How to use County in a sentence

county
  • The county borough was created in 1888.

    168
    69
  • Five years hadn't changed the wild hills of Madison County, but she had forgotten how truly remote the area was.

    64
    42
  • Ouray County doesn't have a farm vote.

    43
    24
  • I'm not a citizen of the county, so I can't vote for you.

    35
    21
  • Time to go back to keeping the county safe, 'from speeders and bike nappers'.

    43
    30
    Advertisement
  • It was a shock for David Dean to see Fred O'Connor sitting on a wooden stool behind bars at the Ouray County jail.

    23
    13
  • It makes but little difference whether you are committed to a farm or the county jail.

    28
    19
  • The wedding took place the Sunday before the election for Ouray County Sheriff.

    17
    10
  • Daniel Brennan came calling and the county was reduced of fish by his visit.

    11
    6
  • Kossuth continued the agitation by reporting in letter form the debates of the county assemblies, to which he thereby gave a political importance which they had not had when each was ignorant of the proceedings of the others.

    8
    3
    Advertisement
  • It lies in the densely populated district in the north-east of the county, between Stalybridge and Ashton-under-Lyne, and is served by the London & North Western and Great Central railways.

    8
    5
  • The borough is finely situated in the Wyoming Valley among the rich anthracite coalfields of eastern Pennsylvania, and its inhabitants are chiefly engaged in the coal industry; in 1906 and 1907 (when it shipped 24,081,4 9 1 tons) Luzerne county shipped more anthracite coal than any other county in Pennsylvania.

    6
    3
  • I figured this county deserves a more astute sheriff than the current candidate, so I tossed my hat in the ring this morning.

    7
    5
  • He accepted her offer and thus became Under Sheriff of Ouray County, Colorado.

    8
    7
  • Ouray County was perfect for invigorating outdoor activity, with its crystal clear air and dry, windless temperatures just below freezing.

    7
    6
    Advertisement
  • Here the road was dry and only a few cars passed him before he drifted past a private hot spring, along the wide curve and by the County fairgrounds before entering Ridgway.

    8
    7
  • Dean paused at the County's sole traffic light, a recent addition and, in some minds, a reluctant bow to progress.

    1
    0
  • It's just the primary but that's the whole ball of wax 'cause this is pretty much a one party county.

    1
    0
  • He just happens to be the most eligible bachelor in Benton County.

    1
    0
  • Have you got a number stamped on every girl in the county?

    1
    0
    Advertisement
  • In 1123 he was captured by Balak of Mardin, and confined in Kharput with Joscelin, his successor in the county of Edessa, who had been captured in the previous year.

    6
    5
  • The town, the full name of which is Kirkby-Kendal or Kirkby-in-Kendal, is the largest in the county.

    1
    0
  • A successful well in Marion county, near Mannington, far from the region of the earlier wells, was drilled in 1889, and the output of the state increased from 119,448 bbls.

    4
    3
  • After 1900 it gradually decreased - although new pools in Wetzel county were found in 1902 - and in 1908 it was 9,523,176 bbls.

    4
    3
  • Brine wells have been mentioned above; the salt industry is still carried on in Mason county, and in 1908 145,157 bbls.

    2
    1
    Advertisement
  • All male citizens above twenty-one years of age have the right of suffrage, subject to a residence of one year in the state and sixty days in the county in which they offer to vote.

    4
    3
  • Outdoor enthusiasts might prefer another park because this parks northern border abuts the county landfill.

    2
    1
  • From 1832 to 1885 Kendal sent one member to parliament, but since the last date its representation has been merged in that of the southern division of the county.

    0
    0
  • An excellent glass sand is procured from crushed sandstone near Berkeley Springs, Morgan county.

    0
    0
  • The judicial power is vested in the Supreme Court of Appeals, the Circuit courts, such inferior courts as may be established, county courts, the powers and duties of which are, however, chiefly police and fiscal, and in justices of the peace.

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • The judicial powers of the county court are confined to probate, the appointment of executors, administrators and other personal representatives, and the settlement of their accounts, matters relating to apprentices and to contested elections for county and district officers.

    0
    0
  • As in Virginia, the county is the unit of government, though an unsuccessful attempt to introduce the township system was made in the first constitution.

    0
    0
  • The county court, consisting of three commissioners elected for six years but with terms so arranged that one retires every two years, is the police and fiscal authority.

    0
    0
  • Other officers are the clerk of the county court, elected for six years, the sheriff, who also acts as tax-collector and treasurer, the prosecuting attorney, one or two assessors, the surveyor of lands and the superintendent of free schools, all elected for the term of four years; the sheriff may not serve two consecutive full terms. In addition there are boards appointed or elected by various authorities and charged with specific duties.

    0
    0
  • Each of the magisterial districts (of which, as has been said, there must be at least three and not more than ten in each county) elects one or two magistrates and constables, and a board of education of three members.

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • The constitution provides that the legislature, on the request of any county, may establish a special form of county government, and several of the larger and more populous counties have special acts.

    0
    0
  • The county supervision of public schools is vested in a county superintendent, who is elected for a term of four years.

    0
    0
  • The indebtedness of a county, municipality or school district is limited to 5% of the value of its taxable property.

    0
    0
  • John Van Metre, an Indian trader, penetrated into the northern portion in 1725, and Morgan ap Morgan, a Welshman, built a cabin in the present Berkeley county in 1727.

    0
    0
  • Almost immediately after the adoption of the ordinance a mass meeting at Clarksburg recommended that each county in north-western Virginia send delegates to a convention to meet in Wheeling on the 13th of May 1861.

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • It is the principal seat of the linen trade in the county, and has extensive cloth and thread factories, bleachfields and chemical works.

    0
    0
  • In 1888 Charlottesville was chartered as a city administratively independent of the county.

    0
    0
  • The town was formerly known as South Stockton, and is still included in the parliamentary borough of Stockton (it is within the Cleveland division of the county), but was incorporated as a separate municipal borough in 1892.

    0
    0
  • In 1838 Lundy removed to Lowell, La Salle county, Illinois, where he printed several copies of the Genius of Universal Emancipation.

    0
    0
  • He was also appointed governor of Weymouth, sheriff of Dorsetshire for the king and president of the king's council of war in the county.

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • The General Assembly of Connecticut, in January 1774, erected the valley into the township of Westmoreland and attached it to Litchfield (disambiguation)|Litchfield county, and in October 1776 the same body erected it into Westmoreland county.

    0
    0
  • Patterson was withdrawn, the disputed territory was erected into the new county of Luzerne (1786), the land titles were confirmed (1787), and Colonel Timothy Pickering was commissioned to organize the new county and to effect a reconciliation.

    0
    0
  • The trouble was again revived by the repeal in 1790 of the confirming act 2 Several Scotch-Irish families from Lancaster (disambiguation)|Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, accepted Connecticut titles and settled at Hanover under Captain Lazarus Stewart.

    0
    0
  • In March 1490 the county of Tirol was added to his possessions through the abdication of his kinsman, Count Sigismund, and this district soon became his favourite residence.

    0
    0
  • In Edinburgh, Glasgow, and elsewhere in Scotland, and in London (through the county council), Newcastle and other English towns, the corporations have laid down greens in public parks and open spaces.

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Organizing it like this would be easy, because it would be working with the grain of the encyclopedia itself, and usually, for instance, the county that any British or Irish town is in is listed very early in the article.

    0
    0
  • See William Molyneux, History of Burton-on-Trent (1869); Victoria County History, Staffordshire.

    0
    0
  • With the development of cotton and silk industries the town has increased enormously, and is now second in importance only to Derby among the towns of the county.

    0
    0
  • The principal buildings are the town hall, the county buildings, the assembly rooms, occupying the site of an old Franciscan monastery, three hospitals, a convalescent home, the Smyllum orphanage and the Queen Victoria Jubilee fountain.

    0
    0
  • In 1900 the Birmingham district produced six-sevenths of the total pig iron exported from the United States, and in 1902 nine-tenths of Alabama's coal, coke and pig iron; in 1905 Jefferson county produced 67.5% of the total iron and steel product of the state, and 62.5% of the pig iron produced by the state.

    0
    0
  • It was, in a very real sense, representative of the whole country, as two members were chosen by parliament from each county.

    0
    0
  • Nine of these Puritan Presbyterian churches were established on Long Island between 1640 and 1670 - one at Southampton and one at Southold (originally of the Congregational type) in 1640, one at Hempstead about 1644, one at Jamaica in 1662, and churches at Newtown and Setauket in the next half century; and three Puritan Presbyterian churches were established in Westchester county, New York, between 1677 and 1685.

    0
    0
  • About 1695 Thomas Bridge, with Presbyterians from Fairfield county, Connecticut, settled at Cohansey, in West Jersey.

    0
    0
  • In 1732 the presbytery of "Dunagall" (Donegal) was established in Lancaster (disambiguation)|Lancaster county, Pennsylvania.

    0
    0
  • The Old Side adopted the academy at New London, Chester (disambiguation)|Chester county, Pennsylvania, which had been organized by Francis Alison in 1741, as their own; but the New London school broke up when Alison became a professor in the Philadelphia Academy (afterwards the university of Pennsylvania).

    0
    0
  • What is now Dorchester (disambiguation)|Dorchester county, South Carolina, was settled in 1695 by members of a church established in Dorchester, Massachusetts.

    0
    0
  • The Burgher Synod in 1764 sent Thomas Clarke of Ballybay, Ireland, who settled at Salem, Washington county, New York, and in 1776 sent David Telfair, of Monteith, Scotland, who preached in Philadelphia; they united with the Associate Presbytery of Pennsylvania; in 1771 the Scotch Synod ordered the presbytery to annul its union with the Burghers, and although Dr Clarke of Salem remained in the Associate Presbytery, the Burgher ministers who immigrated later joined the Associate Reformed Church.

    0
    0
  • Avranches, an important military station of the Romans, was in the middle ages chief place of a county of the duchy of Normandy.

    0
    0
  • Forrest; each state was a Realm under a Grand Dragon; several counties formed a Dominion under a Grand Titan; each county was a Province under a Grand Giant; the smallest division being a Den under a Grand Cyclops.

    0
    0
  • Actions may be transferred to it, and appeals made to it, from the county courts in all cases arising within the jurisdiction of the Cinque Ports as defined by that act.

    0
    0
  • Among many hospitals, the county hospital (5828), "open to the sick and lame poor of every country and nation," may be mentioned.

    0
    0
  • During the draft riots in July he proclaimed the city and county of New York in a state of insurrection, but in a speech to the rioters adopted a tone of conciliation - a political error which injured his career.

    0
    0
  • He inherited Flanders and Artois, purchased the county of Namur (1427) and compelled his cousin Jacqueline, the heiress of Holland, Zeeland, Hainault and Friesland, to surrender her possessions to him, 1428.

    0
    0
  • The town is one of the best hunting centres in the county, being within reach of several meets.

    0
    0
  • Of these Lake Bomoseen in Rutland (disambiguation)|Rutland county and Willoughby Lake in Orleans county are the largest.

    0
    0
  • Lake Champlain furnishes the only commerical fishing grounds in Vermont, with the exceptions of small catches of white fish in Lake Bomoseen, Lake St Catherine in Rutland county and Lake Memphremagog.

    0
    0
  • There are important quarries in Franklin (disambiguation)|Franklin county (at Swanton), the stone being a dark Chazy limestone, in which pink and red ("jasper," "lyonnaise" and "royal red") marbles of Cambrian age are found.

    0
    0
  • At Monkton, Addison county, there is a.

    0
    0
  • On Isle La Motte, Grand Isle county, there are marble quarries, the characteristic colours of the marble being "Fisk black" and "Fisk grey."

    0
    0
  • The largest granite quarries are near Barre, Washington county, a city which owes its importance to the quarries.

    0
    0
  • The Barre granites, like those of Woodbury and Calais (also in Washington county) and part of those of South Ryegate, Kirby and Newark (Caledonia county), are of the biotite type; they are grey, except the stone from Newark, which is pinkish.

    0
    0
  • Of the quartz-monzonite type are the whitish granites of Bethel and Rochester (Windsor county) and Randolph (Orange county), the light grey of Dummerston (Windham county), and the darker greys of Cabot (Washington county), Derby (Orleans county), Hardwick and Groton (Caledonia county) and Topsham (Orange county).

    0
    0
  • The olive green syenite found on Mount Ascutney, near the Connecticut river, in Windsor county, is a hornblendeaugite.

    0
    0
  • Slate-quarrying and cutting is carried on in the south-western part of the state, in Rutland county; there are important quarries at Fair Haven, Poultney, Castleton, Wells and Pawlet.

    0
    0
  • In Washington county there are quarries near Northfield.

    0
    0
  • The southern part of the state was early opened to railways, the Sullivan County railway (operated by the Boston & Maine) having been opened in 1849; and in 1850 the state had 290 m.

    0
    0
  • The legislative department consists of a senate of 30 members, apportioned among the counties according to population, but with the proviso that each county must have at least one senator, and a House of Representatives of 245 members, one from each township. Since 1870 elections and legislative sessions have been biennial.

    0
    0
  • The judiciary is composed of a supreme court of seven members, a court of chancery, a county court in each county, a probate court in each probate district, and justices of the peace.

    0
    0
  • Sessions of the supreme court are held in each county once a year in addition to the general session which meets at some central place selected by the judges.

    0
    0
  • The court of chancery is held by the judges of the supreme court, the county by a supreme court judge with the aid of two associates elected by the people of the county.

    0
    0
  • There is no special board of commissioners or supervisors as in most of the other states, the county authority being the assistant judges of the county court.

    0
    0
  • The county treasurer is elected by the assistant judges.

    0
    0
  • From 1761 to 1763 Governor John Wentworth of New Hampshire issued 108 grants, and settlements were established in Brattleboro, Putney, Westminster, Halifax, Marlborough, Wilmington, New Fane, Rockingham, Townshend, Vernon (Hinsdale) and Dummerston (all in Windham county, except Vernon, which is in Cheshire county).

    0
    0
  • The county is situated mostly in the basin of the Erne, which divides the county into two nearly equal sections.

    0
    0
  • Tossett or Toppid and Turaw mountains command extensive prospects, and form striking features in the scenery of the county.

    0
    0
  • See Victoria County History, Devonshire; The Teignmouth Guide and Complete Handbook to the Town and Neighbourhood (Teignmouth, 1875).

    0
    0
  • The National Telephone Company applied to the London County Council for permission to lay wires underground and continued efforts till 1899 to obtain this power, but without success.

    0
    0
  • The Post Office co-operated with the London County Council to put difficulties in the way of the company which had placed wires underground in London with the consent of the local road authorities.

    0
    0
  • In February the Postmaster-General applied for an injunction to restrain the company from opening any street or public road within the county of London without the consent of the Postmaster - General and the London County Council, which injunction was granted in July.

    0
    0
  • For instance, in the county of London, the telephone tariff is £5 per annum plus id.

    0
    0
  • The London County Council, according to the statement of its comptroller, was disturbed by the hope expressed by the manager of the company, that the holders of the company's ordinary shares would obtain the par value of their shares in 1911.

    0
    0
  • Carson City (named in honour of Christopher Carson) was settled in 1851 as a trading post, was laid out as a town in 1858, was made the capital of the state and the county seat of the newly erected county in 1861, and was chartered as a city in 1875.

    0
    0
  • These must be heard in the county courts before two visiting justices and four knights of the shire.

    0
    0
  • The hardship of attendance at the county courts was to some extent obviated.

    0
    0
  • The custom was for the king to get a fixed sum from the sheriff of each county, this being called the firma comitatus, and for the sheriff to collect this as best he could.

    0
    0
  • Twelve knights in each county are to make a thorough inquiry into all evil customs connected with the forests, and these are to be utterly abolished.

    0
    0
  • With the erection of Maesyfed into the shire of Radnor in 1536 Rhayader was named as assize-town for the newly formed county in conjunction with New Radnor; but in 1542, on account of a local riot, the town was deprived of this privilege in favour of Presteign.

    0
    0
  • The maiden name of the poet's mother was Mary Arden, and this name, that of an ancient county family, survives in the district north-west of Stratford, the Forest of Arden, though the true forest character is long lost.

    0
    0
  • In 1832, two years after receiving its charter, it opened near Boydton, Mecklenburg county, Virginia, and in 1868 was removed to Ashland.

    0
    0
  • In 1636 he became lecturer at Dedham in Essex, and was the leader of the church reform party in that county.

    0
    0
  • Basing his work on the principles of Ptolemy, he brings together illustrations from the most recent travellers, and does not hesitate to take as illustrative examples the familiar city of Oxford and his native county of Devon.

    0
    0
  • At the base of the Red Crag in that county is a bed, 3 to 18 in.

    0
    0
  • Other prominent structures are the U.S. government and the judiciary buildings, the latter connected with the capitol by a stone terrace, the city hall, the county court house, the union station, the board of trade, the soldiers' memorial hall (with a seating capacity of about 4500), and several office buildings.

    0
    0
  • The Cumberland County Court House, of white Maine granite, occupies the block bounded by Federal, Pearl, Church and Newbury streets; immediately opposite (to the south-west) is the Federal Court building, also of Maine granite.

    0
    0
  • See Victoria County History, Berkshire; Joseph Stevenson, Chronicon Monasterii de Abingdon, A.D.

    0
    0
  • The Rabbit Hole sulphur-mines are in Nevada, and a great deposit in Utah occurs at Cove Creek, Beaver (disambiguation)|Beaver county.

    0
    0
  • For administrative purposes the country is divided into four counties, Montserrado, Basa, Sino and Maryland, but Cape Mount in the far west and the district round it has almost the status of a fifth county.

    0
    0
  • It should be mentioned that the act provided that the Treasury might advance a portion of the money required for a line in cases where the council of any county, borough or district had agreed to do the same, and might also make a special advance in aid of a light railway which was certified by the Board of Agriculture to be beneficial to agriculture in any cultivated district, or by the Board of Trade to furnish a means of communication between a fishing-harbour and a market in a district where it would not be constructed without special assistance from the s' ate.

    0
    0
  • Fox and their two daughters, at Hydesville (Wayne county), New York, were much disturbed by unexplained knockings.

    0
    0
  • To judge by the osteological remains which the researches of geologists have brought to light, there was perhaps scarcely a county in England or Wales in which, at one time or another, wolves did not abound, while in Scotland and Ireland they must have been still more numerous.

    0
    0
  • He secured full ownership of the county of Avignon through purchase from Queen Joanna (9th of June 1348) and renunciation of feudal claims by Charles IV.

    0
    0
  • Another mining region that attained importance in the early period was the Eureka District, in Eureka county, about 90 m.

    0
    0
  • In May 1900, however, very rich deposits of gold and silver were discovered in Nye county, near the summit of the San Antonio Mountains, and a new era began in Nevada's mining industry.

    0
    0
  • This discovery was followed in 1904 by that of the Bullfrog District, in Nye county, 60 m.

    0
    0
  • In 1905 gold was discovered in Nye county, 29 m.

    0
    0
  • In the production of silver Nye county ranked first in 1907 ($3,667,973, of which $3,544,7 88 was from Tonopah), Churchill county second ($432,617, from Fairview, Wonder and Stillwater), and Eureka county (with lead silver ores) and Storey county were third and fourth respectively.

    0
    0
  • A little graphite is produced in Humboldt county.

    0
    0
  • A sub-bituminous lignite is mined in Esmeralda county (800 tons in 1906; 330 tons in 1907).

    0
    0
  • It is met at several points by lines which serve the rich mining districts to the south; at Cobre by the Nevada Northern from Ely in White Pine county in the Robinson copper mining district; at Palisade by the Eureka & Palisade, a narrow-gauge railway, connecting with the lead and silver mines of the Eureka District; at Battle Mountain by the Nevada Central, also of narrow gauge, from Austin; at Hazen by the Nevada & California (controlled by the Southern Pacific) which runs to the California line, connecting in that state with other parts of the Southern Pacific system, and at Mina, Nevada, with the Tonopah & Goldfield, which runs to Tonopah and thence to Goldfield, thus giving these mining regions access to the Southern Pacific's transcontinental service; and at Reno, close to the western boundary, by the Virginia & Truckee, connecting with Carson City, Minden, in the Carson Valley, and Virginia City, in the Comstock District, and by the Nevada-California-Oregon, projected to run through north-eastern California into Oregon, in 1910, in operation to Alturas, California.

    0
    0
  • A residence in the state of six months and in the district or county of thirty days preceding the election is required of all voters.

    0
    0
  • The state is divided into fifteen counties, each of which is governed in local matters by a board of county commissioners, and is divided for administrative purposes into townships.

    0
    0
  • The constitution requires that township and county governments shall be uniform throughout the state.

    0
    0
  • At the election of 1904 an amendment was adopted which provides that whenever 10% of the voters of the state, as shown by the votes of the last preceding election, express a wish that any law or resolution of the legislature shall be submitted to the people, the Act or Resolve shall be voted on at the next election of the state or county officers, and if a majority of the voters approve the measure it shall stand; otherwise, it shall become void.

    0
    0
  • The rate of taxation for state purposes is fixed by the legislature, and for county purposes by the board of county commissioners.

    0
    0
  • A poll tax is required of all males between the ages of 21 and 60 years, one half of which goes to the county in which it is collected and the rest to the state.

    0
    0
  • In 1858 Carson City was laid out, and in the following year the people of Carson county held a mass meeting and chose delegates to a constitutional convention, which met at Genoa on the 18th of July 1859, and in ten days drafted a constitution.

    0
    0
  • The name of the town is Great Berkhampstead (or Berkhamsted), in distinction from Little Berkhampstead near Hatfield in this county.

    0
    0
  • Early in 1881 he was appointed assistant prosecuting attorney of Hamilton (disambiguation)|Hamilton county (in which Cincinnati is situated), but resigned in 1882 on being appointed collector of internal revenue of the United States for the first district of Ohio.

    0
    0
  • From 1885 to 1887 he served as assistant solicitor of Hamilton county, and in the latter year was appointed judge of the Superior Court of Ohio to fill a vacancy.

    0
    0
  • He was the son of John Henry, a welleducated Scotsman, among whose relatives was the historian William Robertson, and who served in Virginia as county surveyor, colonel and judge of a county court.

    0
    0
  • Then in 1763 was delivered his speech in "The Parson's Cause" - a suit brought by a clergyman, Rev. James Maury, in the Hanover County Court, to secure restitution for money considered by him to be due on account of his salary (16,000 pounds of tobacco by law) having been paid in money calculated at a rate less than the current market price of tobacco.

    0
    0
  • Charles's ambition aimed at wider fields, and when Margaret, countess of Flanders, asked help of the French court against the German king William of Holland, by whom she had been defeated, he gladly accepted her offer of the county of; Hainaut in exchange for his assistance (1253); this arrangement was, however, rescinded by Louis of France, who returned from captivity in 1254, and Charles gave up Hainaut for an immense sum of money.

    0
    0
  • Graduating at the university of North Carolina in 1816, he studied law in the famous Litchfield (Connecticut) law school, and in 1819 was admitted to practice in Southampton county, Virginia.

    0
    0
  • The principal public buildings are the Federal building, the city hall, the county court house, a Y.M.C.A.

    0
    0
  • Murkertagh was chief of the great north Irish clan, the Cinel Eoghain,' and after becoming king of Ireland about the year 517, he wrested from a neighbouring clan a tract of country in the modern County Derry, which remained till the 17th century in the possession of the Cinel Eoghain.

    0
    0
  • On the death of Domhnall in 911 Niall Glundubh became king of Ailech, and he then attacked and defeated the king of Dalriada at Glarryford, in County Antrim, and the king of Ulidia near Ballymena.

    0
    0
  • But John O'Neill (1740-1798), who represented Randalstown in the Irish parliament 1761-1783, and the county of Antrim from the latter year till his death, took an active part in debate on the popular side, being a strong supporter of Catholic emancipation.

    0
    0
  • In the parish of Ludgvan were rich copper works, abounding with mineral and metallic fossils, of which he made a collection, and thus was led to study somewhat minutely the natural history of the county.

    0
    0
  • The town is amongst the healthiest in Scotland and has the lowest rainfall in the county.

    0
    0
  • Until 1867 Harwich returned two members; it then lost one, and in 1885 it was merged in the county.

    0
    0
  • The principal buildings within the parish are the old town hall, now used as a volunteer drill hall and armoury; the county buildings, containing the town hall and court house; the academy; reformatory and the Wigtownshire combination poorhouse.

    0
    0
  • From 1585 two members were regularly returned; the number was reduced to one in 1867, and in 1885 the representation was merged in that of the county.

    0
    0
  • He was mayor 1903; and was made a magistrate for the county of Durham.

    0
    0
  • For a short time he worked for his father in the hardware business; in1852-1856he worked as a surveyor in preparing maps of Ulster, Albany and Delaware counties in New York, of Lake and Geauga counties in Ohio, and of Oakland county in Michigan, and of a projected railway line between Newburgh and Syracuse, N.Y.

    0
    0
  • An ardent anti-renter in his boyhood and youth, he wrote A History of Delaware County and the Border Wars of New York, containing a Sketch of the Early Settlements in the County, and A History of the Late Anti-Rent Difficulties in Delaware (Roxbury, 1856).

    0
    0
  • The church of St Bartholomew, one of the finest in the county, is in the Perpendicular style characteristic of the district.

    0
    0
  • The Pontotoc ridge separates the drainage system of the Mississippi from that of the Tombigbee; extending from the northeastern part of the state southward, this ridge divides in Choctaw county, the eastern branch separating the drainage basin in the Pascagoula from that of the Pearl, and the western branch separating the drainage basin of the Pearl from that of the Big Black and the Mississippi.

    0
    0
  • Cotton is grown in every county of the state, but the large yields are in the Delta (Bolivar, Coaohma, Washington, Yazoo and Leflore counties), the greatest cotton-producing region of the world, and in Monroe, Lowndes and Noxubee counties on the Alabama border.

    0
    0
  • Sugar-cane is grown principally in the southern part of the state, but sorghum-cane is grown to some extent in nearly every county.

    0
    0
  • About 40% of the total catch of the state is made by the inhabitants of Harrison county on the Gulf of Mexico.

    0
    0
  • Each county or legislative district casts as many electoral votes as it has members in the state house of representatives, and a majority of both the electoral and the popular vote is required.

    0
    0
  • The local judicial authorities are the county board of supervisors of five members and the justices of the peace.

    0
    0
  • The other county officials are the sheriff, coroner, treasurer, assessor, surveyor and superintendent of education.

    0
    0
  • The first school established in the state was Jefferson College, now Jefferson Military College, near Natchez, Adams county, incorporated in 1802.

    0
    0
  • The schools are subject to the supervision of a state superintendent of public education and of a board of education, composed of the superintendent, the secretary of state, and the attorney-general, and within each county to a county superintendent.

    0
    0
  • An agricultural experiment station established in 1887 under the Hatch Act, is at Agricultural College; and there are branch experiment stations at McNeill, Pearl River county (1906), near Holly Springs, and at Stoneville, near Greenville.

    0
    0
  • The first European settlement in Mississippi was founded in 1699 by Pierre Lemoyne, better known as Iberville, at Fort Maurepas (Old Biloxi) on the north side of Biloxi Bay, in what is now Harrison county.

    0
    0
  • During the next few years Fort St Peter and a small adjoining colony were established on the Yazoo River in Warren county, and some attempts at settlement were made on Bay St Louis and Pascagoula Bay.

    0
    0
  • In 1822 the capital was removed to Jackson from Columbia, Marion county.

    0
    0
  • At Highlands, Macon county, during 1898 it was 105.24 in., and during 1901 it was 106.17 in., 30.74 in.

    0
    0
  • In Caswell county, North Carolina, " lemon yellow " tobacco was first produced in 1852, and the demand for this " bright " variety became so great that except during the interruption of the Civil War its culture spread rapidly.

    0
    0
  • Probably the earliest large find was a 17-lb nugget on the Reed Plantation in Cabarrus county in 1799; in the same mine a 28-lb nugget, probably the largest found in eastern United States, was discovered in 1803.

    0
    0
  • The production in Rutherford and Burke counties and their vicinity was so great, and transportation to the United States Mint at Philadelphia so difficult, that from 1831 to 1857 gold was privately coined in I, 22 and 5 dollar pieces bearing the mark of the coiner " C. Bechtler, Rutherford county, N.C."

    0
    0
  • In 1908 the product amounted to 48,522 long tons (all magnetite), and was valued at $76,877; almost the entire product is from the Cranberry mines, near Cranberry, Mitchell county.

    0
    0
  • A cotton mill was erected in Lincoln county about 1813, and by 1840 about 25 small mills were in operation within the state.

    0
    0
  • The cotton mills are mostly in the Piedmont Plateau Region; durham|Durham, Durham county, and Winston, Forsyth county, are leading centres of tobacco manufacture; and High Point (pop. in 1900, 4163) in Randolph is noted for its manufacture of furniture.

    0
    0
  • The Senate is composed of fifty members elected biennially by senatorial districts as nearly as possible equal to one another in population, and the House of Representatives (in the Constitution of 1776 called the House of Commons) of one hundred and twenty, elected biennially and chosen by counties' according to their population, each county having at least one representative, no matter how small its population.

    0
    0
  • The county officials are the sheriff, a coroner, a treasurer, a register of deeds, a surveyor and five commissioners, elected for two years.

    0
    0
  • The commissioners supervise the penal and charitable institutions, schools, roads, bridges and finances of the county.

    0
    0
  • Until 1905 the only grounds for an absolute divorce were 1 Under the Constitution of 1776 senators were elected by counties, one for each county, and representatives also by counties, two for each county - in addition, the towns of Edenton, Newbern, Wilmington, Salisbury, Hillsboro and Halifax each elected one representative; and a property qualification - a freehold of 50 acres held for six months before an election - was imposed on electors of senators.

    0
    0
  • In 1908 a state tuberculosis sanatorium was opened near Aberdeen, Moore county.

    0
    0
  • In the counties there is a board of education and there is also a local school committee of three in each township. The compulsory attendance at school of children between the ages of eight and fourteen for sixteen weeks each year by a state law is optional with each county.

    0
    0
  • Although the state of North Carolina owns 70.3% of the stock (besides this Craven county holds 7.7%; Lenoir, 2.8%; and Pamlico county, 1.13%), the state casts only 35 o votes to the 700 of the private stockholders.

    0
    0
  • White soon returned to England for supplies, and having been detained there until 1591 he found upon his return no trace of the colony except the word " Croatan " carved on a tree; hence the colony was supposed to have gone away with some friendly Indians, possibly the Hatteras tribe, and proof of the assumption that these whites mingled with Indians is sought in the presence in Robeson county of a mixed people with Indian habits and occasional English names, calling themselves Croatans.

    0
    0
  • The proprietors had all the powers of a county palatine and proposed to establish a feudal and aristocratic form of government.

    0
    0
  • To this end John Locke drafted for them in 1669 the famous Fundamental Constitutions providing for the division of the province into eight counties and each county into seigniories, baronies, precincts and colonies, and the division of the land among hereditary nobles who were to grant three-fifths of it to their freemen and govern through an elaborate system of feudal courts.

    0
    0
  • But as little had been accomplished when the superior court met at Hillsboro, Orange county, in September 1770, the Regulators became desperate again, whipped the chief offender, Colonel Edmund Fanning, and demolished his residence.

    0
    0
  • The " Mecklenburg Declaration," which it is alleged was passed on the 10th of the same month by the same committee, " dissolves the political bonds " which have connected the county with the mother country, " absolves " the citizens of that county " from all allegiance to the British Crown," declares them " a free and independent people," and abounds in other phrases which closely resemble phrases in the great Declaration of the 4th of July 1776.

    0
    0
  • As for the " Declaration," the original records of the transactions of Mecklenburg county were destroyed by fire in 1800, but it is claimed that a copy of the " Declaration " was made from memory in the same year, and when, in 1819, a controversy had arisen as to where the movement for independence originated, this copy was published, first in the Raleigh Register and North Carolina Gazette and then in many other newspapers.

    0
    0
  • The first and the second provincial congress did little except choose delegates to the Continental Congress and the management of affairs passed in large measure from the royal government to the several county committees.

    0
    0
  • When the popular vote was taken, in the following April, every eastern county gave a majority against the convention, but the West, even with the limitation which was decidedly xix.

    0
    0
  • Johnston surrendered near Durham Station, in Durham county, on the 26th.

    0
    0
  • In Newington Causeway is the Sessions House for the county of London (south of the Thames).

    0
    0
  • His father, George Ewing, settled at Lancaster, Fairfield county, Ohio, in 1792.

    0
    0
  • Elyria was founded about 1819 by Heman Ely, in whose honour it was named; it was selected as the site for the county seat in 1823, and was chartered as a city in 1892.

    0
    0
  • There is a monument at Ottawa to the 1400 soldiers from La Salle county who died in the Civil War, and among the public buildings are the County Court House, the Court House for the second district of the Illinois Appellate Court, and Reddick's Library, founded by William Reddick.

    0
    0
  • He was a member of Rogers' Rangers in the Seven Years' War, served in the War of Independence, was for several years a member of the New Hampshire legislature, was a delegate to the New Hampshire convention which ratified the Federal constitution, and was a justice of the court of common pleas for his county.

    0
    0
  • Their founder was Johann Conrad Beissel (1690-1768), a native of Eberbach and one of the first emigrants, who, after living as a hermit for several years on Mill Creek, Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, founded the sect (1725), then again lived as a hermit in a cave (formerly occupied by another hermit, one Elimelech) on the Cocalico Creek in Pennsylvania, and in 1732-1735 established a semi-monastic community (the "Order of the Solitary") with a convent (the "Sister House") and a monastery (the "Brother House") at Ephrata, in what is now Lancaster county, about 55 m.

    0
    0
  • It is in a region especially devoted to the growing of cotton and grain and to poultry raising, and an annual county fair is held here.

    0
    0
  • After holding the living of Wethersfield in Essex he became vicar of Finchingfield in the same county, and in 1636 was reported for " want of conformity."

    0
    0
  • Dumfries is beautifully situated and is one of the handsomest county towns in Scotland.

    0
    0
  • The county buildings, in Buccleuch Street, are an imposing example of the Scots Baronial style.

    0
    0
  • On the 14th of July of the latter year he became perpetual curate of Theydon Bois, Essex, and a few months afterwards curate and lecturer of Leyton in the same county.

    0
    0
  • At Manitowoc are the county insane asylum and a Polish orphan asylum.

    0
    0
  • The city has a training school for county teachers, a business college, two hospitals and a Carnegie library.

    0
    0
  • The extreme south of the county is lacking in picturesqueness, being for the most part level, with occasional slight undulations.

    0
    0
  • From the northern hills the streams of the county radiate.

    0
    0
  • The Carboniferous or "Mountain" Limestone is the oldest formation in the county; its thickness is not known, but it is certainly over 2000 ft.; it is well exposed in the numerous narrow gorges cut by the Derwent and its tributaries and by the Dove on the Staffordshire border.

    0
    0
  • A small patch of Millstone Grit and Limestone occurs in the south of the county about Melbourne and Ticknall.

    0
    0
  • Most of the southern part of the county is occupied by Keuper marls and sandstones, the latter yield good building stone; and at Chellaston the gypsum beds in the former are excavated on a large scale.

    0
    0
  • From the elevation which it attains in its northern division the county is colder and is rainier than other midland counties.

    0
    0
  • Farther south, heavy crops of wheat, turnips and other cereals and green crops are not uncommon, while barley is cultivated about Repton and Gresley, and also in the east of the county, in order to supply the Burton breweries.

    0
    0
  • Derbyshire cheeses are exported or sent to London in considerable quantities; and cheese fairs are held in various parts of the county, as at Ashbourne and Derby.

    0
    0
  • For many of these this county has long been famous, especially for that of silk, which is carried on to a large extent in Derby, as well as in Belper and Duffield.

    0
    0
  • In the county town and neighbourhood are several important chemical and colour works; and in various parts of the county, as at Belper, Cromford, Matlock, Tutbury, are cottonspinning mills, as well as hosiery and tape manufactories.

    0
    0
  • The chief railway serving the county is the Midland, the south, east and north being served by its main line and branches.

    0
    0
  • In the north-east and north the Great Central system touches the county; in the west the North Staffordshire and a branch of the London & North-Western; while a branch of the Great Northern serves Derby and other places in the south.

    0
    0
  • The Trent & Mersey canal crosses the southern part of the county, and there is a branch canal (the Derby) connecting Derby with this and with the Erewash canal, which runs north from the Trent up the Erewash valley.

    0
    0
  • The area of the ancient county is 658,885 acres, with a population in 1891 of 528,033, and 1901 of 620,322.

    0
    0
  • The area of the administrative county is 652,272 acres.

    0
    0
  • The county contains six hundreds.

    0
    0
  • The municipal boroughs are Chesterfield (pop. 27,185), Derby, a county borough and the county town (114,848), Glossop (21,526), Ilkeston (2 5,384).

    0
    0
  • The county is in the Midland circuit, and assizes are held at Derby.

    0
    0
  • The county is mainly in the diocese of Southwell, with small portions in the dioceses of Peterborough and Lichfield, and contains 255 ecclesiastical parishes or districts.

    0
    0
  • The parliamentary divisions of the county are High Peak, North-Eastern, Chesterfield, Mid, Ilkeston, Southern and Western, each returning one member, while the parliamentary borough of Derby returns two members.

    0
    0
  • The early divisions of the county were known as wapentakes, five being mentioned in Domesday, while 13th-century documents mention seven wapentakes, corresponding with the six present hundreds, except that Repton and Gresley were then reckoned as separate divisions.

    0
    0
  • Ecclesiastically the county constituted an irchdeaconry in the diocese of Lichfield, comprising the six deaneries of Derby, Ashbourne, High Peak, Castillar, Chesterfield and Repington.

    0
    0
  • At the time of the Wars of the Roses discontent was rife in Derbyshire, and riots broke out in 1443, but the county did not lend active support to either party.

    0
    0
  • On the outbreak of the Civil War of the 17th century, the county at first inclined to support the king, who received an enthusiastic reception when he visited Derby in 1642, but by the close of 1643 Sir John Gell of Hopton had secured almost the whole county for the parliament.

    0
    0
  • Derbyshire has always been mainly a mining and manufacturing county, though the rich land in the south formerly produced large quantities of corn.

    0
    0
  • The woollen industry flourished in the county before the reign of John, when an exclusive privilege of dyeing cloth was conceded to the burgesses of Derby.

    0
    0
  • Thomas Fuller writing in 1662 mentions lead, malt and ale as the chief products of the county, and the Buxton waters were already famous in his day.

    0
    0
  • In 1771 Sir Richard Arkwright set up one of his first cotton mills in Cromford, and in 1787 there were twenty-two cotton mills in the county.

    0
    0
  • From 1295 until the Reform Act of 1832 the county and town of Derby each returned two members to parliament.

    0
    0
  • From this latter date the county returned four members in two divisions until the act of 1868, under which it returned six members for three divisions.

    0
    0
  • The Early English style is on the whole less well exemplified in the county, but Ashbourne church, with its central tower and lofty spire, contains beautiful details of this period, notably the lancet windows in the Cockayne chapel.

    0
    0
  • After a highly useful career, under the presidency till 1813 of Sir John Sinclair, the Board of Agriculture was dissolved in 1819, but left in its statistical account, county surveys and other documents much interesting and valuable information regarding the agriculture of the period.

    0
    0
  • It provided that a county council might acquire any suitable land, with the object of allotting from one to fifty acres, or, if more than fifty acres, of an annual value not exceeding £50, to persons who desired to buy, and would themselves cultivate, the holdings.

    0
    0
  • The Fertilizers and Feeding Stuffs Act 1906, amending and re-enacting the act of 1893, provided for the compulsory appointment by county councils of official samplers.

    0
    0
  • By dividing the total production, say of wheat, in each county by the number of acres of wheat as returned by the occupiers on June 4, the estimated average yield per acre is obtained.

    0
    0
  • One English county alone, Suffolk, maintained more pigs than the whole of Scotland.

    0
    0
  • The county councils also expend sums varying at their own discretion on instruction in dairy-work, poultry-keeping, farriery and veterinary science, horticulture, agricultural experiments, agricultural lectures at various centres, scholarships at, and grants to, agricultural colleges and schools; the whole amount in 1904-1905 reaching £87,472.1 The sum spent by individual counties varies considerably.

    0
    0
  • In some instances colleges are supported entirely by one county, as is the Holmes Chapel College, Cheshire; in others a college is supported by several affiliated counties, as in the case of the agricultural department of the University College, Reading, which acts in connexion with the counties of Berks, Oxon, Hants and Buckingham.

    0
    0
  • The organization and supply of county agricultural instruction is often carried out through the medium of the institution to which the county is affiliated.

    0
    0
  • Chosen envoys fail to find a bride worthy of him after a year's search, but the hero goes straight to Emer, the daughter of Forgall the Wily, at Lusk (county Dublin).

    0
    0
  • After his father's death he went to live with an uncle in Warren county.

    0
    0
  • The superintendent of the local Sunday school sent him to an academy at Washington, Wilkes county, for one year and in the following year (1828) he was sent by the Georgia Educational Society to Franklin College (university of Georgia), where he graduated in 1832.

    0
    0
  • Marshall was first settled and was made the county seat in 1839; it became a town in 1866 (re-incorporated 1870) and a city in 1878.

    0
    0
  • The parish church, the finest in the county, is cruciform, and has the unique feature of transeptal towers, imitated from Exeter Cathedral.

    0
    0
  • Heysham added to Hutchins's Cumberland a list of birds of that county, whilst in the same year began Thomas Lord's valueless Entire New System of Ornithology, the text of which was written or corrected by Dr Dupree, and in 1794 Donovan began a History of British Birds which was only finished in 1819 - the earlier portion being reissued about the same time.

    0
    0
  • The local works on English birds are too numerous to be mentioned; almost every county has had its ornithology recorded.

    0
    0
  • In Portsmouth are an Athenaeum (1817), with a valuable library; a public library (1881); a city hall; a county court house; a United States customs-house; a soldiers' and sailors' monument; an equestrian t Island 'Portsmouth ' ?Cd'i .9?-?.

    0
    0
  • Domestic animals are evenly distributed throughout the state; in no county was their total value, in June 1900, less than $500,000, and in only three counties (Licking, Trumbull and Wood) did their value exceed $2,000,000; in 73 counties their value exceeded $1,000,000, but was less than $2,000,000.

    0
    0
  • Beds of rock gypsum extend over an area of 150 acres or more in Ottawa county.

    0
    0
  • The membership in each house, however, is slightly above these figures, owing to a system of fractional representation and to the constitutional amendment of 1903 which allows each county at least one representative in the House of Representatives.

    0
    0
  • The county and the township are the units of the rural, the city and the village the units of the urban local The provision for circuit courts was first made in the constitution by an amendment of 1883.

    0
    0
  • The chief county authority is the board of commissioners of three members elected for terms of two years.

    0
    0
  • The other officials are the sheriff, treasurer and coroner, elected for two years; the auditor, recorder, clerk of courts, prosecuting attorney, surveyor and infirmary directors, elected for two years; and the board of school examiners (three) and the board of county visitors (six, of whom three are women), appointed usually by the probate judge for three years.

    0
    0
  • In 1908 an act was passed providing for local option in regard to the sale of intoxicating liquors, by an election to be called an initiative petition, signed by at least 35% of the electors of a county.

    0
    0
  • Each state institution in addition has its own board of trustees appointed by the governor, and each county infirmary is under the charge of three infirmary directors chosen by popular vote.

    0
    0
  • There are state, county and municipal boards of equalization.

    0
    0
  • Other buildings of local importance are the city hall (1865); the United tates government building (1871-1878, cost about $6,000,00); the county court-house (1887-1893, $2,250,000); the custom house (1837-1848); and the chamber of commerce (1892).

    0
    0
  • Independence is further curtailed by other state boards semi-independent of the city - the police commission of three members from 1885 to 1906, and in 1906 a single police commissioner, appointed by the governor, a licensing board of three members, appointed by the governor; the transit commission, &c. There are, further, county offices (Suffolk county comprises only Boston, Chelsea, Revere and Winthrop), generally independent of the city, though the latter pays practically all the bills.

    0
    0
  • In 1822 it was $100,000; in 1850, $6,195,144; in 1886, $24,712,820; in 1904, $58,216,725; in 1907, $70,781,969 (gross debt, $104,206,706)-this included the debt of Suffolk county which in 1907 was $3,517,000.

    0
    0
  • About a third of its revenue goes for such uses or for Suffolk county expenditures over which it has but limited control.

    0
    0
  • The county of Recklinghausen belonged to the archbishopric of Cologne until 1803, when it passed to the duke of Arenberg.

    0
    0
  • The Agricultural Holdings Act 1906 conferred upon every tenant (with slight exceptions) entire freedom of cropping and of disposal of produce, notwithstanding any custom of the county or explicit agreement to the contrary.

    0
    0
  • Prominent buildings are St Joseph's Cathedral and the buildings of the Berkshire Life Insurance Company, the Agricultural National Bank and the Berkshire County Savings Bank.

    0
    0
  • The earliest system adopted for the collection of petroleum appears to have consisted in Early skimming the oil from the surface of the water upon Methods which it had accumulated, and Professor Lesley states, that at Paint Creek, in Johnson county, Kentucky, a Mr George and others were in the habit of collecting oil from the sands, " by making shallow canals loo or 200 ft.

    0
    0
  • Lying to the east of the Euphrates, at once in close contact with the Armenians, and in near proximity to the great route of trade which came up the Euphrates to Rakka, and thence diverged to Antioch and Damascus, the county of Edessa had an eventful if brief life.

    0
    0
  • The county of Tripoli, the second of these principalities, had also come under the aegis of Jerusalem at an early date.

    0
    0
  • At an early date therefore the county of Tripoli had already come under the influence of the kingdom.

    0
    0
  • The rest of the county of Edessa, including Tell-bashir on the west, was now conquered (1150); while Raymund of Antioch was defeated and killed (in 1149), and several towns in the east of his principality were captured.

    0
    0
  • In these dissensions it was inevitable that Philip Augustus and Richard I., already discordant, should take contrary sides; and while Richard naturally sided with Guy de Lusignan, who came from his own county of Poitou, Philip as naturally sided with Conrad.

    0
    0
  • Yet it had at any rate saved for the Christians the principality of Antioch, the county of Tripoli, and some of the coast towns of the kingdom; 2 and if it had failed to accomplish its object, it had left behind, none the less, many important results.

    0
    0
  • In 1289 Kala`un took Tripoli, and the county of Tripoli was extinguished; in 1290 he died while preparing to besiege Acre, which was captured after a brave defence by his son and successor Khalil in 1291.

    0
    0
  • The estates of the county had the bishop of Cahors for president; other members were the bishop of Montauban and other ecclesiastics, four viscounts, four barons and some other lords and representatives of eighteen towns.

    0
    0
  • During the wars between England and France in the reign of Henry II., the English placed garrisons in the county, and by the treaty of Paris in 1259 lower Quercy was ceded to England.

    0
    0
  • In 1360, by the treaty of Bretigny, the whole county passed to England, but in 1440 the English were finally expelled.

    0
    0
  • The Florida Keys, a chain of islands extending in a general south-westerly direction from Biscayne Bay, are included in the state boundaries, and the city of Key West, on an island of the same name, is the seat of justice of Monroe county.

    0
    0
  • The central region is remarkable for its large number of lakes, approximately 30,000 between Gainesville in Alachua county, and Lake Okeechobee.

    0
    0
  • Silver Spring and Blue Spring in Marion county, Blue Spring and Orange City Mineral Spring in Volusia county, Chipola Spring near Marianna in Jackson county, Espiritu Santo Spring near Tampa in Hillsboro county, Magnolia Springs in Clay county, Suwanee Springs in Suwanee county, White Sulphur Springs in Hamilton county, the Wekiva Springs in Orange county, and Wakulla Spring, Newport Sulphur Spring and Panacea Mineral Spring in Wakulla county are the most noteworthy.

    0
    0
  • Many of the springs have curative properties, one of them, the Green Cove Spring in Clay county, discharging about 3000 gallons of sulphuretted water per minute.

    0
    0
  • The centre of the quarries is Dunnellon in Marion county, and pebble phosphate is found in Hillsboro, Polk, De Soto, Osceola, Citrus and Hernando counties.

    0
    0
  • The city has a Memorial Hall, erected in honour of the soldiers and sailors of Winnebago county, and in charge of the Grand Army of the Republic; a soldiers' memorial fountain; a Carnegie library, containing 51,340 volumes in 1909; and the Velie Museum of natural history.

    0
    0
  • In Allegheny county, of which Pittsburgh is the county seat and business centre, there were in 1920 1,184,832 persons, 13.6% of the total pop. of Pennsylvania.

    0
    0
  • At the head of each division or lodge there was a "body master," who communicated directly with a county delegate; the county delegates reported to the state delegate, and the state delegates to a national delegate.

    0
    0
  • In Albion are the Western House of Refuge for Women (a state institution established in 1890), a public park, the Swan Library, and the county buildings, including the court house, the jail and the surrogate's office; and about 2 m.

    0
    0
  • On his death the county of Boulogne came to his daughter, Matilda, and her husband Stephen, count of Blois, afterwards king of England, and in 1150 it was given to their son, Eustace IV.

    0
    0
  • Hampden-Sidney is the seat of Hampden-Sidney College, founded by the presbytery of Hanover county as HampdenSidney Academy in 1776, and named in honour of John Hampden and Algernon Sidney.

    0
    0
  • The principal buildings are the United States Government Building and the County Court House.

    0
    0
  • On the crest of the hill is the fine Hudson County Boulevard, about 19 m.

    0
    0
  • The parliamentary borough (falling within the south-east county division) returns one member.

    0
    0
  • An act of 1535 declared Hartlepool to be in Yorkshire, but in 1554 it was reinstated in the county of Durham.

    0
    0
  • In July 1774 he wrote for a convention in Fairfax county a series of resolutions known as the Fairfax Resolves, in which he advocated a congress of the colonies and suggested non-intercourse with Great Britain, a policy subsequently adopted by Virginia and later by the Continental Congress.

    0
    0
  • From 1776 to 1788 he represented Fairfax county in the Virginia Assembly.

    0
    0
  • In 1832 Helston lost one of its members, and in 1885 it lost the other and became merged in the county.

    0
    0
  • They were superseded by county courts (q.v.).

    0
    0
  • The promised dowry had not been paid, and the county of Angouleme, which had formerly belonged to Jeanne of Navarre, was now in the possession of the French king's favourite, the constable Charles la Cerda.

    0
    0
  • Dying in 1243, he was succeeded as lord of Connaught by his son Richard, and then (1248) by his younger son Walter, who carried on the family warfare against the native chieftains, and added greatly to his vast domains by obtaining (c. 1255) from Prince Edward a grant of "the county of Ulster," in consequence of which he was styled later earl of Ulster.

    0
    0
  • The family, which changed its name from Bourke to de Burgh in 1752, and added that of Canning in 1862, still own a vast estate in County Galway.

    0
    0
  • The parliamentary borough, falling within the Osgoldcross division of the county, returns one member (before 1885 the number was two).

    0
    0
  • On another hill is the county court house.

    0
    0
  • Other prominent buildings are the Supreme Court building, the county court house (the old state capitol, finished in 18J3), the city-hall, the state arsenal, the high school and the public library.

    0
    0
  • In 1821 the place was chosen to be the county-seat of the newly created Sangamon county and was named Springfield.

    0
    0
  • Cambridge was first settled in 1798 by emigrants from the island of Guernsey (whence the name of the county); was laid out as a town in 1806; was incorporated as a village in 1837; and was chartered as a city in 1893.

    0
    0
  • He sat for that county, and afterwards for Knaresborough, till his death.

    0
    0
  • It is one of the most populous mining centers in the county.

    0
    0
  • Bedlington (Betlingtun) and the hamlets belonging to it were bought by Cutheard, bishop of Durham, between 900 and 915, and although locally situated in the county of Northumberland became part of the county palatine of Durham over which Bishop Walcher was granted royal rights by William the Conqueror.

    0
    0
  • The females numbered 15,753, or 127 to every loo males, considerably the largest proportion to any county in Scotland.

    0
    0
  • Besides Lerwick (q.v.) the county town, one of the most interesting places in the island is Scalloway (8S7), the ancient capital.

    0
    0
  • It forms a sheriffdom with Orkney and Caithness, and there is a resident sheriff-substitute at Lerwick, the county town.

    0
    0
  • The county is under school board jurisdiction and Lerwick has a secondary school, and a few of the other schools earn grants for higher education.

    0
    0
  • The city within the municipal limits constitutes a separate division of the county.

    0
    0
  • Levi Coffin (1798-1877), a native of North Carolina (whose cousin, Vestal Coffin, had established before 1819 a "station" of the Underground near what is now Guilford College, North Carolina), in 1826 settled in Wayne County, Ohio; his home at New Garden (now Fountain City) was the meeting point of three "lines" from Kentucky; and in 1847 he removed to Cincinnati, where his labours in bringing slaves out of the South were even more successful.

    0
    0
  • It was given to a county in California, and to towns and cities in various states.

    0
    0
  • In 1800 the entire Western Reserve was erected into the county of Trumbull and a township government was given to Cleveland; ten years later Cleveland was made the seat of government of the new county of Cuyahoga, and in 1814 it was incorporated as a village.

    0
    0
  • The Glamorgan county council has also a site of one acre in the park for offices.

    0
    0
  • The other public buildings of the town include the infirmary founded in 1837, the present buildings being erected in 1883, and subsequently enlarged; the sanatorium, the seamen's hospital, the South Wales Institute of Mining Engineers (which has a library) built in 1894, the exchange, an institute for the blind, a school for the deaf and dumb, and one of the two prisons for the county (the other being at Swansea).

    0
    0
  • The great sessions for the county were during their whole existence from 1542 to 1830 held at Cardiff, but the assizes (which replaced them) have since then been held at Swansea and Cardiff alternately, as also are the quarter sessions for Glamorgan.

    0
    0
  • It was granted a separate court of quarter sessions in 1890, it was constituted a county borough in 1888, and, by letters patent dated the 28th of October 1905, it was created a city and the dignity of lord mayor conferred on its chief magistrate.

    0
    0
  • The charters of Cardiff and "Materials for a History of the County Borough from the Earliest Times" were published by order of the corporation in Cardiff Records (5 vols., 1898, sqq.).

    0
    0
  • Among the public buildings and institutions are the State Capitol, the State Library, a city public library, the county court-house, the Federal building, the state penitentiary and several charitable institutions.

    0
    0
  • An extensive water-parting in the north central part of the state, an elevation whose inclination is almost imperceptible, determines the course of three great continental river systems. From this central elevation the land slopes off in all directions, rising again in the extreme north-east corner, where the rugged granite uplift in Cook county, known as the Misquah Hills, reaches an altitude of 2230 ft., the highest point in the state; and in the south-west corner, where an altitude of 1800 ft.

    0
    0
  • The largest of the present lakes, Red Lake, in Beltrami county, has an area of 342 sq.

    0
    0
  • The beautiful " Park Region," centring in Ottertail county, contains several thousand lakes.

    0
    0
  • The state supports three parks - Itasca state park (22,000 acres, established in 1891), about the sources of the Mississippi, in Clearwater, Becker and Hubbard counties; the St Croix (established in 1895), in Chicago county, across the St Croix from the Wisconsin state park of the same name, and including the beautiful Dalles of the St Croix; and the Minneopa state park (established in 1905), containing Minneopa Falls, near Mankato.

    0
    0
  • At the head of the system stands the state superintendent of public instruction, appointed by the governor; there are also county superintendents; and a state high school board, consisting of the governor, state superintendent and the president of the state university, has general supervision of the schools and apportions the state aid.

    0
    0
  • Other higher educational institutions in Minnesota are Hamline University (Methodist Episcopal), with a college of liberal arts at St Paul, and a college of medicine at Minneapolis; Macalester College (Presbyterian) at St Paul; Augsburg Seminary (Lutheran) at Minneapolis; Carleton College (non-sectarian, founded in 1866) and St Olaf College (Lutheran, founded in 1874) at Northfield; Gustavus Adolphus College (Lutheran) at St Peter; Parker College (Free Baptist, 1888) at Winnebago City; St John's University (Roman Catholic) at Collegeville, Stearns county; and Albert Lea College for women (Presbyterian, founded 1884) at Albert Lea.

    0
    0
  • In the following year the Franciscan friar Father Louis Hennepin, acting as an agent of the Sieur de la 'Salle, discovered and named the Falls of St Anthony; and in 1686 Nicholas Perrot, the commandant of the west, built Fort St Antoine on the east bank of Lake Pepin, in what is now Pepin county, Wisconsin, and in 1688 formally took possession of the region in the name of the French king.

    0
    0
  • The first county, St Croix, was established in 1839, and in the succeeding years thriving settlements were established at St Paul and Stillwater.

    0
    0
  • Although the county of Champagne had descended to his wife's infant daughter, Joan, Edmund assumed the title "Count Palatine of Champagne and Brie," and is described in the English patent rolls as earl of Lancaster and Champagne.

    0
    0
  • The state capitol, an imposing structure built on a bluff above the river, was built in1838-1842and enlarged in 1887-1888; it was first occupied in 1840 by the legislature, which previously had met (after 1837) in the county court house.

    0
    0
  • Other prominent buildings are the United States court house and post office, the state supreme court house, the county court house, the state penitentiary, the state armoury and the executive mansion.

    0
    0
  • In 1907 an act was passed by which the former county of Oahu, including the island of Oahu and the small islands adjacent, was made a municipal corporation under the name of the "city and county of Honolulu"; this act came into effect on the 1st of January 1909.

    0
    0
  • Irish tradition represents the future apostle as tending the herds of a chieftain of the name of Miliucc (Milchu), near the mountain called Slemish in county Antrim, but Bury tries to show that the scene of his captivity was Connaught, perhaps in the neighbourhood of Croagh Patrick.

    0
    0
  • On another occasion Patrick is reported to have overthrown a famous idol known as Cenn Cruaich or Cromm Cruaich in the plain of Mag Slecht (county Cavan).

    0
    0
  • It is the terminus of the Nevada County Narrow Gauge railway, which connects with the Southern Pacific railway at Colfax, '23 m.