of the national energy, and the extraordinary overflow of native middle-class talent, which were the immediate consequences of the revolution of 1660.

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    0
  • He was present at the battle of Assaye, and displayed such courage and knowledge of tactics throughout the whole campaign that Wellesley told him he had mistaken his profession, and that he ought to have been a soldier.

    0
    0
  • But the queen faced the new situation with her usual courage, devotion and strength of will.

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    0
  • But neither his courage nor his industry forsook him; and he found, in opposing the new views of his old colleague, ample scope for both voice and pen; and as a member of the House of Lords he continued almost to the last to take part in hearing and deciding appeals, and sometimes in the ordinary business of the House.

    0
    0
  • His conduct at the battle of the Alma occasioned imputations upon his personal courage, but they seem to have been entirely groundless.

    0
    0
  • On the ground that after the virtues of courage and valour and fearlessness have been taught in the lower stages of evolution, the virtue of gentle humane ness and extended sympathy for all that can suffer should be taught in the higher cycles of the evolutionary spiral.

    0
    0
  • Miaoulis, for all his high character and courage, was often unable to prevent his captains from sailing home at critical moments, when pay or booty failed.

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  • In these straits the Greek government entrusted the supreme command of the troops to Karaiskakis, an old retainer of Ali of Iannina, a master of the art of guerilla war, and, above all, a man of dauntless courage and devoted patriotism.

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  • The garrison of the Acropolis was hard pressed, and the death of Gouras (October 13th) would have ended all, had not his heroic wife taken over the command and inspired the defenders with new courage.

    0
    0
  • Against the determination to secure a conviction, however, his courage, eloquence, coolness and skill were of no avail, and the verdict of " guilty " was given.

    0
    0
  • But his courage, though impugned, was sufficient to make him press for a court-martial, and a court at last assembled in 1760.

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    0
  • In the same year his coolness and courage in a duel with Captain George Johnstone, M.P., assisted to rehabilitate him, and in 1775, having meantime taken an active part in politics, he became secretary of state for the colonies in the North cabinet.

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    0
  • They met death with great courage, singing the refrain "Plutot la mort que l'esclavage !"

    0
    0
  • Both were men of courage and activity, and the two men are often confused in the chansons de geste.

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  • The incapacity of these officers, notwithstanding the splendid courage of their men, resulted in the total destruction of Baillie's force of 2800 (September the loth, 1780).

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    0
  • His career was distinguished by uprightness, by piety, by a devotion to duty, by courage and consistency.

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    0
  • In 1838 the French government made an attack on the town, and Santa-Anna, by a display of his redeeming virtue of personal courage, lost a leg but regained his influence.

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    0
  • Hence the aim of education was to make young people thoroughly " Greek," to fill them with the " Greek " spirit, with courage and keenness in the quest of truth, and with a devotion to all that was beautiful.

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    0
  • There is no doubt that he saw which way the wind was blowing, and disliked Northumberland's scheme; but he had not the courage to resist the duke to his face.

    0
    0
  • Such interventions with an Eastern king demanded great moral courage, for, though to some extent protected by their sacred character, the persons of the prophets were by no means legally inviolable (i Kings xix.

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  • In the dark years that followed it was the indomitable courage of Queen Louise that helped the weak king not to despair of the state.

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  • But with all these drawbacks he conquered and will retain a place in what is perhaps the highest, as it is certainly the smallest, class of statesmen - the class of those to whom their country has had recourse in a great disaster, who have shown in bringing her through that disaster the utmost constancy, courage, devotion and skill, and who have been rewarded by as much success as the occasion permitted.

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  • In 1534 Lord Thomas Fitzgerald, better known as Silken Thomas (so called because of a fantastic fringe worn in the helmet of his followers), a young man of rash courage and good abilities, son of the Lord Deputy Kildare, believing his father, who was imprisoned in the Tower of London, to have been beheaded, organized a rebellion against the English Government, and marched with his followers from the mansion of the earls of Kildare in Thomas Court, through Dame's Gate to St Mary's Abbey, where, in the council chamber, he proclaimed himself a rebel.

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  • Kepler immediately hastened to Wurttemberg, and owing to his indefatigable exertions she was acquitted after having suffered thirteen month's imprisonment, and endured with undaunted courage the formidable ordeal of "territion," or examination under the imminent threat of torture.

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  • He had the Oriental's power of endurance, alternating with violent and emotional courage.

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    0
  • In the general confusion following on Charles Albert's defeat on the Mincio and his retreat to Milan, where the people rose against the unhappy king, Fanti's courage and tact saved the situation.

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    0
  • Few self-taught riders attain to excellence; they may keep a good place in hunting, if possessed of plenty of courage, and mounted on a bold and not too tender-mouthed horse, but they never will be riders in the proper sense of the word.

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    0
  • It was an austere religion, inculcating self-restraint, courage and honesty; it secured peace of conscience through forgiveness of sins, and abated for those who were initiated in its mysteries the superstitious terrors of death and the world to come.

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  • Ten.nessee: all determined in situalion by river highwaysbore witness to the qualities of strength and courage of the American pioneer.

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    0
  • A good governor is apt to use his veto freelyindeed, a frequent exercise of the power is deemed in many states to be a sort of test of the governors judgment and courage.

    0
    0
  • Much depends on the personal qualities of the president and his power of inspiring the people with trust in his courage and his uprightness.

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    0
  • The prominent features of his character seem to have been cunning, ambition and avarice, combined with want of courage and aversion from effort.

    0
    0
  • In office he proved more of an opportunist than his career in opposition would have indicated, but his political courage and personal integrity remained beyond suspicion.

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    0
  • As queen of Prussia she commanded universal respect and affection, and nothing in Prussian history is more pathetic than the dignity and unflinching courage with which she bore the sufferings inflicted on her and her family during the war between Prussia and France.

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    0
  • At the time when the book appeared his method of apologetic showed both courage and originality, but the excellence of the work is impaired by the difficulty of the style.

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  • The absolute integrity and unflinching courage that marked his career were always ungrudgingly admitted by his greatest enemies.

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  • But he refused to advance farther and to put himself resolutely at the head of his party, although warmly acclaimed by it, and courage failing him, he returned to England, settling first in London, then in Holyrood Palace at Edinburgh and afterwards at Hartwell.

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  • This he refused to do, and his moral courage united with no small political dexterity enabled him to win the day.

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  • The disclosures before the Parnell Commission, the O'Shea divorce proceedings, the downfall of Mr Parnell and the disruption of the Irish party, assisted him in his task; but the fact remains that by persistent courage and undeviating thoroughness he reduced crime in Ireland to a vanishing point.

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  • In his duel with Barba- Alexan- rossa, Alexander III., one of the greatest of medieval der III., popes, displayed extraordinary courage, address and 1159-4181.

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  • At the beginning of the struggle Julius had to endure many a hard blow; but his courage never failed - or, at most, but for a moment - even after the French victory at Ravenna, on Easter Sunday 1512.

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  • He had not enough courage and perspicacity to await in patience the result of the race between France and Germany for the duchy of Milan - a contest which was decided at Pavia (Feb.

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  • Harassed by severe bodily ailments, encompassed by a raging tumult of religious conflict and persecution, and aware that the faint hopes of better times which seemed to gild the horizon of the future might be utterly darkened by a failure either in the constancy of his courage or in his discernment and discretion, he exerted his eloquence with unabating energy in the furtherance of the cause he had at heart.

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  • Never was man more free than Latimer from the taint of fanaticism or less dominated by " vainglory," but the motives which now inspired his courage not only placed him beyond the influence of fear, but enabled him to taste in dying an ineffable thrill of victorious achievement.

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  • On the outbreak of the Greek revolt, he distinguished himself by his courage, tenacity and skill as a partisan leader in the fighting in western Hellas, and was conspicuous in the defence of Missolonghi during the first siege (1822-1823).

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  • On occasion the towns could defend their independence with strenuous courage; the higher qualities which make for a progressive national life the Phoenicians did not possess.

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  • So highly was he now esteemed for his courage, abilities and integrity, that all parties were anxious to have him on their side (Eloge, by Montesquieu).

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  • In 1718 he found himself under the necessity of once more entering Spain with an army; and this time he had to fight against Philip V., the king who owed chiefly to Berwick's courage and skill the safety of his throne.

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  • knew his duty and had the courage to do it.

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  • He had courage, a vivid sense of duty, an indefatigable love of work, and all the inquisitive zeal and inventive energy of a born reformer.

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  • 2 Another legend is that contained in the preface to theRegister or Black Book of the order, compiled in the reign of Henry VIII., by what authority supported is unknown, that Richard I., while his forces were employed against Cyprus and Acre, had been inspired through the instrumentality of St George with renewed courage and the means of animating his fatigued soldiers by the device of tying about the legs of a chosen number of knights a leathern thong or garter, to the end that being thereby reminded of the honour of their enterprise they might be encouraged to redoubled efforts for victory.

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  • It upheld courage and enterprise in obedience to rule, it consecrated military prowess to the service of the Church, glorified the virtues of liberality, good faith, unselfishness and courtesy, and above all, courtesy to women.

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  • Able seaman Mackenzie's courage here gained him a V.C., and able seaman Evans was seriously wounded and taken prisoner in trying to bring in Lt.-Comm.

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  • Insurrection and rebellion triumphed everywhere, and all that Sigismund could do was to minimize the mischief as much as possible by his moderation and courage.

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  • Through all the first troubles of her reign the young queen steered her skilful and dauntless way with the tact of a woman and the courage of a man.

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  • According to the Memoirs of Sir James Melville, both Lord Herries and himself resolved to appeal to the queen in terms of bold and earnest remonstrance against so desperate and scandalous a design; Herries, having been met with assurances of its unreality and professions of astonishment at the suggestion, instantly fled from court; Melville, evading the danger of a merely personal protest without backers to support him, laid before Mary a letter from a loyal Scot long resident in England, which urged upon her consideration and her conscience the danger and disgrace of such a project yet more freely than Herries had ventured to do by word of mouth; but the sole result was that it needed all the queen's courage and resolution to rescue him from the violence of the man for whom, she was reported to have said, she cared not if she lost France, England and her own country, and would go with him to the world's end in a white petticoat before she would leave him.

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  • Alone, "without one counsellor on her side among so many," Mary conducted the whole of her own defence with courage incomparable and unsurpassable ability.

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  • But except for this single instance of oversight or perversity her defence was throughout a masterpiece of indomitable ingenuity, of delicate and steadfast courage, of womanly dignity and genius.

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  • This note of exultation as in martyrdom was maintained with unflinching courage to the last.

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  • Hunted hither and thither, he wandered on foot or cruised restlessly in open boats among the many barren isles of the Scottish shore,enduring the greatest hardships with marvellous courage and cheerfulness.

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  • The courage and resourcefulness of their youthful leader inspired the people to make heroic sacrifices for their independ- of the ence, but unfortunately such was the revulsion of feeling against the grand pensionary, that he himself and his brother Cornelius were torn in pieces by an infuriated mob at the Hague (loth of August).

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  • An indecisive, but bravely fought action with Admiral Parker at the Dogger Bank showed, however, that the Dutch seamen had lost none of their old dogged courage, and did much to soothe the national sense of humiliation.

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  • The zeal, industry and courage displayed by the grand pensionary during the course of this fiercely contested naval struggle could scarcely have been surpassed.

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  • The popular ideas regarding his stature, strength, bodily prowess and undaunted courage are confirmed by the writers nearest his own time - Wyntoun and Fordun.

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  • During the trial of the ex-ministers, in December, he was summoned as a witness, and paid a tribute to the character of his former colleagues which, under the circumstances, argued no little courage.

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  • The accounts of early writers as to its courage, nobility and magnanimity have led to a reaction, causing some modern authors to accuse it of cowardice and meanness.

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  • He thought only of Ireland; lived for no other object; dedicated to her his beautiful fancy, his elegant wit, his manly courage, and all the splendour of his astonishing eloquence."

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  • Henry seems to have been a man of high character, great courage, resolution and ability.

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  • A few months later the attempt of Passanante to assassinate King Humbert at Naples (12th of December 1878) caused his downfall, in spite of the courage displayed and the severe wound received by him in protecting the king's person on that occasion.

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  • and Alexander VI., and set himself with courage and determination to restore, consolidate and extend the temporal possessions of the Church.

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  • The Saxons were able to cope with the Danes and the German boundary was pushed forward in the south-east; but the Slays fought with such courage and success that during the reigns of the emperors Otto II.

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  • The two brothers were enthusiastic imperialists, and with persistent courage they upheld the cause of their sovereign during his two absences in Italy.

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  • So complete was his hold over themajority of the princes that when the Turks, in 1683, surrounded Vienna, and appeared not unlikely to advance into the heart of Germany, they looked on indifferently, and allowed the emperor to be saved by the promptitude and courage of John Sobieski, king of Poland.

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  • By skill, foresight and courage Frederick William managed to add largely to his territories; and in an age of degenerate sovereigns he was looked upon as an almost model ruler~ His son, Frederick, aspired to royal dignity, and in 1701, having obtained the emperors assent, was crowned king of Prussia.

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  • conclusion; the famous rampart of the Dannewerk, on which the Danish defence chiefly relied, was turned, and after a short campaign, in which the Danes fought with distinguished courage, peace was concluded by the treaty of Vienna (August I, 1864), by which Schleswig, Holstein and Lauenburg were ceded to Austria and Prussia jointly.

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  • of Spain for the assassination of William the Silent, prince of Orange, but being himself without courage to undertake the task, d'Anastro, with the help of his cashier Venero, persuaded Jauregui to attempt the murder for the sum of 2877 crowns.

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  • The measure seems to have been successful, and there is a general agreement that the inspectors have done their work with skill and courage.

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  • The scheme was crushed by the courage and skill of the Aetolians, who thereupon summoned Spartan and Corinthian aid for a counter attack on Naupactus.

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  • In his fifth year, near Kadesh on the Orontes, his army was caught unprepared and divided by a strong force of chariots of the Hittites and their allies, and Rameses himself was placed in the most imminent danger; but through his personal courage the enemy was kept at bay till reinforcements came up and turned the disaster into a victory.

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  • After a short period of inaction, when it seemed as if the change might be for the worse, England and France summoned up courage to look the situation boldly in the face, and, in November 1879, re-established the Dual Control in the persons of Major Baring and M.

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  • passive resistance; but it contained a military element who had more courage, and who had learned their power when Ismail employed them for overturning his constitutional ministry.

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  • The courage and resource displayed by Frederick III.

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  • Under the impression, in consequence of a furious charge of Austrian cavalry, that the battle was lost, he rode rapidly away at an early stage of the struggle - a mistake which gave rise for a time to the groundless idea that he lacked personal courage.

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  • After a siege of over a year, the energy, skill, and courage of Belisarius, and the sickness which was preying on the Gothic troops, obliged Vitiges to retire.

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  • The city was sacked and burnt; but the Capitol itself withstood a siege of more than six months, saved from surprise on one occasion only by the wakefulness of the sacred geese and the courage of Marcus Manlius.

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  • In the centre of the court is the celebrated Fountain of Lions, a magnificent alabaster basin supported by the figures of twelve lions in white marble, not designed with sculptural accuracy, but as emblems of strength and courage.

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  • He occasionally visited his family, and their unfailing confidence helped to keep up his courage.

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  • 1881), who succeeded his adoptive father in 1888, earned great distinction by the courage with which he risked his life to save that of Sir Andrew Fraser, the lieutenant-governor of Bengal, on the occasion of the attempt to assassinate him made by Bengali malcontents on the 7th of November 1908.

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  • They fought with courage, but were no match for Roman discipline; it was, however, impossible to follow them into their mountain fortresses, nor were the difficulties of pursuit thoroughly overcome till after the battle of Culloden in 1746.

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  • Tradition attributes to Wallace strength equal to his courage.

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  • Now, too, came the attempts of Monmouth and of Argyll, who, owing to divided counsels in his camp, and want of support either from his clan or from the southern malcontents, failed in his invasion of Scotland, was taken, and was executed, suffering like his father with great courage and dignity.

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  • He was continually engaged in theological controversy, and, by his advocacy of all efforts to promote the social, moral, and religious amelioration of the poorer classes and his chivalrous courage in defending those whom he held to be unjustly denounced, undoubtedly incurred much and grow- ing odium in influential circles.

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  • Hearing of the strength and courage of Theseus, Pirithous desired to put them to the test.

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  • An immense joy in battle breathes through the earliest Norse literature, which has scarce its like in any other literature; and we know that the language recognized a peculiar battle fury, a veritable madness by which certain were seized and which went by the name of " berserk's way " (berserksgangr).2 The courage of the vikings was proof against anything, even as a rule against superstitious terrors.

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  • " We cannot easily realize how all-embracing that courage was.

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  • Wiseman displayed calmness and courage, and immediately penned an admirable Appeal to the English People (a pamphlet of over 30 pages), in which he explained the nature of the pope's action, and argued that the admitted principle of toleration included leave to establish a diocesan hierarchy; and in his concluding paragraphs he effectively contrasted that dominion over Westminster, which he was taunted with claiming, with his duties towards the poor Catholics resident there, with which alone he was really concerned.

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  • But he instinctively shrank from conflict; he lacked the resoluteness and the sterner sort of courage that grapples with a crisis.

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  • He protested with a characteristic combination of caution and courage.

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  • Adams contended that these "Gag Rules" were a direct violation of the First Amendment to the Federal Constitution, and refused to be silenced on the question, fighting for repeal with indomitable courage, in spite of the bitter denunciation of his opponents.

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  • At the critical moment the queen's courage seems to have failed her; she and her son fled from the city to seek 1 See the Palmyrene inscriptions given in Vogue, Syrie centrale, Nos.

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  • Jefferson had the full courage of his convictions.

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  • His generosity, his courage and his commanding height, had already commended him to the affection of the Irish.

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  • Mahmud, the son of Mir Wais, a man of great courage and energy, carried out a project of his father's, the conquest of Persia itself.

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  • Discouraged by the official authorities, and ever liable to banishment or deportation, they not only devoted themselves with courage to their special work of evangelization, but were also the first to study the vernacular dialects spoken by the common people.

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  • The Greek ambassador observed with admiration the absence of slavery in India, the chastity of the women, and the courage of the men.

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  • It was thus by his courage and persistence that the modern capital of India was eventually founded.

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  • In January 1799 the French under Championnet reached Naples, but the lazzaroni, ill-armed and ill-disciplined French in as they were, resisted the enemy with desperate courage, and it was not until the 20th that the invaders were masters of the city.

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  • had sent to Gaeta to delay the inevitable fall of the dynasty, was withdrawn at the instance of Great Britain; and_ although the garrison fought bravely and the king and queen showed considerable courage, the fortress surrendered on the 13th of February and the royal family departed by sea.

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  • In 1866 he displayed considerable personal courage and energy in quelling an insurrection of separatist and reactionary tendencies.

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  • By a combination of tact, courage and resourcefulness he won the hearts of the natives, repelled the Portuguese and, notwithstanding the great distance from Spain, established the new colony on a practical basis.

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  • But the Alids, though not devoid of personal courage, never excelled in politics or in tactics.

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  • Sahl, a Zoroastrian of great influence, who in 806 had adopted Islam, reanimated his courage, and pointed out to him that certain death awaited him at Bagdad.

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  • Lord Gambier was a man of earnest, almost morbid, religious principle, and of undoubted courage; but the administration of the admiralty has seldom given rise to such flagrant scandals as during the time when he was a member of it; and through the whole war the self-esteem of the navy suffered no such wound as during Lord Gambier's command in the Bay of Biscay.

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  • So long as the relation of the nominal to the real essence has no other background than Locke's doctrine of perception, the conclusion that what Kant afterwards calls analytical judgments a priori and synthetic judgments a posteriori exhaust the field follows inevitably, with its corollary, which Locke himself has the courage to draw, that the natural sciences are in strictness impossible.

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  • He takes courage from the reflection that to accept scepticism is to presume the competence of the thought that accepts.

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  • It was saved partly by the courage of his wife, Theodora, and partly by the timely prodigality of Narses, who stole out into the capital, and with large sums of money bribed the leaders of the "blue" faction, which was aforetime loyal to the emperor, to shout as of old "Justiniane Auguste to vincas."

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  • Still with unfaltering courage they continued their resistance to the dominant faction, till on the 2nd of June 1793 things came to a head.

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  • The decisive event, which turned defeat into victory and reestablished courage and faith, was the resurrection of Jesus from the dead and his reappearance to his disciples.

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  • Some had the rare courage to investigate the mysterious disease by dissecting the bodies of the dead.

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  • Ruggeri Laderchi took his courage in both hands, and, without waiting, counter-attacked with his own battle-worn troops.

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  • The recovery of the Italian army on Monte Grappa and the Piave, after the initial failures and the heart-breaking experiences of the long retreat, was a remarkable feat of courage and will.

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  • His courage failed him in prison and, to regain his freedom, he renounced the doctrines of Wycliffe and Hus.

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