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countries

countries Sentence Examples

  • The brunette stood between Traci and Rainy, as if she were trying to broker a peace deal between two warring countries.

  • Somewhat relieved, she read his biography, impressed by his clientele, who ranged from heads of countries around the world to the richest families on the planet.

  • She didn't know where exactly, but by the man's pale skin, she guessed Europe, maybe one of the Slavic countries.

  • One of those little Eastern European pocket-sized countries?

  • Brady had conducted many missions in austere conditions in other countries.

  • The Horsemen was the tongue in cheek name given to the government program that placed a series of devices across the world, both in enemy and friendly countries.

  • Elise needed no other motivation than her friend was in trouble, and Brady hadn't yet digested how such tiny devices could collapse the countries of the world.

  • There is the further complication that in some countries thunder seems to be on the increase.

  • Notwithstanding the proximity of the two countries, there is not much parallelism between the data.

  • Occurring in all temperate and tropical countries, book-scorpions live for the most part under stones, beneath the bark of trees or in vegetable detritus.

  • Palgrave's most important work is his History of Normandy and England, which appeared in four volumes (London 1851-1864), and deals with the history of the two countries down to 1101.

  • It had to be replaced by new concordats concluded with Wurttemberg in 1857 and the grand-duchy of Baden in 1859; but these conventions, not having been ratified by those countries, never came into force.

  • On the relations between the church and the state in various countries see Vering, Kirchenrecht, §§ 30-53.

  • In 1494 he was again in the Netherlands, where he led an expedition against the rebels of Gelderland, assisted Perkin Warbeck to make a descent upon England, and formally handed over the government of the Low Countries to Philip. His attention was next turned to Italy, and, alarmed at the progress of Charles VIII.

  • Examples may perhaps occasionally still be found in the uninhabited forests of Hungary and Transylvania, and occasionally in Spain and Greece, as well as in the Caucasus and in some of the Swiss cantons, but the original race has in most countries interbred with the domestic cat wherever the latter has penetrated."

  • Throughout Japan, China, Siam, and the Malay countries, normal long-tailed cats are indeed seldom seen.

  • Most of the species are esteemed good eating by the natives of the countries in which they live.

  • Other countries have gradually followed, and, with few exceptions, the low pitch derived from the Diapason Normal may be said to prevail throughout the musical world.

  • While the heroism of the Montenegrins has been lauded by writers of all countries, the Albanians - if we except Byron's eulogy of the Suloits - still remain unsung.

  • Classified according to place of birth, the principal nationalities were as follows in 1901: Canada, 180,853; England, 20,392; Scotland, 8099; Ireland, 4537; other British possessions, 490; Germany, 229,; Iceland, 54 0 3; Austria, 11,570; Russia and Poland, 8854; Scandinavia, 1772; United States, 6922; other countries, 4028.

  • As to the number and native countries of the Sibyls much diversity of opinion prevailed.

  • Canada and Australasia led the way, for in these countries the Methodist Church was undivided, and the sentiment was greatly strengthened by the formation in the United Kingdom of the United Methodist Church in 1907.

  • With respect to the calculating rods, he mentions in the dedication that they had already found so much favour as to be almost in common use, and even to have been carried to foreign countries; and that he has been advised to publish his little work relating to their mechanism and use, lest they should be put forth in some one else's name.

  • Even, therefore, where people desired the Reformation there were powerful influences opposed to the setting up of church government and to the exercise of church discipline after the manner of the apostolic Church; and one ceases to wonder at the absence of complete Presbyterianism in the countries which were forward to embrace and adopt the Reformation.

  • - [[History In Different Countries]] From this general outline of Presbyterianism we now turn to consider its evolution and history in some of the countries with which it is or has been specially associated.

  • It may be compared in some degree to such European societies as the Carbonara, Young Italy, the Tugendbund, the Confreries of France, the Freemasons in Catholic countries, and the Vehmgericht.

  • Few countries have suffered more from a depreciated currency than Argentina.

  • Holdich, The Countries of the King's Award (London, 1904); W.

  • It left the government free either to apply to foreign countries the general tariff or to enter into negotiations with them for the application, under certain conditions, of a minimum tariff.

  • The following were the countries sending the largest quantities of goods (special trade) to France (during the same periods as in previous table).

  • Trade with Principal Countries.

  • The following are the principal countries receiving the exports of France (special trade), with values for the same periods.

  • The trade of France was divided between foreign countries and her colonies in the following proportions (imports and exports combined).

  • Countries.

  • The increase in the tonnage of sailing vessels, which in other countries tends to decline, was due to the bounties voted by parliament to its merchant sailing fleet with the view of increasing the number of skilled seamen.

  • The most important free institution in this class is the cole des Sciences Politiques, which prepares pupils for the civil services and teaches a great number of political subjects, connected with France and foreign countries, not included in the state programmes.

  • Detailed notices of the separate countries will be found under their several heads:

  • The only countries in which there is a considerable white population are Algeria, Tunisia and New Caledonia.

  • In the other colonies and protectorates more than half the trade is with foreign countries.

  • The foreign countries trading most largely with the French colonies are, in the order named, British colonies and Great Britain, China and Japan, the United States and Germany.

  • In detail, however, they differ widely from the purer Gothic of northern countries.

  • From England he passed to the Low Countries, Germany, Switzerland and Italy, and on his return to the Peninsula in 1796 was appointed official translator to the foreign office.

  • After a period of inaction war between the two countries again became imminent in 1209; but a peace was made at Norham, and about three years later another amicable arrangement was reached.

  • The cabinet noir has now disappeared, but the right to open letters in cases of emergency appears still to be retained by the French government; and a similar right is occasionally exercised in England under the direction of a secretary of state, and, indeed, in all civilized countries.

  • The temperature, however, has a daily range less than that of other countries under the same isothermal lines.

  • The marriage rate varies as in other countries from year to year according to the degree of prosperity prevailing.

  • The death rate of Australia is much below that of European countries and is steadily declining.

  • In several of the states, fish have been introduced successfully from other countries.

  • The import trade is divided between the United Kingdom and possessions and foreign countries as follows: - United Kingdom £23,074,000, British possessions £5,3 8 4, 000, and foreign states L9,889,000, while the destination of the exports is, United Kingdom £26,703,000, British possessions £12,519,000, and foreign countries £17,619,000.

  • The United Kingdom in 1905 sent 60% of the imports taken by Australia, compared with 26% from foreign countries, and 14% from British possessions; of Australian imports the United Kingdom takes 47%, foreign countries 31% and British possessions 22%.

  • Lines of steamers connect Australia with London and other British ports, with Germany, Belgium, France, Italy, Japan, China, India, San Francisco, Vancouver, New York and Montevideo, several important lines being subsidized by the countries to which they belong, notably Germany, France and Japan.

  • The geographical features of the countries formerly known collectively as the Netherlands or Low Countries are dealt with under the modern English names of Holland and Belgium.

  • Attempts to breed these sheep in other countries have always resulted in a deterioration in the quality of the skins owing to some peculiarity of climate.

  • The Panislamic propaganda was encouraged; the privileges of foreigners in the Ottoman Empire - of ten an obstacle to government - were curtailed; the new railway to the Holy Places was pressed on, and emissaries were sent to distant countries preaching Islam and the caliph's supremacy.

  • Instead, we find the Sakai occupying this position, thus indicating that they have been driven northward by the Malays, and that the latter people has not been expelled by the Mon-Khmer races from the countries now represented by Burma, Siam and French Indo-China.

  • After studying at the university of Prague he travelled through Europe, and among other countries he visited England, where he became acquainted with James Hope (afterwards Hope-Scott) and other leaders of the Tractarian party.

  • alba, the white oak, abounding all over the eastern districts to the continent from Lake Winnipeg and the St Lawrence countries of the shores of the Mexican Gulf.

  • The ilex, also known as the "holm oak" from its resemblance to the holly, abounds in all the Mediterranean countries, showing a partiality for the sea air.

  • coccifera, a small bush growing in Spain and many countries around the Mediterranean, furnishes the kermes dye ([[Kermes).

  • Large steps were made towards the union of the two kingdoms by the representation of Scotland in the parliament at Westminster; free trade between the two countries was established, the administration of justice greatly improved, vassalage and heritable jurisdictions abolished, and security and good order maintained by the council of nine appointed by the Protector.

  • "It was hard to discover," wrote Clarendon, "which feared him most, France, Spain or the Low Countries."

  • Much has also been done by the discussion of observations made on board vessels belonging to the mercantile marine of various countries.

  • Damme, although long neglected, preserves some remains of its former prosperity, thanks to its remoteness from the area of international strife in the Low Countries.

  • Others again, like Michaelis and Rosenmiiller, have supposed that the name Cush was applied to tracts of country both in Arabia and in Africa, but the defective condition of the ancient knowledge of countries and peoples, as also the probability of early migrations of "Cushite" tribes (carrying with them their name), will account for the main facts.

  • From Italy the practice spread to France, Spain, England and other countries.

  • In the north are the large native towns of Yendi and Sansane Mangu, both on caravan routes between Ashanti and the Niger countries.

  • At this time he was nominated to the pope as coadjutor of Geneva,' and after a visit to Rome he assisted Bishop de Granier in the administration of the newly converted countries and of the diocese at large.

  • In most countries where religious opinion is sharply divided the procession of Corpus Christi is therefore now forbidden, even when Catholicism is the dominant religion.

  • Notwithstanding all its drawbacks, Rajputana is reckoned one of the healthiest countries in India, at least for the native inhabitants.

  • Hughes's form was taken up by the French government in 1860, and is very largely in use not only in France but in all European countries, including Great Britain.

  • Some of the complaints against the companies, however, were exaggerated, and the estimates formed of the possible commercial development of telegraphy were optimistic. The basis for these estimates was the experience of other countries, which, however, did not justify the expectation that a large increase of business consequent on reduction of rates could be obtained without serious diminution of profit.

  • The profits when earned were derived mainly from foreign messages and transit messages between foreign countries, while the receipts from inland messages did not always cover expenses.

  • From and after that time the British Admiralty and the navies of other countries began to give great attention to the development of electric wave telegraphy.

  • The instrument was described in over fifty publications 6 in various countries, and was well known to physicists previous to Bell's introduction of the electric telephone as a competitor with the electric telegraph.

  • The next transmitter of note was that introduced by Francis Blake, which came into wide use in the United States of America a.nd other countries.

  • In 1906 there were 30,551, equal to 7.2 per cent., more telephone stations in the United Kingdom than in the ten European countries of Austria, Hungary, Belgium, Denmark, Holland, Italy; Norway, Portugal, Russia, Sweden and Switzerland, having a combined population of 288 millions as against a population of 42 millions in the United Kingdom.

  • As the friars became more and more numerous their missionary labours extended wider and wider, spreading first over Italy, and then to other countries.

  • Nor do the highest summits form a continuous ridge of great altitude for any considerable distance; they are rather a series of groups separated by tracts of very inferior elevation forming natural passes across the range, and broken in some places (as is the case in almost all limestone countries) by the waters from the upland valleys turning suddenly at right angles, and breaking through the mountain ranges which bound them.

  • The district west of the Apennines, a region of great beauty and fertility, though inferior in productiveness to Northern Italy, coincides in a general way with the countries familiar to all students of ancient history as Etruria and Latium.

  • The geographical position of Italy, extending from about 46° to 38° N., renders it one of the hottest countries in Europe.

  • The movement of emigration may be divided into two currents, temporary and permanentthe former going chiefly towards neighboring European countries and to North Africa, and consisting of manual laborers, the latter towards trans-oceanic countries, principally Brazil, Argentina and the United States.

  • The quality, too, owing to bad weather at the time of vintage, was not good; Italian wine, indeed, never is sufficiently good to compete with the best wines of other countries, especially France (thotigh there is more opening for Italian wines of the Bordeaux and,Burgundy type); nor will many kinds of it stand keeping, partly owing to their natural qualities and partly to the insufficient care devoted to their preparation.

  • Although in some industrial centres the working-class movement has assumed an importance equal to that of other countries, there is no general working-class organization comparable to the English trade unions.

  • nearly 10 per inhabitant per annum in 1904, as against 5-65 in 1888) the average is considerably below that of,most other European countries.

  • At the end of 1907 Italy was among the few Countries that had not adopted the reduction of postage sanctioned at the Postal Union congress, held in Rome in 1906, by which the rates became 23/4d.

  • In the movement of shipping, trade with foreign countries prevails (especially as regards arrivals) over trade between Italian ports.

  • Italian trade with foreign countries (imports and exports) during the quinquennium 1872-1876 averaged 94,000,000 a year; in the quinquennium 1893f 897 it fell to 88,960,000 a year.

  • Thus: Trade with Foreign Countries in 1000

  • Another source of weakness is the fact that Italy is a country of transit and the Italian mercantile marine has to enter into competition with the ships of other countries, which call there in passing.

  • The countries with which this trade is mainly carried on are: (imports) United Kingdom, Germany, United States, France, Russia and India; (exports) Switzerland, United States, Germany, France, United Kingdom and Argentina.

  • As in most civilized countries, the number of suicides in Italy has increased from year to year.

  • Like almost all Universal Service countries, Italy only drafts a small proportion of the available recruits into the army.

  • The amount.spent is slight compared with the military expenditure of other countries.

  • Abroad, Catholic countries Italian at first received the tidings with resignation, and occupa.

  • Protestant countries with joy.

  • France undertook, the maintenance of order in the Regency, and assumed the representation of Tunisia in all dealings with other countries.

  • In 1538 an embassy of German divines visited England with the design, among other things, of forming a common confession for the two countries.

  • In the Low Countries, France and England the jurisdiction of the official principal was wider (Van Espen, pars i.

  • With the Reformation in the 16th century, Church courts properly speaking disappeared from the non-episcopal religious communities which were established in g Holland, in the Protestant states of Switzerland and of Germany, and in the then non-episcopal countries of Denmark and Norway.

  • To this extent ecclesiastical jurisdiction is still exercised in these countries.

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